Iowa Public Television

 

CAMPAIGN 2002: The Secretary of Agriculture

posted on October 22, 2002

Glover: GOOD EVENING. TONIGHT WE CONTINUE WITH OUR FIVE-PART SERIES FEATURING CANDIDATES WHO'LL APPEAR ON THE BALLOT ON NOVEMBER 5. LAST NIGHT WE OPENED OUR "CAMPAIGN 2002" SERIES WITH A DISCUSSION WITH FOUR CANDIDATES SEEKING THE OFFICE OF SECRETARY OF STATE AND TWO CANDIDATES SEEKING TO BECOME AUDITOR OF IOWA. THIS EVENING OUR CAMPAIGN SPOTLIGHT SHIFTS TO THE CAMPAIGN FOR IOWA SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE, WHERE FIVE CANDIDATES ARE ON THE 2002 BALLOT. LET'S MEET TONIGHT'S GUESTS. IOWA'S SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE SITS ON IOWA'S EXECUTIVE COUNCIL AND IS ELECTED TO A FOUR-YEAR TERM. PATTY JUDGE IS THE INCUMBENT. SECRETARY JUDGE IS A DEMOCRAT AND LIVES IN ALBIA.BRIAN DEPEW IS A NATIVE OF LAURENS, IOWA, AND HE APPEARS ON THE BALLOT AS A CANDIDATE FROM THE IOWA GREEN PARTY.FRITZ GROSZKRUGER IS FROM DUMONT AND IS ON THE BALLOT REPRESENTATIVE OF THE LIBERTARIAN PARTY.RONALD TIGER FROM FORT DODGE IS AN INDEPENDENT RUNNING FOR IOWA'S SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE.AND JOHN ASKEW OF THURMAN, IOWA, IS THE REPUBLICAN PARTY'S CANDIDATE FOR AGRICULTURE SECRETARY.WELCOME, ALL OF YOU, TO THE SHOW TONIGHT. SECRETARY JUDGE, IF WE COULD START WITH YOU THIS EVENING. YOU ARE THE INCUMBENT. MANY OF THE CANDIDATES FOR SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE ARE NOT ALL THAT WELL KNOWN. LET'S HELP THAT VOTER OUT THERE WHO IS TRYING TO MAKE A DECISION. WHAT WOULD YOU LIKE THAT VOTER THINKING ABOUT YOU AS HE OR SHE WALKS INTO THE VOTING BOOTH ON NOVEMBER 5?

Judge: I THINK I WOULD LIKE TO SAY TO THE VOTERS THAT IOWA STRENGTH HAS ALWAYS BEEN A COMBINATION OF THE STRONG PEOPLE AND THE FERTILE SOIL. AGRICULTURE HAS BEEN THE BACKBONE OF THE STATE FOR A LONG TIME, AND IT WILL BE. WE HAVE TO CULTIVATE THAT BASE. IN 1998 I WAS VERY PROUD TO BE THE FIRST WOMAN WHO WAS ELECTED TO THIS POSITION. SINCE THAT TIME I HAVE BEEN A STRONG VOICE FOR IOWA, FOR ALL OF ITS PEOPLE, BOTH RURAL AND URBAN. TODAY I'M PROUD TO REPORT THAT WE HAVE HAD SUCCESS IN ADDING VALUE TO COMMODITY CROPS, WHICH RESULTS IN MORE MONEY IN THE POCKETS OF PRODUCERS AND MORE JOBS FOR IOWA WORKERS.

Glover: WE'LL GET INTO SOME OF THOSE ISSUES. MR. ASKEW, LET'S GO TO YOU. THE SAME QUESTION: WHAT DO YOU WANT THAT VOTER THINKING ABOUT YOU AS HE OR SHE WALKS INTO THE VOTING BOOTH ON NOVEMBER 5?

Askew: WELL, LET ME INTRODUCE MYSELF A LITTLE BIT. I'M A SIX-GENERATION FAMILY FARMER FROM SOUTHWEST IOWA, DOWN IN FREMONT COUNTY. IN FACT, OURFAMILY HELPED SETTLE THE COUNTY BACK IN THE MID 1800S. WHAT I SEE IN THE PAST FOUR YEARS, IN FACT EVEN MORE THAN THAT, I'VE SEEN A DIFFERENT -- A SHIFT IN IOWA, A CHANGE IN WHAT AGRICULTURE HAS BECOME. YOU KNOW, I'M A WORKING FARMER EACH AND EVERY DAY, AND I SEE WHAT HAPPENS WHEN THE POLICIES AFFECT THE FARMING INDUSTRY OUT THERE. I WANT TO CREATE A DIFFERENT TYPE OF DEPARTMENT. I WANT TO CREATE A DEPARTMENT OF VISION, ONE THAT LOOKS AT VALUE-ADDED AGRICULTURE BUT KEEPS THAT VALUE HERE IN THE STATE, RETAINS IT. I'VE HAD EXPERIENCE AS PRESIDENT OF THE IOWA SOYBEAN ASSOCIATION. I'VE HAD EXPERIENCE BEING ON THE FEDERAL CROP INSURANCE CORPORATION BOARD OF DIRECTORS LOOKING AT PROGRAMS AND PROVIDING RISK MANAGEMENT TOOLS FOR FARMERS OUT THERE. WE SEE A GREAT FUTURE IN IOWA, AND I AM YOUNG ENOUGH AND HAVE THE PASSION ENOUGH TO GET IT DONE.

Glover: OKAY, MR. TIGNER, TO YOU THE SAME QUESTION. ASSUME VOTERS ARE THINKING ABOUT ONE OR TWO THINGS ABOUT A CANDIDATE. WHAT WOULD YOU LIKE THAT TO BE?

