Content Track
Tuesday, November 5
12:30 PM REGISTRATION
1:30 PM PANEL - THE FUTURE OF DIGITAL MEDIA: The Industry
Dust off your crystal ball and hear what industry representatives are saying is the "hot new thing" with digital media.
   More on Kurt Schini's presentation

Dr. Karen Billings, Education Division of the Software and Information Industry Association (SIIA)
Fred Baumgartner, AT&T Digital Media Centers
Jonathan Tyman, University Corporation for Advanced Internet Development (UCAID)
Kurt Schini, Harmonic

3:00 PM BREAK
3:15 PM PANEL - THE FUTURE OF DIGITAL MEDIA: The Marketplace
A varied and informative overview of the current state of DTV consumers, market, and initiatives.
   More on Jack Perry's presentation
   More on Phillip Swann's presentation
   More on Donn Kelly Presentation

Donn Kelly, Best Buy Consumer Marketing
Jack Perry, Decisionmark
Maryann Schulze, Magid Media Futures
Phillip Swann, TVPredictions.com

6:00 PM WELCOME RECEPTION
EXHIBITS OPEN Join us for a relaxing evening of fine hors d'oeuvres and conversation! The Welcome Reception is the perfect opportunity to explore the new and interesting displays at the exhibits, converse with new acquaintances, and catch up with old friends from previous conferences.
Wednesday, November 6
7:00 AM REGISTRATION
CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST
8:00 AM SPINNING A WEB THAT WORKS
Two Web experts will share their insights on the current state of the industry. Trisha Creekmore, Editorial Director for PBS Interactive Learning will talk about how the PBS interactive team has created a Web powerhouse in the .org realm. James Trautman, Managing Director of Bortz Media & Sports Group will give a report on best practices for public and commercial television Web sites. What can we learn about utilizing the Web from those on the "other side" of the broadcasting fence?

James M. Trautman, Bortz Media & Sports Group, Inc.
Trisha Creekmore, PBS Interactive

9:00 AM BREAK
9:15 AM A DIGITAL DIALECT: PRODUCTION PROCESS & PRODUCTIVITY
Digital production is the topic of discussion. Presenters are all at the top of their game and topics range the spectrum from DV & HD, to DVD production. Michelle Halsell, founder of New York-based Missing Pixel, will lead us on a journey from the preproduction conception to the creation of an interactive DVD product. Bruce Johnson has promised to bomb some digital production myths with Alphabet Soup & You: DV/DVCam/DVCPro. With HD credits from national commercials to the movie Windtalkers, veteran HD ace B. Sean Fairburn will wish everyone “Top O’ the Howdy”, while sharing the truth and dispelling the myths related to shooting in HD, with his High Definition Fact Sheet and HD 101. Finally, Smokey Forester will mesmerize with a demo of HD.

B. Sean Fairburn, SOC, HD Cinematographer & Consultant
Bruce Johnson, Wisconsin Public Television
Michelle Halsell, Missing Pixel
Smokey Forester, Science Bulletins, American Museum of Natural History

12:00 PM LUNCH
Exhibits Open
1:00 PM DIGITAL DELIVERY I: 'ONES AND ZEROES'
This digital quartet will present information about four initiatives utilizing a variety of different content formats and digital distribution methods, including streaming and hard drive/server delivery.
   More on Mike Zeller's presentation

Bryan Scanlon, United Learning
Michael Connet, onCourse
Mike Zeller, KCPT, Kansas City
Smokey Forester, Science Bulletins, American Museum of Natural History

2:30 PM BREAK
2:45 PM DAM EVANGELISTS: THE GOSPEL OF DIGITAL ASSET MANAGEMENT
You’ll shout "Hallelujah" when you become enlightened about the new world of Digital Asset Management. CPB’s media maven Alison White will spread the word(s) from the Metadata Dictionary Project. (Metadata is all the information about your valuable digital media assets and you’ll find out, you have more than you thought.) David MacCarn will deliver the gospel according to a new DAM model recently developed at WGBH in Boston. And Grace Agnew, Library of Congress & Association of Moving Image Archivists, will baptize you in the deep digital waters of organizing & storing your valuable media assets.

