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Living in Iowa

Andy Williams (#914)

The normally reticent Andy Williams granted an exclusive interview to Living in Iowa host Morgan Halgren and producer Nancy Heather upon his first return to his hometown of Wall Lake since the age of seven. Heather chose the house in which Williams was born to do the interview, which naturally led to many fond memories. 'We basically honed in on what happened in this house, their family life,' Heather said of the interview with Andy and his three 'rambunctious' brothers. 'They were so fun.' The tight harmonies of Andy and his brothers led to the formation of the Williams Brothers quartet. 'They listened to other groups,' Heather says. They had no professional arranger. Their Dad would tape the (radio) shows and by the next day they'd be singing those songs.' Williams' first trip back to his hometown was prompted by the efforts of the community to refurbish his boyhood home. The other brothers, too, were touched by Wall Lake's efforts, which fostered in them a sense of belonging. 'They love Wall Lake,' Heather said. 'For Andy, he said it was the place where he could think of having roots.' [28 minutes] Closed Captioning

This episode has not aired in the past few months on Iowa Public Television.

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  • Episode #801

    Feature #1: R.A.G.B.R.A.I. Special Feature #1: Feature title FOR AIR: RAGBRAI XXV Producer: Chris Gourley Contact: Gourley Phone: 242-3188 Des Moines Register Newspaper Contact: Jim Green Phone: (515)248-8285 Storyline: For 25 years The Des Moines Register has sponsored a bicycle ride that crosses the state of Iowa from the Missouri River to the Mississippi. The bike ride known as RAGBRAI (the Registers Annual Great Bike Ride Across Iowa) has grown from 300 riders in its first year to over 15,000 riders this year that came from all 50 states and 14 different foreign countries. Riders ranged in age this year from 4 to 81, which is testament to the fact that RAGBRAI is for everyone. We cover the ride from the dipping of the back tire in the Missouri river to the final day where front tires are dipped in the Mississippi river. Along the way we see Iowa from the seat of a bicycle, take a look at some past RAGBRAI's, and talk to people on this years ride what makes RAGBRAI so popular. RAGBRAI XXV is set to music by musicians from the state of Iowa. Music by; James McNear Jr., Gayla Drake Paul, Bo Ramsey, Jeff Burak, Rob Lumbard, and Paul Micich. Please note RAGBRAI XXV runs 55:21 and Iowa Public Television is offering it for sale on VHS tape. Phone response: None [55 minutes]

  • Episode #803

    Feature #1: 'Better Than 1,' Rudy the 2-headed Piglet. Feature #2: 'Softball,' Bill Hyland, 73-year-old softball player. Feature #3: 'Greetings,' Linda Pratt, greeting card artist. Feature #1: Better Than 1 Producer: Marlin Schram Contact: Vicki & Scott Vorwald Phone: (319)928-7176 Address: 305 W. Union, Edgewood, IA 52042 Storyline: All manner of media are doing a double take when they feature Rudy the two-headed piglet from Edgewood. Rudy has been in the news and on TV across the nation and even hamming it up in Hollywood on the Leeza show which aired on October 22nd. Scott and Vicki Vorwald have painstakingly raised this unusual critter in a playpen instead of a pigpen. Find out how everyone is rooting for Rudy and how it's changed the Vorwald family. Phone response: You know you're in Iowa when... Feature #2: Producer: Jack Shepard Contact: Bill Hyland Phone: (515)277-6972 Address: 1521 62nd St. Des Moines, IA 50310 Storyline: Even though baseball's popularity has waned in recent years, softball is more popular than ever. But what happens to softball players when they are considered 'over the hill?' While many turn to physically-less demanding sports like golf, others have shown their determination to play on - in a 50-and-over league of their own. The story centers on 73-year-old Bill Hyland, former DSM Dowling prep star, former NY Yankees minor league ball player who's still enjoying his favorite sport. Bill says playing the game makes him feel young - and there's a video montage to the tune 'Young at Heart.' Feature #3: Greetings Producer: heather Contact: Linda Pratt Phone: (319)294-2745 Address: 4104 Treeline Court NE, Cedar Rapids, Iowa 52411 (fyi she moved after we shot and produced this feature) Storyline: In the age of e-mail, there's one Iowa woman who's bucking the trend. She has recently begun a career as a greeting card artist. We discovered Linda Pratt in her Dubuque [29 minutes]

  • Episode #804

    Feature #1: 'In a Nutshell,' Acorn Feed Store sells feed with a little live music. Feature #2: 'Swiss Family Jurgensen,' Giant treehouse near Marshalltown. Feature #3: 'Puttin' on the Patina,' Nick Klepinger's bronze statues in Pella. Feature #1: Feature title: 'In A Nutshell' Producer: Laurel Bower Contact: Dave and Harry Fronk Phone: (712) 325-9282 Address: 329 16th Ave Council Bluffs, IA Storyline: The Acorn Feed Store has been open nearly 14 years. The store was opened by father and son, Harry and Dave Fronk. It started out as a feed and supply company, but when Harry started taking guitar lessons with his buddies, it became a tradition for people to gather and play music right there in the store. Every Saturday, people come to play in these jam sessions. They come from all over, several are locals, but visitors from out-of-state and even other countries come often to play music as well. It is a family oriented place with animals, antiques, nice people, and music. It's fun for the whole family and a great place for musicians of all sorts, no matter what their talent, etc. It has never been publicized, people just come by word of mouth. Phone response: Sing your favorite childhood song. Feature #2: Feature title: 'Swiss Family Jurgensen' Producer: Jack Shepard Contact: Mick Jurgensen Phone: 515-752-5756 Address: 1906 S. 5th Ave. Marshalltown, IA 50158 (w) 515-754-1070 Storyline: Mick Jurgensen is a grade school principal whose hobby over the last 14 years has been building a treehouse in his grandmother's backyard. It all started out as an idea for a deck, which his grandfather nixed, so Mick decided to hook the deck to the tree. 14 years later, it consists of 10 levels, climbs 55 ft. into the Maple tree, and covers 5000 sq. ft. It's been a family project, with his mother and wife helping with construction, and his grandmother leading tours. dog.' Feature #3: Feature title: 'Puttin' on the Patina' Producer: Pat Oswald [29 minutes]

  • Episode #805

    Feature #1: 'Core of Discovery,' Ken Burns publicity tour for Lewis & Clark. Feature #2: 'Takin' the T Train,' Thomas The Tank train engine comes to Boone. Feature #3: 'The Art of Junk,' Ben Britton creates metal sculpture out of junk. Feature #1: Feature title: The Core of Discovery Producer: Nikki Tundel Contact: Blair Chicoine (Chkwin) Phone: (712)279-4840 Storyline: We'll follow in the waves of Lewis and Clark as we meet up with the creators of this year's PBS documentary 'Lewis and Clark: The Journey of the Corps of Discovery.' We'll sit down with Ken Burns, documentarian and creator of 'The Civil War' and 'Baseball', as well as Dayton Duncan, an Iowa native, historian and author, who worked alongside Burns to create this look back at the quintessential American camping trip. We caught up with the two filmmakers in Sioux City as they retraced the trail of Lewis and Clark and found out just what attracted these two men to the story of Lewis and Clark. Burns and Duncan will lead us beyond the classroom history lessons to find out why Lewis and Clark are so important to our past and our future. We'll also visit with Sioux City's Blair Chicoine, a history buff, reenactor and Lewis and Clark enthusiast, who feels his study of Lewis and Clark is his own exploration into the unknown. And, once you've gone behind the scenes with 'Living in Iowa', you can catch a special encore presentation of the Lewis and Clark documentary on December 9 and 10 on IPTV. Phone response: What is your best marital advise? Feature #2: Feature title: Takin' the T Train Producer: Nancy Heather Contact: Boone and Scenic Valley Railroad Phone: (800)626-0319 Address: 11th & Division, Boone, IA 50036 (Fenner Stevenson General Manager) Storyline: Take the 't' train with about 8000 of your closest friends this week as Living In Iowa rides the rails with a tv megastar: Thomas the Tank. If you're not familiar with Thomas, you're either not cool, or you're not a pre-schoole [29 minutes]

  • Episode #806

    Feature #1: 'Tireless Tractors,' the Great Iowa Tractor Ride across central Iowa. Feature #2: 'Shep,' a wise, veteran sheep herding dog. Feature #3: 'Proprietors of the Past,' Art and Ermadene Dickey at the general store at Living History Farms. Feature #1: Feature title: Tireless Tractors Producer: Nikki Tundel Contact: Frank Jones Phone: (515)462-3251 Address: 503 E. Buchanan, Winterset Storyline: Come for a spin on the Great Iowa Tractor Ride - it's RAGBRAI without all the sore muscles as we take a tractor trek across central Iowa. Join over 130 antique tractor enthusiasts for a 3 day travelling tractor show - rolling from Grinnell to downtown Des Moines at speeds of 10 miles an hour. It's a chance to climb up onto these vintage vehicles and see just what cultivates such a passion in their proud owners. We'll also meet Frank Jones of Winterset - who restored a 1941 John Deere for the event. Phone response: What word or phrase is overused? Feature #2: Feature title: 'Shep' Producer: Jack Shepard Contact: Dave Lensing Phone: (515)342-4456 Address: 2308 Scott St. New Virginia, IA 50210 (w) 270-6900 Storyline: Dave Lensing is a stock dog trainer who trains Border Collies for sheep dog trials at, for example, the Iowa State Fair. Shep was his first of more than a dozen Border Collies he's trained. The 8-year-old Shep is a wise, veteran sheep herding dog. Dave discusses the intelligence of the dogs, the fact that they are bred for herding, while a sheep dog trainer is not and therefore needs as much or more training. 'You should never think you know more than the dog,' he says. 'The how-to part of sheep herding should be left up to the dog.' Feature #3: Feature title: Proprietors of the Past Producer: Marlin Schram Contact: Living History Farms Phone: 278-5286 Address: Urbandale, IA Storyline: An era ends at the general store at Living History Farms with the retirement of Ermadene [29 minutes]

  • Episode #807

    Feature #1: Tim Britton and Carol Hunner sing 'Brightest and Best.' Feature #2: Gayla Drake Paul sings 'We Three Kings' Feature #3: Christmas in July? Feature #4: James McNear plays 'Go Tell It On The Mountain. ' Feature #5 Morgan sings 'Let it Snow' accompanied by Jamie Poulson on piano Feature #6 Tim Britton and Carol Hunner sing 'The Frost is over, Mick Cumbaw O'Sullivan.' Close: The sights and sounds of Indianola gers singing 'Comfort and Joy.' Phone response: NO PHONE THIS WEEK Feature #1: Carol Hunner plays acoustic guitar and Tim Britton plays flute on their performance of 'Brightest and Best'. Carol Hunner is Tim Britton are from Fairfield. Feature #2: Gayla Drake Paul plays 'We Three Kings'. Feature #3: Christmas in July? Morgan tries to find the Christmas spirit in the hottest month of the year. Feature #4 James McNear and friends perform the old favorite gospel tune 'Go Tell It On The Mountain.' James McNear is from Des Moines. Feature #5 Morgan sings 'Let it Snow.' Jamie Poulson on the Piano is from Des Moines Feature #6 Tim Britton and Carol Hunner perform a medley 'The Frost Is Over and Mick Cumbaw O'Sullivan.' Carol plays guitar and Tim plays the Uilleann. Close: The sights and sounds of Indianola annual 'Dickens of a Christmas Phone # 1-800-383-6124 This week's question: No phone. [29 minutes]

  • Episode #808

    Feature #1: John Gaps III, Associated Press Photographer. Feature #2: Monica Leo, Eulenspiegel Puppets. Feature #3: Nick Ackerman, Amputee High School Wrestler. Feature #1: Feature title: John Gaps III, AP photographer Producer: Nikki Tundel Contact: John Gaps Phone: 243-3281 Address: Insurance Exchange Building, 505 5th Ave. Suite 1000, DSM 50309-2315 Storyline: When John Gaps III was in high school, he decided he wanted to take pictures for a living. In college, he learned the key to being a photographer: always point your camera at something that matters. For the last 12 years, John has been a combat photographer for the Associated Press. Although he's based in Des Moines, he's pointed his camera at scenes from Somalia to Bosnia, the Occupied Territories to the deserts of the Gulf War. We'll take a look at the world from John's point of view and hear what it's like to find yourself in the middle of the world's most violent and poverty stricken areas - and what it's like to then return to middle class, middle America. We'll sit down with John and talk about death, violence, poetry and passion - as we take a look at the world through this Iowa photographer's lens. Phone response: What were the best and worst things of 1997? Feature #2: Feature title: Monica Leo, Eulenspiegel Puppets Producer: Nancy Heather Contact: Monica Leo Phone: (319)627-2487 (messages) Address: 5691 Sioux Ave. SE, Iowa City, IA, 52240-8240 (home) Owl Glass Puppetry Center, West Liberty, IA agent: 515-347-5651 (Afton) home: (319)341-9555 mornings Afton Elem. School, Dave Turner, Principal: (515)347-8774 or 5411 Afton Elem. fax #: (515)347-5514 Storyline: Enter the imaginative world of Monica Leo, half of Iowa's Eulenspiegel Puppetry team. She claims she has the world on a string because she's doing what she loves: making puppets, and playing with them! She and her puppet partner, T.J. Breitbach, teach us about paper mache'and the zen of playtime, this week on Living In Io [29 minutes]

  • Episode #809

    Feature #1: 'Going Under,' Cold Water Cave & Wonder Cave Exploration. Feature #2: 'First Class Murals,' Post Office Murals from the Great Depression Era. Feature #1: Feature title: 'Going Under' Producer: Marlin Schram Contact: See Producer Storyline: Morgan Halgren explores two caves in Northeast Iowa near Decorah with members of the Iowa Grotto, a local chapter of the National Speleological Society. Cold Water Cave is probably the largest cave in Iowa and gets its name because cold water is constantly running through it. The cave also has several large speleothems which are mineral deposit formations such as flowstones, stalactites and stalagmites. Another smaller but beautifully decorated cave is Wonder Cave, which used to be open to the public but now the Iowa Grotto members are removing old stairways and railings to return the cave to its natural state. The groups goals are conservation and safety. Phone response: Sing your favorite commercial jingle. Feature #2: Feature title: 'First Class Murals' Producer: Marlin Schram Contact: See Producer Storyline: The 'New Deal' was President Franklin Roosevelt's plan to cure the Great Depression during the 1930's. To help relieve the economic pressures of high unemployment, the W.P.A., Works Progress Administration was formed to hire workers for public building projects. Murals in many Iowa towns still remain in Post Offices, Public Buildings and Schools. Most have a distinctive style of the era. Government programs kept many young Iowa artists busy during a decade that might have been an artistic desert but it turned out to be one of the most fruitful in the development of American art. We interviewed artist John Bloom from Davenport and Lee Allen from Iowa City as they talked about their experience working with Grant Wood and discussed their artistic careers during the Depression. This is an opportunity to see little known works of art from 50 years ago that belong to rural Iowa communities. For inq [29 minutes]

  • Episode #810

    Feature #1: 'Joel West,' male supermodel from Indianola. Feature #3: 'Jack Becker,' woodcarver whose work has become signature of the town of Dyersville. Feature #2 'Lands of Langland's,' Living In Iowa walks the land of poet Joseph Langland's childhood with a true Iowa son. Feature #1: Feature title: 'Joel West Young Man' Producer: Chris Gourley Contact: See Producer Storyline: What do the streets of Indianola have in common to fashion runways in Milan and Paris? We'll find out when Joel West tells us how he made the transformation from an Iowa farm boy to international super model. We'll look at photographs taken of and by Joel, he'll share his dreams of the future with us, and we'll learn what it is that keeps bringing him home to Iowa. Phone response: If you could rid the world of one thing, what would it be? Feature #2 Feature title: Lands of Langland's Producer: Nancy Heather Contact: Joseph Langland Phone: (413)549-6517 Address: 16 Morgan Circle, Amherst, Mass. 01002 Storyline: The rolling hills and sparkling creeks north of Decorah are part of Joseph Langland's being. He grew up on the border of Iowa and Minnesota, one of nine children in a Norwegian immigrant family. And while the other boys dreamed of farming or playing baseball, Joe hid away in a narrow limestone cave, writing poems with a stubby pencil by candlelight. He followed his dreams, and carved out a life as a poet, earning an endowed 'Robert Frost' professorship at the University of Massachussetts in Amherst. Robert's poetry paints impressions of his rural Iowa childhood, not just rosy images, but remembrances which include his brother's death as a soldier in World War II. One poem, 'The Wheel of Summer,' describes his farm-boy experience of castrating pigs. It was this poem which was once described as, 'The best poem ever written...on that particular subject!' Living In Iowa walks the land of Joseph Langland's childhood with a true Iowa son. Feature #3: [29 minutes]

  • Simon Estes Special (#811)

    Feature #1: Simon Estes Special Producer: Chris Gourley Contact: See Producer Storyline: Simon Estes is 'The best small town Iowan to make it big' story that Register columnist Chuck Offenburger feels has come across his desk in 25 years. Growing up in a small town in Iowa would not be easy for any African American... But with a little help from people that believed in him Simon Estes has gone from helping his dad as a porter in a hotel in Centerville, Iowa to singing on stages throughout the world. While the 'Rags to Riches' story of Simon Estes is a good one... The real story is Simon Estes the humanitarian. From Des Moines, Iowa... to Capetown, South Africa...we go backstage with Simon Estes for a close look at the man behind the music. A man described by some as Iowa's Ambassador to the World. Phone response: None Close: Simon Estes and Chuck Offenburger sing the Iowa Corn song in Capetown shop. Phone # 1-800-383-6124 This week's question: None [27 minutes]

  • Project Reality (#812)

    Feature #1: 'Project Reality,' prisoners counsel troubled youth. Feature #2: 'Clear Thinking,' Family in Clear Lake is saving the shoreline from development. Feature #1: Feature title: Reality Check Producer: Nikki Tundel Contact: John Goetz Phone: (319)372-5432 Address: Iowa State Penitentiary, 31 Ave. G, PO Box 316, Fort Madison, IA 52627 Storyline: For more than 3 years, the inmates at the Iowa State Penitentiary in Fort Madison have been sharing their realities with troubled youths from across the state. As part of a program called Project Reality, men serving life sentences have shared their bad choices and the resulting consequences with more than 1000 young Iowans - and are continuing to do so in hopes of giving others a new take on life. We did time with 8 of the prison's inmates and learned of their days in maximum security and their afternoons reaching out to help kids who are heading down the same troubled roads they once did. While none can take back the violent choices they made in the past or any of the anguish they caused, they are hoping that now they can stop the cycle of violence from spinning out of control. We'll get a reality check from behind bars and visit one of the group's presentations. Phone response: What super power would you like to possess? Feature #2: Feature title: Clear Thinking Producer: Marlin Schram Contact: See Producer For Information about the Conservation Easement Program mentioned in the Feature, Contact: Iowa Natural Heritage Foundation, 505 Fifth Ave. Suite 444, Des Moines, Ia 50309-2321, (515)288- 1846 FAX (515)288-0137 Storyline: Clear Lake locals know it as 'Lone Tree Point' but the local deer, ducks, and other wildlife know it as 101 acres of timber, marsh and grassland to hang out in. This includes 4,600 feet of undeveloped shoreline. The generosity and foresight of Marcia and Jim Connell will preserve forever this beautiful lakeshore property with a conservation easement through the [29 minutes]

  • Hale of a Tale. School of Hard Knocks (#813)

    Feature #1: 'Hale of a Tail,' John Wenck photographed Hale-Bop comet. Feature #2: 'School of Hard Knocks,' school in Sioux City fights crime. Feature #3: 'Call of the Wild,' environmental center in Cedar Rapids. Feature #1: Feature title: Hale of a Tail Producer: Chris Gourley Contact: John Wenck Phone: 274-5660 Address: Des Moines Storyline: Sometimes a once in a lifetime opportunity comes once every 4,200 years. At least that's the case for John Wenck and the photo he took of the Hale-Bop comet that could be seen in the skies over Iowa last spring (spring of '97). Winning the 'Best of Show Award' at the Iowa State Fair the picture John took has changed his life and touched the lives of many. Phone response: What is your best advice for staying friends? Feature #2: Feature title: School of Hard Knocks Producer: Laurel Bower Contact: Pete Hathaway Phone: (712)279-6816 Address: Woodrow Wilson Middle School, 1010 Iowa Street Sioux City, IA 51105 Storyline: For nearly five years, Woodrow Wilson Middle School in Sioux City has made remarkable improvements concerning juvenile crime both in the school and on school grounds. These Improvements are largely due to the principal, Pete Hathaway. When Pete joined the staff five years ago, he took a look at the problem Woodrow was having and decided to make a change. Otherwise, the school doors were going to be closed. Pete's agenda was to open the doors to outside resources including the Department of Human Services, the Juvenile Courts, and other community agencies. Pete felt that the traditional closed door policy of schools was not for Woodrow. They needed to open the doors to other people in order to meet the needs of their diverse population of students. All of these programs are based in the school. They include a probation officer, police liaison officer, and outreach workers just to name a few. The school has made great strides in turning itself around and has gained recognition from [29 minutes]

  • Common Ground (#814)

    Feature #1: Feature title: Common Ground Producer: Jack Shepard Contact: Osha Gray Davidson Phone: Address: 14 S. Governor, Iowa City, IA Storyline: Osha Gray Davidson is an Iowa City author whose most recent book, 'Best of Enemies,' was nominated for the Pulitzer Prize in history. It's the story of an unlikely friendship between C.P. Ellis, the leader of the Durham, N.C. Ku Klux Klan and Ann Atwater, a black activist and community organizer. They were brought together on a school committee charged with segregating the Durham schools. The more they found out about each other's lives and problems, the more C.P. realized that black people were just like him. The friends were in Waterloo and Cedar Falls recently to speak with students and community leaders about how their friendship came to be and how their experiences are relevant to Iowa and Iowans. We talk with them and with Davidson about the book and how it's relevant to the Iowa of the 90s, and how and why he became a writer. Phone response: Create your own epitaph in 1 sentence. Feature #2: Feature title: Wish Upon A Star Producer: Marlin Schram Contact: David Oesper Phone:bus(515)233-0117 Email Address: daveoesper@aol.com Storyline: David Oesper, of Ames, is an amateur astronomer with a passion for pulsars and planets. But there's a problem. More and more city lights are drowning out our night sky with light pollution. Dave is part of an organization called the International Dark-Sky Association, whose mission is to build awareness of the problem of light pollution and provide solutions and education about quality nighttime lighting. New light fixtures can dramatically make a difference by directing the light down where it is needed instead of shining up wastefully to the heavens. Urban sky glow is destroying mankind's view of the universe. You wouldn't put up with noise pollution, why lose our night sky for no good reason but igno [29 minutes]

  • Small World (#815)

    Feature #1: Small World Some artists believe that to create a work of art that ut artists like Don Perkins believe in the motto, 'Think Small.' Don and his wife, Gladys, make miniature furniture and housewares. Their objectives are to make exact scale objects that work together to create the illusion of reality in a big way. You may need a good pair of bifocals to really appreciate Gladys head-sized spools of thread. Living in Iowa takes a close look at a tiny slice of life. Phone response: What did you do as a child to torment your siblings? Feature #2: The Man In The Moon Dr. Alexander Abian has truly gone were no Iowan has gone before. Currently an Emeritus professor in mathematics at Iowa State University, he is pushing the bounds of science and questioning our place in the universe. Dr. Abian, has gained considerable media attention due to one of his theories which suggested blowing up the moon in order to solve the earth's climatic and environmental problems. He believes that if the moon is jolted out of it's orbit, it will affect the tilt of the earth's axis, bringing an end to natural dilemmas such as draught, famine, hurricanes, and global warming. The driving force behind Dr. Abian and his theories is to challenge the 'status quo:' the existing order and existing truths, and to promote progress in the human condition. Feature #3: Do The Write Thing It's hard to know much about black history in Iowa because so little has been written on the subject. However Dr. Hal Chase, a professor at the Des Moines Area Community College in Ankeny, and thirty other people hope to change that. Together they are writing a book titled 'Outside In:' African American History in Iowa. The books twenty chapters deal with everything from politics and social change, to the fine arts and agriculture and rural life. The goal of the book is to show how intertwined [29 minutes]

  • The Cave Dwellers (#816)

    Feature #1: 'The Cave Dwellers' Virtual Reality at ISU. Feature #2: 'Mad Dads' Eddie Staton organizes parents to fight crime in Omaha and the nation. Feature #3: 'It e 2-legged dog.' Feature #1: Feature title: The Cave Dwellers Producer: Jack Shepard Contact: Carolina Cruz-Neira Phone: 515-294-5685 cruz@iastate.edu also:Jill Shannon 515-294-3093 Address: 2062 Black Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 Storyline: Carolina Cruz-Neira is a scientist who works in another reality reality that is. This former classical ballet dancer is one of the top virtual reality researchers in the U.S. Born in Venezuela, reared in Spain, and educated in both, as well as in the US, she was one of the first people in the world to earn her Ph.D. in virtual reality. She uses the VR cave for many purposes: designing VR programs that enable drug researchers to 'step inside' a microscopic world of drug and virus interactions, and for industrial purposes, as well n tractor parts in VR without spending a dime on prototypes. There is a flight simulator, a driving simulator, an expedition through a sci-fi cave, and more. Open houses are given regularly. Phone response: Describe your most embarrassing moment. Feature #2: Feature title: Mad Dads Producer: Marlin Schram Contact: MAD DADS, Inc. Phone: (402)451-3500 Address: 3030 Sprague St., Omaha, NE 68111 Nationwide Pager (800)746-1920 Cell Phone (402)681-5738 FAX (402)451-3477 Website www.maddadsnational.com Storyline: Eddie Staton (pronounced Stayton) is a dad who is mad. Mad about gangs, drugs and violence in his Omaha, Nebraska neighborhood. Eddie became co-founder and national president for an organization called MAD DADS, an acronym for Men Against Destruction-Defending Against Drugs and Social-Disorder. MAD DADS are volunteers who are positive role models and concerned loving parents and are a visible presence i [29 minutes]

  • Toy Drive, Earning Their Wings (#817)

    Feature #1: 'Toy Drive,' Burlington Museum of life-sized toys. Feature #2: 'Earning Their Wings,' Tuskegee Airmen reunite at Dubuque High School. Feature #3: 'Pet Spaw,' pampered pets at Avondale Pet Resort. Feature #1: Feature title: Toy Drive Producer: Nikki Tundel Contact: Arnie Arledge Phone: (319)753 0436 Address: PO Box 1062 Burlington, IA 52601 Storyline: Arnie Arledge insists that he While he was in the trucking business for most of his life, today this 82-year-old spends his days surrounded by life-sized dolls and animated toys. Arnie runs the Toy Box, a Burlington museum of sorts, that is packed with what he calls the country to find unusual items for his collection ts his mind set on acquiring something, there swears that we s inventory was worth ot toy warehouse does have an extensive security system. Arnie spends his days at the y (and many times that means old friends who stop by and tell dirty jokes.) He displays his collection free of charge, but warned us that museum hours are th Arnie and check out his 15 jukeboxes (trimmed down from 55), his mechanical Little Red Riding Hood and his animated monkey band ch a glimpse of some of the hundreds of other quirky collectibles he keeps. Phone response: What do you do that makes people laugh? Feature #2: Feature title: Earning Their Wings Producer: Chris Gourley Contact: John Adelman Phone: (319)588-8395 Address: Central High School, 39 Bluff Street, Dubuque, Iowa 52001-7608 Storyline: Find out how at risk students at Central High School in Dubuque turned a class project into a class reunion for a group of the first African American fighter pilots to be trained in air com [29 minutes]

  • Gone with the Wind (#818)

    Feature #1: 'Gone With The Wind' David Thoreson's sailing trip that took him below the Antarctic circle. Feature #1: Feature title: Gone With The Wind Producer: Chris Gourley Contact: David Thoreson Address: P.O. Box 589 Okoboji, Iowa 51355 Phone: (712)-332-2754 Storyline: At age 32, David Thoreson took a trip that most of us might dream of taking but only a handful of people have actually ever made. David's trip, aboard a 57 foot sailboat named Cloud Nine, took him to a seldom seen part of the world that lies below the Antarctic Circle. David videotaped his adventure and shares his insights as well as the many emotions he felt while at the mercy of a moody sea. Just one feature! There are no phones, no new phone question and no closing video other than credits and here's what's coming up. [29 minutes]

  • Unlimited Possibilities, Ragtime In Randall (#819)

    Feature #1: 'Unlimited Possibilities' Grant Wood style mural painted at ISU by Doug Shelton. Feature #2: 'Ragtime in Randall' big ragtime concert in the small town of Randall. Feature #3: 'Paul Micich' artist and musician. Feature #1: Unlimited Possibilities Producer: Jack Shepard Contact: Marilyn Vaughan Phone: (515)294-6469 Address: Iowa State University Museums, 290 Scheman Building, ISU, Ames, IA 50011 Storyline: The new Iowa State University mural titled, 'Unlimited Possibilities,' commissioned to commemorate the University sary, recently joined its counterparts in the Parks Library. The mural surrounds a huge doorway in the library y is decorated with 8 Grant Wood murals from the 30s. Des Moines native, Doug Shelton, designed the mural and also led a 12-member team of students and faculty artists as they helped produce the work. The mural is meant to depict the entire university and its future. Work on the painting was done across campus, in a gallery not large enough to house the painting in its finished form, so it had to be done in three pieces. We were on hand for the installation and for some touchups, interviews with the principal Phone response: Favorite day of the year. Feature #2: Ragtime in Randall Producer: Marlin Schram Contact: Ellis Anderson Phone: (515)328-3200 Address: PO Box 133, Randall, Iowa 50231-0133 Storyline: Popular in the early 1900 c was primarily written for the piano and made famous by Scott Joplin. Ragtime was the risqu hug with such dances as the Bunny Hug, Grizzly Bear and the Kangaroo Hop. Although primarily instrumental, words were written to several ragtime tunes and you c written by an Iowan and lyrics by Irving Berlin. Ellis Anderson of Randall sings with and accompanies Morgan and gives us some insight into the music and his compulsion for pla [29 minutes]

  • Up for the Count, Creating Community (#820)

    Feature #1: 'Up For The Count' Auctioneer College and family. Feature #2: 'Creating Community' Art Pushers Ruth and Russ Nash Feature #3: 'Passionate Prose' Romance Novelist LeAnn Lemberger Feature #1: Up for the Count Producer: Nikki Tundel Contact: STEVE WISE Phone: 515-454-2379 Address: AUCTION BARN 515 454 2122 Contact: BILLIE DEVOLL Phone: 515-423-5242 WORLD WIDE AUCTIONEERING COLLEGE PO Box 949 Mason City, IA 50402-0949 Storyline: Why would a roomful of grown adults spend 10 days chanting children's nursery rhymes? We'll find out as we drop in on the Worldwide Auctioneering College in Mason City - where future fast talkers from across the continent come to sharpen their selling skills. We'll also head up to Manly to meet two graduates of the Worldwide Auctioneering College - one who still must squeeze in his auctions between English class and math homework. We'll tour the Wise Family Auction Barn with 13-year-old Josh Wise and his father, Steve, and find out where their schooling led them. And we nd out how their love for auctioneering has turned into a family affair. Phone response: What would you like to blame on El Nino? Feature #2: Creating Community Producer: Nancy Heather Contact: Rocco Buda Arts Resource Center Phone: 319-557-9384 Address: 434 Loras Blvd, Dubuque, IA 52001 Storyline: It medium sized Iowa towns like Dubuque are facing problems in their inner-city neighborhoods. In Ruth and Russ Nash has come to the forefront, and a neighborhood organization has been looking for ways to keep the neighborhood safe and quiet. This winter, Ruth and Russ have taken a new tact at saving their little corner of the world, they neighborhood tailor who loved opera, the Rocco Buda Art Resource Center is hoping to draw people together, and is one of the gazillion projects Ruth and Russ have sparked in their [29 minutes]

  • Double Vision, Reflection (#821)