Tigner: WELL, THANK YOU FOR ASKING US HERE. FIRST OF ALL, I WAS BORN AND RAISED ON A LIVESTOCK FARM IN NORTH CENTRAL IOWA, AND I FARMED WITH MY FATHER AND ALSO HAD AN OFF-THE-FARM JOB IN SALES AND MARKETING FOR ABOUT TEN YEARS. WHAT I SEE IS THAT SINCE THE LATE 1800S AND EARLY 1900S, THERE'S BEEN A TREND, A QUIET NATIONAL POLICY TO REMOVE FARMERS AND RESOURCES FROM RURAL AMERICA AND TO SHIFT THAT INTO URBAN AMERICA. THAT'S REFLECTED IN WHAT'S HAPPENING IN AGRICULTURE. THERE'S A VERTICAL INTEGRATION STARTING TODAY RIGHT NOW IN FOOD PRODUCTION, AND THAT WANTS TO CONTINUE FROM THOSE WHO ARE IN SPECIAL INTEREST AGRICULTURE. WHAT WE NEED TO DO IS FIND NEW DIRECTIONS AND NEW FUTURES FOR FAMILY FARMERS AND ALSO PROCESSORS TO KEEP OUR FOOD IN THE HANDS OF MANY AND NOT INTEGRATED INTO A FEW.

Glover: MR. GROSZKRUGER, THE SAME QUESTION TO YOU: THAT ONE THOUGHT YOU WANT ON THE VOTERS' MINDS AS HE OR SHE WALKS INTO THE VOTING BOOTH.

Groszkruger: I'D LIKE PEOPLE TO THINK THAT THEY WOULD BE VOTING FOR SOMEONE WHO BELIEVES AS THE FOUNDERS DID, THAT EACH INDIVIDUAL ACTING ON HIS OWN CAN MAKE DECISIONS BETTER THAN SOMEONE WHO IS NOT KNOWLEDGEABLE OF THAT INDIVIDUAL BUT IS TRYING TO PLAN A SOCIETY.

Glover: MR. DEPEW, THE SAME QUESTION TO YOU: VOTERS THINKING ABOUT ONE OR TWO THINGS AS THEY HEAD INTO THE BOOTH; WHAT DO YOU WANT THEM TO THINK ABOUT YOU?

Depew: THANK YOU FOR THE INTRODUCTION. AS YOU SAID, MY NAME IS BRIAN DEPEW, THE GREEN PARTY CANDIDATE FOR SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE. QUICKLY ON MY BACKGROUND. I GREW UP ON A FARM IN POCAHONTAS COUNTY IN NORTHWEST IOWA, WHERE I RAISED PIGS FOR NIMAN RANCH IN A PARTNERSHIP WITH MY FATHER. I'M ALSO CURRENTLY A SENIOR AT SIMPSON COLLEGE IN INDIANOLA, IOWA, WHERE I'LL RECEIVE MAJORS IN BOTH PHILOSOPHY AND ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE. I DECIDED TO RUN FOR IOWA SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE BECAUSE IT WAS PAINFULLY CLEAR TO ME THAT WE NEEDED NEW LEADERSHIP IN THE OFFICE. WE NEED LEADERSHIP THAT WILL FOSTER INDEPENDENT FAMILY FARMS, LEADERSHIP THAT WILL ENCOURAGE THE DIVERSIFICATION OF OUR FARMS, LEADERSHIP THAT WILL ENCOURAGE PRODUCTION OF LOCAL FOOD IN THE STATE, BUT WE HAVEN'T SEEN THAT LEADERSHIP IN THE PAST FOUR YEARS. WE'VE SEEN LEADERSHIP THAT TAKES MONEY FROM THE BIGGEST HOG PRODUCERS IN THE NATION, SPENDS COUNTLESS HOURS TRYING TO SELL GENETICALLY MODIFIED GRAIN TO COUNTRIES THAT DON'T WANT IT. IT'S TIME FOR NEW LEADERSHIP, AND THAT'S WHAT MOTIVATED ME TO RUN.

Glover: A LOT THOSE ISSUES WILL COME UP LATER IN THIS PROGRAM. MR. ASKEW, LET'S GO TO YOU. AS MENTIONED, ONE OF THE HOTTEST ISSUES GOING IN RURAL IOWA RIGHT NOW IS THE DEVELOPMENT OF LARGE HOG CONFINEMENT FACILITIES. THE LEGISLATURE HAS SEEN FIT TO TWICE ADDRESS THAT ISSUE, AND THE GOVERNOR HAS SIGNED BOTH OF THOSE BILLS. DO YOU AGREE WITH WHAT THE LEGISLATURE HAS DONE? SHOULD THEY GO FURTHER? SHOULD THEY HAVE DONE LESS?

Askew: I GUESS WITH THE LIVESTOCK BILL THAT WAS PASSED THIS LAST YEAR, 2293 SENATE FILE. I JUST THOUGHT IT WAS THE MOST WORTHLESS PIECE OF LEGISLATION THAT'S GONE THROUGH IN QUITE A FEW YEARS. WHY IS SAY THAT IS, ONE, BECAUSE THERE'S THREE ASPECTS TO THAT, THAT THEY TRIED TO ADDRESS. ONE IS WATER QUALITY, SECOND IS AIR QUALITY, AND THIRD IS LOCAL CONTROL. WITH WATER QUALITY, THEY DIDN'T EVEN DEAL WITH WHAT WE SEE AS THE FUTURE OF WATER QUALITY IN THE STATE. THEY'RE DEALING WITH PHOSPHORUS, A PHOSPHORUS INDEX THAT WAS NEVER MEANT TO BE USED FOR REGULATORY CONTROL. IT WAS JUST AN INDICATOR. YOU KNOW, MANURE IS APPLIED TO 8 PERCENT OF THE LAND MASS OUT THERE, SO DID WE REALLY SOLVE APROBLEM OR DID WE NOT. THE SAME THING WITH AIR QUALITY. THE SETBACKS THAT WERE PASSED BACK IN '96 ARE WORKING, BUT THE THING IS IT'S THE ODOR. IT'S THE SMELL. SO LET'S LOOK AT WHAT WE CAN DO TO GET RID OF THAT SMELL. WE SHOULD BE PUTTING MORE RESEARCH DOLLARS INTO ODOR CONTROL MANAGEMENT ON THE FARMS. WE SHOULD BE GIVING FARMERS INCENTIVES TO IMPLEMENT THOSE. IF IT'S THE COST OF TECHNOLOGY, LET'S DO THAT. AND THEN LOCAL CONTROL; THAT'S THE THIRD PART. WE PASSED THIS MATRIX AS UNWORKABLE. WE DIDN'T REALLY GIVE -- WE DIDN'T REALLY GIVE WHAT WHEAT FARMERS NEED. WHAT WE NEED IS -- WE DON'T NEED 99 DIFFERENT SETS OF REGULATIONS ACROSS THE STATE. WHAT WE NEED ARE STATE STANDARDS THAT WORK WELL,NOT ONLY FOR THE FARMERS BUT FOR THE REST OF THE COMMUNITY OUT THERE. WE ALSO NEED TO BE ABLE TO HAVE SOME LOCAL INPUT ON EACH AND EVERY ONE OF THOSE ISSUES.