Alison White, Corporation for Public Broadcasting
David MacCarn, WGBH
Grace Agnew, Rutgers Digital Library

4:00 PM BREAK
4:15 PM DIGITAL CONTENT PLANNING
Overview of PBS content planning including HD strategy, multi-channel broadcasting and cable partnerships.

Cindy Johanson, PBS Interactive

5:30 PM INFORMAL GATHERING IN THE EXHIBIT AREA
CASH BAR
This is the precursor to the DINNER WITH KEYNOTE SPEAKER allowing you an opportunity to discuss with the day's presenters the ins and outs of their presentations. Take time to wander through the various displays, visit with cohorts, and catch up on the latest in the digital arena.
7:00 PM DINNER WITH KEYNOTE SPEAKER

Ralph Justus, Consumer Electronics Association

Thursday, November 7
7:30 AM REGISTRATION
Continental Breakfast
8:00 AM DIGITAL MEDIA COLLABORATION AND THE FUTURE OF THE INTERNET
Our three panelists will show how new broadband online technologies are providing producers, programmers and educators with new ways of sharing resources. Kristin Mellinger will discuss how NPR's ContentDepot will employ emerging technologies to enable public radio stations and program producers to improve and expand their services to listeners. Jonathan Tyman, of the University of Michigan, will examine how Internet2 is transforming education with the use of broadband videoconferencing and the transfer of high resolution video and media, and Kevin Dahl, of Digital One, will show how the tremendous growth of digital media can be applied within the Internet market.

Jonathan Tyman, University Corporation for Advanced Internet Development (UCAID)
Kevin Yahl, Digital One
Kristin Mellinger, NPR Content Depot

9:15 AM BREAK
9:30 AM DIGITAL RIGHTS AND WRONGS: THE LEGAL VIEW
What are the legal standards for usage of material in this new digital domain? Ken Salomon, with the D.C. law firm Dow, Lohnes & Albertson, has been negotiating the legal usage rights for the educational community. He will share what we can, what we shouldn’t, and what we cannot use in our products. Plus, he will give us a view of the future and what will be the likely digital media rights scenario.

Kenneth D. Salomon, Dow, Lohnes & Albertson, PLLC

10:30 AM BREAK
10:45 AM DIGITAL DELIVERY II: 'MORE ONES AND ZEROES'
The three presenters in this session continue the discussion from the Digital Delivery 1 panel by presenting additional initiatives that span datacasting, streaming, and CD/DVD delivery. Local/national and commercial/public implications will be explored. Look for the pros and cons of different delivery systems to be covered.
   More on Mike Kern's presentation
   More on Mary Halnon's presentation
   More on Jim Trautman's presentation

Amy S. Shaw, WSIU-TV
James M. Trautman, Bortz Media & Sports Group, Inc.
Mary Halnon, PBS Interactive
Mike Kern, Wisconsin Educational Communications Board

12:00 PM LUNCH
Exhibits Open
1:00 PM STREAMING VIDEO: FAD, FICTIONAL, OR FUNCTIONAL?
Is streaming video on the Web worth the cost, the hassle, and the infrastructure requirements? This panel with diverse opinions will certainly cover the bases. We'll hear from Dave Johnston, Senior Director of Technology at PBS and Kent Osbourne, who has implemented numerous useful streaming video initiatives for South Dakota Public Television.

Dave Johnston, PBS
Kent Osbourne, South Dakota Public Television

2:00 PM BREAK
2:15 PM CPB DIGITAL TOWN HALL MEETING
Digital conversion has joined death and taxes on the roster of life’s sure things. But what’s not at all sure is what local broadcasters can do with digital technology. What can they do with digital, in other words, that will reach and engage audiences, advance station missions, work technologically, and be financially sustained? What kind of help do local broadcasters need from national organizations, like CPB, PBS, and the networks? What skill sets will we need, and which ones do we already have on board? What lessons have we learned from digital TV’s first years? We’ll explore those issues through a facilitated, scenario-based town hall-style discussion. Share experiences with colleagues. Float new ideas. And give CPB your suggestions as to what they should be doing to make digital work.

3:45 PM BREAK - ROOM CONFIGURATION
4:00 PM DTV 'SMACK DOWN'
“You want to do WHAT? By WHEN?” What happens when worlds collide? When the Engineering and Content Tracks intersect? What do engineers want to tell the programmers, producers and educators who are looking to engineering to make their DTV dreams – HD, multicasting, datacasting, VOD – come true? What do the engineers need to hear from the folks in charge of content? Close out the DTV Symposium with this unique exchange of views.

