Content Track
Tuesday, October 28
12:00 PM LUNCH WITH KEYNOTE SPEAKER, JOHN ORLANDO, NAB
It's official! John Orlando, Executive Vice President for Government Relations at the National Association of Broadcasters, will keynote the Iowa DTV Symposium.

The 9th annual DTV Symposium kicks off with a bang as John Orlando delivers the keynote address at the opening day luncheon Tuesday, October 28, 2003.

Mr. Orlando's remarks will address the following topics:
- Where Washington stands on the transition to digital television.
- Who are the major players?
- What is necessary for continued success?

John Orlando, National Association of Broadcasters

2:00 PM CONSUMER TRENDS/MARKETPLACE
Maryann Baldwin with Frank N. Magid Associates reports on their annual survey of consumers and their awareness and attitudes regarding digital and high definition TV. Has consumer knowledge grown enough to turn the corner of the HD and digital adoption curve? What role does the growing availability of video on demand and digital video recorders have in advancing or slowing HD and digital adoption? And among those who plan to hop on the HD bandwagon in the months to come, what do we know about them and how can we best appeal to their interests and motivations? Learn more in this latest chapter on the consumers role in the HDTV roll-out.

Phil Swann, President and Publisher of TVPredictions.com comments on The Cable-Satellite War: Why it will help drive sales of new HDTVs

DirecTV and EchoStar are now locked in a war for subscribers, trying to outdo each other in delivering the best -- and cheapest -- service possible. Cablevision's entry into the satellite TV business will put pressure on DIRECTV and Echostar to offer more HDTV channels. Cablevision's new dish will offer up to 40 different high-def channels, nearly seven times as many as on DIRECTV and Echostar. This competitive atmosphere will keep prices down and HD channels up. And the cable TV industry will be forced to follow suit to prevent its customers from seeking better deals. All and all, the HDTV industry could be the biggest winner of this war.

David Liroff of WGBH presents a two-part observation of the marketplace entitled Why Technology Predications Go Awry; Why Tivo Owners Can't Shut Up

The hype and spin trumpeting the rollout of HDTV and digital television are among recent examples of the "irrational exuberance" which accompanies the introduction of many new technologies. To the educated eye, the causes and patterns are predictable. We'll deconstruct examples from 2003. 2) The PVR/DVR/TiVo phenomenon may be one more example of over-hyped marketing. Or, it may turn out to be a subversive and disruptive technology with truly revolutionary impact. We'll look at the early indicators.

David Liroff, WGBH
Maryann Baldwin, Magid Media Futures
Phillip Swann, TVPredictions.com

3:45 PM BREAK
Sponsored by: The CPB/WGBH National Center for Accessible Media (NCAM)
4:00 PM THE DIGITAL PROMISE PROJECT
Creating a multi-billion trust fund to help transform education, learning, and skills training for the digital age.

Lawrence Grossman, The Digital Promise

5:00 PM WELCOME RECEPTION
EXHIBITS OPEN Join us for a relaxing evening of fine hors d'oeuvres and conversation! The Welcome Reception is the perfect opportunity to explore the new and interesting displays at the exhibits, converse with new acquaintances, and catch up with old friends from previous conferences.
Wednesday, October 29
8:00 AM WHAT'S NEW IN DV AND SD VIDEO PRODUCTION
Need a video camera that can imitate a film camera? How about one that can shoot DV and transmit directly over the Web? Or maybe you'd like to give each of your producers an Avid on their desktop...for free! Join Bruce A. Johnson for a lightning tour through these and many other exciting news flashes from the still- important world of DV and standard-definition production.

Bruce Johnson, WPT

8:45 AM HD vs. MULTICASTING
One Station? Multicast!