    Feature #1: 'Double Vision' 10 sets of twins at Glidden-Ralston School. Feature #2: 'Reflection' Sam Mulgrew makes caskets and searches for the meaning of life. Feature #3: 'A Man For All Seasons' Herb Plambeck, farm radio broadcast legend. Feature #1: Feature title: 'Double Vision' Producer: Jack Shepard Contact: Glidden Ralston Community School Phone: (712)659-3863 Address: Glidden, IA Storyline: We about all the twins in Glidden-Ralston Community School and had to get a first-hand look: in a school of about 450 students, there are 10 sets of twins, 7 sets in 1st and 2nd grades, with every 4th student in 2nd grade having a twin sibling. Some say it with many of the 2nd and 1st graders along with a set of 4th grade twin girls and found not only how much they have in common, but also what distinguishes them. We pretty much stay out of their way, though, and let them be kids e response: Do an impersonation of someone famous. Feature #2: Feature title: Reflection Producer: Marlin Schram Contact: Wendy & Sam Mulgrew Phone: (319)673-7481 Address: 708 92nd Street, Monmouth, IA 52309 Storyline: This is a story about a family striving for a quality lifestyle, who just happen to choose the woods and rolling hills of Eastern Iowa. Wendy, Sam and their two young daughters live on a farm but since Sam admits he would win the worst farmer of the year award, they don ist who paints images of the areas quiet beauty in a style of the old masters. Sam makes caskets that are handcrafted in a simpler style reminiscent of 100 years ago. He sells them at a reasonable cost to offer an alternative to today about the common misconceptions about how and where you can be laid to rest. A world traveler and student of many other religious philosophies, Sam is guiding his family on the se [29 minutes]

  • He's Got The Bug, Music of the Mnd (#822)

    Feature #1: 'He ous 5 satins. Feature #2: 'Music for the Mind' Craig Bircher teaches school kids about life with music. Feature #3: 'Ticked Off' Kathy Cuddeback ) Producer: Fritz J -9658 Address: 4689 Wakonda Drive, Norwalk, Iowa 50211 Storyline: You wouldn t Control is a bug man who u the impression that he is just another man making a living. But his past contains some stories that might surprise you. In 1956, a song called 'In the Still of the Night' climbed to #2 in the national pop charts the original 5 Satins, the group responsible for this hit single that has sold over 10 million copies to date. Perhaps, what makes Jim so interesting is the fact that he has never really made it known that he was part of that piece of music history. Even though he has toured with Rock and Roll legends such as Chuck Berry, Bo Diddley, and Ruth Brown, and played at the Apollo with Little Richard, he humbly goes about his daily life and keeps his past to himself. He was successful doing this until he was recently inducted into the Rhythm and Blues Hall of Fame along with a long list of other music pioneers. Jim looks back on his interesting life, his rise and fall from national stardom in the mid-Fifties, and offers insight on living life today. He is a fascinating and wonderful man, still every bit the same young boy from New Haven, Connecticut who cut one of America ds. Phone response: What ure #2: Music for the Mind (Craig Bircher) Producer: Nikki Tundel Contacts: Craig Bircher (402)346 4042, Adam Branting, PR, Omaha Symphony (402)342 3836 fax (402)342 3819, Thea [29 minutes]

  • Button Up, A Long Time (#823)

    Feature #1: 'Button Up' Elda Dolash button collector. Feature #2: 'A Long Time' Baseball Manager George Long Feature #3: 'Mozart is Missing' UNI professor finds lost work of Mozart Feature #1: 'Buttoned Up' Producer Chris Gourley Contact: Elda Dolash Phone: 319-232-5671 Address: 404 Wilshire Ave. Waterloo, Iowa 50701 Storyline: Elda Dolash is known in the Waterloo area as the 'Button Nut.' It's a name she doesn't mind being called, especially if people remember the name and save their buttons for her. Elda started collecting buttons over 22 years ago but couldn't tell you how many buttons she's collected since then. Elda shared with us her collection of buttons and took us to a meeting where we found out that she isn't the only button nut in the Waterloo Phone response: What have you lost that you'd give anything to find? Feature #2: 'A Long Time' Producer Marlin Schram Contact: See producer Phone: Storyline: This is a story about a baseball legend in his hometown of Muscatine, Iowa. At 91-years-old, George Long, Sr. was the oldest manager in baseball history. We taped this story in the summer of 1997 and sadly George passed away in January of 1998. His life was dedicated to the game of baseball, his players and his hometown. The Muscatine Red Sox is a semipro team George started in 1931 and kept going through the depression. Back then many big-leaguers played exhibition games including Babe Ruth who hit two out of the park in a game for George. The Indianapolis Clowns were the 'Globetrotters' of baseball, a black traveling all-star team that George also owned and managed. George never owned a car and walked all over town selling advertising to raise money for the team. His spirit kept the team going for what George said had to be a record, 67 consecutive winning seasons. Feature title for air: 'Mozart is Missing' Producer: Shepard Contact: David J. Buch Phone: 319-273-2761 Address: University of No. Iowa [27 minutes]

  • Lion Kings, Rhyme and Reason (#824)

    Feature #1: 'Lion Kings' Two town cats Feature #2: 'Rhyme and Reason' Girls Group Home poetry Feature #3: 'Farm Safety 4 Kids' Feature #1: Lion Kings Producer: Heather Contact: Spencer Library Phone: 712-264-7290 Address: Vickie Myron, Director, 21 East 3rd Street, Spencer, Iowa 51301-4131 Contact: Kirby Phone: 515-366-2305 Ralph Contact name cleared? YES Storyline: Two tabbies who more Books, lion king of the Spencer Library, and Conrad om, who library cat. He has a diplomatic personality and a sense of fun that has captured the hearts of people from as far away as London. Tom is an equally pampered people pleaser. In Conrad, he cial mayor. Local leash laws have been written to give him full run of the place. In nice weather, he ice door to open, and choose the best windows and chairs for his lounging. Phone Response: What's your favorite bumper sticker? Feature #2: 'RHYME AND REASON Producer: Tundel Contact: See producer Storyline: Like many teen treatment programs, the Children and Families of Iowa Girls Group Homes offer a variety of ways to help once troubled youth get back on their feet - utilizing everything from individual and group counseling to a strict series of house rules. But for the girls at the program's Newton group homes, poetry seems to be as important as any other element in their treatment programs. If you stop by and visit either of the two Newton group homes, you're sure to find at least one girl who's either writing or talking about poetry. Feature #3: 'Farm Safety 4 Kids' Producer: Bower Contact: Marilyn Adams Phone: 515-758-2827 Address: 110 S Chestnut Ave. PO Box 458, Earlham, Iowa 50072 Contact name Cleared? YES Storyline: Marilyn Adams lost her son Keith in a framing accid [28 minutes]

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  • Flight Plan Pattee Perry Testing Her Mettle (#825)

    Living In Iowa Show # 825 Length 28:25 Airdates: 5/8,10/98 Feature #1: 'Flight Plan,' Bob Anderson sacrifices to raise and release peregrine falcons. Feature #2: 'Pattee Perry,' Hotel in Perry renovation by former rich resident. Feature #3: 'Testing Her Mettle,' Judy Hoit is an advocate for the physically challenged. Feature #1: Flight Plan Producer: Chris Gourley Contact: Bob Anderson Phone: (319)382-6300 Address: 2580 310th Street, Ridgeway, Iowa 52165 Storyline: DDT pushed the peregrine falcon to the brink of extinction. Today only two pairs of peregrines nest in Iowa, both in urban areas, on man made structures. Bob Anderson dreams that someday the skies over Iowa will be filled with peregrines that will live not in cities but in the wild where they belong. To realize his dream Bob has given up his job, his home, and most of his savings to raise the peregrines which he will eventually release into the wild. Phone response: What place you Shepard Contact: Ann Zimmerman, The Public Relations Group HYPERLINK mail to:PRGDM@aol.com Phone: 243-4123 Address: Hotel Pattee, 1112 Willis Avenue PO Box 307 Perry, IA 50220 Phone: (515)465-3511 Storyline: When Roberta Green Ahmanson was growing up in Perry, the Hotel Pattee was THE place for those important events like wedding receptions and anniversary parties. And she especially remembers Sunday lunches and sitting at the counter with a cool dish of chocolate ice cream. Those days are long gone, but thanks to Roberta, the hotel isn d by Roberta from a fate common to many other small town hotels, the hotel has been completely restored. Originally opened in 1913, the doors were reopened exactly 84 years later. Living in Iowa ren joins Roberta for a guided tour of the hotel she e people and history of her hometown. Rooms are dedicated and decorated for former famous residents, famous h [28 minutes]

  • Collectors.Ice Cream Scoops and Bowling Balls (#826)

    Feature #1: Collectors 'Ice Cream Scoops and Bowling Balls' Feature #2: Collectors 'Turn a New Leaf' Tea leaf collectors/ Marti & Chuck Peterson Feature #3: Collectors 'The Key Chain To Life' and 'Toolin' Around' Feature #1: Ice Cream Scoops and Bowling Balls Producer: Tundel Contact: Jeff Crookshank Phone: (515)479-2788 Address: Marshalltown Contact name cleared? Yes Storyline: To put it simply, Jeff Crookshank likes things that are shiny. Couple that with his love for ice cream and you'll understand (well, at least to a small degree) his ice cream scoop collection. Jeff has over 175 ice cream scoops, but admits to actually using only one. He's also expanded his collection to include ice cream related collectibles - including 25 straw holders and a variety of ice cream fountain table and chair sets. And while he originally intended to keep his collection limited to an ice cream theme, he admits his eye has wandered and he now collects lawn sprinklers as well. He tells us they're really shiny. Contact: Rich Michaels Phone: work 284 2996 at Meredith Address: 4308 Maple Street home 223 8611 West Des Moines, IA 50265 Contact name cleared? Yes Storyline: Rich Michaels isn't all that fond of bowling. But bowling BALLS, well, they're right up his alley. For this art director, bowling balls fall into the category of decoration rather than recreation and his living room is proof of his curious obsession. Recently Rich recycled some of his collectibles, returning them to thrift stores, but still has over 20 bowling balls just striking a pose in his West Des Moines home. And while you might think that a bowling ball collection would be enough to keep a collector content, Rich just couldn't stop there. He also collects ashtrays in the shape of states, pottery, ceramics, furniture, pitchers and tinker toys. Phone response: What are you collecting that will be valuable in 100 years? Feature #2: Turn A New Leaf Producer: Heather [29 minutes]

  • Grandfather Artist, Know News Is Good News (#827)

    Feature #1: 'Grandfather Artist. ; Feature #2: 'Know News is Good News,' Classic Iowa Journalists Ed Sidey, Adair and Carolyn Gage, Villisca. Feature #1: Grandfather ram; Contact: See Producer Storyline: The life and times of Ray Young Bear are visualized in this Living in Iowa feature. A Meskwaki author, poet and performing artist, Ray has been writing for about 30 years creating volumes of published poetry and is currently working on his third book. Ray g his own experiences, characters, situations from his imagination and family stories. Meskwaki spirituality, prophecy, tribal lore and history and casino gambling are several of the topics that Ray tackled in his novels through the eyes of the fictional character, Edgar Bearchild. Living in Iowa shares Ray gs and commentary about his life as a member of the Meskwaki Nation of Central Iowa near Tama. We dance by Ray, his wife, Stella, and their nephew, Rocky. Phone response: What project are you working on that you e #2: Know News is Good News; Producer: Shepard, Gourley; Contact: See Producers Storyline: Iowa has more newspapers per capita than any place in the country and perhaps the world In an era when national media have become so dominant, it e small town newspapers and their editors and reporters are. This generation is aging and may soon be gone and forgotten. With them will go their stories and their insight. A group of U of I students and their two professors are busy making sure that these classic journalists and the skills they honed are not forgotten. Through oral histories of over 100 Iowa journalists, they hope to preserve and honor the men and women who wrote the stories. Living i [28 minutes]

  • Out of Hitler's Reach, A Circular Argument (#828)

    Feature #1: 'Out of Hitler's Reach' Scattergood Hostel Feature #2: 'A Circular Argument' Crop Circles. Feature #1: 'Out of Hitler's Reach' ; Producer: Tundel; Contact: Michael Luick-Thrams C/o Bud and Phyllis Luick 15118 Lark Ave. Mason City, IA 50401 Storyline: Most people known about Oskar Schindler and the 1100 lives he saved during the Holocaust. However, few know of the Quaker farmers and college kids who saved 185 European refugees right here in West Branch, Iowa. From 1939 to 1943, the Iowa prairies became a safe haven for those trying to escape Hitler. Here Europeans found refuge at the Scattergood Hostel, a temporary community run by Quakers in what had been a Quaker boarding school. Unlike so many who turned a blind eye to the atrocities in Europe, a group of Quakers in the middle of the Iowa cornfields opened their arms and their hearts to those in need. With the help of these Iowans, the refugees were give an opportunity to live as well as a place to overcome the trauma of their experiences in Europe and find a new life in the United States. This story was nearly lost - as most of the refugees had chosen to put the past behind them and the Quakers weren't interested in publicizing their own good work. However, through the research of Iowa native Michael Luick-Thrams, this story has been brought to light - and can perhaps be an example to us today of just how much simple human kindness can accomplish. Phone response: What stories do your scars tell? Feature #2: 'A Circular Argument' Producer: Fritz J dress: BLT Research Team Box 127 Cambridge, MA 02140 (617) 492-0415 Contact #2: Beverly J. Trout State Director -- MUFON 103 W. North, Apt. 103 Truro, Iowa 50257 (515) 765-4317 Contact #3: Brett Anderson 24611 610th Avenue Nevada, Iowa 50201 (515) 382-4091 Storyline: During the fall of 1996, Brett Anderson of Nevada, ran across three myster [28 minutes]

  • Boone Suede Shoes, Taking It to the Grave (#829)

    Feature #1: 'Boone Suede Shoes,' Jamie Kelley, High School Elvis impersonator. Feature #2: 'Taking it to the Grave,' Roy Dixon, Gravestone Artist. Feature #3: 'Swan's Song,' Steve Swan, Wetland Trail. Feature #1: Boone Suede Shoes; Producer: Nancy Heather; Contact: Larry Kelley; Phone: (515)432-4332; Address: 718 West 3rd Street, Boone, Iowa 50036-4007 Storyline: Mention the name, 'Elvis,' to Jamie Aaron Kelley, and there's more than a glimmer in his eye. Jamie just loves everything Elvis: the music, the movies, even the clothes. And his friends are used to the fact that Jamie dresses like Elvis, combs his hair like Elvis, and even sings like Elvis. At age 17, this senior in high school has 14 years of experience in the business of 'Elvis Performer.' At the age of 3, he could be found at his father's knee, both of them decked out in flamboyant white bell-bottoms and vee-necked shirts trimmed with fringe and rhinestones. Yes, the Elvis impersonation act has been handed down from father to son, and Living In Iowa walks a mile in their blue suede shoes. Phone response: Sing part of your favorite song. Feature #2: TAKING IT TO THE GRAVE; Producer: Nikki Tundel; Contact: Roy Dixon; Phone: (319)752-4654 Address: Leyda, Burrus and Metz Monument Company 1500 Osborn Street, Burlington, IA 52601 Storyline: Unlike most children, when Roy Dixon drew pictures on the household walls, he signed his name to them. Even then, Roy knew he would oneday make his living as an artist. What he didn't know was that his canvases would be 500 pound granite slabs. For nearly 15 years, this Burlington resident has been a monument artist - etching his art into gravestones. In an average year, Roy will complete over 50 stones. The majority are for young adults and children. A handful are for babies. For each piece, Roy sits down with family members and just listens. Roy admits that he can't think of his subjects as being gone. As he etches portraits onto the granite, he tries to bring e [28 minutes]

  • Better Than 1, Softball (#830)

    Feature #1: 'Better Than 1,' Rudy the 2-headed Piglet. Feature #2: 'Softball,' Bill Hyland, 73-year-old softball player. Feature #3: 'Greetings,' Linda Pratt, greeting card artist. Feature #1: Better Than 1; Producer: Marlin Schram; Contact: Vicki & Scott Vorwald; Phone: (319)928-7176; Address: 305 W. Union, Edgewood, IA 52042 Storyline: All manner of media are doing a double take when they feature Rudy the two-headed piglet from Edgewood. Rudy has been in the news and on TV across the nation and even hamming it up in Hollywood on the Leeza show which aired on October 22nd. Scott and Vicki Vorwald have painstakingly raised this unusual critter in a playpen instead of a pigpen. Find out how everyone is rooting for Rudy and how it's changed the Vorwald family. Phone response: What one you know has overcome? Feature #2: Producer: Jack Shepard; Contact: Bill Hyland; Phone: (515)277-6972; Address: 1521 62nd St. Des Moines, IA 50310 Storyline: Even though baseball's popularity has waned in recent years, softball is more popular than ever. But what happens to softball players when they are considered 'over the hill?' While many turn to physically-less demanding sports like golf, others have shown their determination to play on - in a 50-and-over league of their own. The story centers on 73-year-old Bill Hyland, former DSM Dowling prep star, former NY Yankees minor league ball player who's still enjoying his favorite sport. Bill says playing the game makes him feel young - and there's a video montage to the tune 'Young at Heart.' Feature #3: Greetings; Producer: Heather; Contact: Linda Pratt; Phone: (319)294-2745; Address: 4104 Treeline Court NE, Cedar Rapids, Iowa 52411 (fyi she moved after we shot and produced this feature) Storyline: In the age of e-mail, there's one Iowa woman who's bucking the trend. She has recently begun a career as a greeting card artist. We discovered Lin [27 minutes]

  • In A Nutshell, Swiss Family Jurgenson (#831)

    Feature #1: 'In a Nutshell,' Acorn Feed Store sells feed with a little live music. Feature #2: 'Swiss Family Jurgensen,' Giant treehouse near Marshalltown. Feature #3: 'Puttin' on the Patina,' Nick Klepinger's bronze statues in Pella. Feature #1:; Feature title: 'In A Nutshell'; Producer: Laurel Bower; Contact: Dave and Harry Fronk; Phone: (712) 325-9282 Address: 329 16th Ave Council Bluffs, IA Storyline: The Acorn Feed Store has been open nearly 14 years. The store was opened by father and son, Harry and Dave Fronk. It started out as a feed and supply company, but when Harry started taking guitar lessons with his buddies, it became a tradition for people to gather and play music right there in the store. Every Saturday, people come to play in these jam sessions. They come from all over, several are locals, but visitors from out-of-state and even other countries come often to play music as well. It is a family oriented place with animals, antiques, nice people, and music. It's fun for the whole family and a great place for musicians of all sorts, no matter what their talent, etc. It has never been publicized, people just come by word of mouth. Phone response: What is your most unique talent? Feature #2: Feature title: 'Swiss Family Jurgensen' Producer: Jack Shepard Contact: Mick Jurgensen; Phone: 515-752-5756 Address: 1906 S. 5th Ave. Marshalltown, IA 50158 (w) 515-754-1070 Storyline: Mick Jurgensen is a grade school principal whose hobby over the last 14 years has been building a treehouse in his grandmother's backyard. It all started out as an idea for a deck, which his grandfather nixed, so Mick decided to hook the deck to the tree. 14 years later, it consists of 10 levels, climbs 55 ft. into the Maple tree, and covers 5000 sq. ft. It's been a family project, with his mother and wife helping with construction, and his grandmother leading tours. dog.' Feature #3: ; Feature title: 'Puttin' on the Patina'; Producer: Pat Oswald; Contact: Nic [27 minutes]

  • Core of Discovery, Takin' The T Train (#832)

    Feature #1: 'Core of Discovery,' Ken Burns publicity tour for Lewis & Clark. Feature #2: 'Takin' the T Train,' Thomas The Tank train engine comes to Boone. Feature #3: 'The Art of Junk,' Ben Britton creates metal sculpture out of junk. Feature #1:; Feature title: The Core of Discovery; Producer: Nikki Tundel Contact: Blair Chicoine (Chkwin) Phone: (712)279-4840 Storyline: We'll follow in the waves of Lewis and Clark as we meet up with the creators of this year's PBS documentary 'Lewis and Clark: The Journey of the Corps of Discovery.' We'll sit down with Ken Burns, documentarian and creator of 'The Civil War' and 'Baseball', as well as Dayton Duncan, an Iowa native, historian and author, who worked alongside Burns to create this look back at the quintessential American camping trip. We caught up with the two filmmakers in Sioux City as they retraced the trail of Lewis and Clark and found out just what attracted these two men to the story of Lewis and Clark. Burns and Duncan will lead us beyond the classroom history lessons to find out why Lewis and Clark are so important to our past and our future. We'll also visit with Sioux City's Blair Chicoine, a history buff, reenactor and Lewis and Clark enthusiast, who feels his study of Lewis and Clark is his own exploration into the unknown. And, once you've gone behind the scenes with 'Living in Iowa', you can catch a special encore presentation of the Lewis and Clark documentary on December 9 and 10 on IPTV. Phone response: What are you always looking for that you can never find? Feature #2: Feature title: Takin' the T Train Producer: Nancy Heather Contact: Boone and Scenic Valley Railroad Phone: (800)626-0319 Address: 11th & Division, Boone, IA 50036 (Fenner Stevenson General Manager) Storyline: Take the 't' train with about 8000 of your closest friends this week as Living In Iowa rides the rails with a tv megastar: Thomas the Tank. If you're not familiar with Thomas, you're either not cool, or you're not [28 minutes]

  • Tireless Tractors, Shep (#833)

    Feature #1: 'Tireless Tractors,' the Great Iowa Tractor Ride across central Iowa. Feature #2: 'Shep,' a wise, veteran sheep herding dog. Feature #3: 'Proprietors of the Past,' Art and Ermadene Dickey at the general store at Living History Farms. Feature #1: Feature title: Tireless Tractors; Producer: Nikki Tundel Contact: Frank Jones; Phone: (515)462-3251 Address: 503 E. Buchanan, Winterset Storyline: Come for a spin on the Great Iowa Tractor Ride - it's RAGBRAI without all the sore muscles as we take a tractor trek across central Iowa. Join over 130 antique tractor enthusiasts for a 3 day travelling tractor show - rolling from Grinnell to downtown Des Moines at speeds of 10 miles an hour. It's a chance to climb up onto these vintage vehicles and see just what cultivates such a passion in their proud owners. We'll also meet Frank Jones of Winterset - who restored a 1941 John Deere for the event. Phone response: What phrase your parents always used to say. Feature #2: Feature title: 'Shep'; Producer: Jack Shepard; Contact: Dave Lensing; Phone: (515)342-4456; (w) 270-6900 Address: 2308 Scott St. New Virginia, IA 50210 Storyline: Dave Lensing is a stock dog trainer who trains Border Collies for sheep dog trials at, for example, the Iowa State Fair. Shep was his first of more than a dozen Border Collies he's trained. The 8-year-old Shep is a wise, veteran sheep herding dog. Dave discusses the intelligence of the dogs, the fact that they are bred for herding, while a sheep dog trainer is not and therefore needs as much or more training. 'You should never think you know more than the dog,' he says. 'The how-to part of sheep herding should be left up to the dog.' Feature #3: Feature title: Proprietors of the Past; Producer: Marlin Schram; Contact: Living History Farms; Phone: 278-5286; Address: Urbandale, IA Storyline: An era ends at the general store at Living History Farms with the retirement of Ermadene and Art Dickey. They saw the store built a [28 minutes]

  • Joel West, Jack Becker (#834)

    Feature #1: 'Joel West,' male supermodel from Indianola. Feature #3: 'Jack Becker,' woodcarver whose work has become signature of the town of Dyersville. Feature #2 'Lands of Langland's,' Living In Iowa walks the land of poet Joseph Langland's childhood with a true Iowa son. Feature #1: Feature title: 'Joel West Young Man'; Producer: Chris Gourley; Contact: See Producer Storyline: What do the streets of Indianola have in common to fashion runways in Milan and Paris? We'll find out when Joel West tells us how he made the transformation from an Iowa farm boy to international super model. We'll look at photographs taken of and by Joel, he'll share his dreams of the future with us, and we'll learn what it is that keeps bringing him home to Iowa. Phone response: What fad or fashion you would or would not like to see return. Feature #2 Feature title: Lands of Langland's; Producer: Nancy Heather; Contact: Joseph Langland; Phone: (413)549-6517 Address: 16 Morgan Circle, Amherst, Mass. 01002 Storyline: The rolling hills and sparkling creeks north of Decorah are part of Joseph Langland's being. He grew up on the border of Iowa and Minnesota, one of nine children in a Norwegian immigrant family. And while the other boys dreamed of farming or playing baseball, Joe hid away in a narrow limestone cave, writing poems with a stubby pencil by candlelight. He followed his dreams, and carved out a life as a poet, earning an endowed 'Robert Frost' professorship at the University of Massachussetts in Amherst. Robert's poetry paints impressions of his rural Iowa childhood, not just rosy images, but remembrances which include his brother's death as a soldier in World War II. One poem, 'The Wheel of Summer,' describes his farm-boy experience of castrating pigs. It was this poem which was once described as, 'The best poem ever written...on that particular subject!' Living In Iowa walks the land of Joseph Langland's childhood with a true Iowa son. Feature #3: Feature titl [27 minutes]

  • RAGBRAI Special (#835)

    Feature #1: R.A.G.B.R.A.I. Special Feature #1: Feature title FOR AIR: RAGBRAI XXV Producer: Chris Gourley Contact: Gourley Phone: 242-3188 Des Moines Register Newspaper Contact: Jim Green Phone: (515)248-8285 Storyline: For 25 years The Des Moines Register has sponsored a bicycle ride that crosses the state of Iowa from the Missouri River to the Mississippi. The bike ride known as RAGBRAI (the Registers Annual Great Bike Ride Across Iowa) has grown from 300 riders in its first year to over 15,000 riders this year that came from all 50 states and 14 different foreign countries. Riders ranged in age this year from 4 to 81, which is testament to the fact that RAGBRAI is for everyone. We cover the ride from the dipping of the back tire in the Missouri river to the final day where front tires are dipped in the Mississippi river. Along the way we see Iowa from the seat of a bicycle, take a look at some past RAGBRAI's, and talk to people on this years ride what makes RAGBRAI so popular. RAGBRAI XXV is set to music by musicians from the state of Iowa. Music by; James McNear Jr., Gayla Drake Paul, Bo Ramsey, Jeff Burak, Rob Lumbard, and Paul Micich. Please note RAGBRAI XXV runs 55:21 and Iowa Public Television is offering it for sale on VHS tape. Phone response: None [55 minutes]

  • Project Reality, Clear Thinking (#836)

    Feature #1: 'Project Reality,' prisoners counsel troubled youth. Feature #2: 'Clear Thinking,' Family in Clear Lake is saving the shoreline from development. Feature #1: Feature title: Reality Check; Producer: Nikki Tundel; Contact: John Goetz; Phone: (319)372-5432; Address: Iowa State Penitentiary, 31 Ave. G, PO Box 316, Fort Madison, IA 52627 Storyline: For more than 3 years, the inmates at the Iowa State Penitentiary in Fort Madison have been sharing their realities with troubled youths from across the state. As part of a program called Project Reality, men serving life sentences have shared their bad choices and the resulting consequences with more than 1000 young Iowans - and are continuing to do so in hopes of giving others a new take on life. We did time with 8 of the prison's inmates and learned of their days in maximum security and their afternoons reaching out to help kids who are heading down the same troubled roads they once did. While none can take back the violent choices they made in the past or any of the anguish they caused, they are hoping that now they can stop the cycle of violence from spinning out of control. We'll get a reality check from behind bars and visit one of the group's presentations. Phone response: What do you consider to be the most difficult stage in life and why? Feature #2: Feature title: Clear Thinking Producer: Marlin Schram Contact: See Producer For Information about the Conservation Easement Program mentioned in the Feature, Contact: Iowa Natural Heritage Foundation, 505 Fifth Ave. Suite 444, Des Moines, Ia 50309-2321, (515)288-1846; FAX (515)288-0137 Storyline: Clear Lake locals know it as 'Lone Tree Point' but the local deer, ducks, and other wildlife know it as 101 acres of timber, marsh and grassland to hang out in. This includes 4,600 feet of undeveloped shoreline. The generosity and foresight of Marcia and Jim Connell will preserve forever this beautiful lakeshore property with a conservation easemen [26 minutes]

  • Hale of a Tale, School of Hard Knocks (#837)

    Feature #1: 'Hale of a Tail,' John Wenck photographed Hale-Bop comet. Feature #2: 'School of Hard Knocks,' school in Sioux City fights crime. Feature #3: 'Call of the Wild,' environmental center in Cedar Rapids. Feature #1: Feature title: Hale of a Tail; Producer: Chris Gourley; Contact: John Wenck; Phone: 274-5660; Address: Des Moines Storyline: Sometimes a once in a lifetime opportunity comes once every 4,200 years. At least that's the case for John Wenck and the photo he took of the Hale-Bop comet that could be seen in the skies over Iowa last spring (spring of '97). Winning the 'Best of Show Award' at the Iowa State Fair the picture John took has changed his life and touched the lives of many. Phone response: What is your favorite bumper sticker? Feature #2: Feature title: School of Hard Knocks; Producer: Laurel Bower; Contact: Pete Hathaway; Phone: (712)279-6816 ; Address: Woodrow Wilson Middle School, 1010 Iowa Street Sioux City, IA 51105 Storyline: For nearly five years, Woodrow Wilson Middle School in Sioux City has made remarkable improvements concerning juvenile crime both in the school and on school grounds. These Improvements are largely due to the principal, Pete Hathaway. When Pete joined the staff five years ago, he took a look at the problem Woodrow was having and decided to make a change. Otherwise, the school doors were going to be closed. Pete's agenda was to open the doors to outside resources including the Department of Human Services, the Juvenile Courts, and other community agencies. Pete felt that the traditional closed door policy of schools was not for Woodrow. They needed to open the doors to other people in order to meet the needs of their diverse population of students. All of these programs are based in the school. They include a probation officer, police liaison officer, and outreach workers just to name a few. The school has made great strides in turning itself around and has gained recognition from both Attorney [27 minutes]

  • Common Ground, Wish Upon A Star (#838)

    Feature #1: 'Common Ground,' Pulitzer Prize nominated book on racism. Feature #2: 'Wish Upon A Star,' Ames man's mission to save the night sky. Feature #3: 'Change of Art,' Art Exhibit of women in men's minds. Feature #1: Feature title: Common Ground; Producer: Jack Shepard; Contact: Osha Gray Davidson; Address: 14 S. Governor, Iowa City, IA Storyline: Osha Gray Davidson is an Iowa City author whose most recent book, 'Best of Enemies,' was nominated for the Pulitzer Prize in history. It's the story of an unlikely friendship between C.P. Ellis, the leader of the Durham, N.C. Ku Klux Klan and Ann Atwater, a black activist and community organizer. They were brought together on a school committee charged with segregating the Durham schools. The more they found out about each other's lives and problems, the more C.P. realized that black people were just like him. The friends were in Waterloo and Cedar Falls recently to speak with students and community leaders about how their friendship came to be and how their experiences are relevant to Iowa and Iowans. We talk with them and with Davidson about the book and how it's relevant to the Iowa of the 90s, and how and why he became a writer. Phone response: What Feature title: Wish Upon A Star; Producer: Marlin Schram; Contact: David Oesper; Phone:bus(515)233-0117; Email Address: daveoesper@aol.com Storyline: David Oesper, of Ames, is an amateur astronomer with a passion for pulsars and planets. But there's a problem. More and more city lights are drowning out our night sky with light pollution. Dave is part of an organization called the International Dark-Sky Association, whose mission is to build awareness of the problem of light pollution and provide solutions and education about quality nighttime lighting. New light fixtures can dramatically make a difference by directing the light down where it is needed in [28 minutes]

  • Small World, The Man in the Moon (#839)

    Feature #1: 'Small World' The mini world of Don Perkins Feature #2: 'The Man In The Moon' Dr. Alexander Abian wants to blow up the moon to make the planet a better place. Feature #3: 'Do the Write Thing' Up coming book on Black History in the state of Iowa. Feature #1: Small World; Producer: Nancy Heather; Contact: Don Perkins; Phone: 279-6639; Address: 1708 59th Street, Des Moines, Iowa 50322 Storyline: Some artists believe that to create a work of art that l inspire awe in the viewer. But artists like Don Perkins believe in the motto, 'Think Small.' Don and his wife, Gladys, make miniature furniture and housewares. Their objectives are to make exact scale objects that work together to create the illusion of reality in a big way. You may need a good pair of bifocals to really appreciate Gladys iature needlepoint, or Don n Iowa takes a close look at a tiny slice of life. Phone response: What is the strangest occupation you Man In The Moon; Producer: Fritz Junker; Contact: Dr. Alexander Abian; Phone: 515-294-1752; Address: ISU Mathematics Department 515-292-4661; 400 Carver Hall, Ames, Iowa 50011-2064 (or) abian@iastate.edu Storyline: Dr. Alexander Abian has truly gone were no Iowan has gone before. Currently an Emeritus professor in mathematics at Iowa State University, he is pushing the bounds of science and questioning our place in the universe. Dr. Abian, has gained considerable media attention due to one of his theories which suggested blowing up the moon in order to solve the earth's climatic and environmental problems. He believes that if the moon is jolted out of it's orbit, it will affect the tilt of the earth's axis, bringing an end to natural dilemmas such as draught, famine, hurricanes, and global warming. The driving force behind Dr. Abian and his theories is to challenge the 'status quo:' the existing order and existing truths, and [26 minutes]