Technical Track
Tuesday, November 5
12:30 PM REGISTRATION
1:30 PM PANEL - THE FUTURE OF DIGITAL MEDIA: The Industry
Dust off your crystal ball and hear what industry representatives are saying is the "hot new thing" with digital media.
   More on Kurt Schini's presentation

Dr. Karen Billings, Education Division of the Software and Information Industry Association (SIIA)
Fred Baumgartner, AT&T Digital Media Centers
Jonathan Tyman, University Corporation for Advanced Internet Development (UCAID)
Kurt Schini, Harmonic

3:00 PM BREAK
3:15 PM PANEL - THE FUTURE OF DIGITAL MEDIA: The Marketplace
A varied and informative overview of the current state of DTV consumers, market, and initiatives.
   More on Jack Perry's presentation
   More on Phillip Swann's presentation
   More on Donn Kelly Presentation

Donn Kelly, Best Buy Consumer Marketing
Jack Perry, Decisionmark
Maryann Schulze, Magid Media Futures
Phillip Swann, TVPredictions.com

6:00 PM WELCOME RECEPTION
EXHIBITS OPEN Join us for a relaxing evening of fine hors d'oeuvres and conversation! The Welcome Reception is the perfect opportunity to explore the new and interesting displays at the exhibits, converse with new acquaintances, and catch up with old friends from previous conferences.
Wednesday, November 6
7:00 AM REGISTRATION
CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST
8:00 AM BROADCAST SYSTEM RF OPTIMIZATION
Broadcasters invest substantial time and money choosing an RF system. The mechanical and electrical broadcast system covers components such as antennas, transmission line sections, combiners, filters, elbows, impedance matching sections, transitions, structural hangers and braces, thermal compensation, and pressurization. Optimizing the entire RF system is key to maximizing its performance. This paper will discuss why and how tests are performed and the equipment and personnel needed to achieve the station's requirements.

Walter Mamak, Andrew Broadcast Systems

8:45 AM IMPLEMENTATION OF AN ON-CHANNEL DTV NETWORK
Digital television brings with it many opportunities, one of which is the possiblity of changing the coverage model from a sing-transmitter architecture to an on-channel network. This approach can provide the broadcaster with the ability to target population centers with lower power transmitters, improving coverage while minimizing operation costs.

This paper will describe the implementation of an On-Channel DTV network using a technique which involves the synchronization of multiple DTV transmitters/boosters to mitigate mutual interference in overlapping coverage regions.

Richard Schwartz, Axcera's Broadcast Systems

9:30 AM REAL LIFE PERFORMANCE OF DUALBAND™ ANTENNA FOR VHF/UHF TRANSMISSIONS
An antenna that operates in both the VHF and UHF bands simultaneously allows the transmission of analog and digital signals within the same aperture. This results in lower tower loading and reduces the costs of the transition to DTV. Because the UHF design is similar to existing pylon antennas, UHF DTV performance is excellent in both the azimuth and elevation plan patterns. Actual test data from the first production of this antenna will be presented.

Joe Zuba, Dielectric Communications

10:15 AM BREAK
Exhibits Open
10:30 AM A NEW GENERATION, ULTRA-EFFICIENT, HIGH-POWER DTV TRANSMITTER
In this paper we discuss the implementation of the newest, and possibly the last innovation in IOT technology, the Multi Stage Depressed Collector (MSDC) IOT. In addition to achieving up to twice the operating efficiency of a traditional IOT other feature enhancements to the system may also be realized. To take full advantage of these improvements, a specially designed amplifier and support circuitry are required. This paper introduces a newly designed, ultra-efficient high-power DTV power amplifier and its practical integration into a complete and working UHF transmitter system. Actual performance results are also provided.

Fred M. Stefanik, Thales Broadcast & Multimedia, Inc.

11:15 AM OET-69 PROCESS: WHY IT DOESN'T ALWAYS WORK CASE STUDIES
This presentation will introduce some of the basics of the NTSC allocation rules and then cover OET 69, the methodology the FCC uses to assign DTV channels. At the heart of OET 69 is Longley-Rice propagation analysis. We'll discuss where the propagation analysis methodology works and where (and why) is doesn't. We'll show some examples using software designed to analyze and map DTV interference.

