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Displaying 15 to 21 of 75 results.

Can Your Class Recite the Gettysburg Address?

posted on April 9, 2014 at 10:21 AM

Can Your Class Recite the Gettysburg Address?

“Four score and seven years ago…”

To celebrate the 150th anniversary of the Gettysburg Address, have your class join a national effort to encourage everyone in America to video record themselves reading or reciting the famous speech. Then, on April 15, tune in for the premiere of The Address on PBS, a 90-minute feature length documentary by Ken Burns that tells the story of the Greenwood School, a tiny school in Putney, Vermont, where the students are encouraged to practice, memorize, and recite the Gettysburg Address each year. In its exploration of the Greenwood School, the film also unlocks the history, context and importance of President Lincoln’s most powerful...

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Posted on April 9, 2014 at 10:21 AM Comments

Read, Watch, Interact! Literacy for Grades 1-8

posted on March 18, 2014 at 10:18 AM

Read, Watch, Interact!  Literacy for Grades 1-8

Have you tapped the power of digital media in your classroom?  Join Iowa Public Television for a deep dive into PBS LearningMedia, a free service of thousands of media-rich resources, including the Inspiring Middle School Literacy collection.  This free webinar, hosted by Iowa Public Television and PBS LearningMedia will zero in on middle school literacy strategies and showcase two of the Common Core-aligned cross-curricular lessons from the Inspiring Middle School Literacy collection.  For more information visit Read More

Posted on March 18, 2014 at 10:18 AM Comments

IPTV and ICN Partner to Support Education with PBS LearningMedia

posted on March 3, 2014 at 1:45 PM

IPTV and ICN Partner to Support Education with PBS LearningMedia

Iowa Public Television (IPTV) and the Iowa Communications Network (ICN) are looking forward to working together via PBS LearningMedia to support enhanced educational opportunities for educators and students in Iowa. PBS LearningMedia has over 35,000 digital resources available for educational use. This effort builds on the ICN’s dedication to education that the ICN has demonstrated by providing high-speed Internet and data to schools where the Network is connected. Likewise the effort builds on IPTV’s reputation as a producer and distributor of highly trusted and high quality educational content. PBS LearningMedia is a free, on-demand service for educators that provides easy access to classroom-ready learning resources based on multiplatform educational media developed by IPTV and other PBS...

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Posted on March 3, 2014 at 1:45 PM Comments

Is Genealogy the Key to Understanding U.S. and World History?

posted on February 26, 2014 at 12:00 AM

Is Genealogy the Key to Understanding U.S. and World History?

Did you know that genealogy can help your students build an emotional connection not only to their past, but to our nation’s history? Take your classroom on a revealing journey back in time with this collection of resources from the PBS program Genealogy Roadshow. Resources include an introduction to genealogical research from two prominent genealogists, clips from the show demonstrating how personal stories connect to larger events in history (such as slavery and the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln), and brief historical introductions to key people, places, and events in U.S. and world history. Who knew that genealogy could reveal so much? This Read More

Posted on February 26, 2014 at 12:00 AM Comments

Getting to the Roots of Family Trees

posted on February 24, 2014 at 12:00 AM

Getting to the Roots of Family Trees

Family trees can be more than just a grid displaying who your relatives are. In this activity created by WETA and drawing on material from the PBS documentary series Latino Americans, students are challenged to reflect on their own family’s arrival to America and learn new facts about their cultural history. Inspired by clips from the documentary, students research and fill in as much information as possible on the names and birthplaces of themselves, their parents, grandparents and so on. Next, they plot the names and birthplaces on a world map. More important than establishing the exact detail of their family tree is the process of understanding the migration/settlement story of those that came before them, making this activity inclusive of students who are adopted as well as those who are biologically connected to their parents. Your students will be intrigued as they complete reflective questions that compare and contrast their family’s story of arrival with the rich arrival stories of characters from the documentary. And to top it all off, they’ll be sure to carry these conversations home to the dinner table, making for some quality learning both in and out of the classroom. Their parents will thank you! This Read More

Posted on February 24, 2014 at 12:00 AM Comments

Educating the Whole Child in a Segregated Society

posted on February 7, 2014 at 12:00 AM

Educating the Whole Child in a Segregated Society

The demands of the 21st century require a new way of approaching education policy and practice; a “whole child” approach to learning, teaching, and community engagement. What if policymakers made decisions about education policy by first asking: what works best for children? Answering that question pushes us to redefine what a successful learner is and how we measure success. For a 70-year period, when America cared little about the education of African Americans and discrimination was law and custom, the Bordentown School was an educational utopia that WAS answering this question and creating “whole child” learners in a segregated society. Analyze how the Bordentown community fostered a well-rounded education for African American students with this resource from Hudson West. This Read More

Posted on February 7, 2014 at 12:00 AM Comments

Celebrate Black History Month with the Cultural Contributions of the Harlem Renaissance

posted on January 30, 2014 at 12:42 PM

Celebrate Black History Month with the Cultural Contributions of the Harlem Renaissance

February is Black History Month and we couldn’t think of a better way to celebrate than by enjoying the groundbreaking artistic and cultural contributions that came out of the Harlem Renaissance. Writers such as Counted Cullen and Langston Hughes, painters including Jacob Lawrence and Romare Bearden, and musicians and composers such as Duke Ellington and Bessie Smith, became widely known during this time as leaders of artistic innovation within the African American community. Put on your dancing shoes and check out this collection of primary resources from the Library of Congress, which provide a window into the Harlem Renaissance with portraits of the artists and treasured gems such as the original sheet music to the Charleston Rag! Visit this Read More

Posted on January 30, 2014 at 12:42 PM Comments

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Displaying 15 to 21 of 75 results.