  • The Cove Dwellers, Mad Dads (#840)

    Feature #1: 'The Cave Dwellers' Virtual Reality at ISU. Feature #2: 'Mad Dads' Eddie Staton organizes parents to fight crime in Omaha and the nation. Feature #3: 'Up for the Count' Auctioneering College and Family. Feature #1: Feature title: The Cave Dwellers; Producer: Jack Shepard; Contact: Carolina Cruz-Neira; Phone: 515-294-5685 cruz@iastate. edu also:Jill Shannon 515-294-3093; Address: 2062 Black Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 Storyline: Carolina Cruz-Neira is a scientist who works in another reality s. This former classical ballet dancer is one of the top virtual reality researchers in the U.S. Born in Venezuela, reared in Spain, and educated in both, as well as in the US, she was one of the first people in the world to earn her Ph.D. in virtual reality. She uses the VR cave for many purposes: designing VR programs that enable drug researchers to 'step inside' a microscopic world of drug and virus interactions, and for industrial purposes, as well in VR without spending a dime on prototypes. There is a flight simulator, a driving simulator, an expedition through a sci-fi cave, and more. Open houses are given regularly. Phone response: What technology amazes you? Feature #2: Feature title: Mad Dads; Producer: Marlin Schram; Contact: MAD DADS, Inc.; Phone: (402)451-3500; Address: 3030 Sprague St., Omaha, NE 68111; Nationwide Pager (800)746-1920 Cell Phone (402)681-5738 FAX (402)451-3477; Website www.maddadsnational.com Storyline: Eddie Staton (pronounced Stayton) is a dad who is mad. Mad about gangs, drugs and violence in his Omaha, Nebraska neighborhood. Eddie became co-founder and national president for an organization called MAD DADS, an acronym for Men Against Destruction-Defending Against Drugs and Social-Disorder. MAD DADS are volunteers who are positive role models and concerned loving parents and are a visible presence in their neighborhoods fighting against the [28 minutes]

  • Toy Drive, Earning Their Wings (#841)

    Feature #1: 'Toy Drive,' Burlington Museum of life-sized toys. Feature #2: 'Earning Their Wings,' Tuskegee Airmen reunite at Dubuque High School. Feature #3: 'Pet Spaw,' pampered pets at Avondale Pet Resort. Feature #1: Feature title: Toy Drive; Producer: Nikki Tundel; Contact: Arnie Arledge; Phone: (319)753 0436; Address: PO Box 1062 Burlington, IA 52601 Storyline: Arnie Arledge insists that he hile he was in the trucking business for most of his life, today this 82-year-old spends his days surrounded by life-sized dolls and animated toys. Arnie runs the Toy Box, a Burlington museum of sorts, that is packed with what he calls the country to find unusual items for his collection s his mind set on acquiring something, there swears that we inventory was worth t toy warehouse does have an extensive security system. Arnie spends his days at the (and many times that means old friends who stop by and tell dirty jokes.) He displays his collection free of charge, but warned us that museum hours are Arnie and check out his 15 jukeboxes (trimmed down from 55), his mechanical Little Red Riding Hood and his animated monkey band a glimpse of some of the hundreds of other quirky collectibles he keeps. Phone response: What item of your spouse w away? Feature #2: Feature title: Earning Their Wings; Producer: Chris Gourley; Contact: John Adelman; Phone: (319)588-8395; Address: Central High School, 39 Bluff Street, Dubuque, Iowa 52001-7608 Storyline: Find out how at risk students at Central High School in Dubuque turned a class project into a class reunion for a group of the first African American fighter pilots to be trai [28 minutes]

  • Unlimited Possibilities (#842)

    Feature #1: 'Unlimited Possibilities' Grant Wood style mural painted at ISU by Doug Shelton. Feature #2: 'Ragtime in Randall' Big ragtime concert in the small town of Randall. Feature #3: 'Paul Micich' Artist and musician. Feature #1: Unlimited Possibilities Producer: Jack Shepard Contact: Marilyn Vaughan Phone: (515)294-6469 Address: Iowa State University Museums, 290 Scheman Building, ISU, Ames, IA 50011 Storyline: The new Iowa State University mural titled, 'Unlimited Possibilities,' commissioned to commemorate the University ry, recently joined its counterparts in the Parks Library. The mural surrounds a huge doorway in the library is decorated with 8 Grant Wood murals from the 30s. Des Moines native, Doug Shelton, designed the mural and also led a 12-member team of students and faculty artists as they helped produce the work. The mural is meant to depict the entire university and its future. Work on the painting was done across campus, in a gallery not large enough to house the painting in its finished form, so it had to be done in three pieces. We were on hand for the installation and for some touchups, interviews with the principal Phone response: What is the most ridiculous American custom? Feature #2: Ragtime in Randall Producer: Marlin Schram Contact: Ellis Anderson Phone: (515)328-3200 Address: PO Box 133, Randall, Iowa 50231-0133 Storyline: Popular in the early 1900 gtime music was primarily written for the piano and made famous by Scott Joplin. Ragtime was the risqu dancers to hug with such dances as the Bunny Hug, Grizzly Bear and the Kangaroo Hop. Although primarily instrumental, words were written to several ragtime tunes and you with music written by an Iowan and lyrics by Irving Berlin. Ellis Anderson of Randall sings with and accompanies Morgan and gives us some insight into the music and his compulsi [28 minutes]

  • Double Vision (#843)

    Feature #1: 'Double Vision' 10 sets of twins at Glidden-Ralston School. Feature #2: 'Reflection' Sam Mulgrew makes caskets and searches for the meaning of life. Feature #3: 'A Man For All Seasons' Herb Plambeck, farm radio broadcast legend. Feature #1: Feature title: 'Double Vision' Producer: Jack Shepard Contact: Glidden Ralston Community School Phone: (712)659-3863 Address: Glidden, IA Storyline: We d about all the twins in Glidden-Ralston Community School and had to get a first-hand look: in a school of about 450 students, there are 10 sets of twins, 7 sets in 1st and 2nd grades, with every 4th student in 2nd grade having a twin sibling. Some say it d with many of the 2nd and 1st graders along with a set of 4th grade twin girls and found not only how much they have in common, but also what distinguishes them. We pretty much stay out of their way, though, and let them be kids ne response: What eature title: Reflection Producer: Marlin Schram; Contact: Wendy & Sam Mulgrew Phone: (319)673-7481; Address: 708 92nd Street, Monmouth, IA 52309 Storyline: This is a story about a family striving for a quality lifestyle, who just happen to choose the woods and rolling hills of Eastern Iowa. Wendy, Sam and their two young daughters live on a farm but since Sam admits he would win the worst farmer of the year award, they don ist who paints images of the areas quiet beauty in a style of the old masters. Sam makes caskets that are handcrafted in a simpler style reminiscent of 100 years ago. He sells them at a reasonable cost to offer an alternative to today about the common misconceptions about how and where you can be laid to rest. A world traveler and student of many other religious philosophies, Sam is guiding his family on the se [28 minutes]

  • He's Got The Bug (#844)

    Feature #1: 'He mous 5 satins. Feature #2: 'Music for the Mind' Craig Bircher teaches school kids about life with music. Feature #3: 'Ticked Off' Kathy Cuddeback atins) Producer: Fritz J 658 Address: 4689 Wakonda Drive, Norwalk, Iowa 50211 Storyline: You wouldn Control is a bug man who the impression that he is just another man making a living. But his past contains some stories that might surprise you. In 1956, a song called 'In the Still of the Night' climbed to #2 in the national pop charts e original 5 Satins, the group responsible for this hit single that has sold over 10 million copies to date. Perhaps, what makes Jim so interesting is the fact that he has never really made it known that he was part of that piece of music history. Even though he has toured with Rock and Roll legends such as Chuck Berry, Bo Diddley, and Ruth Brown, and played at the Apollo with Little Richard, he humbly goes about his daily life and keeps his past to himself. He was successful doing this until he was recently inducted into the Rhythm and Blues Hall of Fame along with a long list of other music pioneers. Jim looks back on his interesting life, his rise and fall from national stardom in the mid-Fifties, and offers insight on living life today. He is a fascinating and wonderful man, still every bit the same young boy from New Haven, Connecticut who cut one of America . Phone response: What would you like to know the truth about? Feature #2: Music for the Mind (Craig Bircher) Producer: Nikki Tundel Contacts: Craig Bircher (402)346 4042, Adam Branting, PR, Omaha Symphony (402)342 3836 fax (402)342 3819 Thea Sc [28 minutes]

  • Button Up, A Long Time (#845)

    Feature #1: 'Button Up' Elda Dolash button collector. Feature #2: 'A Long Time' Baseball Manager George Long Feature #3: 'Mozart is Missing' UNI professor finds lost work of Mozart Feature #1: 'Buttoned Up'; Producer Chris Gourley; Contact: Elda Dolash; Phone: 319-232-5671; Address: 404 Wilshire Ave.; Waterloo, Iowa 50701 Storyline: Elda Dolash is known in the Waterloo area as the 'Button Nut.' It's a name she doesn't mind being called, especially if people remember the name and save their buttons for her. Elda started collecting buttons over 22 years ago but couldn't tell you how many buttons she's collected since then. Elda shared with us her collection of buttons and took us to a meeting where we found out that she isn't the only button nut in the Waterloo Phone response: What have you lost that you'd give anything to find? Feature #2: 'A Long Time'; Producer Marlin Schram; Contact: See producer Storyline: This is a story about a baseball legend in his hometown of Muscatine, Iowa. At 91-years-old, George Long, Sr. was the oldest manager in baseball history. We taped this story in the summer of 1997 and sadly George passed away in January of 1998. His life was dedicated to the game of baseball, his players and his hometown. The Muscatine Red Sox is a semipro team George started in 1931 and kept going through the depression. Back then many big-leaguers played exhibition games including Babe Ruth who hit two out of the park in a game for George. The Indianapolis Clowns were the 'Globetrotters' of baseball, a black traveling all-star team that George also owned and managed. George never owned a car and walked all over town selling advertising to raise money for the team. His spirit kept the team going for what George said had to be a record, 67 consecutive winning seasons. Feature title for air: 'Mozart is Missing' Producer: Shepard Contact: David J. Buch; Phone: 319-273-2761; Address: University of No. Iowa; Cedar Falls , Iowa; Please cont [27 minutes]

  • Lion King, Rhyme and Reason (#846)

    Feature #1: 'Lion Kings' Two town cats Feature #2: 'Rhyme and Reason' Girls Group Home poetry Feature #3: 'Farm Safety 4 Kids' Feature #1: Lion Kings Producer: Heather Contact: Spencer Library Phone: 712-264-7290 Address: Vickie Myron, Director, 21 East 3rd Street, Spencer, Iowa 51301-4131 Contact: Kirby Ralph Contact name cleared? YES Storyline: Two tabbies who their entire towns. Dewey Readmore Books, lion king of the Spencer Library, and Conrad Dewey is currently Iowa ality and a sense of fun that has captured the hearts of people from as far away as London. Tom is an equally pampered people pleaser. In Conrad, he written to give him full run of the place. In nice weather, he ly wait for a store or post office door to open, and choose the best windows and chairs for his lounging. Phone Response: Where do you find privacy? Feature #2: 'RHYME AND REASON Producer: Tundel; Contact: See producer Storyline: Like many teen treatment programs, the Children and Families of Iowa Girls Group Homes offer a variety of ways to help once troubled youth get back on their feet - utilizing everything from individual and group counseling to a strict series of house rules. But for the girls at the program's Newton group homes, poetry seems to be as important as any other element in their treatment programs. If you stop by and visit either of the two Newton group homes, you're sure to find at least one girl who's either writing or talking about poetry. Feature #3: 'Farm Safety 4 Kids' Producer: Bower Contact: Marilyn Adams Phone: 515-758-2827 Address: 110 S Chestnut Ave. PO Box 458, Earlham, Iowa 50072 Contact name Cleared? YES Storyline: Marilyn Adams lost her son Keith in a framing accident in 1986 when he suffocated after becoming trapped [28 minutes]

  • Flight Plan, Patee Perry (#847)

    Feature #1: 'Flight Plan,' Bob Anderson sacrifices to raise and release peregrine falcons. Feature #2: 'Pattee Perry,' Hotel in Perry renovation by former rich resident. Feature #3: 'Testing Her Mettle,' Judy Hoit is an advocate for the physically challenged. Feature #1: Flight Plan; Producer: Chris Gourley; Contact: Bob Anderson; Phone: (319)382-6300; Address: 2580 310th Street, Ridgeway, Iowa 52165 Storyline: DDT pushed the peregrine falcon to the brink of extinction. Today only two pairs of peregrines nest in Iowa, both in urban areas, on man made structures. Bob Anderson dreams that someday the skies over Iowa will be filled with peregrines that will live not in cities but in the wild where they belong. To realize his dream Bob has given up his job, his home, and most of his savings to raise the peregrines which he will eventually release into the wild. Phone response: What Iowa treasures are we in danger of losing? Feature #2: Pattee Perry; Producer: Jack Shepard; Contact: Ann Zimmerman, The Public Relations Group HYPERLINK mail to: PRGDM@aol.com; Phone: 243-4123; Address: Hotel Pattee, 1112 Willis Avenue PO Box 307 Perry, IA 50220 Phone: (515)465-3511 Storyline: When Roberta Green Ahmanson was growing up in Perry, the Hotel Pattee was THE place for those important events like wedding receptions and anniversary parties. And she especially remembers Sunday lunches and sitting at the counter with a cool dish of chocolate ice cream. Those days are long gone, but thanks to Roberta, the hotel isn Rescued by Roberta from a fate common to many other small town hotels, the hotel has been completely restored. Originally opened in 1913, the doors were reopened exactly 84 years later. Living in Iowa n Halgren joins Roberta for a guided tour of the hotel she to the people and history of her hometown. Rooms are dedicated and decorated for former famous residents, famous hotel guests, and for the many ethnic groups that came together t [28 minutes]

  • Collectors, Ice Cream Scoops, Turn A New Leaf (#848)

    Feature #1: Collectors 'Ice Cream Scoops and Bowling Balls' Feature #2: Collectors 'Turn a New Leaf' Tea leaf collectors/ Marti & Chuck Peterson Feature #3: Collectors 'The Key Chain To Life' and 'Toolin' Around' Feature #1: Ice Cream Scoops and Bowling Balls; Producer: Tundel Contact: Jeff Crookshank; Phone: (515)479-2788; Address: Marshalltown Contact name cleared? Yes Storyline: To put it simply, Jeff Crookshank likes things that are shiny. Couple that with his love for ice cream and you'll understand (well, at least to a small degree) his ice cream scoop collection. Jeff has over 175 ice cream scoops, but admits to actually using only one. He's also expanded his collection to include ice cream related collectibles - including 25 straw holders and a variety of ice cream fountain table and chair sets. And while he originally intended to keep his collection limited to an ice cream theme, he admits his eye has wandered and he now collects lawn sprinklers as well. He tells us they're really shiny. Contact: Rich Michaels; Phone: work 284 2996 at Meredith; Address: 4308 Maple Street; home 223 8611; West Des Moines, IA 50265 Contact name cleared? Yes Storyline: Rich Michaels isn't all that fond of bowling. But bowling BALLS, well, they're right up his alley. For this art director, bowling balls fall into the category of decoration rather than recreation and his living room is proof of his curious obsession. Recently Rich recycled some of his collectibles, returning them to thrift stores, but still has over 20 bowling balls just striking a pose in his West Des Moines home. And while you might think that a bowling ball collection would be enough to keep a collector content, Rich just couldn't stop there. He also collects ashtrays in the shape of states, pottery, ceramics, furniture, pitchers and tinker toys. Phone response: What are you addicted to? Feature #2: Turn A New Leaf; Producer: Heather; Contact: Marti and Chuck Peterson; Phone: 71 [27 minutes]

  • Grandfather's Wish, Know News Is Good News (#849)

    Feature #1: 'Grandfather's Wish,' Ray Young Bear, Meskwaki Author and Artist. Feature #2: 'Know News is Good News,' Classic Iowa Journalists Ed Sidey, Adair and Carolyn Gage, Villisca. Feature #1: Grandfather's Wish; Producer: Marlin Schram; Contact: See Producer Storyline: The life and times of Ray Young Bear are visualized in this Living in Iowa feature. A Meskwaki author, poet and performing artist, Ray has been writing for about 30 years creating volumes of published poetry and is currently working on his third book. Ray's first two novels were fictionalized memoirs combining his own experiences, characters, situations from his imagination and family stories. Meskwaki spirituality, prophecy, tribal lore and history and casino gambling are several of the topics that Ray tackled in his novels through the eyes of the fictional character, Edgar Bearchild. Living in Iowa shares Ray s a writer through his readings and commentary about his life as a member of the Meskwaki Nation of Central Iowa near Tama. We ss a performance in song and dance by Ray, his wife, Stella, and their nephew, Rocky. Phone response: What do your neighbors do that makes you mad? Feature #2: Know News is Good News; Producer: Shepard, Gourley; Contact: See Producers Storyline: Iowa has more newspapers per capita than any place in the country and perhaps the world In an era when national media have become so dominant, it ber how important the small town newspapers and their editors and reporters are. This generation is aging and may soon be gone and forgotten. With them will go their stories and their insight. A group of U of I students and their two professors are busy making sure that these classic journalists and the skills they honed are not forgotten. Through oral histories of over 100 Iowa journalists, they hope to preserve and honor the men and women who wrote the stories. Living in Iowa spends some time with Carolyn Gage, publish [28 minutes]

  • Out of Hitler's Reach, A Circular Argument (#850)

    Feature #1: 'Out of Hitler's Reach' Scattergood Hostel Feature #2: 'A Circular Argument' Crop Circles. Feature #1: 'Out of Hitler's Reach'; Producer: Tundel; Contact: Michael Luick-Thrams; C/o Bud and Phyllis Luick; 15118 Lark Ave.; Mason City, IA 50401 Storyline: Most people known about Oskar Schindler and the 1100 lives he saved during the Holocaust. However, few know of the Quaker farmers and college kids who saved 185 European refugees right here in West Branch, Iowa. From 1939 to 1943, the Iowa prairies became a safe haven for those trying to escape Hitler. Here Europeans found refuge at the Scattergood Hostel, a temporary community run by Quakers in what had been a Quaker boarding school. Unlike so many who turned a blind eye to the atrocities in Europe, a group of Quakers in the middle of the Iowa cornfields opened their arms and their hearts to those in need. With the help of these Iowans, the refugees were give an opportunity to live as well as a place to overcome the trauma of their experiences in Europe and find a new life in the United States. This story was nearly lost - as most of the refugees had chosen to put the past behind them and the Quakers weren't interested in publicizing their own good work. However, through the research of Iowa native Michael Luick-Thrams, this story has been brought to light - and can perhaps be an example to us today of just how much simple human kindness can accomplish. Phone response: What goes best with chocolate? Feature #2: 'A Circular Argument' Producer: Fritz J ress: BLT Research Team Box 127 Cambridge, MA 02140 (617) 492-0415 Contact #2: Beverly J. Trout State Director -- MUFON 103 W. North, Apt. 103 Truro, Iowa 50257 (515) 765-4317 Contact #3: Brett Anderson 24611 610th Avenue Nevada, Iowa 50201 (515) 382-4091 Storyline: During the fall of 1996, Brett Anderson of Nevada, ran across three mysterious circ [27 minutes]

  • Episode #901

    [28 minutes]

  • Little Italy - Iowa Style (#902)

    Indianola Winery - Just north of Indianola a quaint vineyard lies next to a winery and bed and breakfast. The vineyard produces the grapes that Ron Mark, owner of the Summerset Inn and Winery, uses to make his wine. WW II Pilots Book - Dick Munsen was a 22-year-old World War II pilot flying his 23rd mission when German warplanes forced him to bail his B-17. Landing in Nazi-controlled Yugoslavia, Dick with his crew of 10 begin their 45-day journey to safety. Fifty years later, Dick's wife Kay has compiled the surviving crew's memories into the book 'Bailout Over the Balkans.' [26 minutes]

  • Dreams Take Flight (#903)

    Since childhood, Randy Hartman and Bernie Hayes have had dreams of flying and building flying machines. Fifteen years ago they embarked on a mission to build a plane and fly it to the premiere airshow in the country in Oshkosh, Wisconsin. LIVING IN IOWA follows Randy and Bernie and their home-built aircraft from Cedar Rapids to Oshkosh to be there for its exciting first flight. See if their dreams will come true at the airshow, where the pair hopes to win the competition for the best built plane. [27 minutes]

  • Memories (#904)

    FEATURE #1: 'Memories'-Kintzle Farm Family video FEATURE #2: 'Food for Thought'-Serbian Cafe FEATURE #3: 'A Mazing Cornfield'-Corn Maze UPDATE: Peregrine Falcons-CLOSE: Neil Smith National wildlife Refuge & Prairie Learning Center FEATURE #1: : Memories Producer Chris Gourley Contact: Gloria Kintzle Phone: 319-437-4161 [28 minutes]

  • Bui Family (#905)

    Storyline: Back in 1983, Living in Iowa presented the story of Hien Pham and Ban Van Bui. In 1975, Hien and her 10 children and mother, boarded a boat, leaving behind their home in Vietnam and winding up in Central Iowa. It would be 7 years before husband ban would make it out of the country to join the family. In January of 1998, son Chap, his wife and four children arrived, making the family complete again. We caught up with the Buis recently at their south side Des Moines home. [28 minutes]

  • Dinosaur / Demarias Yard Battle / Myszka Wrestling Museum / Chapman (#906)

    FEATURE #1: Dinosaur / Demarias FEATURE #2: Yard Battle / Myszka FEATURE #3: Wrestling Museum/Chapman UPDATE: Dawni Hill CLOSE: Seagulls FEATURE #1: Producer: Gourley Contact: Bill Desmarais Phone: 319-377-8578 Address: 1700 25th Avenue - Cedar Rapids, Iowa 52302-1128 Contact name cleared? Yes Storyline: Bill Desmarais' has always been interested in dinosaurs. It's an interest that is shared by a large number of people. This summer Bill who is a science teacher in the Cedar Rapids area, was able to combine his love of dinosaurs with his love of repelling as he traveled to Canada to assist in the mapping of dinosaur foot prints found in the Canadian Rockies. Bill takes us over the edge as scientist to repel to explore FEATURE #2: Father & Son Toy Battle/Eric Myszka Producer: Nikki Tundel Contact: Eric Myszka (Mish – ka) Phone: 319 266 1378 Address: 1315 College Street, Cedar Falls Contact name cleared? __X__Yes Storyline: For many fathers and sons, quality time means watching a baseball game or throwing around a football. For Eric Myszka (Mish – ka) and his father, Leonard, father/son bonding translates into all out war. At least once a year, this Cedar Falls duo battles to the death -- using thousands of toy soldiers, hundreds of miniature tanks and countless plastic cannons. Over the years, they have launched more than 10 wars -- re-enacting everything from World War II to the Civil War – all executed by moving plastic army men around the family garage. While spending hours playing with little army men may sound like kid’s stuff, the Myszka’s take each battle seriously. They spend nearly a year preparing for each battle and now have a war game rulebook that is over half an inch thick. We caught up with this father/son team as they were re-enacting the Battle of Gettysburg. Between small-scale troop advances and imaginary cannon blasts, Leonard and Eric filled us in on the strategies behind their miniature wars as well as the reasons why they love to battle it out. UPDATE: Producer: Bower Dawni Hill Contact: Pat Hill (Dawni’s mother) Phone: 515-232-2646 Address: Ames, IA Contact name cleared? __x__Yes Storyline: When we first met Dawni Hill she had been in a horrible car accident. Doctor’s didn’t think she would ever walk or talk again, but Dawni proved them wrong. She started rehabilitation at On With Life in Ankeny and re-learned how to walk, talk, and eat. Even though she is making a remarkable recovery, Dawni faces challenges every day. She has a tremor on the right side of her body that makes it very difficult for her to write and her speaking is better but not consistent. Today, she can walk on her own without a walker. She graduated from High School and now attends DMACC. Her goal is to become independent enough to attend ISU someday. She is working with an advanced computer system to help her write on her own. FEATURE #3: Wrestling Museum/Mike Chapman Producer: Doug Brooker, Nancy Heather Contact: Mike or Bev Chapman Phone: 515-792-4436 Address: P.O. Box 194, Newton, Iowa 50208 Contact name cleared? __X__Yes Storyline: There are wrestling fans and then there are WRESTLING FANS. In 1997, Mike Chapman, a wrestling fan, sports writer, and historian decided it was time to have a museum dedicated to the history of wrestling. He drove across Iowa, looking for just the right location, finally deciding on Newton. Now, with the help of his wife, Bev, and a few thousand hours of volunteer help, he’s opened the 'International Wrestling Institute and Museum.' We’ll walk through Mike’s dream of a museum, rubbing elbows with some of the world’s finest wrestlers, and learning about professional wrestling in the first part of this century. CLOSE:.: Seagulls Producer: Laurel Bower Storyline: We shot this close at Saylorville Lake near the dam. It was going to be on all sorts of water fowl, but I decided to go with the footage on the sea gulls. PHONE: 1(800)383-6124 Comments and Story Ideas [26 minutes]

  • Nashua's Little Brown Church (#907)

    If you want to get married in Nashua's Little Brown Church you'd better take a number -- as more than 600 couples tie the knot there every year. For decades, people have come from near and far to be married in the church and the tradition continues as their children and grandchildren are doing the same. LIVING IN IOWA took the plunge, too, on a day when ministers Linda and Bob Myren conducted a dozen weddings. We'll witness a multitude of marriages as we stop by the Little Brown Church in th Vale. Next, find out how kissing a pig can help stock Quad Cities food shelves as LIVING IN IOWA stops by the area's annual high school food drive. Students from 13 Quad Cities area high schools have definitely found unique ways to encourage people to help the hungry and, in the process, have discovered the spirit of giving to be contagious. For at least 12 years, Quad Cities high schools have competed in a pound-for-pound competition -- collecting enough food each year to keep 100 local shelters and soup kitchens stocked for six months. LIVING IN IOWA meets two of the participants in the 6-week student hunger drive to learn more about the event's success. Then, meet a woman who's using horses to help herself, and others, through life struggles. After the devastating loss of both her home and her husband to Hurricane Andrew, Kathryn Russell wanted to get as far away from the coast as possible. With her life turned upside down, she decided to move her horse ranch to Winterset. Today, she's using her horses to help special needs children overcome their everyday challenges. LIVING IN IOWA visits with Kathryn and finds out how she's learned to live life to the fullest once again. We'll also update you on artist John Deason of Muscatine whose history/photography project was featured on in LIVING IN IOWA in 1993. We'll check in on his latest endeavor which has him walking the 5th principal Meridian. [28 minutes]

  • Episode #908

    [26 minutes]

  • The Best of Living In Iowa 1998 (#909)

    LIVING IN IOWA host Morgan Halgren picked her favorite stories from 1998 for a special Best of LIVING IN IOWA Friday, January 1 at 8:30 p.m. and Sunday, January 3 at 7:30 p.m. on Iowa Public Television. Morgan visits Glidden and Ralston - which could be mistaken for the twin cities. One in four second graders has a twin at the towns' Community School. Morgan meets with several of these sets of siblings on this week's LIVING IN IOWA. Sometimes a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity comes once every 4,200 years. At least that's the case for John Wenck. The photo he took of the Hale-Bopp comet as it appeared over the skies of Iowa in the spring of '97 won the 'Best of Show' at the Iowa State Fair photography contest. John's picture has not only touched the lives of many, it has also changed the life of this amateur photographer. Look to the skies with this Johnston native on LIVING IN IOWA. Next, out of eastern Iowa - Roy Dixon revolutionizes the art of gravestone etching. For nearly 15 years, this Burlington resident has listened to grieving parents' stories of their lost children. They tell him of their lost toddler's love for 'The Lion King' or their son's childhood football games. Roy absorbs it all and turns the details into art. LIVING IN IOWA joins Roy in his studio, where he spends up to twenty hours a day bringing memories to life. [27 minutes]

  • Iowa's Wild Places - Kurtz (#910)

    Explore Iowa's wild places with photographer Carl Kurtz on this week's LIVING IN IOWA Friday, January 8 at 8:30 p.m. and Sunday, January 10 at 7:30 p.m. on Iowa Public Television. This LIVING IN IOWA special explores the sights and sounds of Iowa's natural beauty through the lens of Carl Kurtz, one of the state's most recognized nature photographers. Along with Carl's spectacular photos, Iowa's Wild Places features a symphonic mix of natural audio and music created by Iowa musicians. Carl's love of his 'studio' - which stretches form the Mississippi River in the east to the Loess Hills in the west - is preserved on film. See Iowa through his eyes, and find out how he's helping others develop an appreciation of our natural environment. Plus, savor the golden moments he's captured on film. [28 minutes]

  • 5th Principal Meridian Heartland Candles Heartland Candles (#911)

    Featured towns/areas: Muscatine, Durant, Canton, Manchester, Iowa City Walking the Line on Living in Iowa Photographer/historian John Deason has a new project: to walk in the footsteps of Iowa's first surveyors. In 1836, they marked a line in the Iowa wilderness that determined how the Midwest would be parceled out into counties and towns, and where roads would run. More than 150 years later, John Deason searches the path, not just for remnants of those explorers, but also to hear stories of people who now live on that stretch of history. John takes viewers along this week on LIVING IN IOWA, Friday, January 15 at 8:30 p.m. and Sunday, January 17 at 7:30 p.m. on Iowa Public Television. Also on this week's program, LIVING IN IOWA spends some time with rising star and Manchester native, Susan Werner. Susan, a singer and songwriter, has performed in a variety of locations from the Civic Center in Des Moines to the Beacon Theater in New York City. She recently released her fourth CD, 'Time Between Trains,' which includes songs that interpret life and love with Midwestern honesty. Morgan Halgren walks and muses with Susan about the makings of a modern minstrel, and the LIVING IN IOWA cameras also capture Susan in a live performance in Ames. Mike and Lynette Richards' small business, Heartland Candles, is not known only for their candles, but also for its employees. These Iowa City residents employ those who find themselves homeless, disadvantaged, and disabled. We'll update this story with news of their inventive new soybean-based candles. With recent reports of the possible carcinogenic properties of paraffin, these candles are considered a major breakthrough. Finally, enjoy the late fall color and solitude of Wildcat Den State Park near Muscatine. Join LIVING IN IOWA Fridays at 8:30 p.m. and Sundays at 7:30 p.m. on all Iowa Public Television stations: Channel 32, Waterloo; Channel 11, Des Moines; Channel 12, Iowa City; Channel 21 Fort Dodge; Channel 24, Mason City; Channel 27, Sioux City; Channel 32 Council Bluffs; and Channel 36, Red Oak. LIVING IN IOWA invites phone calls at 800-383-6124 and email at: lii@iptv.org. Suggested TV listing: 'Living in Iowa' 5th Principal Meridian The Manchester Minstrel Heartland Candles [29 minutes]

  • An Amish Friend/The Spinning Lady African-American Farmer Swamp White Oak Savanna (#912)