Doug Vernier, V-Soft Communications

12:00 PM LUNCH
Exhibits Open
1:00 PM ADVANCED DIGITAL DELIVERY ENTITY "A CASE STUDY OF BROADCAST CENTRALIZATION"
This presentation will look at the actual process that a group of public television stations recently went through to determine which model of broadcast centralization makes good business sense. It will highlight the financial and technology barriers encountered along the way towards their development of a practical model.

The following topics will be covered: •Goals and objectives of centralization •Possible models and services offered as part of broadcast centralization •The enabling technologies of centralized broadcasting oNetwork connectivity for broadcast equipment -Wide area automation -Facility monitoring and control -Signal transport •Connectivity options -Wide pipe vs. small pipe -Cell vs. packet -Last mile options -Preparing to negotiate with carriers •The impact of network distribution models.

The final chapter of this interesting story is still being played out and will not be determined until late October 2002. The author will report the outcome as shortly after has been determined.

Jay C. Adrick, Harris Corporation, Broadcast Communications

1:45 PM CENTRALCASTING
Centralization of TV stations in the analog world has achieved some success, and likely several not-so-successful implementations. As DTV becomes a viable service, will centralization become more or less popular? What does it look like? Will it enable new revenue streams or simply replicate the current business?

AT&T Digital Media Centers (maybe Comcast by meeting time) provides a unique view into large-scale channel origination, and what is possible and practical. Fred’s presentation goes into the economics, the changing world of storage and program distribution, and technologies such as ASI and MPEG native environments that affect the broadcaster’s choices and opportunities in the near DTV future.

Fred Baumgartner, AT&T Digital Media Centers

2:30 PM "HEADS UP" MULTI-CHANNEL OPERATION - REDESIGNING THE AUTOMATION USER INTERFACE
The arrival of digital television imposes a requirement for multi-channel operation on stations designed and staffed to deliver a single channel. This change impacts virtually all aspects of station operation. Some of this additional workload requires increased and capacity and feature enhancements within the scheduling and automation systems. However, other operational processes that are dependent on manual entry, monitoring, and control require additional staff or better utilization of existing staff. In this category, the master control operator's function is perhaps the most directly affected by a move to multi-channel operation.

Current automation systems with user interfaces designed for single channel operation (i.e. one operator per channel), can accommodate limited multi-channel operation by adding additional operator positions or placing multiple control workstations at a single position. these solutions are often impractical due to the increased cost or operator overloading leading to on-air errors.

this paper will explore a new approach to the multi-channel operator interface utilizing exception-based display and control. This model combines dual touch-screen displays with an "active monitor wall" to create a heads up operator environment capable of controlling up to sixteen channels from a single position.

John Wadle, Odetics Broadcast

3:15 PM BREAK
Exhibits OPEN
3:30 PM DTV MASTER CONTROL STRATEGIES
With the arrival of DTV along with the integration of AV and IT technologies, many opportunities exist for designing and constructing digital TV Master Control systems. Multiple transmitter systems, multi-station systems, as well as traditional one-station, one transmitter Master Control rooms can make efficient use of Asset Management, IP networking for program and control, MXF file transfer and multi-stream connectivity and servers. Possibilities for Master Control system design will be examined through the overview of several popular MCR functional concepts with an emphasis on how these newer technologies can make such operations more efficient.

Craig Beardsley, Sony Electronics, Inc

4:15 PM NEXT GENERATION STORAGE ARCHITECTURE FOR TELEVISION OPERATIONS
Video Servers are a ubiquitous component of today's broadcast operation. Many forces have converged to foster an ever increasing reliance upon video servers that has in turn fueled the demand for more storage. New software solutions seamlessly integrate nearline disk storage and archive systems with these online video servers, providing a powerful yet cost effective means for storage expansion, and enhanced features like distributed web based asset management and automatic frame accurate MPEG4 proxy generations.

Doug Hinahara, Masstech Group Inc.