Milwaukee Public Television has expanded its broadcast services from a duopoly (WMVS and WMVT) to a full array of two analog and six digital stations (five SD multicast and one HD). GM Ellis Bromberg explains why the station opted for this plan. - Ellis Bromberg

Ellis Bromberg, Milwaukee Public Television
Tom Doggett, Oregon Public Broadcasting

9:30 AM ENHANCED/INTERACTIVE TV: SOMEDAY, WE'LL JUST CALL IT TV
Technology is changing the way we watch and produce for TV. Viewers will have ever-greater interaction with their TV and programming as surely as the sun will rise tomorrow. Someday, this interaction will be an assumed part of TV entertainment. For 6 years, AFI has worked with top commercial and public broadcasting producers to envision the digital, interactive future of their shows. Participants have included ARTHUR (WGBH), SESAME STREET (Sesame Workshop), CELEBRITY MOLE (ABC), KIM POSSIBLE (The Disney Channel), CNN HEADLINE NEWS and Turner Classic Movies (Turner Networks), and over 30 others. Join AFI for a look at some of the innovative concepts developed in the AFI Enhanced TV Workshop, and a discussion of eTV's impact on your programming.

Marcia Zellers, American Film Institute

10:30 AM BREAK
Sponsored by Trillium Development Inc.
11:00 AM PBS' MOVE TO BECOME VOD AND DVR FRIENDLY
DVR and VOD technology promises to impact the broadcast industry in many ways. Content providers and distributors are responding to the growing demand by audiences to experience what you want, when you want it. Come understand PBS on-demand strategy with respect to DVRs and VOD. At this session, you will learn about the PBS/TiVo initiative to promote time-shifted viewing and improve viewer search results around public television programming. Well reveal PBS DVR research findings and show recent TiVo promotions. Well also talk about the new VOD pilot with cable operators around PBS KIDS
   Read more on this presentation

Jennifer Fabian Browning, PBS

12:00 PM LUNCH
1:00 PM THE ROLE OF THE WEB IN 21st CENTURY STATION SUCCESS STRATEGIES
Many broadcasters see the web as an annoyance, as competition, or at best as a "value add" for TV and radio. This 20th century perspective could lead to a significant missed opportunity. In this session, a case will be made for a prominent role for the worldwide web in 21st century broadcasting, and some cost-effective web strategies will be discussed. - Rich Winefield

Graham MacDougall, PBS
Rich Winefield, KQED

2:30 PM THE NEW PRODUCTION WARRIOR: WHEN ART AND TECH CONVERGE
The days of having one skillset and keeping a job for life are long gone. Today's production warriors need to be familiar with a little bit of everything including storytelling, graphics, audio, video, authoring and programming. Keeping up with this convergence of artistic inspiration and technical skills is a constant battle for designers, editors and producers everywhere. In this session Rod Harlan, Executive Director of the Digital Video Professionals Association, will show how he builds his presentations from scratch and work through several graphics, animation and video programs while building his final piece.

Rod Harlan, Digital Video Professionals Association

3:15 PM BREAK
Sponsored by: BroadcastBuyersGuide.com
3:30 PM AN EMBEDDED REPORTER'S PERSPECTIVE OF THE COVERAGE OF THE IRAQ WAR
An insider's look at the biggest stories of the last decade from reporter who has covered a good number of them.

Damir Loretic, CNN
Gary Tuchman, CNN

4:15 PM DIGITAL ARCHIVES: SAVING YOUR CONTENT
Television programming has significant influence in contemporary society and is the public record of the collective experience and memory of the American people. Moving image archivists are concerned about the longevity of these materials which have enduring value in documenting our culture. The viewing audience has the expectation that past programming will be readily available to them. Television producers and broadcasters recognize the increasing value of reusing old footage in enhancing new productions.

By converting existing video into digital objects and ensuring the longevity of "born digital" media, broadcasters and archivists can offer better access to historical television footage and leverage media assets into new educational, cultural and economic opportunities. Yet, without proper planning, financial commitment and collaboration, archival efforts, digital conversion projects and the preservation of digital assets can quickly become ineffective, inefficient and expensive.

Lisa Carter, Association of Moving Image Archivists

5:00 PM "TAKE FIVE" RECEPTION
Hosted by Iowa Motion Picture Association along with DPVA

"Take Five" to relax with friends and enjoy fine hors d'oeuvres thanks to the generosity of the Iowa Motion Picture Association along with DPVA.