    NEW: FEATURE #1: Swamp White Oak FEATURE #2: Black Farmer/Cornelius FEATURE #3: Amish Book Author/Davis UPDATE: Spinning Woman/Eleanore Mast CLOSE: Rochester Cemetery FEATURE #1: Swamp White Oak Savanna (My One and Only) Producer: Nancy Heather Contact: Nature Conservancy Phone: (515) 244-5044 Address: 108 Third Street, Suite 300, Des Moines, Iowa 50309-4758 E-mail address: gbr@netins.net Web page?: national organization has one, theirs is still in the works Contact name cleared? ___x_Yes Storyline: The typical American love story is boy meets girl. But this week, Living in Iowa tells a love story with deeper roots, a story of the love of the land. We p White Oak Savanna, a place which not only has caused naturalists and conservationists to swoon, but also has attracted attention from some of the neighbors. What makes it so special is the fact that this area has an unique blend of trees, grasses, and wildlife. This blend used to be common along Iowa waterways, but the rich soil it created has long since gone to agricultural use. Scientists are excitedly studying the area to see what can be learned about how nature balances life along an often-flooded river bank area. FEATURE #2: Black Farmer/Gary Cornelius - (Okra Dude) PRODUCER: Chris Gourley Contact: Gary Cornelius Contact name cleared? No Storyline: When it comes to farming Gary Cornelius is in a minority. He's in a minority because he's one of only 33 African Americans that farm in Iowa. Compared to other farmers in the state, the size of his operation makes him small potatoes, but he's been influential in farm policy throughout the U.S, by serving on several ag committees which look after the interests of both small, and minority farmers. UPDATE: Update Spinning Lady ucer: Bower Contact: Eleanore Mast Phone: 319-291-8111 Address: Apt. 318 /Waterloo, Iowa 50702-5278 Contact name cleared? Yes Storyline: We did a story on Eleanore in 1994. S [28 minutes]

  • Sixth Grade Opera, Nutty Professor (#913)

    Featured towns / areas Carson, Macedonia, Mt. Vernon, Creston, Ruthven, Ames Sixth Grade Opera -Sixth Grade Creates Opera - The sixth grade class of Riverside Middle School in Carson, Iowa stage an original opera each year. All 55 students divide into committees to make sure everything from writing and set construction to make-up are covered. With minimal adult supervision the students learn responsibility, creativity and general life skills. This year's opera is, 'There's No I in Teamwork.' Nutty Professor -Art and Life - Cornell College professor Hugh Lifson is retiring at age 60. Eccentric and flamboyant, he tags all of his e-mail messages with the quote, 'The difference between art and life is that you can do something about art.' Meet this popular professor who started wrapping his paintings in plastic-wrap back in 1966 because he liked the layering effect and thought plastic was beautiful. Officer Springer -Ride-Along - Sam Springer is an activist in his community of Creston, in fact he rides along with Captain Lonnie Novy in the Ride-Along program with the Creston Police Force. Sam has been so vigilant in upholding the law that the police swore him in as an official officer with his own badge and radio code number. Learn how this has not only been a great opportunity for Sam, who has cerebral palsy, but has also benefited the police force. Tim Wiegand update -See the progress of Tim Wiegand, an ISU pre-med student who fought the effects of chemotherapy through Tae Kwan Do. He was married in 1998 and is enjoying his fourth year of remission. Psychedelic Bubbles -The program closes with psychedelic colors moving on the surface of bubbles. If you're 'forever blowing bubbles,' you'll love seeing their secret lives as we zoomed in on the ebbs and flows of rivers of color as they flow and shape shift. Each one of the patterns we captured was on the surface of a bubble, and the area was less than as square inch! [28 minutes]

  • Underground Railroad (#915)

    Underground Railroad During the years leading up to the U.S. Civil War, slaves escaping from Missouri and Nebraska traveled West to East across Iowa, making their way to Canada with the help of what has come to be known as the underground railroad. Although the vast majority of their travels were above ground and on foot, they were given assistance along the way by 'conductors,' Iowans whose anti-slavery sympathies induced them to help the fugitives to freedom. In the upcoming book, 'Outside In: African American History in Iowa, Galin Berrier explores the history of the underground railroad, the people who made it run and the people who rode it to liberty. [28 minutes]

  • Quad Cities Kidney Transplant (#916)

    Quad Cities Kidney Transplant Terry Buckwalter owns a tavern in the Quad Cities. Dewitt Pollard is a bus driver who has been one of Terry's customers for 20 years. When Terry's kidney disease had advanced to the point that he needed a transplant, he half jokingly offered free drinks for life to the donor. Dewitt Pollard stepped forward, not out of thirst, but out of friendship. The surgery took place in November, both men are recuperating and getting ready to resume their normal lives. It's a touching story that takes on even more significance because of the fact that Dewitt Pollard is a black man and Terry Buckwalter is white. For the University of Iowa Hospitals in Iowa City, theirs was the first kidney transplant between live interracial donors. We'll introduce you to two men whose expression of friendship can teach us all something about brotherhood. [28 minutes]

  • Peregrine Falcons (#917)

    The half-hour special,examines Bob Andersen, of Bluffton, whose personal sacrifice to rescue and re-introduce peregrine falcons to Iowa is inspiring. Though peregrines recently have been removed from the endangered species list, producer Chris Gourley notes there are only two breeding pair of falcons in Iowa. 'A lot of people think they should still be considered at least threatened and not taken off the list completely,' Gourley says. Andersen would be one person who agrees. He quit his job and sunk his life savings into a project aimed at saving the falcons, arguably the world's fastest bird. Falcons have been clocked at 210 miles per hour in a dive. Gourley and cameraman Kris Knight spent three months tracking two male falcons, from the moment they broke free of the egg to the point where they begin to fly. [27 minutes]

  • Pencilman Dollyville The Picture That Launced 1,000 Parodies (#918)

    FEATURE#1: :'Pencilman' (pencil collector)/Stephan Contact: Bill & Dorine Stephan Phone: (515)436-8285 Address:105 W. Percival, Rippey, IA 50235 Storyline: Bill Stephan is a blunt man who likes sharp sticks. He's a pencil collector. And he says he's collected 35-thousand pens and pencils which is nothing to shake a stick at! The point of his avocation is to travel the world without leaving home. He's made pencil pals in countries as far away as Japan and New Zealand. And with the pencils which come to him already sharpened, he creates schoolhouses, hay wagons, windmills, and even a hearse which he remembers from his childhood. FEATURE #2: 'Dollyville' (doll collector) Ranniger Contact: Grace Ranniger Phone: (712) 652 3458 Address: 1001 Jefferson Street, Scranton Storyline: Over the last 40 years, Grace Ranniger has searched swap meets and garage sales looking for discarded dolls that 'just needed someone to love em'. She welcomes each new doll to her home, washing and curling its hair, bathing it and making it a new outfit. Today Grace has over 2500 dolls and they fill nearly every square inch of her Scranton home. We'll tour of Grace's Dollyville - taking in everything from the 'Birthday Party Room' to the 'Couple's Commune.' And we'll cuddle up to Grace and some of her plastic friends. FEATURE #3: : 'The Picture that Launched a Thousand Parodies' (American Gothic) Storyline: Usually when we hear the expression 'picture this' it's and invitation to let our imaginations paint the picture. So let's begin picture Iowa's most famous painting….What do you see? For many of you, I'm sure you envision Grant Wood's painting, 'American Gothic.' We visit Stone City and view a collection of American gothic caricatures from around the world. Grant Wood's portrait of his sister and his dentist has come to symbolize the heartland. Most of us have probably even pictured our relatives or neighbors as the famous couple who exude the essence of the 'mid-western character.' This popularity has not been lost to the advertising world. And, it would be hard to think of a famous face that hasn't been substituted in(to) the picture…the list includes everyone from Mickey Mouse to presidents of the United States. 2/99-New Outro info: Price is still collecting Grant Wood parodies. Some of his collection can be seen at the Anamosa Tourism and Art Center. Every so often, he gets a call from a school that wants him to speak about his collection. He invites everyone to visit him and see some of his collection, which he keeps on the second floor of the blacksmith shop in Stone City, when they come to the annual Grant Woods Art Festival held the 2nd Sunday every June. CLOSE: : Doodlebugs/Webster City Contact: Vern Radcliff Phone: (515) 832-2432 Address: 607 2nd Street Webster City, Iowa 50595 Storyline: Small motorscooters know as Doodlebugs were built in Webster City in 1946, 47 and 48. For the last several years Doodlebug enthusiast have been getting together at the Webster City fairgrounds to share some memories and show their scooters. We went to the reunion to take in some of the two wheel fun. 2/99-INFO FOR 900 SERIES OUTRO: In 96 they had their 10th annual reunion which also marked the 50th anniversary of doodle bugs. Over 80 people attended from over 20 states. The reunion is held in Webster City the 2nd full weekend after Labor Day, every September. [27 minutes]

  • What Cheer Opera House (#919)

    FEATURE#1: 'Dalziel Me' (What Cheer Opera House)- Storyline: The What Cheer Opera House was built in 1893 so it obviously has 'scene' a lot of history. The ancestors of the couple we taped performing at the opera house also go way back in time. Musician, Scott Dalziel's great-grandfather, Jimmy Dalziel, was an accomplished trumpet player who came to What Cheer from Scottland in 1882 and led the What Cheer Scotch Band for 59 years. This feature will take us on a short historical tour of the opera house, led by board member Ralph Helmick, we'll see a performance by Scott and Michelle Dalziel and we'll learn a little history about the What Cheer Scotch Band and it's leader Jimmy Dalziel. FEATURE #2: 'Simply Divine' (Belmond Pastor) Celestyne De Vance Contact: Celestyne DeVance Phone: Address: Belmond, IA Storyline: Celestyne DeVance and her husband, Curtis, both Methodist pastors found their way to the flat plains of north-central Iowa last summer. They had been appointed to small all white rural churches. This African American couple from Baltimore were brought to Iowa because the Methodist conference was aggresively recruiting ethnic minorities. Celestyne is pastor for Belmond's United Methodist Church. Since she was appointed, church attendance has tripled and the people of Belmond have received her well. They appreciate her energy and enthusiasm that comes out in her sermons. Celestyne brings a warmth to the sanctuary that her parishioners welcome. UPDATE: Canoe Trail Contact: Lost Island Prairie Wetland Nature Center Phone: (712)837-4866 Address: 3259 355th Street, Ruthven, IA 51358 Storyline: In a vast wetland area in Northwest Iowa, a series of small lakes and marshes make a wonderful area to see by canoe or small boat. In the fall of '97 Living in Iowa introduced you to Steve Swan who was in the process of marking a canoe trail through that area near his home. Last summer (of '98) we went back to see how he was progressing and captured some more interesting details along his trail. FEATURE #3: 'Artist in Residence' (Cultural Affairs) Dan Hunter Contact: Dan Hunter, Director of Iowa Department of Cultural Affairs Phone: 281-7471 Address: Hotel Fort Des Moines Storyline: Dan Hunter is a man who wears many hats. He's probably best known as a singer/songwriter who has made hay poking fun at politicians, both local and national. At the same time, though, Dan Hunter Creative Services was busy providing media and strategic services to political candidates. Dan is also an accomplished poet, playwright and screenwriter, having written musicals and comedies, in addition to books of poetry and prose. Along the way, he's been teaching songwriting, playwriting and creative writing to K thru 12 students funded by grants from the Iowa Arts Council. Today, as director of Iowa's Department of Cultural Affairs, Dan has come back home to Iowa to dole out those grants. Living in Iowa spent some time with this enigmatic political appointee at his home base: The State Historical Building; at his temporary home: The Hotel Fort Des Moines; and at the Taidam New Years' Celebration, a cultural affair near and dear to his heart. Dan's wife, Sivika, is a native of Thailand. CLOSE: : Lone Tree Storyline: A lone tree against an evening sky near Manchester. [29 minutes]

  • Road Rally (#920)

    FEATURE#1: A Rally Good Time, On The Road, It's a Gas, Road Warriors (Road Rally ) Patrick Brooks Contact: Pat Brooks Phone: 515-753-9134 Address: 6 W Main St. Marshalltown, Ia 50158-4941 Storyline: What does a 1949 Buick Super 'Woody' Wagon, a Marshalltown lawyer and his wife, and the cities of Paris, France and Peking China have in common? They're all elements in a challenging road rally that covered 12,000 miles and crossed through 13 different countries. Pat and Mary Brooks are no strangers to adventure and their vacations seldom include lounging by the pool. After reading about a vintage car road rally that would start in Peking, China and end in Paris, France, Pat mentioned to Mary that it might be fun. Without batting an eye she agreed and plans for the adventure were quickly put in motion. We follow their tale of the road from their preparation for the rally, to their disappointing break down in Tibet that caused them to leave the race. FEATURE #2 L'Arche Home for the Mentally Handicapped Contact: Jo Anne Horstmann, Director Phone: 319 243 9035 Address: PO Box 0278 Clinton, IA 52733-0278 Storyline: There was a time in our not so distant past when society chose to hide away those who didn't quite fit into mainstream society. For many, life with physical or mental handicaps meant life in an institution. But for the last 25 years, a program in Clinton, Iowa, has been giving the developmentally disabled an opportunity to not only step out of the institutions, but a chance to live fulfilling lives in a family atmosphere as well. This program, called L'Arche, is just one of over 110 communities around the world where people with developmental disabilities, such as cerebral palsy and down's syndrome, join together with assistants to live in a family setting. Here the handicapped, or core members as they are called, live alongside full-time assistants - and all function as any typical family would. Days are filled with morning chores and evening dishes, afternoon walks and dinner conversations. This family is based on the belief that all people, regardless of ability, want the same things out of life - a sense of value and the feeling of belonging. Living in Iowa visited this L'Arche community to soak up the everyday life of this unique family and found the ways this kind of lifestyle can influence our society as a whole. FEATURE #3 Gladys Black Memorial Storyline: Gladys Black was the unofficial 'Birdlady of Iowa' and Iowa Public Television had a long-running relationship with this enigmatic, one-of-a-kind ecologist, ornithologist, educator, and public health nurse. For Gladys, being called a 'birdbrain' was a compliment; after all she, literally, brought sick and injured birds right into her home. Spending a day with Gladys was like traveling with an old country doctor that still made house calls, visiting individual bird nests, monitoring the environmental health of the entire area, as well as plucking baby birds from their nest for a routine physical. Gladys radiated an appreciation for the natural world and this enjoyment was infectious to the hundreds of grade-schoolers that came through her bird banding station during Red Rock Days and the Knoxville high school students she took under her wing for special environmental projects. When it came to public debate over environmental concerns, it didn't take much to ruffle her feathers. She was frequently in the spotlight of the public discussion on environmental issues ranging from the catastrophic effects of DDT on bird reproduction to the debate on the hunting of Mourning Doves in Iowa. She wrote two books on birds and she wrote a column for several central Iowa newspapers, including the Des Moines Register, which frequently touched off heated discussion, to which Gladys gladly joined. CLOSE: Prairie in Waiting The beauty of an Iowa prairie doesn't disappear with the end of the growing season. It merely changes colors - from the bright, showy colors of summer, to the softer, more subtle shades of fall and winter. [28 minutes]

  • Service with a Tailwag Sunderman Oil of War and Weddings (#921)

    Feature One: Service with a Tailwag (Service Dog/Jalayne Noonan) Producer: Marlin Schram CONTACT: Pause with a Cause National Headquarters: 4646 South Division, Wayland, MI 49348 Phone: 1-800-253-PAWS (7297) Web Page: www.pawswithacause.org E-mail: paws@ionline.com Storyline: Jalayne Noonan worked for Friends of Iowa Public Television until a car accident in 1995 left her paralyzed and in a wheel chair. Gloria Anderson, a secretary for Living in Iowa, suggested the service dog idea to millionaire philanthropist, Percy Ross. With his initial donation a fund raising drive put up the $10, 000 necessary to purchase a trained service dog from the non-profit organization, Paws with a Cause. Jalayne had to wait one year for a suitable dog to be chosen and trained at the Pause with a Cause facility in Michigan. The dog, Garner, will literally and psychologically open doors for Jalayne along with 33 other tasks like retrieving the phone, getting help and picking up dropped items. For Jalayne, the wait was worth it since her new best friend will help Jalayne rise to a new level of independence and freedom. Feature Two: Sunderman Oil (Floyd Sunderman) Producer: Shepard Storyline: 89-year-old Floyd Sunderman runs Sunderman Oil and Tank Service outside of Griswold, Iowa. It's an old fashioned, low-tech station that's short on convenience but long on personality. It's that one-of-a-kind type of gas station that may not be around much longer, with the onslaught of Casey's and Quiktrips. Floyd Sunderman owns the station and he's the kind of guy who loves to chat with everybody who stops by. Living in Iowa pulled in to Sunderman's one late winter day and spent some time with Floyd and his friends - the old-timers who sit around the station and chat, the woman Floyd says is just one of his girlfriends, and others. Update: : Project Reality (Show 812) Producer: Tundel Contact: John Goetz Phone: (319) 372 5432 Iowa State Penitentiary, 31 Ave G. PO Box 316, Fort Madison, IA 52627 Update: 'We'll go behind bars for an update on a program that's helping troubled youth get a new take on life. Feature Three: Of War and Weddings (Peacemaker/Jerry Yellin) Producer: Laurel Bower Contact: Jerry Yellin-Phone: 515-472-8886 cell#515-469-9646 Address: 1855 Crystal Springs Lane, Fairfield, IA 52556-9229 Storyline: Jerry Yellin was a fighter pilot in World War II. After many years of hating the Japanese, he started working through this anger and eventually was able to find peace. Today, he speaks to young people about the war, his experiences in it, and how he was able to let go of his hatred for a country he knew only by war. His healing was greatly affected by a trip to Japan years after the war where he met many Japanese people and was moved by their kindness. One of his sons also visited the country and met a Japanese woman whom he married. Her father was also in WWII for Japan and carried with him a deep hatred for the U.S. Together, the two families discovered peace and acceptance. Close: Roadside Daisies Producer: Nancy Heather On a beautiful summer day, we decided not to resist the temptation to stop and smell the roses. Only we sniffed the air in a miniature prairie, just growing alongside the road. [29 minutes]

  • The Principal of Life (#922)

    FEATURE #1: 'The Principal of Life (Principal/Motocross)Kittie Weston-Knauer FEATURE #2 'Hold The Line' (Draft Horses)/Jake Brandt FEATURE #3: 'His and Her-story' (family histories/Genealogy): UPDATE Fort Des Moines Black Officers Memorial CLOSE: Backbone Secrets FEATURE #1'The Principal of Life (Principal/Motocross)Kittie Weston-Knauer: Producer: Tundel Contact: Kittie Weston-Knauer Phone: 244 0448 at the school Address: Casady Alternative High School, Des Moines Contact name cleared? _x___Yes Storyline: Six years ago, Kittie Weston-Knauer fell from her BMX bike and found herself paralyzed from the neck down. Lying in her hospital bed, the motocross champion swore she'd walk out of the hospital. A week later, she did. Today this high school principal uses that experience as a motivator - both for herself and for her students at Casady Alternative High School in Des Moines. Dealing with a population plagued by drug addiction, sexual abuse and teenage pregnancy, it's sometimes hard to feel as though you're reaching students. But for Kittie, bicycle motocross racing has helped to bridge the gap. When students come into her office, they are met by walls of racing trophies and, whether they verbalize it or not, they can't help but see their 50-year old principal in a new light once they learn she's ranked 5th in the nation in the sport of BMX racing. FEATURE #2: 'Hold The Line' (Draft Horses)/Jake Brandt Producer: Marlin Schram Contact: Jake Brandt Phone: (515)847-2990 Address: 2190 30th Street, Ackley, Iowa 50601 Contact name cleared? __X__Yes Storyline: Jake Brandt grew up in the era before tractors roared over the farm fields. Back in the good old days when horsepower meant just that and each horse in the team knew its name and what to do when pulling the various farm implements around the back 40. Jake's son, Jim and Jim's preschool son Little Jake, are inheriting their father's love of these gentle giants. Grandpa Jake is now retired but a few acres are still reserved for his team of Belgian draft horses. Jake lives for the sensation of driving a team on top of his one bottom plow. UPDATE: Fort Des Moines Black Officers Memorial Producer: Bower Contact: Robert Morris Phone: (515) 237-8152 Address: 3700 SE 18th Court Des Moines, IA Storyline: Copy from 1998: In February of 1997, we brought the story of Des Moines attorney and military historian William Morris to our viewers as a part of Black History Month. He was writing a chapter on the military history of black Iowans, specifically the 1,250 black men who came to Fort Des Moines in 1917 for World War I officers training. It was the United States Army's first training camp for black officers. Recently, the Fort Des Moines Black Officers Memorial, Incorporated commissioned renowned Chicago sculptor Richard Hunt to build a $225,000 memorial in Des Moines to honor these black officers. FEATURE#3: 'His and Her-story' (Family Histories/Genealogy) Producer: Gourley/Morgan CONTACT: Chris Gourley, Theresa Liewer Phone: 515-242-3188 (515)-457-7851 Address:: IPTV E-mail address: gourley@iptv.org Storyline: At one time family histories were shared when families gathered. Whether it was on the front porch as they watched the world pass around the dinner table, the tales of Aunt Betsy or how Great Grandpa Joe crossed the ocean on a sailing ship to live in America, often were topics of conversation. As families have spread out, the opportunities to find out about yourself, by finding out a little about who you're related to, have decreased. Perhaps that's why genealogy has become such a popular past time. We visited with some people who have been looking for the family jewels on the family tree. Sometimes what they find are nuts. CLOSE: Backbone Secrets ( Producer: Heather Unusual rock formations harbor hidden insects and plants, on a 'backbone' of rocks cut out by water and time in North East Iowa PHONE: 1(800)383-6124 Comments and Story Ideas [28 minutes]

  • Yidl in the Middle (#923)

    FEATURE #1 'YIDL IN THE MIDDLE'(GROWING UP JEWISH IN IOWA) Marlene Booth FEATURE #2: 'I BELIEVE I CAN FLY' (Hidden Heroes)/Taylor,Miller,Dodd UPDATE: 'SAVE THE NIGHT SKY' David Oesper CLOSE: 'Loess Hills Steam' FEATURE#1: YIDL IN THE MIDDLE'(GROWING UP JEWISH IN IOWA) Marlene Booth Producer: Shepard Contact: Marlene Booth Phone: 617-547-2865 Address: Cambridge, MA Contact name cleared? - Please see producer E-mail address: mj_booth@yahoo.com Storyline: When Des Moines native, Marlene Booth, told her friends in Massachusetts that she had grown up Jewish in Iowa, they joked that she must have been the only one. To prove to them that there was, indeed, a thriving Jewish community in Des Moines, Marlene, a filmmaker, decided to make a documentary about growing up Jewish in Iowa. Along the way, though, her motivation for making the film changed. While reviewing her life in Des Moines, Marlene realized that she had lived a double life, her Judaism stopping at the front door of her home and synagogue. So she set out to discover why so much time and effort had been expended censoring in public the Jewish parts of herself. 'Yidl in the Middle,' is Marlene Booth's story of growing up in a world where 'being Jewish wasn't for show and tell.' Living in Iowa went along with Marlene for a screening of the film and discussions at West High in Iowa City and at the Middle School in Red Oak. UPDATE: 'SAVE THE NIGHT SKY Producer: Marlin Schram INTERNATIONAL DARK SKY ASSOCIATION E-mail address: ida@darksky.org Web page: www.darksky.org Local Contact: Dave Oesper Phone: (515)233-0117 E-mail address: daveoesper@aol.com Contact names cleared? __X__Yes Storyline: David Oesper, of Ames, is an amateur astronomer with a passion for pulsars and planets. But there's a problem. More and more city lights are drowning out our night sky with light pollution. Dave is part of an organization called the International Dark-Sky Association, whose mission is to build awareness of the problem of light pollution and provide solutions and education about quality nighttime lighting. New light fixtures can dramatically make a difference by directing the light down where it is needed instead of shining up wastefully to the heavens. Urban sky glow is destroying mankind's view of the universe. You wouldn't put up with other kinds of pollution, why lose our night sky for no good reason but ignorance. A brilliant starry view in remote locations is almost a religious experience to those who enjoy looking up. The National Observatory near Tucson was saved by a city that took steps to reduce the night glow from its city lights. FEATURE #2: 'I BELIEVE I CAN FLY' (Hidden Heroes ) / Taylor, Miller, Dodd Producer: Laurel Bower Contact: Sharon Zanders / CCI Phone: 515-225-0800 Address: 2301 Forest Ave. Des Moines, IA 50311 -Contact name cleared? __x__ Storyline: An organization called Youth Working for a Positve Change has nominated young people in the community to be Hidden Heroes for the last three years. YWPC is a group of young people who are active in the community and they have different leaders send them nominations of young people who have overcome obstacles in their life. These Hidden Heroes receive a plaque at a banquet in their honor. Living in Iowa chose three Hidden Heroes by the names of Jamilla Taylor, George Miller, and Brandon Dodd. Jamilla is a 20-year old who had a son at the age of 16. She has been on her own since she was 15 and took care of her younger sister and her son. She went on to graduate from high school and is now attending Hamilton Business College. George is an 18-year old who is attending Casady Alternative School and also volunteers and works at Urban Dreams. He was finding himself going in a negative direction and with the help of Urban Dreams and the strength within himself, he is getting his life back on track. Brandon is a 16-year old who once attended PACE alternative and is being integrated into the normal school system at Hoover. His life was a mess just a year ago when he was using and selling drugs, getting arrested, and sent away. He made the decision to get his life in a more positive direction and now attends school and has a job. CLOSE: 'Loess Hills Steam' PHONE: 1(800)383-6124 Comments and Story Ideas [28 minutes]

  • Native American Healer / Liar's Theater/ Medal of Courage / Water Reflections (#924)

    Featured towns/areas: Des Moines, Decorah, Marion, Colfax, Mingo, Indianola Heritage in Healing on Living in Iowa Howard Matalba of Des Moines is taking back something he was denied throughout his childhood. Matalba's Native American parents raised him as a typical American child, but It wasn't until adulthood that he sought to discover his heritage and that discovery changed his life. Since immersing himself in his native culture, Matalba has adapted his traditional teachings to help others. A recovering alcoholic and addict himself, Matalba leads a recovery support group at Iowa Lutheran Hospital where he burns Native American medicines like sage, flat cedar and sweet grass to help purify minds of negative energies. As an outreach counselor for the Iowa Homeless Youth Center, Matalba hits the streets of Des Moines each night in search of youth with no place to go and no one to trust. LIVING IN IOWA spends time with this Native American healer as he uses his ancient heritage to help heal some modern ills. LIVING IN IOWA also discovers why Iowans pay money just to hear lies. They gather to see the 'Liar's Holographic Radio Theater' in the Campbell Steele Art Gallery in downtown Marion. Craig Campbell of Marion writes and organizes the performances, an unusual weaving of songs, poems, and short character studies. That have been called a cross between Garrison Keillor and Red Green. Over a year ago LIVING IN IOWA broadcast the award winning story of Nick Ackerman who lost the lower portions of his legs to meningitis, yet went on to wrestle in the 1997 High School Wrestling Championships. Today, Ackerman is a sophomore at Simpson College in Indianola where he studies Environmental Sciences and wrestles on the varsity team. This summer, he will be awarded the 1999 Medal of Courage from the Wrestling Hall of Fame in Stillwater, Oklahoma. LIVING IN IOWA updates this story and learns more about the power behind Ackerman's mind and body. As always, LIVING IN IOWA closes its weekly program with the sights and sounds of Iowa's natural beauty. This week's scene features a little reflection -- actually a lot of reflections of water on the walls of a rock bluff near Decorah. A spring emerges from a bluff to form Cold Water Creek, and when the right amount of sunshine is added, it creates nature's version of a lava lamp. LIVING IN IOWA invites phone calls at 1-800-383-6124 and email at: lii@iptv.org. Suggested TV listing: 'Living in Iowa' Native American Healer Liar's Theater Medal of Courage Water Reflections [28 minutes]

  • Collectors (#925)

    Featured towns/areas: Brooklyn, Waterloo, Cedar Rapids, Clarion, Central Iowa, Decorah Annual Iowa Collectors Extravaganzaon Living in Iowa Collectors with a taste for the unusual are gathered together on LIVING IN IOWA's annual collectors program. From Presidential signatures to farm and construction machinery toys to candy paraphernalia to Frankie Laine memorabilia, Iowans' collections are taking up more and more space in their hearts and homes. Iowa Public Television's LIVING IN IOWA features a variety of collections and their collectors. Since hearing 1950s recording star, Frankie Laine, sing on the Ed Sullivan Show, Craig Cronbaugh of Brooklyn has been one of his biggest fans. Cronbaugh not only travels to see Laine perform, but also owns clips of Laine's television appearances and nearly every recording the singer has made including those from movies such as 'Gunfight at OK Corral' and 'Blazing Saddles.' This week LIVING IN IOWA takes a closer look at Cronbaugh's collection of the 1950s singer, Frankie Laine. LIVING IN IOWA also uncovers several other Iowan's passions for collecting. James Sawyer's inedible M & M's collection boasts over 600 pieces including store displays, costumes, cook books, t-shirts, watches, earrings, race cars, baseball cards and more. Richard Schrodermier of Cedar Rapids has been collecting presidential signatures since he was a teenager. Schrodermier's collection includes at least one actual letter or document signed by every president. Larry Maasdam of Clarion started collecting toys and construction more than two decades ago. Maasdam has since transformed his basement into a museum lined with shelves and shelves of antique and modern farm and machinery equipment toys, which he estimates to total over 9,000. Maasdam also collects the full-size machinery, including rare pieces from all over the world. Nedra Shearer and her son David have several collections. David collects antique woodworking tools because he uses them in his antique furniture repair business. David recently began to collect old and odd flashlights and garden hose nozzles. Nedra also has a broad assortment of collectibles, including porcelain pincushion dolls, unusual salt and pepper shakers, and cast iron door stops in all sorts of shapes and images. Also, LIVING IN IOWA updates viewers on a talented singing group of South African high school students now living and touring in Iowa. They were first introduced to Iowans in a LIVING IN IOWA documentary special on opera star Simon Estes' work in South Africa. As always, LIVING IN IOWA closes its weekly program with the sights and sounds of Iowa's natural beauty. This week's scene features a spring walk in the rain, through the woods near Decorah. LIVING IN IOWA invites phone calls at 1-800-383-6124 and email at: lii@iptv.org. [28 minutes]

  • Playing with Fire (#926)

    FEATURE #1 'Playing With Fire' (Rocketeer) Barnes: FEATURE #2: 'Taking Root' (Orchid Man) Carson Whitlow FEATURE #3: 'Know the Score' (Game man) Walter Day UPDATE: Acupuncture Veterinarian / Dr. Gary Van Engelenburg CLOSE: 'Lightning' FEATURE#1: ' Playing With Fire' (Rocketeer) Jeff Barnes Producer: Bill Beustring Contact: Jeff Barnes Phone: 319-377-3379 (wk) Address: 292 7th Ave. Marion, IA 52302 E-mail address: 74507,474@cserve.com Contact name cleared? __X__Yes Storyline: Jeff Barnes, an amateur rocketeer, gathers with other amateur rocketeers to shoot off their high-powered rockets. They have launches in remote locations cleared by the FAA and shoot rockets off sometimes as much as 10,000 feet into the air. Barnes is attempting to be certified at level 3-a personal milestone that he's been working on for months. Unfortunately, his attempt fails, and he's left with only wreckage and a hope for a successful attempt in the future. FEATURE #2: 'Taking Root' (Orchid Man) Carson Whitlow Producer: Nancy Heather Contact: Carson Whitlow Phone: (515) 993-4841 (home) Web page: www.orchidmall.com Contact name cleared? __x__Yes Storyline: Orchids grow all over the world, there are 28,000 different varieties found in the wild. And while they can grow everywhere from the arctic circle to the tropics, our own Iowa varieties are facing serious survival problems. They're becoming rare, and even endangered, because they're picky about the elements in their soil. Carson Whitlow of Adel, Iowa has been studying orchids for more than 40 years. And he's one of the top 'orchidologists' in the world. Working with native 'terrestrial' orchids and hybrids from around the world, Carson is trying to not only save our natural heritage, but also to mix his own breeds. UPDATE: Acupuncture Veterinarian / Dr. Gary Van Engelenburg Producer: Marlin Schram Contact: Dr. Gary VanEngelenburg, D.V.M., C.V.A. Phone: 274-3811 FAX: 274-3887 Address: 7405 University Blvd., Suite 8, Des Moines, IA 50325 E-mail address: apvet@juno.com Contact name cleared? __X__Yes Storyline: In May of 1997 Living in Iowa introduced viewers to Dr. Gary VanEngelenburg, a Veterinarian who began treating his animal patients, from small pets to cows and horses, with acupuncture. Today, Dr. Gary has moved his practice from Sumner to Des Moines and only treats small animals. But, the most interesting change is that he adds Chinese Herbal Therapy to almost all of his patient treatments. FEATURE #3 'Know the Score' (Game man) Walter Day Producer: Nancy Heather Contact: Walter Day Phone: 515-472-3882 Address: 600 North Third Street, Fairfield, Iowa 52556 USA Email: twingalaxies@lisco.com Web page?: http://www.twingalaxies.com/Contact name cleared? ____Yes ____No Storyline: People around the world play games like football, basketball, soccer and ice hockey. Their fans can converse about top players and their statistics. But pinball is also a game played round the world, and there's no international leagues so fans can keep score of the top pinball wizards. But Walter Day has become the self-proclaimed 'scorekeeper of the world of pinball and video game playing.' .' 'Living in Iowa' discovers that Walter is not only a collector of scores, he also collects 'media hits', and he can add this our feature to his list. CLOSE: Lightning Producer: Shepard Storyline: Returning from a late shoot in the Quad Cities last fall, we passed through a thunderstorm incredibly rich with lightning strikes. We pulled off I-80 near Grinnell, set up the camera and captured the light show. PHONE: 1(800)383-6124 Comments and Story Ideas [26 minutes]

