Iowa Public Television

 

Market to Market July 2, 2010 (#3544)


Ethanol interests call on Congress to extend the blenders credit. The Food and Drug Administration questions the use of antibiotics in livestock feed. And the latest reports on grain stocks and planted acreage spark a rally in the corn pit. We examine the market impact of these and other developments with Alan Brugler. (27:46)

Tags: agriculture biofuels corn credit drugs ethanol FDA food grain livestock markets renewable fuels Wall Street

In the News

  • States Ease Food Safety Rules for Homemade Goods
    (Jul 2, 2010) MILWAUKEE (AP) -- At Wisconsin farmers markets, vendors no longer need licenses to sell pickles, jams and other canned foods, while small farmers in Maine can sell slaughtered chickens without worrying about inspections.
  • California Lawmakers Revise OT Rules for Farm Workers
    (Jul 2, 2010) SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) - California lawmakers Thursday sent Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger a bill that would require farmers to pay overtime to field hands after they work eight hours in a day, ending a nearly 70-year exemption for the state's largest...
  • Scientists Predict Gulf 'Dead Zone' Will Be Larger Than Average
    (Jul 2, 2010) NEW ORLEANS (AP) — Researchers predict the Gulf of Mexico "dead zone," an underwater area with little or no oxygen, will be unusually large this year.
  • Irrigation Wells Leave Klamath Basin Town Without Water
    (Jul 2, 2010) MERRILL (AP) - The Klamath Basin town of Merrill is without water until the weekend.
  • Report Says Ag Research Too Focused on Food Production
    (Jul 2, 2010) CHAMPAIGN, Ill (AP) — American farmers are producing more food than ever, but agricultural research is too focused on increasing production and needs to do better at considering consequences such as water and air pollution, according to a report...
  • Farmers Cropping Up On Facebook and Twitter
    (Jul 2, 2010) DENAIR, Calif (AP) - When a video of dairy cows being punched and prodded with pitchforks was recently released by an animal rights group, it made the rounds on YouTube and generated the expected angry responses.