IPTV Celebrates Black History Month

Join Iowa Public Television (IPTV) in celebrating Black History Month this February with timely, educational programs highlighting poignant stories of courage, strength and perseverance. These programs will engage viewers in community conversations, exploring African-American history and culture.

The scheduled programming will appear on IPTV and IPTV WORLD (.3) as follows:

IPTV

American Masters

  • B.B. King­Candid interviews shed light on the challenging life and career "King of the Blues" B.B. King. (Friday, February 12 at 9 p.m.)
  • Fats Domino—Discover how Fats Domino's brand of New Orleans rhythm and blues became rock 'n' roll in the 1950s. (Friday, February 26 at 9:30 p.m.)
  • Sister Rosetta Tharpe: The Godmother of Rock & Roll—This flamboyant African-American gospel superstar was a natural-born performer and a rebel. (Friday, February 26 at 11 p.m.)

Independent Lens

Queen of Swing—This engaging biography highlights the life, career and indomitable spirit of the Harlem-born actress, dancer and choreographer Norma Miller, known as "The Queen of Swing." (Sunday, February 21 at 4 p.m.)

Smithsonian Salutes Ray Charles: In Performance at the White House—Renowned and up-and-coming artists perform the music of Ray Charles at the White House. (Friday, February 26 at 8:30 p.m.)

 

IPTV WORLD (.3)

AfroPop: The Ultimate Cultural Exchange: TchindasMeet Tchinda, who became one of the most beloved women in Mindelo, a small Cape Verdean island after coming out as a transgender person in the local newspaper in 1998. Since then, her name has become the way local people call queer Cape Verdeans. (Monday, February 1 at 7 p.m.; Tuesday, February 2 at 8 a.m. and 2 p.m.)

America Reframed: Old South—This episode looks into the underlying dynamics of race relations that influence so many American communities and ultimately inspires hope, reflection, and a crucial step forward. (Tuesday, February 2 at 7 p.m.; Wednesday, February 3 at 7 a.m. and 1 p.m.; Saturday, February 6 at 9 p.m.; Sunday, February 7 at 8 a.m. and 4 p.m.)

American Masters

  • August Wilson: The Ground on Which I Stand—The legacy of August Wilson, from his roots as an activist to his work on Broadway, is explored. (Saturday, February 6 at 7 p.m.)
  • Alice Walker: Beauty in Truth—The life of the first African-American woman to win a Pulitzer Prize for Literature is chronicled. (Saturday, February 13 at 7 p.m.)
  • Fats Domino—Discover how Fats Domino's brand of New Orleans rhythm and blues became rock 'n' roll in the 1950s. (Saturday, February 27 at 7 p.m. and 11 p.m.)
  • B.B. King­Candid interviews shed light on the challenging life and career "King of the Blues" B.B. King. (Saturday, February 27 at 8 p.m.)

The Black Kungfu Experience—An introduction to kungfu's African-American pioneers, men who challenged convention and overturned preconceived notions while mastering the ancient art, illustrating how kungfu began as - and remains - a unique crucible of the black experience. (Tuesday, February 9 at 6 p.m.)

Bridging the Divide: Tom Bradley and the Politics of Race—The story of how, as the first African-American mayor of Los Angeles, Tom Bradley’s coalition of African Americans, Jews, white liberals, Latinos and Asian Americans united a divided city, brought inclusion and access, and set the foundation for inter-racial coalitions that encouraged the elections of minority candidates nationwide. (Friday, February 19 at 7 p.m.; Saturday, February 20 at 2 p.m.)

Colored Frames—A reflection on the last 50 years in African-American art by exploring the influences, inspirations and experiences of black artists. (Wednesday, February 24 at 5 p.m.)