  • Mobile Museum of Motor Vehicles (#927)

    Featured towns/areas: Des Moines, Iowa City, Perry, Ottumwa, Coralville, Keokuk, Davenport Mobile Museum of Motor Vehicles on Living in Iowa What happens when 183 vintage vehicles bombard Iowa's blacktops? LIVING IN IOWA hits the road with Motorloway - the state's annual classic car caravan to find out. In 1996 a group of classic car enthusiasts celebrated Iowa's sesquicentennial with a trip across the state, all travelling in cars that were over 25 years old. Today, the participants have turned their tour into an annual event with more than 400 drivers joining in their motorcade. This week's LIVING IN IOWA hitches a ride with MotorIoway and shares in the sights and sounds of the week-long 1,000 mile journey across the state as it passes through more than 30 counties and 80 communities. You're probably familiar with cars with names such as Ford, Chevrolet, or Pontiac but have you ever heard of an Autocar, or an NSU Spider? Living In Iowa goes on tour the MotorIo-way and takes a look at some road proven rolling relics that are really a gas. [26 minutes]

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  • Keepers of The Flags/Finding Mr. Wright/Aaron's Lesson (#928)

    Keepers of the Flags - Don Adams is an upholsterer whose working days are spent at a sewing machine working with needle and thread. Every spring, Don spends much of his free time back behind the sewing machine, repairing U.S. flags. Don is this year's president of 'The Court of Honor,' a 40-member organization that takes care of a huge collection of military burial flags. These flags were used to decorate the coffins of veterans, and were then donated to the Court. Every Memorial Day, Court of Honor members and a large group of volunteers decorate Red Oak's cemetery with the flags, which now number over 1000. Living in Iowa was on hand to meet some of the members of the Court, witness the mass decoration activities, and to share in the Memorial Day spirit. Finding Mr. Wright - With all of the recent attention about Frank Lloyd Wright because of the Ken Burns Documentary, we'd like to show off several of Mr. Wright's architectural works of art here in Iowa including the Stockman house in Mason City that was saved from the wrecking ball and is now a museum, a house near Quasqueton owned and operated by the Iowa DNR, and a house in Eastern Iowa built by the Grants who tell us their impressions of the great American architect, Frank Lloyd Wright. Aaron's Lesson - 8-year-old Aaron Connolly was one of the first mentally and physically disabled students to be mainstreamed into Crossroads Park Elementary School in West Des Moines. That means instead of going to a special education class, Aaron learns right along with his fellow first graders and teaches classmates and teachers some life lessons that go beyond the classroom. Update on WWII Veterans' Monument - WWII POW and veteran, Bruce Longstreet shows us some of the details of the monument that was dedicated in 1996 for Iowa's WWII veterans. [28 minutes]

  • Such A Little Winer/Bailout Over The Balkans/The Circle Turns (#929)

    Such a Little Winer - If you should get lost in Warren county you might find yourself thinking that your wrong turn somehow put you in Italy. Actually you're not lost, we know exactly where you are. You are just north of Indianola at the Summerset Inn and Winery where Ron Mark is both owner and winemaker. From his 9.5 acre vineyard located on Summerset Ridge Ron produces a variety of wines while his wife Linda runs the Bed and Breakfast. From rock and roll guitarist, to motorcycle repairman, to winemaker, Ron tells us that it's not as important to have a dream as it is to be dreaming. Update on The Film Kid - When we first met Justin Eveloff in 1996, he was a wide-eyed 7th grader who liked Nintendo and hoped to produce a full-length feature film before becoming 'an adult.' That year he was a finalist in the student category at the Iowa Film Awards and spent his spare time shooting and editing videos for friends and neighbors -charging $5 an hour. Today Justin is a high school sophomore and is still hooked on television and film production. He's now the co-host of the Iowa Public Television program 'Student Voices' and later this year, 'Living in Iowa' will air a story on the Squirrel Cage Jail -produced by this Council Bluffs 10th grader. (Original feature was from show 626) Bailout Over the Balkans - Dick Munsen was a 22-year old World War II pilot flying his 23rd mission that day back in 1944 when German warplanes known as Faulkwolfs forced him and his crew of 10 to bail out of their B-17. Parachuting down to what was then Nazi-controlled Yugoslavia, the American fly boys had the good fortune to be discovered by a group of Tito's Partisans - forces who were also fighting the Germans. The Partisans escorted the Yanks through their war-torn country on a 45-day journey to safety. 50 years after their ordeal, the surviving crew members have compiled their memories into a book written by Dick Munsen's wife, Kay. 'Bailout over the Balkans' is the story of the selfless compassion and courage shared between disparate groups of soldiers brought together during wartime. The Circle Turns - Acting on the urging of her 'inner guidance,' Saundra Strong brought an ancient design, a labyrinth, to share with others in central Iowa. The design is painted on canvas, which is rolled out in large rooms, gyms, sanctuaries, and has even been used by a group at Hilton Coliseum in Ames. Saundra says people walk the pathways to learn about their 'inner self' but the process of walking with others creates a feeling of community. People who have walked it tell of feeling lifted by the experience, and even people with conflicts feel united after they have walked together. Living In Iowa walks a quiet path on an amazing maze this week [27 minutes]

  • Time Flies/in the Bee Line (#930)

    Troubled youth and a Scotsman, and two Cedar Rapids men who spent 15 years building an airplane. [27 minutes]

  • Memories/Food for Thought/A Mazing Cornfield/Falcons Return (#931)

    Get lost in an 'Amazing Maize Maze' in Elgin, meet amateur filmmaker Gloria Kintzle, and ride with police in Creston. [28 minutes]

  • The Master Gardeners/Tubador/Fire In (#932)

    An explosive artist, who paints the night sky with fireworks, find out how the seeds of personal growth are harvested when convicts become 'Master Gardeners,' and Iowa's strolling 'Trubador.' [28 minutes]

  • Walking In Your Footsteps/Battle on the Home Front/Gripping Stories (#933)

    Gripping Stories-- There are wrestling fans and then there are WRESTLING FANS. In 1997, Mike Chapman, a wrestling fan, sports writer, and historian decided it was time to have a museum dedicated to the history of wrestling. He drove across Iowa, looking for just the right location, finally deciding on Newton. Now, with the help of his wife, Bev, and a few thousand hours of volunteer help, he's opened the 'International Wrestling Institute and Museum.' We'll walk through Mike's dream of a museum, rubbing elbows with some of the world's finest wrestlers, and learning about professional wrestling in the first part of this century. Walking in Your Footsteps - Bill Desmarais' has always been interested in dinosaurs. It's an interest that is shared by a large number of people. This summer Bill who is a science teacher in the Cedar Rapids area, was able to combine his love of dinosaurs with his love of repelling as he traveled to Canada to assist in the mapping of dinosaur foot prints fo [28 minutes]

  • Wild Wedding Weekend/The Biggest Game In Town/Horse Sense (#934)

    Wild Wedding Weekend - From the song, 'The Church in the Wildwood,' the lyrics 'No place is so dear to my childhood, As the little brown church in the vale' have made a small country church in Nashua famous. The song is known all across the nation and for decades people have journeyed there to be married. Now the tradition continues as their children and grandchildren are also having weddings in this 135-year-old building that hasn't changed much over the many years. A married couple who are both ministers, Linda and Bob Myren, enjoy taking turns conducting wedding ceremonies, as many as 19 last Valentines Day and about 600 every year. Living in Iowa was there on a day of a dozen weddings and found out what the attraction is to getting married at a little brown church in a vale. The Biggest Game in Town - Every fall since 1986, The 13 Quad Cities area high schools have competed in a 6-week food drive known as The Student Hunger Drive. While the first year's 26,000 pounds of food wa [28 minutes]

  • Walking The Line/The Manchester Minstrel (#935)

    Walking the Line - Living in Iowa first introduced viewers to John Deason in 1993 as he exhibited his history/photography project at the 'Iowa Time Expo' called 'Lost Towns.' John set out to explore, find and photograph towns that were no longer on maps. He found out that the stories and people still in the area were more important than the long gone buildings. Now John has a new project to walk a line through the wilderness that was surveyed in 1836, the 5th principal Meridian. He searches out more fascinating Iowans along his path. The Manchester Minstrel - Manchester native, Susan Werner, is a rising star. Her fourth cd, 'Time Between Trains,' was recently released to critical acclaim. Susan writes songs that interpret life and love with mid-western honesty. When she's not recording, she's traveling, working over 200 one night shows in a typical year. She's performed her songs in a range of locales, from The Civic Center in Des Moines, where she opened for Joan Armatrading, [28 minutes]

  • My One and Only/A Growing Minority/ Culture Shock (#936)

    My One and Only - The typical American love story is boy meets girl. But this week, Living in Iowa tells a love story with deeper roots, a story of the love of the land. We'll venture forth into a Swamp White Oak Savanna, a place which not only has caused naturalists and conservationists to swoon, but also has attracted attention from some of the neighbors. What makes it so special is the fact that this area has an unique blend of trees, grasses, and wildlife. This blend used to be common along Iowa waterways, but the rich soil it created has long since gone to agricultural use. Scientists are excitedly studying the area to see what can be learned about how nature balances life along an often-flooded river bank area. A Growing Minority - When it comes to farming Gary Cornelius is in a minority. He's in a minority because he's one of only 33 African Americans that farm in Iowa. Compared to other farmers in the state, the size of his operation makes him small potatoes, but he's been [28 minutes]

  • Sharing The Spotlight/Partners On Patrol Wrapped Up In Art (#937)

    Sharing the Spotlight - For the past 5 years in a row, the entire 6th grade class at Riverside Middle School in Carson, Iowa has performed all the jobs necessary to stage an original opera. All 55 students divide up into committees such as writing, make-up, costumes, stage production, set construction, electrical, carpentry, you get the idea. With minimal adult supervision, the 6th graders put a lot of effort into this project and take pride in their accomplishments. The title of the opera is based on that teamwork theme. It's called 'There's no I in teamwork.' Partners on Patrol - Sam Springer has Cerebral Palsy, but that doesn't stop him from being active in his community. He takes part in the Ride-Along program with the Creston Police Force in Creston, IA. It's a program that was started to give people in the community a chance to ride with police officers and see first-hand what their jobs are like. Sam is the most dedicated member and rides regularly with Captain Lonnie No [28 minutes]

  • Once in a Blue Moon (#938)

    From Moon River to Wall Lake, Iowa's most famous crooner, Andy Williams, returned home last year after a 60 year absence. We'll celebrate his homecoming on this LIVING IN IOWA special and hear how his fame began as the youngest member of the Williams Brothers family foursome. [28 minutes]

  • The Route of the Story/Sand Hill Secrets /Talk Ray-Dio (#939)

    All aboard for LIVING IN IOWA as we take a round trip into Iowa's past and uncover the history of the underground railroad. Drop on over to Dottie's place, where a cup of coffee and some friendly chitchat just might land you on the longest running radio show in Iowa. And walk the Eddyville dunes with a couple whose stand on sand has changed the course of history by changing the course of a road. [28 minutes]

  • Kin Under The Skin/Food for Thought/ Dream A Big Dream (#940)

    You might give a friend a helping hand, but would you give him your kidney? This week on LIVING IN IOWA, join us for a story of two men giving friendship their best shot. Then, find out how sailing solo across the sea brought an Ottumwa woman back to Iowa to follow her dreams. And find out how a simple conversation can become folk art with a Waverly storyteller. [28 minutes]

  • A Bird In Hand (#941)

    Peregrine falcons are a rare sight in the skies over Iowa. DDT reduced their numbers to such an extent that until just recently, they were considered an endangered species. Thanks in part to the work of people like Bob Anderson, peregrine falcons are making a-come back. After our story last season concerning Bob's efforts, we spent the spring and summer following Bob to see what might hatch in his efforts to return Peregrine falcons to the skies over Iowa. Turned out, it was nine peregrines that Bob was able to raise from birth and release on a cliff in Iowa overlooking the Mississippi River. [27 minutes]

  • A Night at the Opera House/Simply Divine /Artist In Residence (#942)

    What's behind the world's tallest, narrowed door? Find out on this week's LIVING IN IOWA as we peek into the history of the What Cheer Opera House. Then meet a woman who's tripled church attendance and brings a congregation to its feet. The program sings the praises of a popular pastor in Belmond. [28 minutes]

  • A Rally Good Time/The Heart of the Family/Remembering Gladys (#943)

    Think your parents used to take you on long driving vacations? For a rally good time, tune in this week for the story of a Marshalltown couple's 12,000 mile road rally from Peking to Paris. Visit a home for people of all abilities that's turning an institution into a family. Then LIVING IN IOWA presents a loving look back at Gladys Black, the woman affectionately known as "The Bird Lady of Iowa." [28 minutes]

  • A Helping Paw/Sunderman Oil/of War and Weddings (#944)

    A helping paw. That's what a paralyzed woman's new service dog is offering her. Be there when the doors open to newfound freedom. Meet a colorful Iowa character with the gift of gab who's a real gas! Tank up together, with a service station owner that has the whole town talking. What could be more powerful than the atom bomb? A World War II veteran discovers the answer to that question when he falls in love with the country he bombed. [29 minutes]

  • The Principal of Life/Hold The Line/ His and Her-Story (#945)

    How could racing BMX bikes be the way one principal is inspiring her students? Find out as this hard-driving lady gets kids back in the race. Wat if you found out one of your ancestors was a pirate? Join the genealogy craze and get to the root of some family trees. And, we'll unearth two guys named Jake who cross through the generations and plow us back in time using draft horses. [28 minutes]

  • Yidl in the Middle/I Believe I Can Fly (#946)

    What's it like to grow up Jewish in the Bible Belt? Find out as LIVING IN IOWA meets with filmmaker Marlene Booth, whose film "Yidl in the Middle" airs on IPTV Oct. 6 at 9:30 p.M. Also, catch up with three young adults whose peers are honoring them as heroes for their ability to overcome life's obstacles. [28 minutes]

  • Liar, Liar/ A Fire Within (#947)

    See how Howard Matalba uses traditional Native American medicines and spiritual healing to help recovering alcoholics and addicts. Also, enjoy a performance of "Liars Holographic Radio Theater" in Marion. [28 minutes]

  • Bunch O' Stuff/Memory Laine/Candy Coated Collector/Toy Story/Time Signature (#948)

    What do you do with 9,000 farm tows, dozens of garden hose nozzles, piles of pincushions and mounds of M&M memorabillia? Find out as LIVING IN IOWA presents its annual collectors' extravaganza. [28 minutes]

  • Playing with Fire/Taking Root/Know The Score (#949)

    Meet a high-powered rocketeer whose hobby is taking him to the stars; play along with the video and pinball scorekeeper of the world; and give a green thumbs-up to a man who is dedicated to saving rare orchids. [27 minutes]

  • Motorin' The Ioway (#950)

    Experience life in the not-so-fast lane, as LIVING IN IOWA joins 400 classic car enthusiasts for a cruise across the state. [26 minutes]

  • Seeking Solutions In Iowa (#951)

    A look at three successful approaches that help reduce violence in Iowa-on the streets and in the schools. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #1001

    The season premiere sends up a cloud of dust chasing storm chaser Paul Craven; a look at how Hasidic Jews are changing the face of small town Iowa; and, in a weekly look back at the past 20 years, some of Iowa's most original artists are featured. [28 minutes]

  • Iowa Pets Hall of Fame (#1002)

    Meet pets who've saved lives and are honored in the Iowa Pet Hall of Fame; enjoy a profile of "the silhouette lady," Marie Cook; and say "howdy" to the most unique characters we've met in the past 20 years on our weekly retrospective. [26 minutes]

  • Hair Art; Amputee Golfers; Animal Stories (#1003)

    This week Iowa Public Television's LIVING IN IOWA takes an artistic and historical look at human hair with Carol Prusa of Ames, an artist whose creative materials range from curls and snarls, to strands found in hair brushes and clumps pulled from shower drains. Prusa's art and some equally incredible tales from hair history are featured Friday, November 26 at 8:30 p.M. And Sunday, November 28 at 7:30 p.M. On IPTV. Also on this week's program, two golfers, whose handicap means much more than just a number, demonstrate how tragic physical losses have led to life-changing personal gains. Grundy County Recorder Chuck Kruse and Craig Lonning, a salesman with Reichardt's Clothing in Des Moines, have more in common than the fact that each has lost a limb to amputation, each has a his own dramatic story of perseverance. LIVING IN IOWA heard their stories at this past summer's annual golf tournament for amputees. This program also takes a look back at a few of the dozens of LIVING IN IOWA features over the years [26 minutes]

  • You and Eye Sight for Sore Eyes Iowa's Environment (#1004)

    A blind man's vision shows Clearfield how baseball can bring a town together; meet Jane Elliot, who teaches students to look prejudice straight in the eye; and a 20 year retrospective on environmental stories. [27 minutes]

  • Disc Golfer; Good Old Boys Toys; Retrospective Social Issues (#1005)

    Stock cars that have survived to become antiques; a national celebrity in the "flying saucers" game; and a look back at 20 years of Iowa's social issues. [28 minutes]

  • My Three Nuns; Mini Whinnies; Retrospective: A Re-Collection (#1006)

    Meet "My Three Nuns" in southern Iowa; why people enjoy tiny horses that they can't even ride; and Iowa's most unusual collectors from the past 20 years. [28 minutes]

  • Christmas Show (#1007)

    This holiday music special features Iowa musicians Gayla Drake Paul, the Des Moines Children's chorus, Kindred Spirits, and Morgan Halgren with Jeff Burak and Don Jaques. [24 minutes]

  • Annual Review (#1008)

    Annual review of the top stories from the past season. [26 minutes]

  • Eddie Neimann, Folk Art (#1009)

    High school pianist Eddie Neimann's diligence lends proof to the old saying "How do you get to Carnegie Hall? Practice, practice, practice." Plus, a folk art family expresses itself in wood and clay, and Iowa's House Minority Leader finds satisfaction as a stock car driver. [27 minutes]

  • Cold Turkey (#1010)

    A 30th reunion of the cast of the movie Cold Turkey in Greenfield shows Iowans in their best light. [28 minutes]

  • Spanish-Language Newspaper Hands-On History Best of Enemies Update (#1011)

    Moving to a new country and not speaking the language can be quite intimidating. Sergio Corona, of Perry, started a Spanish-language newspaper called Viento del Tropico to serve the Latino community in Iowa. This newspaper helps Latinos find information about their new communities, like where to buy groceries or service their cars, and gives them information about their native countries, where most still have family members. Meet Corona, who is helping a community feel more at home, on this week's LIVING IN IOWA with host Morgan Halgren, Friday, January 21 at 8:30 p.M. And Sunday, January 23 at 7:30 p.M. Also this week, visit a classroom in Washington where hands-on is the rule. Michael Zahs teaches hands-on history to his students. Zahs believes that the secret of keeping young Iowan's from leaving the state begins with a look at the past. LIVING IN IOWA shares how this collector of artifacts teaches not only history, but the love of history, to his students. The Best of Enemies won Iowa City writer Os [27 minutes]

  • Quarry Railroad Depot (#1012)

    Mary Halverson restores a 130-year-old railroad depot, and puts the town of Quarry back on the map; our nation's only all-veterans band plays heart-stirring music; and a man who grew up playing hide-and-seek among the caskets at his family's funeral home gives his perspective on dealing with death. [26 minutes]

  • Saving Snapshots Birth in a Chicken House Race America (#1013)

    Meet the feet from Elgin that raced from the Gulf of Mexico to Canada's Thunder Bay; meet James Lucas, a veterinarian and author of "Birth in a Chicken House;" and look back at Anne Bakke's family photos from 1910. [27 minutes]

  • Juggler's Convention (#1014)

    A test of gravity at a juggler's convention; how graphic art can save lives; and meet a member of a growing minority-African-American farmers. [27 minutes]

  • Cancer Awareness Girls' High School Basketball Des Moines Police History (#1015)

    A profile of E. Wayne Cooley, who's been promoting Iowa girls' basketball for 50 years; meet Don Graves, a cancer survivor, who is running to step up the pace of prevention; and more than 100 years of Des Moines police history. [28 minutes]

  • Edna Griffin Remembered 100 Years of Iowa Boys' Basketball Poetic Justice (#1016)

    Enjoy an historical look at boys' high school basketball in Iowa with highlights from over 100 years. [28 minutes]

  • Jim Freeman, Four Seasons Singer, Bug Man (#1017)

    Meet a musician who's really killin' em. Bug that is. Iowa's own Jim Freeman was a doo-wop singer with the Five Satins, a Rhythm and Blues Hall of Fame inductee. Freeman currently runs a bug extermination business. [27 minutes]

  • John F Lacey (#1018)

    Find out how Iowa lawyer John F. Lacey changed the face of America by fighting for National Parks and Forest Reserves a hundred years ago. Celebrate cerebral canines and uncanny kitties with the Iowa Pets' Hall of Fame. [28 minutes]

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  • The Scoop, In Harmony (#1019)

    Stories of Iowans who are making a difference are featured on this, the only magazine show focusing exclusively on our state. [28 minutes]

  • Minnette Doderer Medical Students Helping Kids The Prairie-Rainforest Connection (#1020)

    Medical students take time away from the books to make house calls, teaching and interacting with grade schoolers in the Iowa City area. Also a profile of one of Iowa's most influential legislators, Minnette Doderer, and a look at how Iowans are making a difference in the rain forest. [28 minutes]

  • The Power of Trees (#1021)

    LIVING IN IOWA focuses on Louis Licht, a man on a mission to make poplar trees popular by showing how they slurp up toxins from the environment. [28 minutes]

  • Bettendorf High School "Casualties" (#1023)

    Bettendorf High School students are learning how to avoid 'Casualties' by acting in a play by that name. The play's author, English teacher Paul Lewellan, was inspired to write about his feelings after the violence at Columbine High School. His drama sheds light on the roots of violence: how people treat one another. [28 minutes]

  • Antibiotics War (#1024)

    Meet two doctors at the University Hospitals in Iowa City who are fighting bacteria 50,000 ways. And see the shining faces of exotic insects through the eyes of "shutterbug" Marlin Rice. [28 minutes]

  • Collectors (#1025)

    Collect yourself for our annual look at what Iowans are collecting. This year, expect everything from lots of Lefton china to piles of padlocks, tons of tools, and strands of snake skins. [26 minutes]

  • Dave Moore (#1026)

    Meet musician Dave Moore, who says that, for him, music is the next thing to a religion. [26 minutes]

  • Adopting from Russia (#1027)

    Pam and Bart Brown's children grew up, so they decided to raise another family. This time, with help from an agency specializing in adopting children from Russia, the Browns travel to bring back a 5, 8 and 13-year old. Plus, an other-worldly look at professional paranormal experts in Omaha. [26 minutes]

  • Storm Chaser (#1028)

    Give chase to storm chaser Paul Craven; find out how a community of Hasidic Jews is changing Postville; and look back at the past 20 years of Iowa's musical artists. [27 minutes]

  • The Silhouette Lady (#1029)

    Enjoy a profile of "the silhouette lady," Marie Cook; a visit with Berkley Bedell; and meet the most unique characters from the past 20 years. [26 minutes]

  • Hair Art, Animal Stories (#1030)

    Explore the roots of Carol Prusa's "Hair Art;" find out how the game of golf is getting amputees together; and 20 years of animal stories. [26 minutes]

  • Blind Man's Vision, Jane Elliot (#1031)

    See how a blind man's vision has brought a town together; meet Jane Elliot, who teaches students to look prejudice in the eye; and 20 years of environmental stories. [27 minutes]

  • Antique Stock Cars (#1032)

    See how some antique stock cars have started racing again; meet a national celebrity in the flying saucers game; and 20 years of Iowa's social issues. [27 minutes]

  • My Three Nuns, Mini-Whinnies (#1033)

    Living in Iowa Show #1033 Airdates: 7/7,9/00 FEATURE #1: 'My Three Nuns' 3 Catholic nuns help people in rural S.W. Iowa. FEATURE #2: 'Mini Whinnies' Warm and furry miniature horses are easy to love. FEATURE #3: 'Retrospective: A Re-Collection' A look back at 20 years of collector stories. CLOSE: 'Wild Orchids' Easy to overlook since they are rare in Iowa and quite small. FEATURE #1: 'My Three Nuns' Producer: Laurel Bower Contact: Sister Marian Klostermann Phone: 515-785-2228 Address: Maloy, IA Storyline: Sisters Marian Klostermann, Joanna Rettennmeier, and Nan Ross were brought together by Iowa bishops to the tiny town of Maloy in Ringold County, one of the poorest counties in the state. Since their arrival, they have quietly become a powerful presence in the surrounding communities. All three sisters extend their services to anyone in need, no matter what their religion. While they are Catholic, they don't try to push Catholicism on people. They just hope to inspire others in their own faith by being good role models. Every week, each sister volunteers in the towns of Mount Ayr, Bedford, Lenox and Maloy. Their volunteer services include working in neighborhood centers, teaching religious education, teaching English to local Hispanics, playing soccer with neighborhood kids, partaking in hospice and respite care, and visiting local nursing homes. The sisters share a love for not only the town of Maloy, but rural southwest Iowa. While their work is not uncommon for nuns, their compassion for the people they have both helped and become friends with will never be forgotten. FEATURE #2: 'Mini Whinnies' Producer: Nancy Heather Contact: Jerry & Nadine Kesting Phone: 967-2008 Address: 8925 Hubbell Rd., NE, Franklin Township, Bondurant 50035-1253 Storyline: Horses fit for Tom Thumb? Well, they're a bit bigger, but you sure can't ride miniature horses unless you're a kid. Why do grown-ups like them? We asked Jerry Kesting, who along with his wife, Nadine, runs a mini-horse farm in Bondurant. He tells us that these little horses take up less room, eat less, and are just as personable as their larger cousins. But we think Jerry is a bit prejudiced towards his little mares and their babies. After 20 years as a breeder, he shows unbridled enthusiasm about them. FEATURE #3: 'Retrospective: A Re-Collection' Producer: Chris Gourley Contact: See Producer Storyline: A recollection that covers our own collection of stories about collections and collectors. Our look back examines the folks who have to gather more than one of something, with 'something' being everything from Barbie Dolls to bowling balls. A number of our collectors bring new meaning to the term 'hunter/gatherer' as their collections often take on enormous proportions. We are left to wonder that in cases where the urge to collect becomes a rabid infatuation, if a collection reflects a lifestyle or if a collection determines a lifestyle. CLOSE: 'Wild Orchids' Producer: Nancy Heather Contact: See Producer Storyline: Rare and beautiful, tiny wild orchids can still be found in Iowa. These are just about as big as a thumbnail and were surrounded by other tiny plants and animals. (late spring) PHONE: 1(800)383-6124 Comments and Story Ideas [27 minutes]

  • Eddie The Pianist, The Politics of Racing (#1034)

    Living in Iowa Show #1034 Airdates: 7/14,16/00 FEATURE #1: Eddie the Pianist, high school senior on concert pianist career path. FEATURE #2: The Politics of Racing, Iowa State Representative and Racecar Driver, Dave Schrader. FEATURE #3: Artful Folk, Family of folk artists. UPDATE: Peregrine Falcons, Update on Bob Anderson who raises falcons to be released in the wild. CLOSE: Thistle Patch, Gold Finches feed on thistles at Eddyville Dunes. FEATURE #1 Rachmaninoff Rocks Producer: Marlin Schram Contact: See Producer Storyline: Living in Iowa taped Eddie Neimann's Piano Recital in May of 1999, one of his last big events as a high school senior. There aren't that many senior recitals accompanied by an orchestra, just one of the many remarkable things about Eddie. An extraordinary dedication to learning his musical craft has put Eddie on a career path to becoming a concert pianist. We could tell you about all of the competitions and awards that he has won but we'd rather let his fingers do the talking. He is still very humble and constantly gives credit for his success to God, his family and friends. FEATURE #2 The Politics of Racing Producer: Nikki Tundel Contact: See Producer Storyline: How do stock car races influence Iowa politics? Find out this week as Living in Iowa meets Monroe's Dave Schrader, a late model stock car racer as well as the minority leader in the Iowa House. While many are surprised to learn that this State Representative loves to spend his nights racing around a dirt track, Dave swears that racing has actually helped make him a better politician - by reminding him to always focus on the task at hand. Living in Iowa visits Dave in his garage - where he crams calls from constituents in between working on his carburetor and his quarter panels-and then catches up with him at a summer stock car race. UPDATE: Falcon - Update Producer: Chris Gourley Contact: Bob Anderson Address: RRP, 2580 310th Street, Ridgeway, Iowa 52165 Phone: (319) 382-6300 E-mail address: rrp@salamander.com Storyline: In February of 1999 we shared with our viewers the story of Bob Anderson a northeast Iowa man who had dedicated the last ten years of his life to the pursuit of a dream. That dream was to see Peregrine falcons return to historic nesting sites along the upper Mississippi after an insecticide known as DDT brought the birds of prey to the brink of extinction. In 1998 Bob released 9 young peregrines on a cliff at Effigy Mounds National Monument in N.E. Iowa. In 1999 Bob released ten more at the same site. In this update we catch up with Bob in the spring of 2000 and find out how his efforts have paid off. FEATURE #3: Artful Folk Producer: Jack Shepard Contact: see producer Storyline: Folk artist, Marge Mable, has had quite an influence on her children, as all five of them have chosen art and artistic careers as their life's work. Marge is a driftwood artist and she took us along with her as she gathered her raw materials at Saylorville Lake, painted them at her West Des Moines shop, and presented one of her driftwood Santas as a gift to her daughter, Betsy's family. Betsy Peterson is a folk artist, too; her husband, Eric, and son, Sven, are potters, and her older son, Seth is a sculptor. It's an artistic family and Marge's influence was instrumental in their creative bent. As a mother and an artist raising five children, she was determined to give them experiences that would help them become independent and divergent thinkers. Living in Iowa was on hand as the Petersons prepared their State Fair arts entries - 3-dimensional stick figures, clay pots and clay sculptures. CLOSE: Thistle Patch Producer: Marlin Schram Contact: See Producer Storyline: Thistles and thorns adorn an area of the sand dunes near Eddyville. Full grown in the fall, the thistle plants stand tall with gold finches swaying on top of purple flowers digging deep for the seeds. Nearby we captured the textures of thorns on a tree and taped the migration of ducks on a pond reflecting golden flowers at water's edge. [27 minutes]

  • Cold Turkey Reunion (#1035)