Thursday, October 30
8:00 AM PBS DIGITAL MEDIA SERVICES FOR SCHOOLS: SO WHAT HAPPENED?
Last year at the Iowa DTV conference, you heard PBS present on "phase one" of the Digital Classroom Pilot, which involved detailed research into K-12 school technology infrastructure, stations' current education services and digital conversion plans, and early "lessons learned" about digital media service development for an in-school pilot that was just beginning last October. So what happened next? In this session, we'll present findings from the in-school pilot (content formatting, distribution, training and tech support) and talk about the financial and rights implications of the pilot work. You'll also get up to speed on the work that PBS has done since the in-school pilot to assess the digital media marketplace, sustainability, and best distribution options for school services.

Mary Halnon, PBS Interactive

8:45 AM INTEGRATING DIGITAL VIDEO INTO THE CLASSROOM
In January 2003, the Wisconsin Educational Communications Board (ECB) and CESA 10 received a grant to deliver digital content to and provide staff development for teams of media specialists and elementary teachers at CESA 10, CESA 12, and area public libraries. The first phase of the Digital Resources to Teach Wisconsin Studies project involved delivery of digital versions of three ECB instructional video series and supporting teacher guides to classrooms and computer labs within these CESAs via a variety of servers. All digital content was indexed and packaged into learning objects that support Wisconsin's Model Academic Standards for Social Studies.

The project's second phase involved professional development for educators and media and technology specialists to effectively receive and use these innovative materials to improve student knowledge and skills. Presenters will describe the project's goals and share discoveries made during this ongoing project, including technical, pedagogical and professional development issues, as well as feedback gathered from educators, staff and students.

Linda Hanson, Wisconsin ECB
Peggy Garties, Wisconsin ECB

9:30 AM NETV DIGITAL CLASSROOM PROJECT
Nebraska Educational Telecommunications (NET) is developing new education strategies that take advantage of digital television (DTV) capabilities. NET is implementing a pilot project to deliver educational content to Nebraska schools using a variety of DTV delivery methods. Participants will receive educational television video programs on TV sets equipped with digital tuners (multicasting), or videos and classroom activity materials directly to your desktop computer or school network server (datacasting) from their local Nebraska ETV transmitter.

Carl Mesecher, Nebraska Educational Telecommunications

10:15 AM BREAK
10:30 AM More Than Must Carry: What's the Cable Industry Doing About Education These Days Anyway?
Cable in the Classroom began as the cable industry's sole education initiative in 1989. Since then, both MSO's and networks have expanded the industry's attention to education exponentially, and Cable in the Classroom, in the past two years, has undergone a complete re-creation, re-invigoration, and expansion. Peggy O'Brien will be your tour guide through this territory, with particular attention to work focused on the educational potential of broadband.

Peggy O'Brien, Ph.D., Cable in the Classroom

11:15 AM DTV RIGHTS AND ISSUES - WE'RE FROM THE GOVERNMENT & WE'RE HERE TO HELP
A review of recent government DTV activities examining such "help" as the Chairman's "voluntary" DTV plan, mandatory DTV Tuners, the DTV Periodic Review, interpretation of the Balanced Budget Amendment "end of analog," the Broadcast Flag, Must Carry, the Cable Plug and Play Agreement, and Congressional Policy Efforts.

James M. Burger, Dow, Lohnes & Albertson

12:00 PM LUNCH
1:00 PM THE CENTER FOR DIGITAL EDUCATION: TRENDS AND PERSPECTIVES
The Center for Digital Education is an international research and advisory institute providing industry and education leaders with decision support, research and services to help them effectively incorporate new technologies in the 21st century.

The Center offers a series of unique programs covering the critical policy, executive leadership and applications surrounding education technology. Designed to help companies build and maintain successful business-to-education relationships and help educators further develop their education-to-education relationships. The Center will share a sampling of perspectives from around the country around digital media content as well as an overview of the work they are currently undertaking.