Glover: SECRETARY JUDGE, THE SAME QUESTION TO YOU. YOU'VE SEEN THE LEGISLATURE TWICE ADDRESS THIS ISSUE. IN FACT, I THINK YOU WERE IN THE LEGISLATURE WHEN IT WAS ADDRESSED ONCE. DO YOU AGREE WITH WHAT THEY'VE DONE? IF NOT, WHAT SHOULD THEY HAVE DONE?

Judge: ACTUALLY, MIKE, THIS IS MY THIRD TRIP AROUND THIS ISSUE, TWICE IN THE SENATE AND THEN AGAIN THIS SPRING. FIRST OF ALL, LET ME SAY THAT WE NEED TO FEED LIVESTOCK IN IOWA. WE ARE THE NATION'S LEADING PRODUCER OF FEED GRAINS, AND FEEDING THAT GRAIN TO LIVESTOCK IN THE STATE IS GOOD VALUE-ADDED BUSINESS. SO WE WANT THAT TO BE HERE, BUT WE ALSO UNDERSTAND THAT IT NEEDS TO BE VERY CAREFULLY WATCHED AND THAT IT COULD HAVE A NEGATIVE ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT IF ITWASN'T. I DON'T THINK WE'VE GOT QUITE THE RIGHT MIX YET. WE'VE CERTAINLY COME A LONG WAY. WHEN WE STARTED THIS DISCUSSION IN 1994-1995, WE HAD NO STANDARDS AT ALL. AND WE NOW HAVE FAIRLY TOUGH RULES, AND WE'VE COME A LONG WAY IN PROTECTING THE ENVIRONMENT. IT'S MY OPINION THAT WE HAVE NOT SOLVED THE PROBLEM ENTIRELY AT THIS POINT.

Glover: MR. DEPEW, I WOULD SUSPECT YOU DON'T THINK THE LEGISLATURE HAS BEEN QUITE TOUGH ENOUGH ON THEM, DO YOU?

Depew: NO, I DON'T. QUICKLY, I'D LIKE TO RESPOND TO SOMETHING MRS. JUDGE SAID. SHE SAID THAT WE NEED TO FEED LIVESTOCK IN THE STATE, AND I AGREE WITH THAT. SHE ALSO SAID EARLIER THIS YEAR THAT IF WE PASS LOCAL CONTROL LEGISLATION OR OTHER LEGISLATION, IT WILL BE THE END OF THE LIVESTOCK INDUSTRY IN THE STATE. I THOUGHT GREAT; THEN WE CAN GO BACK TO HAVING FARMERS RAISE PIGS. WE NEED LOCAL CONTROL AND WE NEED IT NOW AND WE NEED A SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE WHO WILL SUPPORT LOCAL CONTROL. IOWANS HAVE WANTED TO VOTE ON IT EVER SINCE HOUSE FILE 519, AND I THINK THIS YEAR THEY CAN DO THAT BY HOW THEY VOTE FOR SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE.

Glover: MR. GROSZKRUGER, WHAT DO YOU THINK OF WHAT THE LEGISLATURE HAS DONE ON THIS ISSUE? SHOULD THEY GO FURTHER? HAVE THEY GONE TOO FAR?

Groszkruger: I THINK ABOUT ALL THE LEGISLATION THAT'S BEEN PASSED WAS PASSED MOSTLY JUST TO BUY VOTES OR UNDER THE INFLUENCE OF BIG CONTRIBUTORS. IT WASN'T PASSED TO ACTUALLY PROMOTE THE SO-CALLED PROPER TYPE OF FARMING OR A CLEAN ENVIRONMENT. THINGS LIKE THE PHOSPHORUS STANDARD, IT'S RIDICULOUS TO SOMEBODY THAT FARMS TO THINK THAT A PHOSPHORUS STANDARD IS GOING TO PROTECT THE ENVIRONMENT, BECAUSE IT BINDS THE SOIL PARTICLES. IF THE LEGISLATION WAS ACTUALLY INTENDED TO PROTECT THE ENVIRONMENT, THEN IT WOULD SEEM KIND OF SILLY, BUT THEY OUGHT TO PASS LEGISLATION AGAINST TILLAGE BECAUSE THAT ALLOWS THE PHOSPHORUS CONNECTED TO THE SOIL TO WASH INTO THE WATER.

Glover: MR. TIGNER, WHAT DO YOU THINK OF WHAT THE LEGISLATURE HAS DONE ON THIS? HAVE THEY GOTTEN IT RIGHT? HAVE THEY GOTTEN IT WRONG?

Tigner: THEY NEED TO GO MUCH FURTHER. SOME OF THE ISSUES THAT HAVEN'T BEEN EVEN NEARLY ADDRESSED -- THE CONCENTRATION IS REALLY THE PROBLEM. IF LIVESTOCK WAS DISPERSED ALL OVER THE STATE OF IOWA LIKE IT WAS IN THE '60S AND '70S, WE WOULDN'T BE HAVING THIS PROBLEM. SO THAT LEGISLATION DOESN'T ADDRESS THAT ATALL, AND THAT'S WHAT CAUSES THE MANURE PROBLEMS, THE AIR QUALITY PROBLEMS, THE WATER QUALITY PROBLEMS. ANOTHER THING IS THE MATRIX. IT'S BASICALLY JUST A COMPLICATED SYSTEM TO GIVE LOCAL COMMUNITIES A SAY, WHICH THEY ALREADY HAD BEFORE. NOW YOU JUST HAVE A CERTAIN SET OF RULES THAT THEY'RE SUPPOSED TO GO BY, SO IT DOESN'T CHANGE ANYTHING FOR THE LOCAL CITIZENS ON THAT ISSUE.