    Living in Iowa Show #1035 Airdates: 7/21,23/00 FEATURE #1: Greenfield Cold Turkey Reunion - Many Hollywood stars return to a small Iowa town 30 years after making a movie. CLOSE: Winter Pond FEATURE #1 Greenfield Cold Turkey Reunion Producer: Nancy Heather Contact: Margie & Terry Moore Phone: 515-743-2031 Address: 2446 State Highway 92, Greenfield, IA 50849 E-mail address: Termargy@mddc.com or Jennifer Van Nostrand e-mail: greenfld@mddc.com Web page: http://www.brasslantern.com/coldturkey/ Storyline: What is the best side of human nature? Does it only come out during an emergency or disaster? Or can we sometimes see ourselves at our best during happy times? There is only one answer to the last question, an unqualified 'yes.' And the proof is in a LIVING IN IOWA special about how Iowans pulled together for a one-of-a-kind event, the filming of a movie in small town Iowa. The film required the input of not only big name actors from Hollywood, but also the farmers next door. And as people look back at that time, they express how wonderful it was to collaborate on a project that made everything look larger-than-life. The movie was 'Cold Turkey,' filmed in Greenfield, Winterset, and Des Moines during the summer of 1969. Back then, it was unusual to take productions on the road so far away from California or New York. But producer Norman Lear fell in love with central Iowa, and thousands of Iowans returned the favor. So, for three months, the hard work and hot lights gathered unheard-of crowds. People lined up for casting calls, they stood in the sidelines watching scenes, and some even camped nearby for a summer of celebrity viewing. But it wasn't all gawking; over those months there was a camaraderie built between locals and the stars. It was an exchange of enthusiasm that is still tangible 30 years later at a reunion party held in Greenfield. This special program traces back the history of the making of the movie, attends the reunion, and asks how it all reflects what's best about the Iowa 'character.' CLOSE: Winter Pond Producer: Nikki Tundel Contact: See Producer Address: Glendale Cemetery Pond, Des Moines Storyline: We stopped by this Des Moines pond just after the sun came up and watched as the winter cold brought out the beauty of this tiny wetland. Our visit came just a day before the season's snow -allowing us to get a closer look at the icy pond before it was covered up with the whiteness of winter. PHONE: 1(800)383-6124 Comments and Story Ideas [28 minutes]

  • In Touch with the Past, Mr Music, Spanish Newspape (#1036)

    Living in Iowa Show #1036 Airdates: 7/28/00 (No Sunday Airing) FEATURE #1: In Touch With The Past, Michael Zahs uses a hands on approach to teaching history. FEATURE #2: Mr. Music, Stories and the meaning of music from musician, Dave Moore. FEATURE #3: Spanish Newspaper, Latinos stay informed in their own language. CLOSE: Prairie Song, the song of the prairie is carried on the wind by birds and bug. FEATURE #1 In Touch With The Past Producer: Chris Gourley Contact: See Producer Storyline: Michael Zahs loves hands on history and as a collector of artifacts, he can literally keep in touch with the past. In his classroom in Washington, Iowa he shares that same hands on approach to history with his students. It's Michael's belief that the secret of keeping young Iowans from leaving the state in the future, begins with a look at the past. FEATURE #2 Mr. Music Producer: Jack Shepard Contact: See Producer Storyline: Dave Moore has been making music around Iowa for the past 25+ years, playing harmonica, guitar and accordion on three of his own albums and with friends Greg Brown, Bo Ramsey and many others on theirs. He's been a frequent guest on Garrison Keillor's 'A Prairie Home Companion.' and he even spent a short season leading the NPR program's house band. But when he released his 3rd cd, 'Breaking Down to Three,' in the fall or '99, it had been nearly 10 years since his last recording. Living in Iowa spent some time with Dave at his riverside cabin, in his downtown studio, at home and at a concert in Iowa City and found him to be a traditional musician with a passion for the roots of American music. We hear a little about life on the road - Dave's been travelling extensively since the release of the new record - and a lot about what music means to him: 'not actually a religion, but something like a religion.' FEATURE #3 Spanish Newspaper Producer: Laurel Bower Contact: Sergio Corona Phone: 515-465-3508 Address: Perry, IA Storyline: Sergio Corona came to Perry, Iowa a little over five years ago and started a Spanish-language newspaper called 'Viento del Tropico.' He started the paper because Latinos in the area were lacking a source to get local and national news. Unlike Sergio, most Latinos that he knew were unable to speak English and didn't have a way to find out information concerning their new communities. They felt isolated and cut off from the world around them. 'Viento del Tropico' has given Latinos in Iowa what they have yearned for - a way to connect to their new communities, as well as, a way to hear about their native countries where most have relatives they left behind. CLOSE: Prairie Song Producer: Chris Gourley Contact: See Producer Storyline: The song of the prairie is carried in the wind. In July wildlife photographer Karl Kurtz invited us back to his prairie where he grows prairie seed to market.. It was an invitation we couldn't refuse. PHONE: 1(800)383-6124 Comments and Story Ideas [27 minutes]

  • Quarry Train Station (#1037)

    A 130-year-old railroad station puts Quarry back on the map; the nation's only all-veterans band; dealing with death through the eyes of a family funeral business owner. [27 minutes]

  • Juggler's Convention (#1039)

    Test gravity at a juggler's convention; find out how graphic art can save lives; get a look behind the bench with a retiring, but poetic, Supreme Court justice. [26 minutes]

  • Threepeat, Capturing History, on the Right Path (#1040)

    Iowa's passion for girls' basketball as seen through the Lynnville-Sully Hawkettes; cancer survivor Don Graves gets others on the PATH of awareness; 100 years of Des Moines police history reveals that prisoners were once dropped into their cells by ropes. [27 minutes]

  • Wheelchair Man and His Dog. John F Lacey (#1041)

    On this show we share a tale of unconditional love between a dog and a man in a wheelchair, find out how Iowa Lawyer John F. Lacey changed the face of America, and visit Davenport for a story about those who are not a part of America's prosperity. [28 minutes]

  • Jurassic Larks, Barbara Robinette Moss (#1042)

    Go on a road trip with the Jurassic Larks, a barbershop quartet that spreads harmony wherever it goes. Also meet Barbara Robinette Moss, an Iowa City author who has learned to find beauty in the world despite a childhood plagued by poverty and violence. Then get ready for the scoop on 'The Community Scoop'. A weekly newsletter put together by volunteers in the small town of Lost Nation. [28 minutes]

  • Medical Students, Minnette Doderer (#1043)

    Medical students take time away from the books to make house calls, well, really 'school calls,' teaching and interacting with grade-schoolers in the Iowa City area. Also Minnette Doderer talks to us about her 36 years of tackling controversial subjects in the House of Representatives. She has been a pioneer for women in Iowa and some believe that she has been the conscience of the Iowa House. Plus find out what an Iowa musician, 'America's Funniest Home Videos', and the rainforest in Costa Rica have in common. [28 minutes]

  • Boy's Hs Basketball (#1044)

    Enjoy a historical look at Iowa boys' high school basketball; find out why poplar trees are popular with Louis Licht; and meet a rural doctor who had to overcome a racial stereotype before his practice was accepted locally. [28 minutes]

  • Bettendorf Hs "Casualities" (#1045)

    Bettendorf High School students are learning how to avoid 'Casualties' by acting in a play by that name. The play's author, English teacher Paul Lewellan, was inspired to write about his feelings after the violence at Columbine High School. His drama sheds light on the roots of violence: how people treat one another. Also run the bases with Bill 'Lefty' Bell and Ernie 'Schoolboy' Johnson who played for the Kansas City Monarchs of the Negro Leagues in the early 1950s. [27 minutes]

  • Road Runners, Saving Time (#1046)

    Follow Lowell Lyngaas and 24 young runners in their nine-day dash from Holly Beach, Louisiana, to Thunder Bay, Canada; find out what to do with those family photos that you might have stored in shoe boxes beneath the bed; and meet Jim Lucas, who suffers from Parkinson's disease. [27 minutes]

  • Collectors (#1047)

    From puppets to padlocks, take a look at some unique collections and meet the Iowans who are consumed by them in LIVING IN IOWA's annual collectors show. [26 minutes]

  • Cora Unashamed (#1048)

    Go behind the scenes of the EXXONMOBIL MASTERPIECE THEATRE'S AMERICAN COLLECTION production of Cora Unashamed, which was filmed in Iowa. [26 minutes]

  • Adopting Russian Children (#1049)

    With help from an agency that specializes in adopting children from Russian orphanages, Pam and Bart Brown travel to Russia to bring back three children ages 5, 8 and 13 for their new family. Also, in Villisca a man known as 'the ghost hunter' says he has proof that ghosts do exist. [26 minutes]

  • Annual Collectors Show (#1050)

    Living in Iowa Show #1050 Airdate: 11/5/00 Only ANNUAL COLLECTORS SHOW FEATURE #1: Snakes and Puppets FEATURE #2: Lefton China and Locks FEATURE #3: Cars and Tools CLOSE: Icicles FEATURE #1 Snakes Producer: Laurel Bower Contact: See Producer Storyline: Jeff Vincent started collecting snakes when he was 7 years old while living on a farm near Chariton. His snakes won't bite or hiss because they are all dead, being preserved in jars of rubbing alcohol. His collection ranges from five-foot bull snakes to silky blue racers. Although the majority of his collection is snakes, it does include other things like a walking stick, salamander, crayfish, etc. He doesn't collect snakes anymore, but has kept his childhood collection with him. He will share about 20 jars of snakes and other critters with us. Puppets Producer: Laurel Bower Contact: See Producer Storyline: Daniel Hodges has a collection of 200 to 300 different puppets. His collection includes a wide variety of marionette string puppets that range in date from the 1930s to the 1990s. For our story, we will be concentrating on his marionette puppets in which he will demonstrate about 2 dozen. Daniel also wrote a reference book for puppet collectors in August of 1998. FEATURE #2 Lookin' for Lefton Producer: Beustring/Schram Contact: Richard and Alma Rogers Phone: (515)752-3041 Storyline: Richard and Alma Rogers have approximately 16,000 pieces of Lefton china. Where do you put that much porcelain in your house? You cover the walls in your living room, kitchen and basement. Besides having an unbelievable amount of china, the variety of products that the Lefton company makes is amazing from miniature buildings to Norman Rockwell-like novelty scenes and everything in between. Richard says that they have just scratched the surface because there have been literally millions of pieces of Lefton China produced. The Rogers have looked at the bottom of a lot of china for the Lefton logo because the oddest piece can turn out to be a future part of their collection, which is only Lefton. The spare tire cover on their motorhome says, 'Just Look'n for Lefton' and they have traveled the US in search of their heart's desire. The Lefton Company makes hand-painted porcelain china, is based in Chicago and was started in 1940 by George Zolton lefton, a native of Hungary. It's still a family run business and according to Richard, there are no reproductions since the Lefton trademark is patented. Their collection was shown live on the national cable TV show 'F/X Collectibles.' The Lure of Locks Producer: Morgan Halgren Contact: See Producer Storyline: Harold Gaass is a retired farmer with a basement full of padlocks. He has them categorized by brand and by function. He scours the flea markets and antique shows for ones he might not have, and spends a lot of time making keys so that he can solve the mysteries of this 8,000 locks. He's much more interested in admiring and working on the padlocks than he is in talking about them. FEATURE #3 Enough To Drive You Crazy Producer: Chris Gourley Contact: See Producer Storyline: Grant Quam says he only buys cars that he likes, the problem is he likes most cars. Grant isn't sure how many cars he owns but guesses that its 60 some. Grant collects classic automobiles that are in various stages of repair or disrepair but the one thing that all his cars have in common is that they are all unique. Grant knows the history of each car from who made it to who owned it. He told us that he had heard the secret of a happy life is a short memory and while he's 83 years old, he says he his memory is so long he's not sure if he's happy or not. Grant lets us step back in time and learn a little about the history of the automobile, and a lot about life. Tool Collector Producer: Chris Gourley Contact: Harold Mutch Address: 304 7th Street, Grundy Center, Iowa Phone: (319) 824-6105 Storyline: Harold Mutch has a collection of tools that includes blacksmith tools, shipwright tools, cobbler tools, farm tools, barrel making tools, auto tools, kitchen tools, kid tools, and tools that he is clueless as to how they were used. Harold has been collecting tools for over 30 years and feels that there is no tool like an old tool. CLOSE: Icicles Producer: Chris Gourley Contact: See Producer Storyline: A spring emerges from a cliff at Dolliver Memorial State Park that on a cold winter day forms icicles. With the approach of spring and warmer temperatures, the water from the spring runs across the icicles never stopping to freeze. Nature supplies the music as drops of water provide a background rhythm. OR We drove to Fort Dodge and this is what we saw. PHONE: 1(800)383-6124 Comments and Story Ideas [26 minutes]

  • Mississppi Clean Up Chad Pedrake (#1101)

    Mississippi Cleanup/Chad Pregracke -Jack Shepard, producer Female Jockey/Cindy Noll s Moines- Nancy Heather, producer (**NOTE: WACS is Veterans' Day-related) Combing the Mississippi for clams, Chad Pegracke found himself getting more and more annoyed by the tons of trash he encountered in North America river his business. We hose skill as a jockey has her on the fast track in horse racing circles. Plus, visit with some of the very first women who enlisted in the U.S. Army, as the original WACs return to their training grounds in Des Moines. And, new this year to Living In Iowa, Paul Berge will be searching for Iowa's hidden treasures in a segment known as Side Roads. [27 minutes]

  • Hepititus C, Hybred Roses (#1102)

    Hybrid Roses/Griffith Buck(Ames)- Morgan Halgren, producer Hepatitis C/ Johnson(Johnston, IA) - Chris Gourley, producer Horse Archery/ Ft. Dodge ericans have Hepatitis C and don't know it. Find out what you need to know about a disease that some believe will be a bigger killer than AIDS. Also, discover how Griffith Buck ll bloom in Ames and around the world. And straddle some fast horses carrying sharp sticks, when we admire the classic art of horse archery. [28 minutes]

  • Prisnoer Amy Creswell, Tractor Square Dancing (#1103)

    Prisoner/ Amy Creswell (Ft. Madison/Pekin, IL) r Eddyville Bypass/ Eddyville ng Tractors/ Nemaha n where Amy Cresswell is serving time for her role in her cousin th from methamphetimines. It in her footsteps. On a lighter note, in the tiny northwest Iowa town of Nemaha, Iowa, it's not the Twist or the Watussi that has them dancing in the streets but instead it's Tractor Square Dancing t, eight Farmall tractors that actually do-si-do! And, we ddyville where debate about a highway bypass continues [29 minutes]

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  • Social Worker Tom Walz, Dinosaur Discovery (#1104)

    A Cedar Rapids father and son tell how they uncovered a teenage Tyrannosaurus rex fossil and brought it back to Iowa; and Tom Walz of Iowa City's Wild Bill's Coffee Shop talks about creating success for others. [27 minutes]

  • Shinkedo Swordplay, Simple Living (#1105)

    Morgan Halgren ventures into West Branch, where she encounters a master of Shinkendo (samurai-style) swordplay; and a rural couple shows how simple living can be, in their solar- and wood-heated home along Onion Creek near Ames. [26 minutes]

  • Siberian Survival, Miss Iowa 2000 (#1106)

    Bill Mueller of Cedar Rapids shows how he is helping Siberians survive and thrive; and Davenport's Theresa Uchytil, Miss Iowa 2000, talks about breaking through barriers against people with disabilities. [27 minutes]

  • Savor The Season (#1107)

    The tastes of the holiday season are celebrated with chefs from many different Iowa cultures. [27 minutes]

  • Best of Living In Iowa (#1108)

    This program features the most talked-about stories from the past season. [28 minutes]

  • Lincoln Highway Special with Paul Berge (#1109)

    This program travels across Iowa's mid-continent to meet modern residents and hear some tales of the past, hosted by Sideroads correspondent Paul Berge. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #1110

    Native American Storyteller/ Moisa #1 ndian,' assures Ralph Moisa, Jr. He tells about his life as a 'city Indian' and how the loss of his son has intensified Moisa ing harmony to Iowa. And, snip a little off the sides with Lloyd the Barber of Holstein, Iowa. Also, a month-long series about the future of Iowa 'Who Will Teach Iowa [29 minutes]

  • Holocaust, Dr Grammar (#1111)

    Holocaust/ Anolik Dr. Grammar/Cedar Falls te? 'Dr. Grammar' can help. Meet professor Jim Hiduke of Cedar Falls, the man who lives to restrain dangling participles. And, find out how Charles Anolik reclaimed his life after surviving the Holocaust, becoming one of America ach Iowa [29 minutes]

  • Farm Broadcast (#1112)

    Farm Broadcaster/Plambeck (Des Moines) Education Close-up #3 asher Finger Flix/Sharpnack world are 'projected' by finger. Meet Joe Sharpneck of Iowa City, who 'directs' Finger Flix, and get in touch with this non-celluloid entertainment. This program also profiles Iowa journalist Jack Shelley, and continues the special series on the future of Iowa . [29 minutes]

  • Cora Unashamed (#1113)

    LIVING IN IOWA goes behind the scenes of Cora Unashamed, a MASTERPIECE THEATRE production that was filmed in Iowa; Charles Anolik tells how he reclaimed his life after surviving the Holocaust; and the special series on Who Will Teach Iowa's Children? Continues. [26 minutes]

  • Gregalan Williams (#1114)

    Featured cities: Sac City, Des Moines, Sioux City SAC CITY’S TEACHER CRISIS ON IPTV’s LIVING IN IOWA Teacher retirements will claim up to 40 percent of Iowa’s teaching force in the next few years. Sac City is feeling the effects now. English teacher Larry Sorensen and art instructor Roger Ring, both 30-year veterans of this northwest Iowa school district, are among three teachers retiring at the end of this school year. And no one, including Principal Dave Ackerman, is sure how to replace them. The Des Moines Register reporter Jennifer Dukes Lee, notebook and LIVING IN IOWA crew in tow, spent some time in Sac City examining this problem, which is becoming increasingly common to Iowa schools. Her Sac City reporting, in a unique cooperative effort between The Register and Iowa Public Television, is appearing in the newspaper and on LIVING IN IOWA. The episode of LIVING IN IOWA airs at 8:30 p.m. Friday, February 9, and again at 7:30 p.m. Sunday, February 11, on all Iowa Public Television stations. [26 minutes]

  • New Game In Town, Queen for a Year (#1115)

    FEATURE #1: 'A New Game in Town' girls' high school wrestling. FEATURE #2: 'The Homestead' a place for people with autism to live and work. FEATURE #3: 'Queen For A Year' Abby Menke, 1999 State Fair Queen. SIDEROADS: Town name confusion between Carnforth and Hartwick. CLOSE: Backbone State Park. FEATURE #1 Girls' Wrestling/Auderer 'A New Game in Town' Producer: Jack Shepard Contact: Scott Auderer, wrestling coach, Gilbert High School Phone: 515-232-3738 Dave Storm, wrestling coach, Spencer High School Phone: 712-262-1700 Storyline: In a wrestling crazed state like Iowa, it just had to happen: girls' high school wrestling. Gilbert High School, now in its third season, is the pioneer in this sport. They've held the unsanctioned State Tournament there for the last two years and this years' is scheduled for March 4. Living in Iowa was on hand for the state's first dual meet between Gilbert and Spencer, where we met some of the wrestlers and their coaches. Actually, Iowa is getting off to a slow start in girls' wrestling, which is already quite popular in several states, with Texas' 130 sanctioned high school teams leading the way. There has been a national tournament for the last several years, and the International Olympics Committee is planning to add women's wrestling soon. Some see the sport as a possible savior for men's college wrestling programs which are being scaled back due to Title IX requirements for gender equality. SIDEROADS: Hartwick/Carnforth Producer: Marlin Schram Contact: See Producer Storyline: This is a Side Roads about a legend involving two towns along a railroad line. As the story goes, apparently the Chicago and Northwestern Railroad accidentally reversed the names of the two towns and the communities went along with the change. FEATURE #2 Autism/Homestead 'The Homestead' Producer: Chris Gourley Contact: Steve Muller Address: The Homestead, 8272 NE University, Runnells, IA 50237 Phone: 515-967-4369 or 888-228-8476 Fax: 515-967-7018 E-mail address: Info@TheHomestead.Org Web Page: www.thehomestead. org/contactus.htm Storyline: About one person in two thousand is autistic. Autism is a neurological disorder that significantly impairs how a person gathers and processes information, causing problems in communication and social skills. In Runnells, Iowa, a place known as the Homestead is helping those with autism by providing training and support through some unique and innovative techniques. FEATURE #3 State Fair Queen 'Queen for a Year' Producer: Marlin Schram Contact: See Producer Storyline: The duties of the Iowa State Fair Queen are as varied and unusual as the State Fair itself, much more than measuring beards, kissing piglets and gulping down pies in the pie eating contest. Abby Menke represented the Fair and Iowa's youth throughout the year giving speeches to civic groups, riding in parades even in March and judging numerous county fair queen contests. You'll get to know Abby and see what she does throughout the year from the time she was crowned to one year later when she crowned the new queen. CLOSE: Backbone State Park Producer: Chris Gourley Contact: See Producer Storyline: Backbone State Park was dedicated in 1920. It was Iowa's first state park and remains one of the most significant. Backbone is named for its narrow and steep ridge of bedrock carved by a loop of the Maquoketa River. Folklore named this high ridge of rock the 'Devil's Backbone'. Nearly a hundred years ago, State Geologist Samuel Calvin wrote these words about 'The Backbone': 'Its sides are in places precipitous, the rocky cliffs rising sheer for more than 80 feet. Erosion and secular decay have carved the rocks into picturesque columns, towers, castles, battlements and flying buttresses.' Backbone consists of 1,780 acres and is heavily wooded with a variety of tree species, predominantly oak and maple. This woodland serves as a valuable refuge for a variety of wildlife including deer, raccoon, fox, turkeys, ruffed grouse and many species of songbirds. PHONE: 1(800)383-6124 www.iptv.org/livinginiowa Comments and Story Ideas [27 minutes]

  • Off-Off Broadway, Living In New York (#1116)

    Tune in for a special rebroadcast of Living in Iowa City to meet a group of young Iowa artists trying to make it on Broadway. In this episode, Living in Iowa profiled six young Iowans: Nathan Halvorson, Braden Pospisil, Katie Hefel, Angie Toomsen, Matt Mullin and Angie Den Adel. All from Iowa and all graduates from the University of Northern Iowa, they are living in the Big Apple trying to find success in the theatre business. After moving to the city, they started their own company called the Key Theatre hoping to produce their own productions. The Key Theatre is comprised of nearly 40 people - most are from Iowa and also graduates of UNI. So far, they have produced two plays - "Eastern Standard" and "Boston Proper." Living in Iowa traveled to New York City to see "Boston Proper," an in-your-face comedy about a group of self-absorbed twenty-year-olds in the late 1970s. Living in Iowa got to know the Iowa artists as they prepared and performed "Boston Proper" and as they went about their daily lives in the big city. The Key Theatre members impressed us with their hard work and passion for theatre. Most of all, they reminded us of what it's like to dream and to go after that dream no matter what it takes. [28 minutes]

  • U of I Basketball Coach Stve Alford (#1117)

    Featured cities: Iowa City, Des Moines, Harlan, Newton IN THE LOCKER ROOM WITH UNIVERSITY OF IOWA BASKETBALL COACH STEVE ALFORD ON IPTV’S LIVING IN IOWA Thousands of Iowans see him once or twice a week during the winter months on their television screens. He’s the tall, slender young man with the close-cropped haircut huddling with University of Iowa basketball coach Steve Alford during timeouts. He’s Greg Lansing, a young Iowan paying his dues in the fraternity of basketball coaches in hopes of one day becoming a head coach himself. On Friday, March 2 at 8:30 p.m. and Sunday, March 4 at 7:30 p.m., Iowa Public Television’s LIVING IN IOWA this week gets an up-close look at life inside one of the country’s top college basketball programs. Laurel Bower, a LIVING IN IOWA producer who also is Lansing s cousin, will take viewers inside those huddles, into the Iowa locker room and into Lansing’s home to learn about the high-pressure world of coaching college basketball. Lansing is living the dream of many young Iowa athletes. He was a high school basketball star in Harlan, Iowa, playing for his father, Iowa Hall of Fame coach Dave Lansing. After playing college basketball and serving a brief stint as Des Moines Roosevelt High School’s coach, Greg landed his first college job as an assistant at Indiana State. When Alford got the Iowa job four years later, Lansing was one of his first hires. Also this week, LIVING IN IOWA meets Sheree Clark and John Sayles, collectors of Blenko glass, the colorful hand-blown glass designs manufactured in West Virginia by the Blenko company. And LIVING IN IOWA makes a stop in Newton, where Mike Chapman, a wrestling fan, sports writer, and historian has opened the “ International Wrestling Institute and Museum.” “Sideroads” host Paul Berge is in Lucas this week, digging up information on the town’s most famous son, labor leader John L. Lewis. LIVING IN IOWA, with host Morgan Halgren, airs Fridays at 8:30 p.m. and Sundays at 7:30 p.m. on all Iowa Public Television stations: Channel 32, Waterloo; Channel 11, Des Moines; Channel 12, Iowa City; Channel 21, Fort Dodge; Channel 24, Mason City; Channel 27, Sioux City; Channel 32 Council Bluffs; Channel 36, Red Oak. LIVING IN IOWA invites phone calls at 1-800-368-6124 and email at its Web site at < http://www.iptv.org/livinginiowa>. ### [28 minutes]

  • Jack Shelley, Cancer Research (#1118)

    UNI Jazz Reunion/Cedar Falls Broadcaster/Jack Shelley Cancer Research Update Sideroads: LeMars Close: Harleys in the park 50 years ago, the music program at Iowa State Teachers' College (now UNI) started the first college jazz program in the country, 'Dimensions in Jazz.' Living in Iowa visits with 10 of 11 of the surviving members of the original 1951 Jazz band at a 50th anniversary celebration. LII also profiles broadcaster Jack Shelley, who observed some of the 20th century’s most unforgettable events. And the show will travel to the front lines of the war on cancer. [28 minutes]

  • Spectrum Resources, Mayor Lee Clancey (#1119)

    FEATURE #1: Spectrum Resources is a non-profit job training and life-facilitating company. FEATURE #2: 24 hours with Mayor Lee Clancey of Cedar Rapids, IA. FEATURE #3: Prison Theatre at the Iowa Correctional Institution for Women in Mitchellville. SIDEROADS: Battle Hill Museum in Battle Creek, IA. CLOSE: Old Cemetery near Murray, IA. FEATURE #1 Spectrum/Brantley 'A Fresh Start' Producer: Jack Shepard Contact: Jerald Brantley Address: 601 Hickman Rd., Des Moines, IA Phone: (515)288-1248 Storyline: Spectrum Resources is a non-profit job training and life-facilitating company that deals in restoration, both of the houses they reconstruct and of the lives they help get on track. Spectrum's student/workers are people who have had trouble fitting into society; some are ex-convicts, others are ex-drug addicts, most are unemployed. Spectrum's combination of classroom and on-the-job training helps them become productive citizens. Since its inception in 1995, Spectrum has helped nearly 200 men and women toward a better life, through their training in construction and heavy machine operation and in their instruction on what it means to have a job. Jerald Brantley, the driving force behind Spectrum, grew up in a tough neighborhood in Akron, Ohio and it was his early experiences that today give him a rapport with his clients. SIDEROADS: Battle Hill Museum/Battle Creek, IA Producer: Chris Gourley Contact: Dennis Laughlin Address: Hwy 175E, Battle Creek Iowa 51006 Phone: (712)365-4414 E-mail: bhmuseum@pionet.net Web Page: http://pionet.net/~ bhmuseum/ Storyline: We visit a rather unusual museum in Northwest Iowa, where Dennis Laughlin's collection of natural… and unnatural wonders are on display. FEATURE #2 Mayor Clancey/Cedar Rapids '24 Hours' Producer: Marlin Schram Contact: Office of Mayor Lee Clancey Phone: (319)286-5051 Address: Veteran's Memorial Building, First Avenue Bridge, Cedar Rapids, IA 52401 E-mail address: mayor@cedar-rapids.org Web page: www. cedar-rapids.org Storyline: Mayor Lee Clancey is the first woman in Iowa to run a city the size of Cedar Rapids. Elected in 1995, Clancey has brought forward an ambitious slate of city projects. She says there's only one way to lead and that's forward. Living in Iowa followed her for 24 hours during a hectic schedule that included a ceremonial duty at a hockey game, a city council meeting and a meeting regarding the solid waste landfill, to name a few. Mayor Clancey says she has a strong sense of herself and strong opinions. She's up to the challenge of making difficult decisions that are in the best interest of the city and feels suited to the job of mayor since she grew up with three younger sisters who called her the boss of us all. FEATURE #3 Prison Theater/Sivi 'Captive Cast' Producer: Mary Milz/Nancy Heather Contact: Marti Sivi Address: 5320 Waterbury Road, Des Moines Phone: 255-9453 Storyline: One woman's efforts to make a difference in the lives of women doing time at a the Iowa Correctional Institution for Women in Mitchellville. Des Moines actress Marti Sivi uses theater to improve the emotional well-being of the inmates and to prepare them for life on the outside. The women involved in the theater project tell how it's boosted their confidence and improved their self-esteem. Marti too has gleaned important lessons, learning to look beyond the headlines and see the 'lost potential' of women who made bad choices. CLOSE: Cemetery/Murray Producer: Laurel Bower Contact: See Producer Storyline: Living in Iowa travels to southwest Iowa on a chilly March day. We visited an old cemetery right outside the town of Murray off of Highway 34, capturing the essence of a small, rural cemetery. We found stones dating back to the early 1800's and discovered others hiding in the winter snow. PHONE: 1(800)383-6124 www.iptv.org/livinginiowa Comments and Story Ideas [27 minutes]

  • Climatologist Elwin Taylor, Mauricio Lasansky (#1120)

    FEATURE #1: Climatologist Elwynn Taylor from Iowa State University. FEATURE #2: Printmaker Mauricio Lasansky from Iowa City. FEATURE #3: World Food Prize Youth Institute, students document their foreign travels. SIDEROADS: Noble Popcorn Factory in Sac City. CLOSE: Winter Scenes. FEATURE #1 Climatologist/Taylor 'Let's Talk Weather' Producer: Nancy Heather Contact: Elwynn Taylor Address: 2104 Agronomy Hall, ISU Extension, Ames Iowa 50011-1010 Phone: 515-294-1923 E-mail address: setaylor@iastate.edu Web page: www.extension.iastate.edu (click on WEATHER) Storyline: Meet an expert in the most-talked-about subject in Iowa: the weather. He's Elwynn Taylor, ISU Extension Climatologist, and weather talk-show-host on WOI-AM public radio. For more than 2 decades, Elwynn has investigated how earth, wind, sun, and humidity interact to effect everything from the price of corn to the probability of a sunny vacation in Tahiti. More than a meteorologist, Elwynn studies weather trends such as El Nino and La Nina, and has even started his own weather indicator, the Reiman index. SIDEROADS: Noble Popcorn Factory Producer: Laurel Bower Contact: Dan Martin Phone: 1-800-537-9554 E-mail address: noblepop@pionet.net Web page: www.noblepopcorn.com Storyline: Paul Berge takes a sideroad to Sac City in Northwest Iowa to visit the Noble Popcorn Farms. Noble Popcorn Farms was founded in the mid 1940's as an offshoot of Noble Manufacturing Co., a farm equipment maker, who used small packages of unpopped popcorn as customer and dealer appreciation promotions. In 1985, Milo and Sally Lines bought the business and started marketing microwave and flavored popcorn along with the raw popcorn. The flavored popcorn became a big hit. In 1995, the company started marketing Cedar Creek popcorn through wholesale distributors to the convenience stores in Iowa. Today, the company does business with over 20 wholesale distributors who do business in over 40 states. Cedar Creek popcorn is also sold in gift and specialty shops like The Cracker Barrel Old County Stores and Cabela's. Fundraising is still a large part of the business such as schools, youth groups and the Mid-Iowa Council of the Boy Scout of America. Paul saw first-hand how the Noble Popcorn Farms make and package the flavored popcorn. FEATURE #2 Nazi Drawings/Lasansky 'The Printmaker' Producer: Laurel Bower Contact: See Producer Storyline: Mauricio Lasansky is one of the country's foremost printmakers. Mauricio's love for the print brought him to the United States with the aid of the prestigious Guggenheim Fellowship. He came to America from Argentina in 1942 and became a U.S. citizen in 1952. In 1945, Mauricio was asked to establish a print department in the School of Art and Art History at the University of Iowa. It was Mauricio's presence that was responsible for the reputation of the University's print department acquired as the 'printmaking capital of the U.S.' and Lasansky himself as the 'nation's most influential printmaker.' Mauricio's prints are executed in the intaglio method of printmaking, where a metal plate is incised with lines. Ink is spread over the surface of this plate then carefully wiped away until almost all the ink remaining lies in the incisions. The damp paper and plate are then placed together and run through a press which forces the ink onto the paper. His works are especially skillful and complicated because of the size of the prints and the number of colors used. In most of Mauricio's work, the human figure is a predominant theme ranging from warm depictions of his family to prints ravaged by war. Living in Iowa takes a special look at Mauricio's 'Nazi Drawings', a powerful and disturbing portrayal of man's inhumanity to man. This series of 33 drawings created in the 1960's, represents the 'poison' he felt when viewing a U.S. military film showing the actual victims and aftermath of Nazi atrocities. We will tell the story of Mauricio and his artwork. FEATURE #3 World Food Prize Youth Institute 'The Seeds of Awareness' Producer: Chris Gourley Contact: See Producer Storyline: Meant to be the agricultural equivalent to the Nobel Peace Prize, the World Food Prize was established in 1986. Every year it awards $250,000.00 to a person that has made a major break through in improving the quantity, quality or availability of food, thus alleviating hunger and malnutrition throughout the world. In 1995 the World Food Prize Youth Institute was established to educate Iowa students about international food issues. This year we share some documentaries that the students produced as World Food Prize ambassadors to foreign countries, where they learned that one person is able to make a difference CLOSE: Winter Scenes Producer: Jack Shepard Contact: See Producer Storyline: As winter is finally giving way to spring, we look back at some of the ways the cold air and precipitation beautify the Iowa countryside. Even though winter is mostly painted in shades of gray, the extremes of the season combine for some lovely, if not colorful, landscapes. PHONE: 1(800)383-6124 www.iptv.org/livinginiowa Comments and Story Ideas P - Feature - Climatologist/ Elwynn Taylor - Nancy I - Feature - Nazi Drawings/ Lasansky - Laurel B - Feature - Student Voices Videos - Chris In honor of Holocaust Remembrance month, Living in Iowa takes a look at 33 drawings created by world-renown print artist Mauricio Lasansky. Also on the program, ISU Extension Climatologist Elwynn Taylor reveals his not-so-secret passion for teaching us about the weather. [28 minutes]

