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What Is Cyberlearning?

posted on January 23, 2015 at 12:00 AM

What Is Cyberlearning?

We are living in the information age. The development of networked computer technology has created a world in which information flows freely, and children are growing up in a digital world where such technology is second nature to them. In the field of education, this is an exciting time to find ways to harness the power of computers and the networked environment to better educate students.

In this video learn how new developments in computer-mediated learning can enhance educational experiences. Hear from experts and explore three examples of cyber-learning: students learn about astronomy and game design in the Universe Quest project; students use remote scientific equipment to learn about radiation with the iLab Network; and students use handheld devices to play an augmented reality game from MIT and learn about climate change. 

Posted on January 23, 2015 at 12:00 AM Comments

PBS LearningMedia Reaches 100,000+ Resources!

posted on January 16, 2015 at 12:00 AM

PBS LearningMedia Reaches 100,000+ Resources!

PBS LearningMedia announced that it now offers more than 100,000 digital resources available to PreK-13+ educators nationwide. Since its launch in 2011, PBS LearningMedia has continued to actively expand its offerings of education content that appeals to digital native students. Resources are available in English and Spanish, and are aligned to National and Common Core State Standards.

PBS LearningMedia is proud to have reached this milestone as we continue to increase the number of resources we have available to support educators in the classroom,” said Alicia Levi, Vice President, PBS Education. “With new content from partners like the Vlogbrothers from PBS Digital Studios and the live-action PBS KIDS series Odd Squad, PBS LearningMedia now offers even more high-quality, highly relevant educational content that truly engages and empowers students.”

New content is now available in all educational subject and topic areas to PreK-13+ teachers and students in a variety of formats from videos and primary source documents to virtual events and maps.

Highlights include:

  • CRASH COURSE: Created and developed by John and Hank Green (“the Vlogbrothers”), the PBS Digital Studios series, CRASH COURSE, provides courses on world history, U.S. history, chemistry, psychology, literature and more that have been viewed nearly 150 million times and shared by educators around the globe. The entire CRASH COURSE library, including a brand-new course on astronomy, is now available to PBS LearningMedia users through the new collection. In addition, a new course on U.S. government will be available on Friday, January...
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Posted on January 16, 2015 at 12:00 AM Comments

City Farm

posted on January 9, 2015 at 12:00 AM

City Farm

Everyone knows that foods like vegetables, grains, meat and fruits are grown or raised on farms. Most of us, however, get our food from a grocery store rather than from a garden or farm. If a refrigerator or supermarket is our main experience of food, then it’s easy to think that food is always plentiful and instantly available.

Urban gardening, which can occur in backyard gardens, small-scale community gardens, and larger-scale urban farm undercuts this common misconception, helping people realize that food takes time, care and resources to produce.

In this interactive science game your class will learn about sustainable practices by growing crops, protecting them against unforeseen problems and determining how best to conserve resources. 

Posted on January 9, 2015 at 12:00 AM Comments

Crack the Case

posted on January 6, 2015 at 1:32 PM

Crack the Case

How do we develop and support theories about historical events using primary and secondary research sources? In this lesson based on PBS’s History Detectives, your class will answer that very question as they examine how to approach a historical investigation!

Bring learning alive as you guide your students though project-based inquiry into one of history’s famous cold cases. Students will choose a mystery to investigate, seek out and analyze both primary and secondary sources, develop a theory as to what happened in the mysterious historical event, and support their theory with evidence from their research. In the end, students will present a case file on their mystery, including a final report of their research findings and copies of the relevant source material.

By the end of this lesson, students will become familiar with how to conduct a research project and should know the basic steps to analyze a historical event. 

Posted on January 6, 2015 at 1:32 PM Comments


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