Marina Leight, Center for Digital Education

1:45 PM VIRTUAL VIDEO REALITY

Joe Stevens, Micoy

2:30 PM COLLABORATIVE PEER-TO-PEER USE OF SHARED ASSETS IN PRODUCTION
The eLinks demonstration project brings together the public university PTV community with major research universities working in the areas of asset management and digital distribution of rich media content. It is an Internet2-based repository and distribution test-bed designed to evaluate the benefits and challenges of content-sharing and collaboration in public service media. The project partners include seven PBS stations and The Research Channel.

In this presentation we will demonstrate the results of work done on the eLinks project during the summer of 2003.

Steve Vedro, Evolving the Links
Tina Hauser, Wisconsin Public Television

Technical Track
Tuesday, October 28
12:00 PM LUNCH WITH KEYNOTE SPEAKER, JOHN ORLANDO, NAB
It's official! John Orlando, Executive Vice President for Government Relations at the National Association of Broadcasters, will keynote the Iowa DTV Symposium.

The 9th annual DTV Symposium kicks off with a bang as John Orlando delivers the keynote address at the opening day luncheon Tuesday, October 28, 2003.

Mr. Orlando's remarks will address the following topics:
- Where Washington stands on the transition to digital television.
- Who are the major players?
- What is necessary for continued success?

John Orlando, National Association of Broadcasters

2:00 PM CONSUMER TRENDS/MARKETPLACE
Maryann Baldwin with Frank N. Magid Associates reports on their annual survey of consumers and their awareness and attitudes regarding digital and high definition TV. Has consumer knowledge grown enough to turn the corner of the HD and digital adoption curve? What role does the growing availability of video on demand and digital video recorders have in advancing or slowing HD and digital adoption? And among those who plan to hop on the HD bandwagon in the months to come, what do we know about them and how can we best appeal to their interests and motivations? Learn more in this latest chapter on the consumers role in the HDTV roll-out.

Phil Swann, President and Publisher of TVPredictions.com comments on The Cable-Satellite War: Why it will help drive sales of new HDTVs

DirecTV and EchoStar are now locked in a war for subscribers, trying to outdo each other in delivering the best -- and cheapest -- service possible. Cablevision's entry into the satellite TV business will put pressure on DIRECTV and Echostar to offer more HDTV channels. Cablevision's new dish will offer up to 40 different high-def channels, nearly seven times as many as on DIRECTV and Echostar. This competitive atmosphere will keep prices down and HD channels up. And the cable TV industry will be forced to follow suit to prevent its customers from seeking better deals. All and all, the HDTV industry could be the biggest winner of this war.

David Liroff of WGBH presents a two-part observation of the marketplace entitled Why Technology Predications Go Awry; Why Tivo Owners Can't Shut Up

The hype and spin trumpeting the rollout of HDTV and digital television are among recent examples of the "irrational exuberance" which accompanies the introduction of many new technologies. To the educated eye, the causes and patterns are predictable. We'll deconstruct examples from 2003. 2) The PVR/DVR/TiVo phenomenon may be one more example of over-hyped marketing. Or, it may turn out to be a subversive and disruptive technology with truly revolutionary impact. We'll look at the early indicators.

David Liroff, WGBH
Maryann Baldwin, Magid Media Futures
Phillip Swann, TVPredictions.com

3:45 PM BREAK
Sponsored by: The CPB/WGBH National Center for Accessible Media (NCAM)
4:00 PM THE THEATRE EXPERIENCE
Broadcasters have been steadily improving the quality of their transmitted signals. Substantial improvements have already occurred with the video content. The next challenges are in the upgrade of the audio sources to support discrete multi-channel sound and the conversion of aspect ratios to support the home theater experience. This will require upgrades to the broadcast facility and to the production chain and transmission paths (satellite, terrestrial or cable). Standards-compliant set-top receivers will enable the consumer to receive and subsequently decode multi channel audio signals. The key to success is to maintain compatibility with existing surround sound decoders and systems.

This presentation will briefly review the transition to color and the impact and growth of the consumer VCR, standards-compliant set-top receivers, DVD products and Direct-to-Home Satellite and digital cable services as predictor of DTV adoption trends.