  • Alcohol Free Fraternities, Leopold Center Director (#1121)

    P - Feature - Leopold Center Director - Jack (not confirmed) I - Feature - Alcohol-Free Fraternities - Marlin B - Feature - Rerun -TBA Alcohol-free doesn't mean free alcohol at some of the fraternities at Iowa State University. Find out what happens when students choose to ban alcohol and change their fraternities' drunk and disorderly reputation. [27 minutes]

  • Gay Lutheran Minister, Drake Women's Track Coach (#1122)

    FEATURE #1: Drake Women's Track Coach and Olympian, Natasha Kaiser Brown. FEATURE #2: Steve Sabin, gay Lutheran minister. FEATURE #3: Country-Western dance champions. SIDEROADS: Frank Lloyd Wright house near Quasqueton. CLOSE: Signs of Spring FEATURE #1 Drake Coach/Kaiser 'On The Fast Track' Producer: Chris Gourley Contact: See Producer Storyline: As a young girl growing up in Iowa Natasha Kaiser aspired to someday running in the Drake Relays. Not only did she grow up to run in the Drake Relays, she won four Drake championships and 9 state medals representing Roosevelt High School. In 1992 she represented the United States at the Olympics in Barcelona and won a silver medal in the 4x400 relay. After going away to college in Missouri and serving as an assistant coach there, Natasha Kaiser has come home to Iowa and to Drake University where she is the new Women's Track Coach. SIDEROADS: Frank Lloyd Wright House/Quasqueton Producer: Marlin Schram Contact: Iowa Dept. of Natural Resources Phone: (319)934-3572 Storyline: Side Roads' Host, Paul Berge, travels to northeast Iowa to a picturesque site along the Cedar River near Quasqueton, where Frank Lloyd Wright designed a lovely summer home for Lowel and Agnes Walter. Mr. Wright designed or chose everything - the furniture, dishes and knickknacks. It's open to tours from May through October and is owned and operated by the Iowa Department of Natural Resources. FEATURE #2 Gay Clergy/Sabin 'Keeping the Faith' Producer: Laurel Bower Contact: See Producer Storyline: In 1998, Steve Sabin became a well-known name in central Iowa when it became public that he was gay and had a partner. The reason why this became so public was because Steve Sabin was a Lutheran minister. In the Lutheran denomination, ministers can be gay, but cannot have a partner. Steve was asked to resign by Iowa Bishop Phil Hougen, but he refused. Steve's congregation, the Lord of Life church in Ames, supported his decision. However, Steve's name was removed from the roster list after a hearing. Steve Sabin is no longer a minister at the Lord of Life. He moved to San Francisco to serve a church there. However, he did not leave Ames because of the ordeal he and his congregation went through. Living in Iowa visited with Steve off camera before he left, but wanted to do a story discussing the aftermath of Steve's story and talk with others including parishioners from his church and Iowa Bishop Phil Hougen about the climate of gay clergy in Iowa. FEATURE #3 Country Western Dancers/Trimble 'Steppin' Time' Producer: Nancy Heather Contact: See Producer Storyline: Dave and Gina Trimble met in a country-western bar, fell in love, and have been happily two-stepping together ever since. In fact, they've danced their way to the World Championship title in the UCWDC (United Country Western Dance Council) competitions. They dance to country-western songs using classic ballroom steps like the cha-cha, waltz, and swing, but with a precision and flare the makes their sequin-studded outfits sparkle on the dance floor. Precision is the name of their game, and they preach what they practice, teaching lessons in their front living room which has been converted into a dance hall. Living in Iowa steps into the moving world of Dave and Gina Trimble this week. CLOSE: Signs of Spring Producer: Nancy Heather Contact: See Producer Storyline: Signs of spring… maybe to some people it's the filling of the potholes in their winter-weary streets. But in George Wyth State Park in Cedar Falls, signs included wild flowers, a robin's chirps, and some very lively Canada Geese. PHONE: 1(800)383-6124 www.iptv.org/livinginiowa Comments and Story Ideas P - Feature - Athlete/ Tash Kaiser - Chris (not confirmed) I - Feature- Gay Minister/ Steve Sabin - Laurel B - Feature - Country-Western Da nce Champions - Nancy (not confirmed) Meet some of Iowa's top Country-Western Dance Champions. And, visit Steve Sabin, of Ames, who resignedas pastor for Lord of Life Lutheran Church of Ames, despite the suppo rt his parishioners gave after he came out to them. Steve talks about the climate in Iowa on homosexuality and the church. [27 minutes]

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  • Preserving Iowa's Grotesques (#1123)

    Featured cities: Missouri Valley, Indianola, Stanton, Lorimor, Des Moines Preserving Iowa’s Grotesques on IPTV’s LIVING IN IOWA Staring down on passersby from perches on buildings throughout Iowa are intricately carved stone faces. Some laugh. Some grimace. Some sneer. They’re called “grotesques,” and in addition to being aptly named and beautifully crafted, they’re nearly anonymous. Des Moines author Jan Fleming is attempting to change the anonymous part. After her own discovery of the local grotesques several years ago, she has made their preservation a personal crusade. In her attempts to raise public awareness of this centuries-old art form, she is preparing a book that will feature outstanding examples in Des Moines. Iowa Public Television’s LIVING IN IOWA this week tours Des Moines with Fleming to get an up-close look at these underappreciated treasures. The program airs at 8:30 p.m. on Friday, April 27, and again at 7:30 p.m. on Sunday, April 29, on all Iowa Public Television stations. LIVING IN IOWA also travels to western Iowa this week to meet an Iowan who has found a way to make sure the land he owns in the Loess Hills does not fall victim to the temptations of urban sprawl. Bob Romeo has donated 750 acres in the Loess Hills as a conservation easement. Romeo says some of his neighbors think he's crazy for forfeiting future sales of land that could have potentially brought more than $4 million in profit. But he said it's his dream that the land be preserved for all people who find spirituality in the Hills. And with tornado season in full bloom, LIVING IN IOWA catches up with storm chaser Paul Craven. Craven, of Indianola, loves both ends of the weather spectrum. When the weather’s good, he pilots a hot air balloon he built. When bad weather is forecast, he chases storms in hopes of capturing a tornado on video or in a photograph. And “Sideroads” host Paul Berge is in Stanton this week, grabbing a cup of coffee in the town Mrs. Olson helped to make famous. LIVING IN IOWA, with host Morgan Halgren, airs Fridays at 8:30 p.m. and Sundays at 7:30 p.m. on all Iowa Public Television stations: Channel 32, Waterloo; Channel 11, Des Moines; Channel 12, Iowa City; Channel 21, Fort Dodge; Channel 24, Mason City; Channel 27, Sioux City; Channel 32 Council Bluffs; Channel 36, Red Oak. LIVING IN IOWA invites phone calls at (800) 368-6124 and email at its Web site at < http://www.iptv.org/livinginiowa>. ### P - Feature - Mel Larson - Jack (not confirmed) I - Feature - Loess Hills - Chris (not confirmed) B - Feature - Grotesques - Marlin Grotesques and gargoyles are lurking everywhere and have been secretly watching Iowans for 100 years. Here's a look at the fierce and funny faces carved in stone that may have been overlooked. [27 minutes]

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  • One Room Schools, Mohammed Khan (#1124)

    One-Room Schools One-room country schools, the first educational experience for many Iowans until the 1950s, were once criticized by social and educational reformers in the early 1900s. Living in Iowa will visit some Iowa one-room schools and meet some teachers who taught in them. Mohamad Khan Also on this program: discover some surprising factsIowa o has a story on Waverly girl Corrine Hatala who advised the President. Big Kaleidoscopes And meet a man who thinks big when it comes to kaleidoscopes. Tom Chouteau of Davenport has invented some that are big enough to walk through FEATURE #1: A look at Kaleidoscopes FEATURE #2: One-room Schools FEATURE #3: Muslim Horticulturist SIDEROADS: Letter to the President from a fifth grader CLOSE: Maple Syrup FEATURE #1 Kaleidoscope/Chouteau (prn. Shoo - to' slight accent on last syllable) 'A New Spin' Producer: Nancy Heather Contact: Tom Chouteau Address: 526 E. Columbia Ave., Davenport, IA 52803-1806 Phone: (home) (319) 322-7297 (work) (319) 326-7832 E-mail address: tommyscope@aol.com Storyline: Like all good magicians, Tom Chouteau of Davenport knows his way around smoke and mirrors. But Tom is more likely to put a rabbit into the hat rather than pull one out. He makes Kaleidoscopes that expose the beauty of ordinary objects, including tooth brush handles and discarded lighters. Look into his Kosmik Kannon, and you might see everything from astronauts and spinning ants to the face of a friend. Not only are his kaleidoscopes eclectic and fanciful, but many of them are big enough to share. He's made them large enough to walk through. In fact, Tom Chouteau thinks so big about his crafty works of art, he's starting to reflect upon ways to share them in a kaleidoscope museum that would be open 24-hours a day. SIDEROADS: Letter to President/Hatala Producer: Nancy Heather and Laurel Bower Contact through Corrin's School: Washington Irving Elementary 319-352-2658 Storyline: We'll visit the 5th grade Waverly, Iowa classroom of Corrin Hatala, where she tells us about meeting the President to give him advice on stress relief. Corrin was a finalist in an essay contest for the educational current affairs television program What's in the News. After her essay was selected, she decided to send a copy to the White House, and soon she and the other finalists were invited to meet the President in person. While Corrin will have many memories of that day, including getting security clearance and teaching the President a few words in Korean language, her most solid keepsake will be a dime she found on the floor of the oval office. The President told her to keep it. FEATURE #2 One-room schools 'Teaching Lessons' Producer: Sara Frasher School Locations: Delaware County, near Pella, the former town of Lancaster in Keokuk Co. and Tama County Contacts: Amsterdam School Museum 641-628-2409 Bennett School 515-226-2894 Lancaster School, Lancaster Heritage Inc, 641-622-2838 Milo #7 School at Delaware County Historical Museum 563-926-2639 Storyline: We talk with some former country school teachers and visit some one-room schools. Criticized as inadequate by reformers in the early 1900s, romanticized today, the one-room school was the first educational experience for thousands of Iowans. The story also sets the schools in some historical context. And, it shows how some teaching techniques of 70 years ago are being used in schools today. FEATURE #3 Horticulturist/Mohamad Khan 'Seeds of Understanding' Producer: Morgan Halgren and Laurel Bower Contact: Mohamad Khan, Warren County Extension Office Phone: 515-961-6237 Storyline: Mohamad Khan has been the Horticulture Field Specialist for Iowa State University Extension for over 25 years. Living in Iowa visited with Mohamad Khan as he went about his many responsibilities. We caught up with him at WHO radio where he hosts a Sunday morning show called 'Gardening Today.' Then, we went along with Mohamad as he showed people how to prune trees in one of his Master Gardeners Classes, a program that involves 40 hours of intensive training in horticulture and related fields. We also traveled to the Mitchellville Women's Correctional Institution where Mohamad not only teaches gardening skills to inmates, but offers classes on Islamic teachings. Mohamad is Muslim and considered a leader in Iowa's Muslim community. He invited us to attend his grandson's Akika, a Muslim celebration when a child is born. And, he taught us about the five principles of Islam and other information about his religion. CLOSE: Maple Syrup Producer: Marlin Schram Contact: Kossuth County Conservation Board Address: 2407 Hwy. 169, Algona, IA 50511 Phone: (515)295-2138 FAX: (515)295-5479 E-mail address: kccb@ncn.net Storyline: In the scenic valley of the Smith Wildlife Area just south of Algona, maple syrup has been produced for over half a century, ever since Slim Smith began tapping the maple trees. The sap is cooked and nearly all of the water is boiled away. It takes 40 gallons of sap to make just one gallon of syrup. Today, the tradition of making maple syrup is carried on by the Kossuth County Conservation Board with the help of volunteers and school groups from the community. This close depicts the picturesque landscape and visually takes viewers through the process of making maple syrup. PHONE: 1(800)383-6124 www.iptv.org/livinginiowa Comments and Story Ideas [28 minutes]

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  • Iowa Rock and Roll Music Hall of Fame (#1125)

    Iowa Rock 'N' Roll Music Hall of Fame AgriAbility Living in Iowa also finds out how AgriAbility is helping disabled farmers stay in their chosen field. And, the show steps back in time with a popular Iowa rock 'n' roll band that appeared on national television in the 1960's. Rock Stacker [27 minutes]

  • Home Schooling (#1126)

    Home Schooling Home-schooling in Iowa: who's doing it, why, and how is it working for the children, parents and schools? Civil War Flags POW bracelet reunion FEATURE #1: Civil War Flags FEATURE #2: Home-Schooling FEATURE #3: Vietnam War POW's SIDEROADS: Farragut CLOSE: Woodbury County Courthouse FEATURE #1 Civil War Flags/Sprague, Hanke, Holmgren 'The Color Bearers' Producer: Jack Shepard Contact: Jerome Thompson, Museum Director, State Historical Society of Iowa Address: E. 6th & Grand Phone: 281-4221 Storyline: They led the Northern troops into battle nearly 150 years ago and, as has the Union they helped defend, these tools of war have survived in tact to this day. But Iowa's collection of 138 regimental flags, banners and cavalry guidons is now in need of some tender loving care. Hung in state capitol display cases since 1894, many of the battleflags have become badly deteriorated, damaged by the ravages of time and torn by the weight of their own fabric. But thanks to the persistence of The Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War, and to the guidance of the State Historical Society, these relics of this nation's great internal struggle are getting the preservation they need and deserve. In addition, the history of each flag is being researched so that its story can be told to future generations of Iowans. Their stories tell of a state, barely 15 years old, that sent 75,000 soldiers to the battlefields, more men per capita than any other state. Nearly one in five died fighting to preserve the Republic. SIDEROADS: Farragut Producer: Chris Gourley Contact: See Producer Storyline: In 1870 the people of Lowland in Southwest Iowa said 'Damn the torpedoes! Full speed ahead!' and renamed the town Farragut after Admiral Farragut, the Civil War hero. Every since then the memory of this man of the sea has been firmly anchored in a landlocked community where even the streets are named for events in his life. FEATURE #2 Home-Schooling 'Learning at Home' Producer: Sara Frasher Contact: See Producer Storyline: Viewers will meet two families who are home-schooling their children for different reasons in different ways. We'll also see how schools can be involved in home-schooling and how home-school parents find creative ways to meet their children's needs. FEATURE #3 POW Bracelet/Snow 'Welcome Home' Producer: Laurel Bower Contact: See Producer Storyline: Denny Snow is a Vietnam vet. While he was a mechanic and never participated in on-the-ground combat, he talked with many soldiers who did. In 1971, he purchased a POW bracelet in Texas. Many people did this after the war because the money was used to help POW families. Over the years, Denny wondered if the guy on the bracelet ever came home. One night, he was watching IPTV and saw an episode of American Experience called 'Return with Honor,' about POWs. To his surprise, one of the guys interviewed was the name on his bracelet, Robert Shumaker. This started a series of phone calls, emails, etc. until he finally tracked down Mr. Shumaker and was able to send his bracelet back to him. Denny says the experience was wonderful, not only did he get to visit with Mr. Shumaker, but was witness to numerous people helping him along the way. Mr. Shumaker was a POW for 8 years and one day and is a highly decorated vet. Living in Iowa tells this uplifting story and also discusses the Vietnam War. CLOSE: Courthouse/Woodbury County Producer: Jack Shepard Contact: Patty Erickson-Puttmann Address: Woodbury Co. Courthouse, 620 Douglas, Sioux City, IA 51101 Phone: 712-279-6558 Storyline: The Woodbury County Courthouse represents and American statement in architecture which originated with Chicago architect Louis Sullivan. It is the largest publicly owned prairie school style building in the world. Designed by architect, William Steele, it was named a national landmark in 1996. Its long, narrow brickwork immediately identifies the structure as belonging to the Midwestern prairie school style, while its unique interior design and rich use of terra cotta lend a neo-classical touch. PHONE: 1(800)383-6124 www.iptv.org/livinginiowa Comments and Story Ideas [28 minutes]

  • Mississippi River Clean Up, Chad Pegracke (#1128)

    Mississippi Cleanup/Chad Pregracke Female Jockey/Cindy Noll (Altoona) Women lose: Birds lla/Knoxville) Combing the Mississippi for clams, Chad Pegracke found himself getting more and more annoyed by the tons of trash he encountered in North America g up the river his business. We Noll, whose skill as a jockey has her on the fast track in horse racing circles. Plus, visit with some of the very first women who enlisted in the U.S. Army, as the original WACs return to their training grounds in Des Moines. FEATURE #1: 'Talkin' Trash' Man on a mission to clean up trash along the Mississippi. FEATURE #2: 'Where it Began' WAC's reunion in Des Moines. FEATURE #3: 'The Ride of Her Life' Jockey, Cindy Noll, on a winning run. SIDEROADS: Introduction to a relatively new Living in Iowa Segment. CLOSE: 'Bird's Eye View' High up view from an observation tower at Red Rock Lake. FEATURE #1 'Talkin' Trash' (Mississippi Trash/Pregracke) Producer: Jack Shepard Contact: Chad Pregracke Address: 17615 Great River Road, Route 84 North, East Moline, IL 61244 Phone: 309-737-9888/9890 or Sheila Bosworth 319-289-4274 Web page: www.cleanrivers.com Storyline: For the last four years, Chad Pregracke's goal has been to clean up the Mississippi River. Working from St. Louis to Guttenberg, Chad has accumulated a garbage collection this year that includes over 1000 55-gallon steel drums, 3600 tires, 187 refrigerators, 5 couches, a 1955 International pickup truck and two prosthetic legs. What started in 1997 as a personal crusade today has the backing of major corporations and the help of a 4-member crew. Living in a houseboat and accompanied by a tugboat and a pair of barges, Chad's team attracts attention wherever they dock. And they inspire community [27 minutes]

  • Hyrbred Roses, Hores Archery (#1129)

    Hybrid Roses/Griffith Buck (Ames) Hepatitis C/ Johnson (Johnston, IA) Horse Archery (Ft. Dodge) Side Roads: Antique Airplanes (Blakesburg) Close: Fall colors (Southwest Iowa countryside) FEATURE #1: Horse Archery 'Ride by Shooting' archery festival in Fort Dodge. FEATURE #2: Hepatitis C 'Looking for Hope' Steve Johnson has this deadly virus. FEATURE #3: Griffith Buck/Roses 'The Perfect Rose' famous rose hybridizer from Ames. SIDEROADS: Antique Airplane Assoc. and Museum in Blakesburg. CLOSE: Fall Colors FEATURE #1 Horse Archery 'Drive by Shooting' Producer: Marlin Schram Contact: Dan Payne, Director of the Fort Dodge Convention and Visitors' Bureau Phone: (515) 573-4282 Contact: Meg Beshey E-mail address: dmbeshey@frontiernet. net Storyline: You say, 'you've never heard of horse archery?' Actually, European, Asian and Native American cultures have a long tradition with the long bow on horseback. Bringing many unique cultures together was the goal of the International Horse Archery Festival held in Fort Dodge in early September of 2000. Archers from around the world came to educate and learn about other cultures through the sport of archery. This story focuses on Kassai Lojos, a world class master horseback archer. Kassai held training for 2 weeks before and during the festival. Japanese, Mongolian and Native American forms of archery were also mentioned in the feature. SIDEROADS: Antique Airplane Association/Blakesburg Producer: Chris Gourley Contact: See Producer Storyline: To aviation junkies the center of the universe is in Blakesburg, Iowa. Blakesburg is the home of the Antique Airplane Association and the Air Power Museum, where you can find everything from biplanes to bombs. FEATURE #2 Hepatitis C / Johnson 'Looking for Hope' Producer: Chris Gourley Contact: Ronnie Johnson Address: PO Box 1102 Phone: Johnston, Iowa 50131 Storyline: Hepatitis C is one of the fastest growing epidemics of the [28 minutes]

  • Tractor Square Dance, Eddyville Environmentalist (#1130)

    Prisoner/ Amy Creswell (Ft. Madison, IA /Pekin, IL) Eddyville Bypass (Eddyville) Square Dancing Tractors (Nemaha) Side Roads: Belinda Church &Toy Museum (Chariton) Close: August Flowers, Goldenrod, Cone flowers (Polk County/Saylorville area)FEATURE #1: 'Second Chances' Prisoner, Amy Cresswell, tells how drugs destroyed her life. FEATURE #2: 'Tractor Promenade' Tractor Square Dancing in Nemaha. FEATURE #3: 'Save It or Pave It' Controversial road building projects in Iowa. SIDEROADS: Toy Museum near Chariton. CLOSE: August Flowers near Saylorville lake. FEATURE #1 Cresswell/Prisoner 'Second Chances' Producer: Laurel Bower Contact: Amy Cresswell and Candy Cresswell (mother) Address: 2714 Ave. K Ft. Madison, IA 52627 Phone: 319-372-2575 Storyline: 22-year old Amy Cresswell was sentenced to five years in a federal prison for her role in the drug-related death of her 14-year old cousin Jessica Smith. Jessica Smith is believed to be the youngest Iowan to die of a methamphetamine overdose. There were three other adults convicted in the case and they are all serving from 12 to 20 years in prison. Amy's sentence was less because the judge took into account how she spent the year before her sentencing. She spent the year visiting schools in southeast Iowa talking about how drugs killed her cousin and nearly destroyed her own life. Amy started speaking thanks to the help of Bob Barnes, a retired schoolteacher from Letts, Iowa who, as a grandfather, was concerned about the meth problem. He wanted to find someone who could talk to young people first-hand about drugs. He found Amy and together the two traveled to schools delivering a message to stay away from drugs. Today, Amy is serving the first year of her five-year sentence. Amy has a three-year old daughter who lives with Amy's mother Candy in Fort Madison. She only gets to see her daughter on weekends. Amy tells her story in a simple and straightforward manner, omitting almost all [29 minutes]

  • Olympic Athelete Natasha Kaiser (#1131)

    FEATURE #1 'Olympic Athlete'/Natasha Kaiser FEATURE #2: 'Gay Clergy'/Steve Sabin FEATURE #3: 'Country-Western Dance Champions' /Dave & Gina Trimble CLOSE: Spring Flowers and Geese SIDEROADS: Frank Lloyd Wright House FEATURE #1: Drake Women's Track Coach and Olympian, Natasha Kaiser Brown. FEATURE #2: Steve Sabin, gay Lutheran minister. FEATURE #3: Country-Western dance champions. SIDEROADS: Frank Lloyd Wright house near Quasqueton. CLOSE: Signs of Spring FEATURE #1 Drake Coach/Kaiser 'On The Fast Track' Producer: Chris Gourley Contact: See Producer Storyline: As a young girl growing up in Iowa Natasha Kaiser aspired to someday running in the Drake Relays. Not only did she grow up to run in the Drake Relays, she won four Drake championships and 9 state medals representing Roosevelt High School. In 1992 she represented the United States at the Olympics in Barcelona and won a silver medal in the 4x400 relay. After going away to college in Missouri and serving as an assistant coach there, Natasha Kaiser has come home to Iowa and to Drake University where she is the new Women's Track Coach. SIDEROADS: Frank Lloyd Wright House/Quasqueton Producer: Marlin Schram Contact: Iowa Dept. of Natural Resources Phone: (319)934-3572 Storyline: Side Roads' Host, Paul Berge, travels to northeast Iowa to a picturesque site along the Cedar River near Quasqueton, where Frank Lloyd Wright designed a lovely summer home for Lowel and Agnes Walter. Mr. Wright designed or chose everything - the furniture, dishes and knickknacks. It's open to tours from May through October and is owned and operated by the Iowa Department of Natural Resources. FEATURE #2 Gay Clergy/Sabin 'Keeping the Faith' Producer: Laurel Bower Contact: See Producer Storyline: In 1998, Steve Sabin became a well-known name in central Iowa when it became public that he was gay and had a partner. The reason why this became so public was because Steve Sabin was [27 minutes]

  • Kidrex, Snake Alley (#1132)

    Shinkendo/Dan Coglan & Jillian Arn (West Branch) Alternative Lifestyle/ Joe Lynch & Lonna Nachtigal (Ames) Shared Living / Thornberry, Van ty (Marion County) Close: Queen Anne Lake area) FEATURE #1: Kidrex, juvenile dinosaur bones on display in Iowa City. FEATURE #2: Social Worker, Tom Walz offers a helping hand and spreads ideas across Iowa. SIDEROADS: Snake Alley in Burlington is the crookedest street in the world. CLOSE: Lake Red Rock Rocks FEATURE #1 Kidrex 'Window to the Past' Producer: Laurel Bower Contact: Dan Grimm of D.L. Grimm & Associates Address: 907 15th St. Onawa, IA 51040 Phone: 319-350-9191(cell) or 712-423-1698 (home) E-mail address: dlgrimm@kidrex.com Web page: www.kidrex.com Storyline: Living in Iowa traveled to Cedar Rapids to see a Tyrannosaurus Rex that spent 66 million years or so lying around South Dakota. The unique thing about this find though is that it's not an adult, but rather a juvenile dinosaur. In fact, those working on it say it's the first and only nearly complete juvenile Tyrannosaurus Rex fossil ever found. Another rare thing about this dinosaur is that three-fourths of the bones are believed to be present. Iowa native Kim Hollrah found the dinosaur fossil in the Badlands of South Dakota over two years ago. At first, the fossil was taken to Texas, but Hollrah, being from Iowa, wanted to bring it to Cedar Rapids for his home state to enjoy. Several other people on Hollrah's team are from Iowa as well. The team is in the works preparing the bones for display. They have named the fossil 'Tinker' and categorize it as a Kid Rex Meet Kim and the rest of his team including his 9-year old son Avery who was with his father when Kid Rex was found. They hope to keep 'Tinker' in Iowa, but look for the dinosaur to bring around $10 million when completed. Right now, they want Iowa kids to enjoy the b [27 minutes]

  • Shared Living (#1133)

    FEATURE #1: Shared Living: Senior citizens in Iowa City share their homes with younger students. FEATURE #2: Shinkendo: West Branch couple teaches Japanese sword martial art. FEATURE #3: Alternative Lifestyle: Ames couple lives a simple life. SIDEROADS: Bridges of Marion County. CLOSE: Queen Anne's Lace Flowers in a field by Saylorville Lake. FEATURE #1 Shared Living 'A Fair Share' Producer: Jack Shepard Contact: David Purdy, director, Shared Housing of Johnson County Address: The Senior Center, 28 South Linn, Iowa City Phone: 319-356-5215 & 319-887-2796 Storyline: One of the tragedies of old age is that, for most people, the advancing years mean diminishing freedoms. Among the main concerns of the elderly is an increasing loss of control over their lives. And no event signals this onset more painfully than when the time comes for them to leave their home. But Iowa City's Louise Thornberry has discovered a way to postpone that threatening necessity. For the last 15 years, the 88-year-old woman has opened up her home to young tenants, women who have helped Louise with some of the homemaking tasks in exchange for bargain basement rent. It's an arrangement that has not only allowed Louise to stay put, but it has also introduced her to members of a generation she might not have gotten to know. And the women, mostly students at the nearby University of Iowa, have profited from more than economics, forming a meaningful friendship with a woman three generations their senior. Renée Van't Land (pron: Vant Lund) is Louise's most recent tenant, having moved in on New Years' Day of 2000. The graduate student in Engineering says living with Louise is part of what life's all about. She enjoys being part of a home, a neighborhood and a community and also learning from someone rich in life's experiences. SIDEROADS: Bridges of Marion County Producer: Chris Gourley Contact: See Producer Storyline: Paul's policy of never asking for directions has led him down a Side Road to the Bridges of Marion County where he attempts to prove that not all the covered bridges are in Madison County. FEATURE #2 Shinkendo 'Samurai in the Corn Field' Producer: Marlin Schram Contact: Dan Coglan and Jillian Arn Address: Jade Tiger Dojo, 105 S. Downey Street or P.O. Box 309, West Branch, Iowa 52358 Phone: (319)643-3456 E-mail address: jadetiger@zensearch.net Web page: www.jadetigerdojo.com or for the National Org. - www. shinkendo.com Storyline: The story is about a couple, Dan Coglan and Jillian Arn, (not married) who have a dojo in West Branch where they teach Shinkendo, a martial art of Japanese swordsmanship. The founder and master of Shinkendo, Toshishiro Obata, came to West Branch to teach and to give a test cutting demonstration. Shinkendo is a revival of the Samurai way of life by training the body and mind. The focus of the story will be split between how Shinkendo has affected their lives and about the martial art form. FEATURE #3 Alternative Lifestyles 'Simple Gifts' Producer: Mark Foust Contact: Joe Lynch, Lonna Nachtigal Phone: (515)292-0117 Storyline: An Ames couple grows vegetables on an acre and a half of ground on their farm they call Onion Creek farms. Believing in the importance of being friendly to the earth, Joe Lynch and Lonna Nachtigal raise and sell locally their own organic crops. Living in a passive solar house, built by Joe in the 70's, the couple raises much of their own food while Lonna supplements their income with her freelance illustrating talents. Hard, manual labor is put to rest monthly when the couple attends a modern Saturday night barn dance on the campus of Iowa State University. Joe and Lonna, like many Iowans, work hard at making a living and believe strongly in the lifestyle they have chosen. CLOSE: Queen Anne's Lace Close Producer: Nancy Heather Contact: See Producer Storyline: It's not a native plant, but Queen Anne's Lace is a weed that's made itself at home in Iowa. In late August, we found a field of these white flowers, and decided to enjoy their intricate designs. With the use of our new High Definition camera, the details are crisp, and it's easy to see the 'flowers within the flowers.' PHONE: 1(800)383-6124 www.iptv.org/livinginiowa Comments and Story Ideas [26 minutes]

  • Miss Iowa 2000 (#1134)