Eyes on the Prize: World Channel Special

  • Ain’t Scared of Your Jails: 1960-1961—Four related stories of young people on Black college campuses taking a more active role in the civil rights movement's leadership and using their own methods of promoting change. (Monday, February 1 at 7 a.m. and 1 p.m.; Tuesday, February 2 at 10 a.m.; Sunday, February 7 at 6 p.m.; Sunday, February 28 at 3 p.m.)
  • No Easy Walk: 1961-1963— This episode depicts major civil rights movement events in Albany, Georgia; Birmingham, Alabama and Washington, D.C., exploring the successes of various political tactics, alternatives to these tactics, and the involvement of the federal government in movement activity. (Sunday, February 7 at 7 p.m. & 11 p.m.; Monday, February 8 at 7 a.m. and 1p.m.; Tuesday, February 9 at 10 a.m.; Sunday, February 14 at 6 p.m.; Sunday, February 28 at 4 p.m.)
  • Then and Now—A half-hour special re-examining the groundbreaking documentary series, "Eyes on the Prize," from the filmmakers' perspective, and the viewpoint of civil rights activists then and now. (Wednesday, February 10 at 7:30 p.m.; Thursday, February 11 at 2:30 p.m.; Saturday, February 13 at noon; Saturday, February 27 at 12:30 p.m.; Sunday, February 28 at 10:30 p.m.; Monday, February 29 at 10:30 a.m.)
  • Mississippi: Is This America? 1962-1964—Exploring the resentment of Mississippians toward federal intervention in voting rights, the role of Northern Whites in a series of activities that climaxed in the Freedom Summer of 1964, and the conflicts between liberals and movement activists at the Democratic National Convention in Atlantic City. (Sunday, February 14 at 7 p.m. and 11 p.m.; Monday, February 15 at 7 a.m. and 1 p.m.; Tuesday, February 16 at 10 a.m.; Sunday, February 21 at 6 p.m.)
  • Bridge to Freedom: 1965—Explore efforts by civil rights activists in Selma, Alabama, to sustain nonviolent street protest to generate nationwide sympathy and federal intervention. (Sunday, February 21 at 7 p.m.; Monday, February 22 at 7 a.m. and 1 p.m.; Tuesday, February 23 at 10 a.m.; Sunday, February 28 at 6 p.m.)
  • Awakenings 1954-1956—A look at two events in post-World War II America that led to the civil rights protests and marches: the lynching in Mississippi of 14-year-old Emmett Till, and the Montgomery, Alabama boycott that forced the desegregation of public buses. (Sunday, February 28 at 1 p.m.)
  • Fighting Back: 1957-1962—Examine the law as a tool, both for change and resistance to change, particularly as it relates to education. (Sunday, February 28 at 2 p.m.)
  • The Time Has Come 1964-1966—After a decade-long cry for justice, a new sound is heard in the civil rights movement: the insistent call for power. (Sunday, February 28 at 7 p.m. and 11 p.m.; Monday, February 29 at 7 a.m. and 1 p.m.)

Fly Boys: Western Pennsylvania’s Tuskegee Airmen—The triumphant story of the African-American soldiers who served their country during World War II. (Sunday, February 14 at 11:30 a.m.)

Ghosts of Amistad: In the Footsteps of the Rebels—Recover the lost history of the Amistad insurrection, told from a seldom-voiced perspective in the historical struggle against slavery. (Monday, February 22 at 7 p.m.; Tuesday, February 23 at 8 a.m. and 2 p.m.)

In Their Own Words: Muhammad Ali—Muhammad Ali's boxing successes, conversion to Islam and Parkinson's disease are explored. (Friday, February 19 at 5 p.m. and 8 p.m.; Saturday, February 20 at 9 a.m.; Thursday, February 25 at 10 a.m.)