Sim Kolliner, Leitch

5:00 PM WELCOME RECEPTION
EXHIBITS OPEN Join us for a relaxing evening of fine hors d'oeuvres and conversation! The Welcome Reception is the perfect opportunity to explore the new and interesting displays at the exhibits, converse with new acquaintances, and catch up with old friends from previous conferences.
Wednesday, October 29
8:00 AM BROADBAND DTV BROADCAST SYSTEM VSWR PERFORMANCE
The challenge of today's broadband broadcast transmission system has been addressed by state of the art RF design techniques. This paper discusses broadband system design parameters and compares both single and dual channel systems. Component and system VSWR parameters are then addressed, as well as their effect on DTV system parameters such as error vector magnitude and signal-to-noise ratio. Several broadband DTV transmission facilities have successfully been designed, installed, tested, and are on-air. The exceptional VSWR performance of these systems is reported.

Myron Fanton, Andrew

8:45 AM PATTERN MEASUREMENTS
Most of us recognize the "Free Space" patterns for TV antennas when we see them. These are pretty shapes filed with the FCC for new antenna installations.

But did you realize that just by hanging an antenna on the side of a tower will distort the station's actual coverage? It will and does. So how do you know for sure where your signal will go? The simple answer is to 'measure it'. That's right, when you order your antenna, have it measured full size, just as you will use it, to learn where the surprise(s) will be so you can make accommodations in your mounting arrangement to over come, as much as possible, these distortions to assure your signal will reach the most potential viewers.

Case studies and examples to be shown in this Power Point presentation by Jampro antennas.

Bob Groome, Jampro

9:30 AM REAL LIFE EXPERIENCE IN COMMON-SITE MULTISTATION FM AND TV PROJECTS
TV/FM analog upgrads and DTV/IBOC implementation have driven competitors to work together in many markets to develop a common site solution. Unlike previous projects where maybe two or three TV broadcasters would choose common suppliers to implement a common-site, multiple TV and FM broadcasters are now involved. Implementations range from (a) the selection of a single integrator whose responsibility is to coordinate the entire project to (b) the broadcasters developing a "committee" to oversee several suppiers directly. This paper will describe several projects representative of these different methods of project management. Actual situation will be analyzed and discussed with alternate solutions proposed for future use by broadcasters to avoid schedule delays and disappointments relative to expectations of how the various organizations will interact.

Kerry Cozad, Dielectric

10:15 AM BREAK
Sponsored by Trillium Development Inc.
10:30 AM IP MPEG TEST EQUIPMENT SOLUTIONS
IP networks are fast becoming ubiquitous. Prices of IP networking equipment and bandwidth keep going down while the speed keeps increasing. Even applications that once were considered too demanding are converting to IP. One of these is the transmission of high-quality live video, usually in MPEG-2 format.

This paper presents the protocols used and the challenges encountered when transmitting MPEG-2 video over IP, be it from one desk to the next or across a continent. It then explores the requirements of test equipment used to monitor such networks and presents some of the possible solutions

Fred Grenier, Thales Broadcast & Multimedia

11:15 AM NetVX
Video networking across traditional data services is becoming the cornerstone of the modern broadcast facility. This paradigm is evident in a number of processes within the organization, including content creation, editing, approval, storage, distribution, and archiving. Each of these areas typically consists of legacy and newly adopted technology and a mixture of network services.

While dedicated, Private-Line Wide Area Network data services have been used for the majority of back-haul feeds of live video, ATM and IP are becoming quite popular.

Yet although ATM was designed to support voice, data and video, issues involving cost and implementation complexity have restricted rollout. Ethernet/IP is quickly becoming the de facto standard for many networked applications, and the industry is embracing the general-purpose computing platform as a substitute for tape-based VTRs, application-specific editors, archiving and several other hardware-specific devices. As Ethernet/IP gains acceptance, the industry is shifting away from live transmission/video tape-based operations to a store-and-forward, file-based operation. This migration to a shared network environment is enabling organizations to more effectively utilize geographically dispersed resources to create, manipulate and distribute content.