Glover: SECRETARY JUDGE, THERE'S A BIG ARGUMENT GOING ON, ON THIS ISSUE, AND THE ARGUMENT STEMS FROM THIS. RIGHT NOW IN RURAL IOWA THERE ARE MORE NONFARMERS THAN FARMERS, AND THERE ARE SOME PEOPLE WHO SUGGEST THAT IF THE LIVESTOCK INDUSTRY DOESN'T BEGIN TO, FORGIVE ME, "CLEAN UP ITS ACT," THERE'S GOING TO BE PRESSURE THAT COULD DRIVE IT FROM THE STATE. DO YOU WORRY ABOUT THAT?

Judge: YES, I DO. I DO WORRY ABOUT THAT. AS I SAID BEFORE, WE NEED TO FEED LIVESTOCK IN THIS STATE. AND WE DO HAVE A DEMOGRAPHIC SHIFT THAT HAS CHANGED THE FACE OF THE STATE, AND WE'RE GRAPPLING WITH THAT ISSUE. AS I SAID, I'VE BEEN TRYING TO FIND SOLUTIONS TO THIS PROBLEM NOW FOR MORE YEARS THAN I LIKE, AND IT'S VITALLY IMPORTANT THAT WE DO THAT. WE NEED TO FIND THE BALANCE THAT SATISFIES BOTH ENDS OF THIS DISCUSSION.

Glover: MR. DEPEW, YOU'LL HEAR THIS ARGUMENT MADE -- RIGHT NOW IT'S AROUND THE FRINGES OF THE DEBATE -- AND THE ARGUMENT GOES LIKE THIS: WHAT DO WE WANT THE HOG INDUSTRY FOR? IT'S A THIRD WORD INDUSTRY. IT POLLUTES. THE JOBS DON'T PAY VERY WELL. LET'S SHIP IT OFF TO MEXICO WHERE THEY DON'T CARE ABOUT THE ENVIRONMENT. NOW, THAT'S AROUND THE FRINGES OF THE DEBATE. BUT THERE ARE THOSE WHO SUGGEST IN TEN YEARS THAT MAY BE THE DEBATE. WHAT DO YOU THINK ABOUT THAT?

Depew: I THINK THAT IMPLEMENTING LOCAL CONTROL NOW WILL KEEP US FROM GETTING TO THAT POINT. IOWA'S HAD HOGS FOR MANY YEARS, AND IT HASN'T BEEN AN ENVIRONMENT CATASTROPHE, AND IT DOESN'T HAVE TO BE. IT GOES BACK TO WHAT WAS SAID EARLIER ABOUT THE DISTRIBUTION OF THE PIGS AROUND THE STATE, AND LOCAL CONTROL WILL FOSTER MORE RESPONSIBLE PRODUCTION SO WE WON'T HAVE TO FACE THAT. I THINK THERE'S STILL HOPE.

Glover: MR. GROSZKRUGER, DOES THE LIVESTOCK INDUSTRY NEED TO CLEAN UP ITS ACT TO PROTECT ITSELF?

Groszkruger: I THINK THE LIVESTOCK INDUSTRY LUMPED INTO A CATEGORY CALLED AN INDUSTRY DOESN'T NEED TO PROTECT ITSELF; IT'S THAT NEIGHBORS NEED TO BE RESPECTIVE OF THEIR NEIGHBORS.

Glover: MR. TIGNER, WHAT DO YOU THINK?

Tigner: WELL, I THINK THEY NEED TO HELP LIVESTOCK PRODUCERS STAY IN BUSINESS. SINCE 1980 WE'VE SEEN ABOUT 40,000 HOG PRODUCERS IN THE STATE OF IOWA GO OUT OFBUSINESS. THE TREND TOWARDS GOING OUT OF STATE BECAUSE OF REGULATIONS, IT DIDN'T HAPPEN TO THE BEEF INDUSTRY AND IT DIDN'T HAPPEN TO THE CHICKENS. IN THE PAST, THEY LEFT BECAUSE OF CONCENTRATION OF OWNERSHIP OF THE ANIMALS. THEY MOVED THEM TO THE SOUTH AND THE SOUTHWEST, PLACES LIKE THAT, SO IT COULD HAPPEN ANYWAY.

Glover: MR. ASKEW, THERE ARE THOSE WHO SUGGEST THAT WHAT THIS WHOLE ISSUE HASSHOWN IS THAT THIS WHOLE TRADITION OF IOWA NEIGHBORLINESS IS BREAKING DOWN. THIS STATE HAS A TRADITION OF NEIGHBORS HELPING NEIGHBORS, NEIGHBORS BEING NEIGHBORLY, AND THAT MAY BE BREAKING DOWN. IS THAT WHAT'S GOING ON HERE?

Askew: WELL, I DON'T THINK IT'S INITIALLY NEIGHBORS AGAINST NEIGHBORS AT THIS POINT. IT SEEMS THAT'S THE WAY THE DEBATE HAS BEEN FRAMED IN THE LAST TWO YEARS. YOU'VE GOT TO UNDERSTAND, LIVESTOCK IS CRITICAL TO THIS STATE, BECAUSEAS WE GROW CORN AND SOYBEANS, WE'VE GOT TO FEED THEM. IF WE PRODUCE BIODIESEL OR ETHANAL, WE USE THOSE COPRODUCTS TO FEED OUR LIVESTOCK. THAT'S WHY IT'S SO IMPORTANT. WHAT CONCERNS ME IS THAT WE'VE SEEN ANOTHER -- BASICALLY A WASTED OPPORTUNITY FOR THE SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE TO COME OUT AND CREATE SOLUTIONS THAT WORK WELL FOR FARMERS, THAT WORK WELL FOR CITIZENS, AND ADDRESS EACH AND EVERY ONE OF THOSE ISSUES. WE HAVEN'T SEEN THAT IN THE LAST FOUR YEARS.

