Iowa Public Television

 

Market to Market January 3, 2014 (#3919)


In the wake of oil train explosions in North Dakota and Canada, the federal government issues a warning for first responders. Critics blast the Obama Administration’s commitment to clean coal. Unmanned aerial vehicles raise hopes, and perspectives, for the next generation of farmers. Market analysis with Elaine Kub. (27:43)

Tags: agriculture business Clean coal drones Elaine Kub farmers farming markets news

In the News

  • Colorado's Fledgling Pot Shops Face New Normal
    (Jan 3, 2014) Retail marijuana is being heavily taxed, with a 10 percent tax per sale and a 15 percent excise tax based on the average market rate of the drug. Colorado has projected $67 million in annual marijuana tax revenue.
  • USDA Allows More Meat, Grains In School Lunches
    (Jan 3, 2014) Guidelines restricting portion size were originally intended to combat childhood obesity, but many parents complained their kids weren't getting enough to eat.
  • Original Cheerios To Go GMO-Free
    (Jan 3, 2014) The change comes after the group Green America started a campaign called GMO Inside asking General Mills to make Cheerios GMO-free
  • After 20 Years NAFTA Hasn't Closed Mexico Wage Gap
    (Jan 3, 2014) While it changed the country in some fundamental ways, the treaty never met many of its sweeping promises to close Mexico's wage gap with the United States.
  • Chinese Official: Soil Pollution Hurts Farming
    (Jan 3, 2014) Farmers already are prohibited from raising crops for human consumption in areas across China that are deemed too badly polluted. But tainted rice and other crops have made their way into the food supply.
  • Defined By Critics, Agriculture Restarts Conversation
    (Jan 3, 2014) Slow to respond and often defensive, farmers and others in agribusiness have for several years let critics define the public debate and influence consumers. Now, the industry is trying to push farmers and businesses to fight back.
  • USDA Opens Door To New Herbicide-Resistant Seeds
    (Jan 3, 2014) The herbicide has had limited use in corn and soybean farming because it becomes toxic to the plants early in their growth. The new seeds would allow farmers to use 2,4-D throughout the plants' lives.