Regulatory changes in ownership, consolidation and multi-channel operation are underscoring the need for high-speed, bi-directional networks. Regional group operations will distribute programming to remote markets for final transmission as well as collect local news and event content. In general, consolidation supports two network methods-- real-time and store-and-forward. Each provides pros and cons and each depends upon specific technology.

Therefore, a video gateway that serves to bridge legacy technology and services with new ones can simplify operational complexity and reduce operating costs. If implemented correctly, this gateway should be scalable and extensible to support future growth and revenue opportunities.

Norman Slater, Harris

12:00 PM LUNCH
1:00 PM SONY PROFESSIONAL DISC, THE NEXT GENERATION OF WORKFLOW INNOVATION
The professional optical disc is a robust new medium that has many uses. In general, it holds high-resolution video, metadata (including low-resolution video), and audio in a randomly accessible format. This presentation will cover the basics of this new media and along with family of Professional Disc products, true Workflow Innovation can be achieved through their AV/IT capabilities.

Mike DesRoches, Sony

1:45 PM RELIABILITY AND REDUNDANCY IN LINEARLY EXPANDABLE ROUTERS
Broadcast routers are at the very heart of the broadcast facility. A router failure has the possibility of resulting in loss of a program or worse, loss of a commercial. Recent advancements in the lower bandwidth routers, specifically digital audio routers, have resulted in new areas of concern. This paper focuses on reliability issues from several perspectives including system architecture, complexity, parts count, forward error correction, and placement of redundancy decision points. Several new approaches to solving these problems will be presented for the first time.

Mitch Hayden, Thomson/Grass Valley

2:30 PM INTELLIGENT INFRASTRUCTURE FOR DIGITAL INSTALLATIONS
There is a growing trend, alongside the incorporation of digital technology, for broadcast installations to become more complex, covering more channels, with fewer trained staff on site and on hand. Industry changes such as Central Casting, diversification of broadcast channels across multiple media, and content provider aggregation are driving this trend. This paper will show some of the technology that is being used in existing and new installations to provide intelligent control and monitoring of the broadcast infrastructure, to maximize the effectiveness and efficiency of the available engineering staff and minimize system downtime. There are two fundamental parts to this technology. Firstly, the infrastructure itself should, wherever possible, have intelligence built in. Secondly, sophisticated, flexible, and easy to use user interfaces are required to access the inherent intelligence in the infrastructure.

John Shike, Snell & Wilcox

3:15 PM BREAK
Sponsored by: BroadcastBuyersGuide.com
3:30 PM TRENDS IN ARCHIVING AND NEAR LINE STORAGE
Ever since the first photograph taken, the first roll of film shot or the first videotape recorded, the requirement to archive audio and video content has been a necessity. Since storage life and retrieval requirements for content vary, categorization for stored information separates into three different basic segments: On-Line, Near-Line, and Off-Line. Whether the information is stored on tape, optical disk, or data disk, future use of the information depends on the ability to search, browse and retrieve in a cost effective manner. This presentation will provide an overview of different archive formats available today, such as tape, optical, and data disk. A cost / performance analysis combined with a usability study will serve as a guideline in helping to identify the most appropriate archive solution for different needs. The presentation will also review the challenges faced in managing and tracking data in todays world of servers and NLEs where the amount of data only grows and frequently has complex data relationships. Whether conserving original tape material, such as 1", Beta, or VHS, or utilizing video server systems a sound solution requires the right mix between On-Line, Near-Line, and Off-Line storage. Additionally, an outlook of future available systems and technologies will be presented.

Douglas Korte, Leitch

4:15 PM P-2 SOLID STATE MEMORY BASED ACQUISITION SYSTEMS
Since the advent of electronic news gathering some 40 years ago, field acquisition has changed little when compared to the revolution caused by full resolution non-linear editing. Having experienced NLE for production, users could easily imagine the benefits of non-linear acquisition, and some "early-adopters" and creative manufacturers tried to use hard drives with limited acceptance. When the recordable DVD appeared, it was thought to be an answer, but many issues precluded its adoption, most notably its writing speed, storage capacity, and physical robustness during record. Nevertheless, the idea of an optical disk camcorder was definitely appealing.