Glover: LET'S STAY WITH YOU, MR. ASKEW, IF WE COULD FOR JUST A SECOND. CONGRESS APPROVED THIS YEAR AND THE PRESIDENT SIGNED THIS YEAR A BRAND-NEW FARM BILL THAT RETURNS THE SAFETY NET BACK TO FARMING. WOULD YOU HAVE VOTED FOR THAT? IF NO, WHAT'S WRONG WITH IT?

Askew: NO, I WOULDN'T HAVE VOTED FOR IT, AND I'LL TELL YOU WHAT'S WRONG WITH IT. ONE, IT CREATES THIS TREADMILL THAT THEY TELL YOU IN IOWA YOU CAN ONLY GROW CORN AND SOYBEANS. THAT'S IT BECAUSE ONCE YOU STEP OFF THAT TREADMILL, THERE'S NO REASON TO GROW ANY OTHER CROPS BECAUSE YOU WON'T HAVE ANY TYPE OF SUPPORT FROM YOUR FEDERAL GOVERNMENT. THERE'S NO RISK MANAGEMENT TOOLS, LIKE CROP INSURANCE THAT DEAL WITH THESE CROPS AND DIFFERENT TYPES OF -- I GROW WHITE CORN. I GROW ORGANIC ALFALFA. THESE ARE THINGS THAT ARE NOT COVERED. THINGS LIKE POPCORN ARE NOT COVERED UNDER THIS NEW FARM BILL. YOU KNOW, WHY I WOULD NOT VOTE FOR THIS FARM BILL, BECAUSE IT DIDN'T INCLUDE THE BAN ON PACKER OWNERSHIP AND PAYMENT LIMITATIONS. NINETY PERCENT OF THE FARMERS OUT THERE WANT IT. SENATOR GRASSLEY WORKED HARD TO PUT THAT IN THERE, AND SENATOR HARKIN DROPPED THE BALL AT THE LAST MOMENT. I WOULD NOT HAVE VOTED FOR IT.

Glover: LET'S LEAVE THE SENATE ELECTION TO ANOTHER FORUM. SECRETARY JUDGE, LET'S TAKE THE SAME QUESTION TO YOU. THE FARM BILL WAS CONTROVERSIAL IN CONGRESS, BUT THE PRESIDENT SIGNED IT. IT'S CALLED A BILL THAT'S GOOD FOR AMERICA AND GOOD FOR AMERICA'S FARMERS. HOW WOULD A SECRETARY JUDGE HAVE VOTED ON THAT?

Judge: I WOULD HAVE VOTED FOR THE BILL. IN FACT, I WAS VERY MUCH INVOLVED IN OFFERING INPUT ON THE BILL TO CONGRESS THROUGH THE DEPARTMENTS OF AGRICULTURE'S ORGANIZATION. WE GOT A LOT OF WHAT WE WANTED. THAT'S ONE OF THE LESSONS THAT YOU HAVE TO LEARN IN POLITICS ALONG THE WAY, THAT YOU DON'T GET EVERYTHING YOUWANT ALL THE TIME. IT'S KIND OF A TOUGH LESSON FOR ALL OF US. AND I KNOW WE DIDN'T GET A COUPLE OF THINGS WE REALLY WANTED -- THE PAYMENT LIMITATION, THE BAN ON PACKER OWNERSHIP -- BUT THAT IS AN IOWA BILL. AND OVER THE LIFE OF THE BILL, THERE WILL BE MORE DOLLARS DELIVERED TO IOWA THAN ANY OTHER STATE.

Glover: MR. DEPEW, THE SAME QUESTION TO YOU. IT WAS A CONTROVERSIAL FARM BILL. WOULD YOU HAVE VOTED FOR IT?

Depew: I WOULD NOT HAVE. AND ALL THOSE DOLLARS THAT ARE DELIVERED TO IOWA ARE ALSO BEING DELIVERED TO THE LARGE AGRIBUSINESS GIANTS BY SUPPRESSING THE PRICE OF CORN AND SOYBEANS, BECAUSE WE'RE FACING MASSIVE OVERSUPPLY BECAUSE THERE IS NO MODIFICATION FOR DIVERSIFICATION. AND THE PACKER OWNERSHIP BAN WAS MISSING. THE PAYMENT LIMITATION BAN WAS MISSING. THE SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE IN IOWA SHOULD BE A PROPONENT OF IOWA FARMERS AND NEEDS TO MAKE THAT VOCAL FOR THE NATIONAL FARM BILL.

Glover: MR. GROSZKRUGER, HOW WOULD YOU HAVE VOTED ON THIS FARM BILL?

Groszkruger: I WOULD HAVE VOTED NO ON THE FARM BILL BECAUSE IT PROMOTES OVERPRODUCTION BY PAYING PEOPLE TO GROW CORN AND SOYBEANS, FOR ONE THING. AND THE PEOPLE IN TOWN THAT HAVE NO INTEREST IN CORN AND SOYBEANS SHOULDN'T BE STOLEN FROM TO GIVE TO FARMERS. MORALITY SHOULD PLAY A PART.

Glover: MR. TIGNER, WOULD YOU HAVE SUPPORTED OR OPPOSED THE FARM BILL?

Tigner: I WOULD HAVE OPPOSED IT IN ITS PRESENT FORM. IT HAD SOME GOOD POINTS IN IT: INCREASE OF CONSERVATION, INITIATIVES. BUT IT DID NOT HAVE THE PACKER OWNERSHIP BAN IN IT. IT DID NOT HAVE A LIMIT ON PRICE SUPPORTS. IT ALSO DID NOT IMPROVE ANY TRUST LEGISLATION. AND ANOTHER THING THAT IT HAD IN IT WASTHAT QUIP PROGRAM THAT WAS MEANT FOR THE LARGEST HOG PRODUCERS. IF THEY'RE SO EFFICIENT, THEY DON'T NEED THAT MONEY.

