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DESIGN SQUAD Contest Winner Brings Recyclable Shelter ...

posted on February 19, 2009

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www.pbskidsgo.org/designsquad PBS KIDS GO!'s hit TV series Design Squad teamed up with the Intel Foundation to challenge kids across the country to enter the recycle-themed "Trash to Treasure" competition. Max Wallack, 12, won the Intel sponsored $10,000 grand prize for his Home Dome invention, which is largely made from discarded plastic and provides temporary shelter to the homeless and displaced victims of natural disasters. Max spent a day at Continuum, a design and innovation consultancy building a full-scale version of the Home Dome with Continuum’s Richard Ciccarelli, director of their model shop and Design Squad host Nate Ball who helped collaborate with Max to take his idea of an easy-to-build and efficient shelter for the homeless to the next level.

Borrowing from the hugely popular reality competition format, DESIGN SQUAD is aimed at kids and people of all ages who like reality or how-to television. Its goal is to get viewers excited about engineering!

Over 13 episodes, eight high school contestants tackle engineering challenges for an actual client -- from building a machine that makes pancakes to a "summer sled" for LL Bean. In the final episode, the top two scorers battle for the Grand Prize-- a $10,000 college scholarship from the Intel® Foundation. Check your local listings to find out when you can watch DESIGN SQUAD on your local PBS station.

For more about Max’s invention go to pbskids.org/designsquad/specia... For more about DESIGN SQUAD, ...


Tags: design education engineering inventions kids PBS PBS Kids plastic recycling