5:30 PM INFORMAL GATHERING IN THE EXHIBIT AREA
CASH BAR
This is the precursor to the DINNER WITH KEYNOTE SPEAKER allowing you an opportunity to discuss with the day's presenters the ins and outs of their presentations. Take time to wander through the various displays, visit with cohorts, and catch up on the latest in the digital arena.
7:00 PM DINNER WITH KEYNOTE SPEAKER

Ralph Justus, Consumer Electronics Association

Thursday, November 7
7:30 AM REGISTRATION
Continental Breakfast
8:00 AM ABSOLUTE TIME REFERENCE
The evolution towards digital television has forced many broadcasters to rethink how reference signals are utilized in a modern broadcast facility. Digital facilities utilize a myriad of different types including SDI, HD-SDI, composite video, and AES/EBU audio. To further complicate the issue, many facilities have to deal with multiple frame rates and television standards simultaneously. Timing issues in multi-standard and multi-format facilities illustrate how traditional synchronize all of these formats. Clearly there is a need for a single all-encompassing timing signal. This paper will discuss a revolutionary new technology called Absolute Time Reference or ATR. This new technology is a comprehensive reference signal that will ensure a deterministic relationship between all formats and television standards and greatly simplify timing issues in a modern broadcast facility.

Mike Pecoraro, Leitch

8:45 AM SNMP BASED MONITORING STRATEGIES IN TELEVISION FACILITIES
In an environment where increasingly complex television facilities are being run by fewer people, we must look to new techniques to provide effective management and monitoring of these plants. These monitoring systems must be comprehensive and be able to flag abnormal conditions, report on errors and maintain comprehensive maintenance records for equipment. In addition, with new products demonstrating higher reliability and requiring less maintenance intervention than our previous generation of technology, managers of smaller facilities find it increasingly difficult to justify maintaining on site staff that have the required knowledge to quickly diagnose any problem that may arise. Tools must be affordable and easily adaptable for both large and small facilities.

Systems management tools from the IT world, such as SNMO, provide a good foundation for a monitoring strategy but manager software has often proven too complex to be really useful for many broadcasters to deploy.

This paper will explore strategies that leverage these IT technologies and describes improvements that can be made to adapt these tools to the unique needs of the broadcast environment to provide efficient tools for managing increasingly sophisticated equipment in increasingly sophisticated facilities. Also reviewed are the basic set of requirements demanded by users for both in-service and out-of-service monitoring, diagnostics, tools to track and record equipment performance.

New facilities being built into DTV equipment can also assist software developers improving the quality of information that is reported to users through their user interfaces. These tools can speed diagnosis of system problems, improve maintenance records and enable manufacturers to improve their level of service to customers.

The paper will be illustrated with examples of new SNMP and Web-based tools that have been adapted to meet the unique needs of television users and improve acceptance of these technologies in the television environment.

Ray Baldock, Thomson-Grass Valley

9:30 AM TIMING AND SYNCHRONIZATION IN MULTI-STANDARD, MULTI-FORMAT VIDEO FACILITY
Meeting the Challenges of Operating in Mixed Environments

Synchronization is one of the most fundamental and critical procedures in a video facility. Every device in a system must be synchronized in order to successfully create, transmit, and recover video pictures and audio information. The complexities of an analog and digital multi-standard, multi-format environment require flexibility to achieve and maintain synchronization in facilities that operate in a mix of formats.

Bill Cohn, Tektronix Corporation

10:15 AM BREAK
Exhibits Open
10:30 AM 24P IMAGE CAPTURE BRINGS CINEMA TO EVERYONE
For the past fifty years, television engineers have labored to create video cameras that produce ever-more perfect pictures, and in many cases film has been held as the image of perfection. Last year at the Iowa DTV Symposium, Panasonic addressed the technology of video cameras that mimicked the under-crank and over-crank mechanical capture process of cinematography in order that video capture could be used in more and more applications previously reserved for film. The role of gamma, going well beyond the traditional non-linear transfer characteristics and knee and white clip, was also addressed. An innovative approach to gamma throughout the entire dynamic range was described so as to produce video with characteristics transfer to film for cinema release, for release as television but with the appearance of film capture, or for a unique appearance created to satisfy the artistic requirements of the moment.