Glover: SECRETARY JUDGE, EVERYBODY LIKES TO TALK ABOUT RURAL DEVELOPMENT AND HOW WE'VE GOT TO REVITALIZE THE ECONOMY OF RURAL AMERICA, RURAL IOWA, SMALL TOWNS IN IOWA. DOESN'T THAT REQUIRE A FUNDAMENTAL SHIFT IN MIND-SET, THAT THE PRODUCTION AGRICULTURE MODEL WE'VE GOT RIGHT NOW JUST ISN'T GOING TO WORK ANYMORE, IT'S TIME TO LOOK FOR SOMETHING NEW?

Judge: ABSOLUTELY. WE DO HAVE TO REINVENT THE WHEEL, SO TO SPEAK. AND WE KNOW THAT ONE OF THE WAYS THAT WE DO THAT IS BY ADDING VALUE TO THOSE COMMODITY PRODUCTS THAT WE'RE CREATING HERE IN THE STATE. OUR RURAL COMMUNITIES HAVE -- WERE TRADITIONALLY AND STILL ARE SUPPLIERS FOR AGRICULTURE, AND SO THEY ARE LINKED VERY, VERY CLOSELY TO AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTION. BUT IN ORDER TO CREATE THE JOBS THAT WE NEED IN RURAL IOWA, WE ARE GOING TO HAVE TO ADD VALUE TO THAT BUSHEL OF CORN AND THAT BUSHEL OF SOYBEANS RIGHT THERE IN THE RURAL COMMUNITY.

Glover: MR. DEPEW, DO WE HAVE TO CHANGE THE WAY WE THINK ABOUT THIS?

Depew: I THINK SO. FIRST AND FOREMOST COMES TO MIND, LOCAL FOOD, A GREAT WAY TO STIMULATE THE LOCAL ECONOMY. AGAIN, LOCAL CONTROL COMES UP. WITHOUT THOSE KINDS OF THINGS, WITHOUT CONTROLS OVER THE HOG INDUSTRY, WE WON'T HAVE A RURAL ECONOMY LEFT. I GUESS I THINK WE SHOULD TAKE SOME OF THAT MONEY THAT'S IN THE FARM BILL AND APPLY IT TOWARDS THESE OTHER THINGS TO ASSIST RURAL DEVELOPMENT.

Glover: MR. GROSZKRUGER, DO WE HAVE TO FUNDAMENTALLY CHANGE THE WAY WE THINK ABOUT RURAL DEVELOPMENT?

Groszkruger: WE COULD GO BACK TO THE WAY RURAL DEVELOPMENT BEGAN IN THE FIRST PLACE, TO WHEN PEOPLE, IF THEY SAW A MARKET, THEY'D PRODUCE FOR THAT MARKET. WHEN I HEAR PEOPLE SAY THAT WE SHOULD PROMOTE, WE SHOULD THIS, WE SHOULD DO THAT, WHAT IT ALWAYS BRINGS TO MIND TO ME IS THE GOVERNMENT STICKING THEIR HAND IN SOME SOMEBODY'S POCKET TO PROMOTE SOMEBODY ELSE'S AGENDA.

Glover: MR. TIGNER, DOES IT REQUIRE A FUNDAMENTAL RETHINKING OF HOW WE DEVELOP RURAL ECONOMIES?

Tigner: YES, IT DOES. WE CAN LOOK AT THINGS LIKE THOSE LOCAL FOOD SYSTEMS, FARMER OWNED PROCESSING FACILITIES. WE NEED TO THINK ABOUT TAKING CARE OF OUR OWN COMMUNITIES AND THE PEOPLE IN THEM, TAKING CARE OF OUR FAMILIES IN THEM FIRST. AND THEN ONCE WE'RE ABLE TO PROVIDE FOR OTHERS, THEN WE CAN HELP FEED THEM TOO. WE HAVE TO TAKE CARE OF OURSELVES FIRST AND FOREMOST.

Glover: MR. ASKEW, THIS WHOLE PRODUCTION MODEL OF -- PRODUCTION AGRICULTURE MODEL OF RURAL ECONOMIES, DO WE HAVE TO, IN THE WORDS OF STEVE FORBES, "DRIVE THE STAKE THROUGH THE HEART AND BURY IT SO IT NEVER RISES AGAIN"?

Askew: I DON'T THINK YOU HAVE TO BURY IT WHOLESALE. WHAT YOU NEED TO DO -- THE PROBLEM IS RIGHT NOW WE'RE NOT RAISING THE REVENUE OUT THERE TO BE ABLE TO SUPPORT THOSE SCHOOLS, THOSE SMALL TOWNS, THE JOBS, THE BUSINESSES IN THOSE TOWNS. WE NEED OPPORTUNITIES TO CREATE EITHER -- TO DIVERSIFY INTO DIFFERENT CROPS, TO CREATE THE PROCESSING PLANTS LIKE WE'VE DONE DOWN IN HAMBURG, IOWA, WITH QUALITY IOWA MAIZE, AND PUTTING VALUE INTO CORN AND SHIPPING IT ACROSS THE WORLD. YOU'VE GOT TO BE ABLE TO PROVIDE SOME OPPORTUNITIES, AND WHETHER ITS LOCAL FOOD SYSTEMS, WHETHER IT BE GROWING ORGANIC, GROWING REGULAR, BUT ALSO WE'RE LOOKING AT A NEW TYPE OF DIVERSITY OUT THERE. THAT'S WHAT'S EXCITING ABOUT AGRICULTURE NOW. IT'S NOT BACK TO THE '50S AND '60S TYPE OF DIVERSITY. IT'S A NEW TYPE. IT'S PUTTING -- HAVING MONEY IN BIOFUELS INVESTMENTS, IN PRODUCING DIFFERENT TYPES OF CROPS, LOOKING AT HOW YOU PRODUCE A FINISHED PRODUCT. THAT'S WHAT WE NEED TO CHANGE, AND THAT'S WHAT WE WANT TO TRY TO DO WITH THIS ADMINISTRATION.