At NAB this year, 2 major manufacturers introduced two very different solutions for non-linear field acquisition - one optical disk based, and one solid-state memory based. This presentation will describe the background and rationale for the selection by Panasonic of memory for field acquisition, the trade-offs and benefits, and a brief overview of the components that comprise the system. Central to the system and to the presentation are the use of Information Technology (IT) elements to transform the workflow, especially for newsgathering, and the derivation of the memory elements from the every increasing use of SD miniature storage element now found in cell phones, PDAs and still cameras for consumers world-wide. The central theme of the concept is to use the most appropriate storage element for each phase of the process, and there is a role for memory cards, hard disk drives, and optical disks wherein each plays on its own strengths.

Phil Livingston, Panasonic

5:00 PM "TAKE FIVE" RECEPTION
Hosted by Iowa Motion Picture Association along with DPVA

"Take Five" to relax with friends and enjoy fine hors d'oeuvres thanks to the generosity of the Iowa Motion Picture Association along with DPVA.

Thursday, October 30
8:00 AM THE THREE D'S OF METADATA
The use of Dolby Digital technology within digital television broadcasts evens the playing field and now allows broadcasters to provide the same number of channels with the same amount of dynamic range as DVDs and cinemas. Dolby Digital uses a system of audio metadata parameters to inform the consumer's home theater system of the number of channels and how to process the audio program given the consumer's listening requirements. What effect do these metadata parameters have on the audio program? What happens when these parameters are set improperly? How can the broadcaster easily set these parameters without incurring more equipment and labor costs? These issues are considered and audio examples of Dolby Digital audio programs are given.

Mike Babbitt, Dolby Labs

10:00 AM BREAK
10:30 AM DIGITAL AUDIO - CHOICES AND CONSIDERATIONS
Digital Audio - Choices and Considerations Digital audio comes in a number of choices, in twisted pair and coax formats, in professional and consumer applications. This paper covers all of these, with installation and operational tips. Included are networked digital audio, and using Category 5 cable to carry digital signals.

Steve Lampen, Belden

12:00 PM LUNCH
1:00 PM ANALOG AND DIGITAL AUDIO BASICS
The transition from Analog to Digital Audio has evolved to a point that most facilities have to face the challenges of both formats. This paper will cover why devices use either balanced or unbalanced signals. Each format has its own physical and electrical characteristics and specific strengths and weaknesses. The basics of AES/EBU non-embedded and embedded digital audio will be covered at the electrical, data, and application layer. A good understanding of the formats will aid in the appropriate application of the audio signals. Testing to maintaining audio quality throughout the plant will be the focus of this paper.

Karl Kuhn, Tektronix

1:45 PM PBS EIOP
This presentation will focus on the projects currently being developed to optimize the acquisition and distribution of PTV content and elimination of processing reductions through deployment of upstream quality control methodologies, new distribution paradigms and exception monitoring.

Jerry Butler, Public Broadcasting Service

2:30 PM SINGLE FREQUENCY NETWORKS
Distributed transmission is single frequency network technology applied to the ATSC system for digital television. Rather than using a single transmitter to service a coverage area, multiple transmitters are used. The transmitters are synchronized in frequency and symbol emission. Timing adjustments allow optimization of the system to produce minimum timing skew in areas where the multiple signals overlap.

This paper provides a detailed introduction to the technology and hardware developed for distributed transmission.

The first station to implement distributed transmission is WPSX-DT in State College, PA. For WPSX, distributed transmission was the only feasible way to provide UHF coverage, mainly because of terrain shielding. This paper presents implementation experiences and data from this real-world installation.

Distributed transmission can also be applied to translator systems, by creating distributed translator networks. In a distributed translator network, the translators may all operate on the same channel. This results in greater spectral efficiency. Multiple hop distributed translator systems can be accommodated with a minor change to the ATSC CS/110 candidate standard. The changes necessary to implement distributed translator systems are also described.

Dave Hershberger, Axcera

AGENDA

This is a partial list of presenters which is updated daily...please stop back often.

Names listed as invited have not yet confirmed their attendance at the session.

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