Since that presentation, Panasonic has introduced a very well received cost-effective 3 CCD DV based camcorder that brings 24P capture to an entirely new group of users. This allows acquisition of material with the look of film, and, perhaps more importantly, allows those learning their craft and those shooting in situations where the camera is in jeopardy to acquire 24P images. This presentation will briefly review the use of 24P in the television industry, the desire for a "universal" HD entertainment acquisition format, and the development of the under-crank and over-crank HD technology since these elements form the basis of the "little" camcorder. The internal signal processing will be discussed as well as a unique approach to producing a compatible mini-DV tape that appears to be standard 60 field interlace while maintaining the 24P image structure for "extraction" by editing systems equipped for such extraction. Lastly, the processing of 24P images in the non-linear domain will be touched upon to show how either 24P or 60i can be used to create finished products that have seen favorable acceptance by the industry.

Phil Livingston, Panasonic

11:15 AM FROM TAPE TO DIGITAL: A SINGLE FRAMEWORK FOR MULTIPLE MEDIA DISTRIBUTION
This presentation will explore the following:
•The next phase of news production: the transition to digital is tweny years in the making. So what comes next?

•What the new technology will enable: support for plug-ins of best-of-breed, multi-vendor applications across web, datacasting, wireless devices, television and radio.

•When technology is at its best: efficient news production workflow from acquisition to output, allowing each broadcaster to get maximum impact from their content.

•Strategies for greater productivity: how these advancements will allow small and large broadcasters to stay competitive.
•Competitive reporting and the new face of news: how newscasting needs have changed over the past year (to include webcasting for news). •Conclusion: challenge and opportunity--evolving newsroom and distribution technologies are re-defining the face of the broadcast facility.

Robert Long, Avid Technology, Inc.

12:00 PM LUNCH
Exhibits Open
1:00 PM RETURN LOSS HEADROOM
This paper shows how digital video cable is designed and manufactured. It also shows how installing it can affect the performance of the system. And all of these factors can be determined by understanding, and measuring, return loss. Included is an analysis of cable "characteristic impedance" and how to judge cable quality from the data provided by manufacturers.

Steve Lampen, Belden

2:00 PM THE CONSTANT EFFICIENCY AMPLIFIER: A SUPER EFFICIENT MSDC IOT
MSDC technology made its UHF TV debut in the 1980s, thereby allowing Klystrons to operate with efficiencies up to 29%. The concept was later abandoned in favor of the Inductive Output Tube (IOT), having an efficiency of 40% in NTSC high peak application. The IOT was later found to be only 12% - 38% efficient in 8VSB DTV application where the probability of peak power is only in the range of 2 kW - 30 kW.

A five-stage depressed collector IOT, known as the Northrop Grumman Constant Efficiency Amplifier (CEA), obtains efficiencies of 50% - 63% over average power levels of 2 kW – 30 kW in 8VSB. Transmitter sites can now realize annual utility savings of 50% per installation in comparison to a standard IOT transmitter in DTV service. The presentation describes differences between Klystrons, IOT's and CEA’s, theory of operation and operating requirements for the CEA. Actual test data will be shared.

Steve Bliek, Northrop Grumman Electron Devices

2:45 PM BREAK
Exhibits Open
3:00 PM DELIVERING CAPTIONS AND VIDEO DESCRIPTION IN DTV SYSTEMS
Extending broadcast information and services to 36 million Americans with hearing and vision disabilities is not just the right thing to do, it's the law. Current FCC rules require support for advanced caption data in DTV broadcast signals and receivers. Many broadcasters also must provide video description for their analog channels, and are mapping these additional audio services to their DTV channels during the transition.

Engineers and managers must know how to ensure the successful delivery of both captions and video description in DTV systems, the importance of 608 captions, 708 captions, multiple audio services and PSIP service descriptors, and techniques for bridging related data across the entire distribution chain.

This session will include a review of current industry standards and practices, as well as practical suggestions for your station's DTV build-out.

Gerry Field, CPB/WGBH National Center for Accessible Media

3:45 PM BREAK - ROOM CONFIGURATION
4:00 PM DTV 'SMACK DOWN'
“You want to do WHAT? By WHEN?” What happens when worlds collide? When the Engineering and Content Tracks intersect? What do engineers want to tell the programmers, producers and educators who are looking to engineering to make their DTV dreams – HD, multicasting, datacasting, VOD – come true? What do the engineers need to hear from the folks in charge of content? Close out the DTV Symposium with this unique exchange of views.

AGENDA

This is a partial list of presenters which is updated daily...please stop back often.

Names listed as invited have not yet confirmed their attendance at the session.

- CONTENT TRACK

- TECHNICAL TRACK

 


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