Glover: MR. ASKEW, LET'S SAY WITH YOU FOR JUST A SECOND BECAUSE I'D LIKE TO STAY ON THAT TOPIC, BECAUSE I THINK IT'S AN IMPORTANT ONE FOR RURAL IOWA. IS RURAL IOWA READY FOR THIS NEW MIND-SET, THIS CHANGE IN THE WAY WE THINK ABOUT HOW THE RURAL ECONOMY HAS DEVELOPED? WHAT'S THE ROLE OF THE AGRICULTURE SECRETARY IN HELPING THEM MAKE THAT SHIFT?

Askew: YOU KNOW, I THINK HALF THE RURAL COMMUNITY IS READY AND THE OTHER HALF IS NOT. YOU KNOW, THE AVERAGE AGE OF A FARMER RIGHT NOW IS 58 YEARS OLD. BY 58, YOU'RE PRETTY WELL SET IN YOUR WAYS IN A LOT OF DIFFERENT THINGS. BUT IF WE WANT TO GET NEW PEOPLE IN -- IF WE WANT TO GET YOUNG PEOPLE BACK IN AGRICULTURE, WE NEED TO PROVIDE THE OPPORTUNITIES. WHAT A DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SHOULDDO IS, ONE, BE A SPOKESMAN FOR AGRICULTURE, WHATEVER TYPE IT IS, WHETHER IT'S ORGANIC, WHETHER IT'S BIOTECH, WHATEVER IT IS THAT WE CAN GROW HERE. WE NEED TO SHOW THAT WE HAVE A SAFE AND SECURE FOOD SYSTEM IN THIS STATE AND THAT ANYTHINGTHAT HAPPENS IN THIS STATE IS GOING TO BE PROVIDED TO OUR CUSTOMER AT THE END KNOWING THAT IT'S SAFE AND SECURE. AND THEN WE CAN START CREATING A WHOLE NEW ENVIRONMENT OUT THERE.

Glover: SECRETARY JUDGE, THE SAME QUESTION TO YOU. IS RURAL IOWA READY FOR THIS CHANGE, AND WHAT CAN YOU AS SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE DO TO FACILITATE THATMIND-SET?

Judge: I BELIEVE RURAL IOWA IS READY FOR THE CHANGE, MIKE. WHEN I WAS FIRST ELECTED TO THE SENATE IN 1992, I CAN REMEMBER TALKING -- GOING THERE AND BEING VERY EXCITED IN TALKING TO SOME OF THE SEASONED VETERANS OF THE IOWA SENATE ABOUT ADDING IOWA VALUE AS A MEANS OF STABILIZING RURAL COMMUNITIES AND BEING TOLD, KIND OF, "WE TRIED THAT LAST YEAR AND IT DIDN'T WORK." NOW TEN YEARSLATER I THINK WE ARE AT THAT POINT WHERE PEOPLE UNDERSTAND THE CONCEPT, PEOPLE ARE EXCITED ABOUT IT AND ARE STARTING TO ADOPT THAT -- THE NEEDED TOOLS TO MAKE THOSE CHANGES. WHAT CAN THE SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE DO? WE HAVE BEEN TIRELESS ADVOCATES OF ADDING VALUE, TIRELESS ADVOCATES OF CREATING JOBS IN RURAL COMMUNITIES. IN THE LAST FOUR YEARS, WE'VE SEEN 12 FARMER-OWNED ETHANOL PLANTS; WE HAVE A NEW BIODIESEL PLANT IN RALSTON, IOWA; WE HAVE A THOUSAND PEOPLE PROCESSING TURKEYS IN A PLANT IN WEST LIBERTY THAT'S OWNED BY TURKEY PRODUCERS; THE CATTLEMEN ARE GOING TO OPEN A NEW BEEF PROCESSING PLANT IN TAMA. THE MODEL IS BEING ADOPTED ACROSS THE STATE.

Glover: MR. DEPEW, DO YOU THINK RURAL IOWA IS READY FOR THE CHANGE?

Depew: EVERYBODY I GET OUT AND TALK TO UNDERSTANDS WHAT'S FUNDAMENTALLY WRONG. OUR SCHOOLS ARE DYING. OUR TOWNS ARE DYING. WE CAN'T LET THAT CONTINUE. BUT WE'RE GOING TO NEED SOME REALLY STRONG LEADERSHIP TO TURN USAROUND, BECAUSE I'M AFRAID WE'RE GOING THE WRONG WAY DOWN THE ROAD.

Glover: MR. GROSZKRUGER, YOU'RE FROM A RURAL PART OF THE STATE. DO YOU THINK THE PEOPLE ARE READY FOR THIS KIND OF A CHANGE? THE PEOPLE YOU TALK TO DAILY, ARE THEY READY?

Groszkruger: YEAH, THEY'RE READY. WE'VE GOT SEVERAL PEOPLE IN OUR NEIGHBORHOOD THAT ARE CUSTOM FEEDING HOGS RIGHT NOW. THAT'S KEEPING THEM ON THE LAND, AND THEY'RE DOING IT IN A RESPONSIBLE WAY. WE OURSELVES ARE GROWING SOME WILD FLOWERS FOR SEED, WHICH I HAPPEN TO NOTICE AFTER I SPENT MANY HOURS WEEDING THAT THE STATE IS DOING THAT TOO. I DON'T THINK MY NEIGHBOR WANTS TO COMPETE WITH ME IN THE WILD FLOWER SEED BUSINESS, AND I DON'T THINK THE STATE SHOULD BE INVOLVED IN IT EITHER, ALONG WITH ANY OTHER PUBLIC PROMOTION OF PRIVATE ENTERPRISE.

Glover: MR. TIGNER, WHAT DO YOU THINK? DO YOU THINK PEOPLE ARE READY FOR THIS KIND OF A FUNDAMENTAL RETHINKING OF THE WAY WE DO BUSINESS?

Tigner: OH, DEFINITELY. I RAN FOUR YEARS AGO AND VISITED A LOT OF COMMUNITIES, AND I'M RUNNING AGAIN THIS TIME. AND I'VE HEARD THE SAME THING FROM PEOPLE: WE NEED TO FIND WAYS SO WE CAN MAKE A GOOD LIVING, STAY IN OUR COMMUNITIES, AND RAISE OR FAMILIES. THEY'RE LOOKING FOR THAT. THEY NEED GOOD LEADERSHIP THAT WILL HELP THEM ACHIEVE THAT.