Independent Lens

  • American Denial—Explore the power of unconscious biases, using Myrdal's 1944 investigation of Jim Crow racism. (Monday, February 1 at 10 a.m.; Tuesday, February 2 at 5 p.m.)
  • A Ballerina’s Tale—Explore the rise of groundbreaking dancer Misty Copeland during a crucial period in her life. (Wednesday, February 10 at 6:30 p.m.; Thursday, February 11 at 7:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m.; Saturday, February 13 at 11 a.m.)
  • Let the Fire Burn—The clash between Philadelphia police and the radical urban group MOVE in 1985 is chronicled. (Tuesday, February 16 at 5:30 p.m.)
  • The Powerbroker: Whitney Young’s Fight for Civil Rights—The controversial civil rights era leader and former head of the National Urban League is profiled. (Wednesday, February 17 at 5 p.m. and 8 p.m.; Sunday, February 21 at 11 p.m.)
  • The Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution—The Black Panther Party emerged within a new revolutionary culture during the turbulent 1960s. (Wednesday, February 17 at 6 p.m.; Thursday, February 18, at 7 a.m. and 1 p.m.; Saturday, February 20 at 11 a.m.)
  • Spies of Mississippi—This film tells the story of a secret spy agency formed by the state of Mississippi to preserve segregation during the 1950s and '60s. (Tuesday, February 23 at 6 p.m.; Wednesday, February 24 at 9 a.m. and 3 p.m.; Saturday, February 27 at 1 p.m.)
  • Through a Lens Darkly—Pioneering African-American photographers have recorded the lives and aspirations of generations. (Wednesday, February 24 at 6 p.m.; Thursday, February 25 at 7 a.m. and 1 p.m.)

Locked Out: The Fall of Massive Resistance—Sheds light on Virginia's refusal to allow black students into all-white public schools in 1958. (Sunday, February 21 at 10 p.m.; Monday, February 22 at 10 a.m.)

The Lost Years of Zora Neale Hurston—Few people know about the woman behind "Their Eyes Were Watching God," particularly the last 10 years of her life. This program delves into her life, work and philosophies, concentrating on her very productive but often overlooked final decade. (Saturday, February 13 at 8:30 p.m.)

Mr. Civil Rights: Thurgood Marshall and the NAACP—This documentary incorporates rare archival film and extraordinary interviews to explore Marshall's life in the years leading up to the landmark Brown v. Board of Education ruling. (Saturday, February 6 at 7 a.m.)

One Night in March—Mississippi State University's basketball program during the Civil Rights movement is highlighted. (Sunday, February 7 at 5 p.m.; Sunday, February 21 at 10:30 p.m.)

Our American Family: The Clarks—The lives of an African-American family with seven children as they employed humor, resourcefulness and respect for all through the Depression, WWII, and racial tension. (Wednesday, February 10 at 6 p.m.; Thursday, February 11 at 7 a.m. and 1 p.m.; Saturday, February 13 at 12:30 p.m.; Tuesday, February 16 at 5 p.m.)

POV

  • Out in the Night— A group of African-American lesbians charged with attempted murder face an uphill battle in court. (Friday, February 12 at 5 p.m. and 8 p.m.; Saturday, February 13 at 9 a.m.)
  • 15 to Life: Kenneth’s Story—Follow a boy's struggle for redemption in a place that routinely condemns children to die in prison. (Friday, February 12 at 6 p.m.; Saturday, February 13 at 7 a.m. & 1 p.m.; Thursday, February 18 at 10 a.m.)

Reel South: Counter Histories: Rock Hill—In 1961 nine college men decided they were ready to go to jail to fight segregation laws and inequality in Rock Hill, SC. Their sit-in at the local whites-only lunch counter changed the course of the civil rights movement by introducing a new strategy. (Tuesday, February 16 at 8:30 p.m.; Wednesday, February 17 at 8:30 a.m. and 2:30 p.m.; Saturday, February 20 at 10:30 p.m.; Sunday, February 21 at 9:30 a.m.)

Summer Hill—A compelling look at the influence of one small, tightly knit community: its school, churches, civic leaders and residents. (Saturday, February 6 at 8:30 p.m.)

Unlikely Friendship—A surprising friendship between a Ku Klux Klan leader and an outspoken black activist is examined. (Wednesday, February 3 at 6:30 p.m.; Thursday, February 4 at 1:30 p.m.; Saturday, February 6 at 12 p.m.)

Vel Phillips: Dream Big Dreams—This documentary tells the story of Vel Phillips, showing her butting heads in the backrooms of Milwaukee's City Hall, marching through the streets as an activist, and speaking across the nation as an outstanding orator. (Friday, February 19 at 6 p.m.; Saturday, February 20 at 7 a.m. & 1 p.m.)