Glover: MR. ASKEW, THIS IS A TERRIBLE THING TO ASK CANDIDATES WHO ARE RUNNINGFOR A POLITICAL OFFICE, BUT THERE'S BEEN A DEBATE ABOUT WHETHER THE SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE SHOULD EVEN BE AN ELECTIVE OFFICE. WHAT'S YOUR VIEW ON THAT?

Askew: WELL, I THINK THROUGH MANY YEARS WE'VE WONDERED WHAT THE SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE HAS DONE. IN FACT, AS I GO AROUND THE STATE, PEOPLE ASK ME, "WHAT DOES THE SECRETARY DO?" I SAY IT'S MUCH MORE THAN JUST DELI SCALES AND GASPUMPS, IS WHERE THEY SEE THE SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE'S MARK AT THIS POINT. IT'S GOT TO BE A DEPARTMENT OF VISION. UNTIL WE MAKE IT A DEPARTMENT OF VISION THAT WE'VE GOT AN IDEA WHERE WE NEED TO GO, WHERE WE'RE TAKING THE FARMERS, WHERE THE OPPORTUNITIES ARE, AND HOW DO WE ADDRESS THOSE AIR QUALITY, WATER QUALITY -- ALL THOSE ISSUES IN THE STATE OF IOWA FOR THE CITIZENS AND KEEPING FAMILIES ON THE FARM, THEN WE'VE GOT A BIG JOB AHEAD OF US, AND WE'RE GOING TO MAKE IT DO IT.

Glover: SECRETARY JUDGE, THE SAME QUESTION TO YOU. YOU'RE RUNNING FOR THE OFFICE PRETTY HARD, BUT THERE'S BEEN A DEBATE ABOUT WHETHER IT SHOULD BE APPOINTED SO THE GOVERNOR AND THE SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE CAN WORK TOGETHER TO PROMOTE AGRICULTURE.

Judge: I HAVE BELIEVED FOR A LONG TIME THAT IT IS IMPORTANT THAT THIS PARTICULAR OFFICE REMAIN AN ELECTED OFFICE. IT IS IMPORTANT TO AGRICULTURE. IT IS IMPORTANT TO THE STATE ECONOMY THAT THE SECRETARY'S VOICE BE AN INDEPENDENT VOICE, AND SOMETIMES WE DON'T HAVE TO AGREE IF THAT'S -- IF THAT'S IN THE BEST INTEREST OF THE FARMERS OF THIS STATE.

Glover: MR. DEPEW, THE SAME QUESTION TO YOU: APPOINTIVE OR ELECTIVE?

Depew: WELL, FIRST I THINK IT'S TROUBLESOME THAT SOME PEOPLE WOULD THINK THAT WE SHOULD GET RID OF THE SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE. BUT IF THEY'D NEVER HEARD ANYTHING OUT OF THE DEPARTMENT EITHER, I SUPPOSE I WOULD WONDER MYSELF.

Glover: MR. GROSZKRUGER, TO YOU. ELECTIVE OR APPOINTIVE?

Groszkruger: I THINK IT SHOULD BE APPOINTED TOO. IT SEEMS LIKE JUST A BASIC JOB OF REGULATING DELI SCALES AND GAS PUMPS, TO ME. EVERYTHING ELSE CAN BE DONE BY PRIVATE ENTERPRISE.

Glover: MR. TIGNER, I HATE TO ASK A CANDIDATE WHO'S RUNNING FOR OFFICE THE QUESTION, BUT SHOULD IT BE APPOINTIVE? SHOULD THE GOVERNOR APPOINT IT?

Tigner: NO, IT SHOULDN'T BECAUSE APPOINTED, BECAUSE THEN IT WOULD BE USED FOR POLITICAL PURPOSES FOR WHICHEVER PARTY WAS IN POWER. AND I BELIEVE THAT SINCE OUR ECONOMY OF THE STATE SO DEPENDS ON AGRICULTURE, THERE'S A LOT GOING ON THERE AND WE NEED TO KEEP IT ELECTED.

Glover: THANK YOU. AND THERE'S A LOT GOING ON HERE, LIKE NO MORE TIME LEFT. I'M SORRY BUT WE'RE OUT OF TIME. THANKS TO EACH OF YOU FOR YOUR PERSPECTIVES ON THE CAMPAIGN OF 2002.AS INDICATED EARLIER, THIS EVENING'S PROGRAM IS THE SECOND OF FIVE CANDIDATE FORUMS THIS WEEK ON STATEWIDE IOWA PUBLIC TELEVISION. LAST NIGHT WE FEATURED CANDIDATES SEEKING TO BECOME IOWA SECRETARY OF STATE AND AUDITOR OF IOWA, AND TONIGHT WE FEATURED CANDIDATES SEEKING TO BECOME IOWA SECRETARY OF AGRICULTURE. TOMORROW EVENING, LIVE AT 6:30 P.M., WE WELCOME THE THREE CANDIDATES SEEKING TO BECOME ATTORNEY GENERAL OF IOWA AND THREE CANDIDATES ON THE BALLOT FOR TREASURER OF IOWA. THE POLICY AND POLITICS OF THOSE CAMPAIGNS WILL BE DISCUSSED, AND I HOPE YOU'LL JOIN US. WE'RE HERE THIS WEEK, MONDAY THROUGH THURSDAY, LIVE AT 6:30 P.M., WITH "CAMPAIGN 2002," HERE ON STATEWIDE IOWA PUBLIC TELEVISION. I'M MIKE GLOVER OF THE "ASSOCIATED PRESS." THANKS FOR JOINING US.

FUNDING FOR THIS PROGRAM WAS PROVIDED BY "FRIENDS," THE IOWA PUBLIC TELEVISION FOUNDATION... GENERATIONS OF FAMILIES AND FRIENDS WHO FEEL PASSIONATELY ABOUT THE PROGRAMS THEY WATCH ON IOWA PUBLIC TELEVISION.


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