    FEATURE #1: Theresa Uchytil: Miss Iowa 2000 FEATURE #2: REAP: Iowan who is helping Russians to become self sufficient SIDEROADS: The Big attraction in Pocahontas. CLOSE: Walk along Red Rock FEATURE #1Theresa Uchytil Crowning Achievement Producer: Nancy Heather Contact#1: Theresa Uchytil's manager, Ms. Lee Keeshan Address: PO Box 2608, Davenport, IA 52809 Phone: 319-332-7733 Fax: 319-388-8171 E-mail: msiowapag@aol.com Contact#2: Miss Iowa Organization Web page: www.missiowa.com Contact#3: Youth Leadership Forum, Mike Williams Phone: (515)281-8088 Web page: http://www.state.ia.us/government/dhr/index.html Storyline: Miss Iowa 2000, Theresa Uchytil has been twirling baton for nearly 20 years. Since age six, this athlete has taken to the sparkling, speedy, sport, even though she was born with only one hand. She also played basketball, softball, any sport she wished, and never thought of herself as handicapped. Her positive perspective became her 'platform' in the summer of 2000, as she spoke out about raising awareness of attitudes about people with disabilities. And, although she didn't win the national crown, Theresa says she's still happy that she's been given an chance to make a difference. SIDEROADS: Pocahontas Producer: Chris Gourley Contact: See Producer Storyline: Just outside of the city of Pocahontas on Highway 3 is a 25-foot likeness of the Indian maiden Pocahontas. The likeness, according to the internet's Tackiest-Places-In- America, has put Pocahontas on the map. FEATURE #2 Bill Mueller 'REAPing the Benefits' Producer: Laurel Bower Contact#1: Bill Mueller Phone: 319-366-4230 Fax: 319-366-2209 E-mail: REAP@reapintl.com Web page:www.reapinternational.com Storyline: Bill Mueller of Cedar Rapids created REAP International, the Rural Enterprise Adaptation Program, in 1992. REAP is a people-to-people non-profit organization working to help the people survive in the Lake Baikal region of Russia. REAP has been on the go delivering programs to improve rural conditions, promote environmental activism, and strengthen village schools to teach people how to be effective service providers for their communities. The people of the Lake Baikal region near the Mongolian border, have suffered since the collapse of the Soviet Union. Bill is hoping REAP will help them become more self-sufficient. However, his goal with REAP is not to force American ideas on the people of this region, but rather give them the tools so that they can make their own lives better. Living in Iowa gave a camera to Bill so he could capture his most recent travels to Russia. CLOSE: Red Rock Producer: Marlyn Schram Contact: Producer Storyline: We take a walk along the shores of Red Rock PHONE: 1(800)383-6124 www.iptv.org/livinginiowa Comments and Story Ideas [27 minutes]

  • Native American Storyteller (#1135)

    FEATURE #1: 'Red Tale' Native American Storyteller, Ralph Moisa. FEATURE #2: Spectrum Resources is a non-profit job training and life-facilitating company. FEATURE #3: 'Lloyd the Barber' Life in 96-year-old Lloyd Luft's barber shop. SIDEROADS: La-Do-Ra CLOSE: Birds FEATURE #1 'Red Tale' Native American Storyteller/Moisa Producer: Nancy Heather Contact: Ralph & Carol Moisa, Jr. Address: 830 25th Street, Des Moines, IA 50312 Phone: (515)556-0908 E-mail address: redtale1@juno.com Also: Gene Fracek (515)285-1658 Storyline: Ralph Moisa, Jr. is a singer/storyteller who's using his voice to 'mend the sacred hoop' and to build bridges between cultures. Ralph, of the Yaqui nation, and his wife, Carol, of European descent, began their interest in native culture when their children began asking questions about why people treated them as 'different.' Soon, the whole family was learning the old stories about the sacredness of all life. Their oldest son, Ralph, III, was so impressed with the importance of the eagles and hawks, that attempted to release a red tail hawk from a power line, an effort that cost him his life. Since the tragedy, Ralph and Carol have increased their efforts to teach and build bridges between cultures. Ralph shares facets of his Native American culture with anyone who cares to listen. That includes school children who enjoy his 'show and tell' over the ICN, tourists at the Iowa State Fair, boy scouts at a jamboree, and the general public at a pow wow. Together with his wife and a friend, Gene Fracek, in the singing group 'Red Tale,' Ralph also performs a mixture of native and pop songs. This Living in Iowa feature gives the microphone to Ralph, and lets him tell his 'Red Tale.' SIDEROADS: Ladora Producer: Jack Shepard Contact: Stanley Brenneman, Mayor of Ladora Phone: 319-623-4581 Storyline: Ladora got its name from a local music teacher who chose the three notes on the musical scale, Do, Re, and La. Paul Berge walks around town telling the story of Ladora's naming in the form of a Dr. Seuss rhyme. FEATURE #2 Spectrum/Brantley 'A Fresh Start' Producer: Jack Shepard Contact: Jerald Brantley Address: 601 Hickman Rd., Des Moines, IA Phone: (515)288-1248 Storyline: Spectrum Resources is a non-profit job training and life-facilitating company that deals in restoration, both of the houses they reconstruct and of the lives they help get on track. Spectrum's student/workers are people who have had trouble fitting into society; some are ex-convicts, others are ex-drug addicts, most are unemployed. Spectrum's combination of classroom and on-the-job training helps them become productive citizens. Since its inception in 1995, Spectrum has helped nearly 200 men and women toward a better life, through their training in construction and heavy machine operation and in their instruction on what it means to have a job. Jerald Brantley, the driving force behind Spectrum, grew up in a tough neighborhood in Akron, Ohio and it was his early experiences that today give him a rapport with his clients. FEATURE #3 Barber/Lloyd Luft 'Lloyd the Barber' Producer: Jack Shepard Contact: See Producer Story line: Lloyd Luft has been cutting hair in Holstein longer than most of his clients have had theirs. The 96-year-old barber opened the shop he still runs in 1935. At that time Lloyd was one of 11 barbers in a town of 1500. Today he's the only one in town and even at that, his business is nothing like it used to be. But even though haircuts are down, coffee consumption is up. Every morning at 10 and again at 2, friends gather at Lloyd's for coffee and conversation. Living in Iowa sat in for coffee, meeting some of Lloyd's customers and friends while getting a snapshot of small town life. Lloyd is revered in Holstein mostly for his shear longevity. Even though his skills are probably not as sharp as they once were, his good customers still patronize his business. Friends help him with the things he can no longer do, both around the house and shop. And his landlord still charges him the same $17.50 a month rent, helping Lloyd stay in the shop, cutting hair and making coffee. CLOSE: Birds Producer: Jack Shepard Contact: See Producer Storyline: Birds are early risers, coming to life at the first sign of light. This day, the sunrise at Saylorville Lake was preceded by a horned owl, and celebrated by ducks, owls, seagulls, pelicans, and others. PHONE: 1(800)383-6124 www.iptv.org/livinginiowa Comments and Story Ideas [27 minutes]

  • Dr. Grammer, Prison Theater (#1136)

    FEATURE #1: 'Doctor Grammar' Jim HiDuke answers grammar questions on the web. FEATURE #2: Prison Theatre at the Iowa Correctional Institution for Women in Mitchellville. FEATURE #3: 'Finger Flickin' Fun' Editorial cartoonist, Joe Sharpnack, makes mini movies. SIDEROADS: Black Angel CLOSE: Wind Turbines FEATURE #1 Dr. Grammar 'Doctor Whom?' Producer: Marlin Schram Contact: Dr. Grammar Address: Cedar Falls E-mail address: dr.grammar@uni.edu Web page: www.drgrammar.org Storyline: If grammar and punctuation of the English language make you ill, the doctor is in, Dr. Grammar that is. Jim HiDuke, alias Dr. Grammar, is an English professor at the University of Northern Iowa and will answer your grammar, punctuation, spelling and etymology questions on his website, drgrammar.org. Jim was always correcting mistakes and colleagues would go to him for answers, so, as Dr. Grammar developed as a means to promote the University around the state, Jim was the logical choice to run it or run with it. He says, 'I live for this stuff,' and his enthusiasm shows. But, Jim has turned Dr. Grammar into a kinder, gentler and non-judgmental corrector of your grammar mistakes. SIDEROADS: Black Angel Producer: Jack Shepard Contact: See Producer Storyline: The legend behind The Black Angel in Iowa City's Oakland Cemetery is explored. According to the legend, what was originally a white angel marking a woman's grave turned black when it was disclosed that the woman had been philandering about town. Another legend has it that if you touch the black angel you'll die within a year. Devil or angel? FEATURE #2 Prison Theater/Sivi 'Captive Cast' Producer: Mary Milz/Nancy Heather Contact: Marti Sivi Address: 5320 Waterbury Road, Des Moines Phone: 255-9453 Storyline: One woman's efforts to make a difference in the lives of women doing time at a the Iowa Correctional Institution for Women in Mitchellville. Des Moines actress Marti Sivi uses theater to improve the emotional well-being of the inmates and to prepare them for life on the outside. The women involved in the theater project tell how it's boosted their confidence and improved their self-esteem. Marti too has gleaned important lessons, learning to look beyond the headlines and see the 'lost potential' of women who made bad choices. FEATURE #3 Finger Flix/Sharpnack 'Finger Flickin' Fun' Producer: Marlin Schram Contact: Joe Sharpnack , P.O. Box 3325, Iowa City, IA 52244 E-mail: j.turbo@eudoramail.com Contact: Matt Pollard @ Thumb Cinema, P.O. Box 2937, Iowa City, IA 52244 E-mail: thumbflip@aol.com Storyline: Joe Sharpnack has been an editorial cartoonist for 14 years. His work has appeared in the Washington Post, USA Today, the Financial Times of London, the Des Moines Register and the Seattle Times. He also makes short films, very short, about five seconds long that are hand operated, specifically with your thumb. By quickly flipping the pages of these miniature books of illustrations, you create the movie-like movement of the pictures. Joe calls them Finger Flix which are based on his off-the-wall humor. Living in Iowa caught up with this fast paced person at a premier showing of Finger Flix on a miniature movie screen at a book store in Iowa City. CLOSE: Wind Turbines Producer: Nancy Heather Contact: See Producer Storyline: Windmills have long been a part of the rural landscape. Now, with the advent of wind farms in northern Iowa, we see some landscapes dominated by the windmills' huge modern counterparts, wind turbines. We close this week's show with a restful look at these hypnotic giants as the sun sets in the west. PHONE: 1(800)383-6124 www.iptv.org/livinginiowa Comments and Story Ideas [27 minutes]

  • Gregalan Williams, Loess Hill Conservationist (#1137)

    FEATURE #1 '1534 Cleveland/ Gregalan Williams' FEATURE #2: Loess Hills Conservationist / Romeo FEATURE #3: 'Isiserettes' CLOSE: stone park SIDEROADS: Salisbury House FEATURE #1: 'All The Worlds A Stage' a story about GregAlan Williams' play 1534 Cleveland. FEATURE #2: Loess Hills conservationist, Bob Romeo. FEATURE #3: 'Not the Same Old Drill' Isiserettes, a Des Moines drill team and drum corps, SIDEROADS: Salisbury House in Des Moines CLOSE: Stone Park in Sioux City FEATURE #1 1534 Cleveland/Williams 'All The Worlds A Stage' Producer: Chris Gourley Contact: GregAlan Williams Address: 3588 Highway 138 Suite 309, Stockbridge, Georgia 30281 Toll Free Nationwide: (800) 720-9999 Fax: (770) 914-7035 E-mail address: See Producer Web page: http://gregalan.com/index. html Storyline: GregAlan Williams and Iowa Public Television are working in cooperation to present 1534 Cleveland, a play of GregAlan's journey to adulthood as a young African-American in Iowa. The stories GregAlan shares are true and give insight in not only what it's like to be black and growing up in Iowa, but what it's like to simply be different. SIDEROADS: Sideroads / Salisbury House Producer: Chris Gourley Contact: Gerry Schepf Address: P.O.Box 13408, Des Moines, Iowa 50310-0408 Phone: (515) 270-2128 Storyline: Paul Berge takes us to a castle that's located in Iowa. FEATURE #2 Loess Hills Conservationist / Romeo Producer: Chris Gourley Contact: See Producer Storyline: Bob Romeo believes there is something spiritual to the Loess Hills and has taken an unusual step to preserve them from development. Bob has donated 750 acres in the Loess Hills as a conservation easement. Some of his neighbors think he's crazy for forfeiting future sales of land that could have potentially brought more than $4 million in profit. But it's Bob's dream that the land be preserved for all people who find spirituality in the Hills. FEATURE #3): Isiserettes Drill Team / Des Moines 'Not the Same Old Drill ' Producer: Nancy Heather Contact: Director: Joan Hill (515)288-2181 Head Instructor: Pam Williams (515)246-9959 Address: 614 E. 6th Street, Des Moines, IA 50309 PRONUNCIATION: EYE-sis-er-etts Storyline: The Isiserettes, a Des Moines drill team and drum corps, has proven that Sousa isn't the only perfect marching music. Using a syncopated drum rhythm, this team of 7 to 17 year-olds, mainly composed of inner-city African Americans, creates a head-turning dance sensation in stadiums, gymnasiums, malls, and parades in Iowa towns large and small. The musical members of the team are all trained by mentors, and they all contribute their ideas to build their routines. Not only are they a bonified tradition, now in their 21st year of performing, but they also accent the talents of inner-city children, breaking stereotypes right and left. Their group has traveled to surrounding states, showing others that Iowa isn't all 'Norwegian Bachelor Farmers.' CLOSE: Stone Park Producer: Jack Shepard Contact: Stone State Park Address: 5001 Talbot Rd., Sioux City, Iowa 51103 Phone: 712-255-4698 Storyline: Stone Park, located in the upper reaches of the Loess Hills, is an 'Urban Wildlife Sanctuary' that offers visitors magnificent vistas of the Big Sioux River and the neighboring states of Nebraska and South Dakota, along with a wide variety of prairie, woodlands and wildlife. PHONE: 1(800)383-6124 www.iptv.org/livinginiowa Comments and Story Ideas [27 minutes]

  • Girld Hs Wrestling, The Homestead (#1138)

    FEATURE #1: 'A New Game in Town' girls' high school wrestling. FEATURE #2: 'The Homestead' a place for people with autism to live and work. FEATURE #3: Charles Anolik is a German concentration camp survivor who has learned to find happiness. SIDEROADS: Battle Hill Museum in Battle Creek, IA. CLOSE: Backbone State Park. FEATURE #1 Girls' Wrestling/Auderer 'A New Game in Town' Producer: Jack Shepard Contact: Scott Auderer, wrestling coach, Gilbert High School Phone: 515-232-3738 Dave Storm, wrestling coach, Spencer High School Phone: 712-262-1700 Storyline: In a wrestling crazed state like Iowa, it just had to happen: girls' high school wrestling. Gilbert High School, now in its third season, is the pioneer in this sport. They've held the unsanctioned State Tournament there for the last two years and this years' is scheduled for March 4. Living in Iowa was on hand for the state's first dual meet between Gilbert and Spencer, where we met some of the wrestlers and their coaches. Actually, Iowa is getting off to a slow start in girls' wrestling, which is already quite popular in several states, with Texas' 130 sanctioned high school teams leading the way. There has been a national tournament for the last several years, and the International Olympics Committee is planning to add women's wrestling soon. Some see the sport as a possible savior for men's college wrestling programs which are being scaled back due to Title IX requirements for gender equality. SIDEROADS: Battle Hill Museum/Battle Creek, IA Producer: Chris Gourley Contact: Dennis Laughlin Address: Hwy 175E, Battle Creek Iowa 51006 Phone: (712)365-4414 E-mail: bhmuseum@pionet.net Web Page: http://pionet.net/~ bhmuseum/ Storyline: We visit a rather unusual museum in Northwest Iowa, where Dennis Laughlin's collection of natural… and unnatural wonders are on display. FEATURE #2 Autism/Homestead 'The Homestead' Producer: Chris Gourley Contact: Steve Muller Address: The Homestead, 8272 NE University, Runnells, IA 50237 Phone: 515-967-4369 or 888-228-8476 Fax: 515-967-7018 E-mail address: Info@TheHomestead.Org Web Page: www.thehomestead. org/contactus.htm Storyline: About one person in two thousand is autistic. Autism is a neurological disorder that significantly impairs how a person gathers and processes information, causing problems in communication and social skills. In Runnells, Iowa, a place known as the Homestead is helping those with autism by providing training and support through some unique and innovative techniques. FEATURE #3 Holocaust/Anolik Producer: Laurel Bower Contact: Charles Anolik Address: 7109 Sunset Terrace Des Moines, IA 50311-1411 Phone: 515-279-3055 Storyline: Charles Anolik was born in 1917 in Kovno, Lithuania to a middleclass Jewish family. When the Germans invaded Kovno in 1941, he and his family were taken to a ghetto and then eventually to the Dachau concentration camp. By the time World War II had ended, Charles, his mother Mina, his brother Ben and Ben's wife were the only members of the family who survived. Charles' father, younger brother, four-year-old nephew, and cousins were all murdered. Today, Charles lives in America, Des Moines, Iowa to be exact, with his wife Adele. They have three children and four grandchildren. And, for fifty years, Charles has been a hairdresser. In the 50s, he owned Salon Charles and styled hair for the socialites of the city. While he is retired, he continues to do hair for a few women. Through a loving family and rewarding career, he has learned to find happiness despite experiencing the Holocaust. He has learned to let go of the guilt he felt for surviving, when so many other Jews died, and embrace life. CLOSE: Backbone State Park Producer: Chris Gourley Contact: See Producer Storyline: Backbone State Park was dedicated in 1920. It was Iowa's first state park and remains one of the most significant. Backbone is named for its narrow and steep ridge of bedrock carved by a loop of the Maquoketa River. Folklore named this high ridge of rock the 'Devil's Backbone'. Nearly a hundred years ago, State Geologist Samuel Calvin wrote these words about 'The Backbone': 'Its sides are in places precipitous, the rocky cliffs rising sheer for more than 80 feet. Erosion and secular decay have carved the rocks into picturesque columns, towers, castles, battlements and flying buttresses.' Backbone consists of 1,780 acres and is heavily wooded with a variety of tree species, predominantly oak and maple. This woodland serves as a valuable refuge for a variety of wildlife including deer, raccoon, fox, turkeys, ruffed grouse and many species of songbirds. PHONE: 1(800)383-6124 www.iptv.org/livinginiowa Comments and Story Ideas [27 minutes]

  • New York Special (#1139)

    FEATURE #1 New York Special (entire show) Producer: Laurel Bower Contact: See Producer or E-mail: keytheatre@hotmail.com or Web pages (links): www.geocities.com/keytheatre Storyline: Living in Iowa traveled to New York City to meet a group of young Iowa artists trying to make it on Broadway. We profiled six of them: Nathan Halvorson, Braden Pospisil, Katie Hefel, Angie Toomsen, Matt Mullin and Angie Den Adel. All in their early to mid-twenties, all from Iowa and all graduates from the University of Northern Iowa, they are living in the Big Apple trying to find success in the theatre business. After moving to the city, they started their own company called the Key Theatre in the hopes to produce their own productions. The Key Theatre is comprised of nearly 40 people - most are from Iowa and also graduates of UNI. So far, they have produced two plays - 'Eastern Standard' and 'Boston Proper.' Living in Iowa traveled to New York City to see 'Boston Proper', an in-your-face comedy about a group of self-absorbed twenty-year-olds in the late 1970s. We got to know the Iowa artists as they prepared and performed 'Boston Proper' and as they went about their daily lives in the big city. The Key Theatre members impressed us with their hard work and passion for theatre. Most of all, they reminded us of what it's like to dream and to go after that dream no matter what it takes. PHONE: 1(800)383-6124 www.iptv.org/livinginiowa Comments and Story Ideas [29 minutes]

  • Farm Program, Rock Stackers (#1140)

    Living in Iowa Show #1140 Airdates: 8/24,26/01 To: Becca Ketcherside Carlyn Crowe Dan Miller Teresa Smith Harriet Meldrem Martha Pas Mary Bracken Night Receptionist Dennis Malloy John Montet Kurt Plagge FEATURE #1: Iowa Rock N' Roll Hall of Fame. FEATURE #2: FaRM Program helps farmers with disabilities stay in their chosen field. FEATURE #3: Rock Stacker, is he an artist or just piling up rocks? SIDEROADS: Corrections in Correctionville. CLOSE: Bright yellow flowers we call Jewelweed. FEATURE #1 Iowa Rock N' Roll 'The Beat Goes On' Producer: Chris Gourley Contact: Bob Godfredsen Phone: (712)754-2503 work (712)753-2063 Home E-mail address: bobmair@heartlandtel.com Web page: http://www.iowarocknroll.com Storyline: While the 50's and 60's are gone there is a group of Iowans who are working to make sure the beat goes on. They are members of the Iowa Rock N' Roll Hall of Fame and their mission is 'To retain the legacy of the very music that so many individuals have spent a lifetime to create.' Since 1997 the organization has been recognizing those who helped set the tone for Rock N' Roll music in the state of Iowa. We rock at last years induction ceremony and roll back the hands of time to look at one Iowa band that made it nationally with their hit song 'Peter Rabbit.' SIDEROADS: Correctionville Producer: Jack Shepard / Paul Berge Contact: See Jack Shepard Storyline: Correctionville got its name from its location. The town is situated on what is known as a surveyor's correction line, needed because the curvature of the earth causes parallel lines, streets, meridians to converge as they approach the north pole. Seems that meridians aren't the only things that are corrected in Correctionville. Paul finds all his missing rogue socks, his check book all of a sudden comes into balance, and a man with that plaid-clashing tendency is transformed into a dapper Dan. FEATURE #2 Fa [27 minutes]

  • Uni Jazz Reunion, Jack Shelly Cancer Update (#1141)

    Living in Iowa Show #1141 Airdates: 8/31 & 9/2/01 To: Becca Ketcherside Carlyn Crowe Dan Miller Teresa Smith Harriet Meldrem Martha Pas Mary Bracken Night Receptionist Dennis Malloy John Montet Kurt Plagge FEATURE #1: Jack Shelley, career news Broadcaster. FEATURE #2: Update on cancer in Iowa. FEATURE #3: Jazz revolution at UNI 50 years ago. SIDEROADS: Le Mars, Iowa, the ice cream capitol of the world. CLOSE: Harleys in the Park FEATURE #1 Broadcaster, Jack Shelley Producer: Chris Gourley Contact: See Producer Storyline: Jack Shelley's career as a news broadcaster began when radio was still a novelty. Jack shares with us some of the stories he covered that changed the world, and shares his thoughts concerning what is news today. SIDEROADS: Sideroads / Ice Cream Capitol Producer: Chris Gourley Contact: See Producer Storyline: Paul Berge will give us the scoop on a small northwest Iowa town (Le Mars) that is known as the Ice Cream Capitol of the World. FEATURE #2 'In The Long Run' Cancer Update Producer: Nancy Heather Contact: Dr. George Weiner Address: Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, IA 52242 Phone: (319) 353-8620 Web page: http://www.uihealthcare.com/DeptsClinicalServices/CancerCenter/ Storyline: When you look around, there are very few people whose lives have never been touched by cancer. Just about everyone knows someone who's fought the dread disease, and many of us know people who've lost the battle. As the second-largest killer in Iowa, cancer is a disease that has many Iowans playing 'detective'. Around the state, Iowans are participating in more than 250 clinical research studies, and there are at least that many laboratory studies also in the works. Living in Iowa will focus in on a group in Iowa City that recently qualified as a National Cancer Institute designated cancer center. Affiliated with the University of Iowa, [28 minutes]

  • Alcohol Free Frat, Leopold Director (#1143)

    Living in Iowa Show #1143 Airdates: 9/14,16/01 To: Becca Ketcherside Carlyn Crowe Dan Miller Teresa Smith Harriet Meldrem Martha Pas Mary Bracken Night Receptionist Dennis Malloy John Montet Kurt Plagge FEATURE #1: Leopold Center Director, Fred Kirschenmann. FEATURE #2: Alcohol-Free Fraternity at ISU. FEATURE #3: Iowa Jazz/Preston Love, jazz musician recalls the midwest music scene from the 1930's. SIDEROADS: Flagpole Sitter History in Strawberry Point CLOSE: Bee Balm Flowers FEATURE #1 Leopold Center/Kirschenmann 'Agricultural Import' Producer: Jack Shepard Contact: The Leopold Center for Sustainable Agriculture Address: Iowa State University, Ames Phone: April @ Leopold Center: 515-294-3711 Storyline: Part philosopher, part old fashioned dirt farmer, raised by dust bowl-seasoned conservationists and educated at some of America's most prestigious institutions, Fred Kirschenmann is a disciple of Iowa's foremost conservation pioneer, whose center he now directs. Kirschenmann began heading up Iowa State University's Leopold Center for Sustainable Agriculture last fall, leaving behind the North Dakota organic farm he'd managed successfully for 25 years. That experience, coupled with a keen intelligence and an inbred love of the land makes Kirschenmann a good fit for the ecology-minded post. Living in Iowa visited him on his Windsor, ND farm, his Ames office, and also sat in on some farm community discussions, which Kirschenmann believes will help put into focus the 21st century vision for U.S. agriculture. SIDEROADS: Flagpole Sitter/Strawberry Point Producer: Marlin Schram Contact: See Producer Storyline: Paul Berge and crew head up to Strawberry Point for a story even more interesting than the giant strawberry statue. In 1930 William Penfield climbed a 97 foot tall flagpole and sat there for 51 days, setting a new record. FEATURE #2 Alcohol-Free Fraternity 'Wet, Dry or Damp? [28 minutes]

  • One Room Schools, Mohammed Khan (#1144)

    Living in Iowa Show #1144 Airdates: 9/21,23/01 To: Becca Ketcherside Carlyn Crowe Dan Miller Teresa Smith Harriet Meldrem Martha Pas Mary Bracken Night Receptionist Dennis Malloy John Montet Kurt Plagge FEATURE #1: A look at Kaleidoscopes FEATURE #2: One-room Schools FEATURE #3: Muslim Horticulturist SIDEROADS: Stanton's water tower looks like a giant coffee pot CLOSE: Maple Syrup FEATURE #1 Kaleidoscope/Chouteau (prn. Shoo - to' slight accent on last syllable) 'A New Spin' Producer: Nancy Heather Contact: Tom Chouteau Address: 526 E. Columbia Ave., Davenport, IA 52803-1806 Phone: (home) (319) 322-7297 (work) (319) 326-7832 E-mail address: tommyscope@aol.com Storyline: Like all good magicians, Tom Chouteau of Davenport knows his way around smoke and mirrors. But Tom is more likely to put a rabbit into the hat rather than pull one out. He makes Kaleidoscopes that expose the beauty of ordinary objects, including tooth brush handles and discarded lighters. Look into his Kosmik Kannon, and you might see everything from astronauts and spinning ants to the face of a friend. Not only are his kaleidoscopes eclectic and fanciful, but many of them are big enough to share. He's made them large enough to walk through. In fact, Tom Chouteau thinks so big about his crafty works of art, he's starting to reflect upon ways to share them in a kaleidoscope museum that would be open 24-hours a day. SIDEROADS: Stanton Producer: Chris Gourley Contact: See Producer Storyline: Paul Berge visits Stanton, a town with a water tower that looks like a coffee pot. FEATURE #2 One-room schools 'Teaching Lessons' Producer: Sara Frasher School Locations: Delaware County, near Pella, the former town of Lancaster in Keokuk Co. and Tama County Contacts: Amsterdam School Museum 641-628-2409 Bennett School 515-226-2894 Lancaster School, Lancaster Heritage Inc, 641-622-2838 Milo #7 [28 minutes]

  • Civil War Flags, Home Schooling (#1145)

    Living in Iowa Show #1145 Airdates: 9/28,30/01 To: Becca Ketcherside Carlyn Crowe Dan Miller Teresa Smith Harriet Meldrem Martha Pas Mary Bracken Night Receptionist Dennis Malloy John Montet Kurt Plagge FEATURE #1: Civil War Flags FEATURE #2: Home-Schooling FEATURE #3: Vietnam War POW's SIDEROADS: Farragut CLOSE: Woodbury County Courthouse FEATURE #1 Civil War Flags/Sprague, Hanke, Holmgren 'The Color Bearers' Producer: Jack Shepard Contact: Jerome Thompson, Museum Director, State Historical Society of Iowa Address: E. 6th & Grand Phone: 281-4221 Storyline: They led the Northern troops into battle nearly 150 years ago and, as has the Union they helped defend, these tools of war have survived in tact to this day. But Iowa's collection of 138 regimental flags, banners and cavalry guidons is now in need of some tender loving care. Hung in state capitol display cases since 1894, many of the battleflags have become badly deteriorated, damaged by the ravages of time and torn by the weight of their own fabric. But thanks to the persistence of The Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War, and to the guidance of the State Historical Society, these relics of this nation's great internal struggle are getting the preservation they need and deserve. In addition, the history of each flag is being researched so that its story can be told to future generations of Iowans. Their stories tell of a state, barely 15 years old, that sent 75,000 soldiers to the battlefields, more men per capita than any other state. Nearly one in five died fighting to preserve the Republic. SIDEROADS: Farragut Producer: Chris Gourley Contact: See Producer Storyline: In 1870 the people of Lowland in Southwest Iowa said 'Damn the torpedoes! Full speed ahead!' and renamed the town Farragut after Admiral Farragut, the Civil War hero. Every since then the memory of this man of the sea has been firmly anchored in a landlo [28 minutes]

  • Artists Respond/Kelly Pardekooper Grotesques & Gargoles (#1146)

    P- Iowa Basketball/Lansing (10 min) Laurel Bower B- Blenko Glass/Sayles (4 min) Nancy Heather B - Feature - Grotesques Marlin Get an inside look at the fast-paced life of Big Ten assistant coach, Greg Lansing. He's an Iowa boy who has lived and breathed basketball his whole life. Find out what drives him. The program also takes a look at a colorful collection of unny faces carved in stone which have been secretly watching Iowans for 100 years. Living in Iowa Show #1146 New Airdates: 10/4,5/01 To: Becca Ketcherside Carlyn Crowe Dan Miller Teresa Smith Harriet Meldrem Martha Pas Mary Bracken Night Receptionist Dennis Malloy John Montet Kurt Plagge FEATURE #1: University of Iowa Assistant Basketball Coach, Greg Lansing. FEATURE #2: Artists Respond/ Kelly Pardekooper, musician (Iowa City) FEATURE #3: Faces carved in stone called grotesques. SIDEROADS: John L. Lewis Museum in Lucas, Iowa. CLOSE: Barn FEATURE #1 Assistant Coach U of I/Lansing Producer: Laurel Bower Contact: Greg Lansing Phone: Office #319-335-9444 Cell #319-430-9480 E-mail address: Greg-Lansing@hawkeyebasketball.com Web pages (links): www.Hawkeyebasketball.com Storyline: Living in Iowa wanted to profile the life of a Division I coach. It just so happens that one of our producers, Laurel Bower, has a cousin who is an assistant coach at the University of Iowa. Greg Lansing has been one of the three assistant coaches with Head Coach Steve Alford for the men's basketball team. We decided what better way to give you a look at what the life of a coach is like than through the eyes of someone on the inside. Greg is an Iowa boy, growing up in Harlan and playing basketball for his father, Dave Lansing, who was a coach there for many years. In 1999, Dave was inducted into the Iowa Boy's Basketball Hall of Fame. Ever since Greg was a little boy, he has lived and breathed basketball -watching his dad coach, playing both at the high school and college levels, coaching Roosevelt High School in Des Moines and moving onto the college level. Greg served as an assistant coach at Indiana State University for four seasons and has been at the University of Iowa for two seasons. Producer Laurel Bower shares her experiences growing up with Greg's obsession for basketball, and together, they talk about his passion for the game and what it takes to be a coach at the Division I level. SIDEROADS: John L. Lewis Museum Producer: Chris Gourley Contact: John L. Lewis Museum: (642)766-6831 Storyline: Paul visits the birth place of John L. Lewis, a miner and major influence in the history of Americas industrial unions. Lewis, the leader of the United Mineworkers for forty years, was born In Lucas, Iowa which is now home of the John L. Lewis Mining Museum. Feature #2: No description. FEATURE #3 Grotesques 'Face to Face' Producers: Marlin Schram & Morgan Halgren Contact: See Marlin Schram Storyline: Historic preservationist, Jan Fleming, is engrossed in grotesques which are faces carved in stone on buildings scattered around Des Moines. Her fascination with them has caused her to write a book on the topic. The 28 grotesque faces on the Polk County Courthouse are charming, funny and scary. We don't know much about the reason for the grotesque faces except that some are similar to faces in Europe called the 'Green Man' because foliage is growing out of or around the face. Jan has found very little documentation about the people who carved these remarkable faces. CLOSE: Barn Producer: Laurel Bower Contact: See Producer Storyline: Living in Iowa was traveling on HWY 169 when we noticed an old barn off the highway on a farm. As we stopped to videotape it, the farmer who owned it visited with us telling stories of the barn. The farmer's name is David Friday and he told us that the barn was built in 1906. He says his grandfather used to have a team of horses in there and when we looked around a bit, we noticed the harnesses were still hanging. We captured the essence of this old barn reminding one of how farming used to be. Unfortunately, the barn will be torn down later this spring. PHONE: 1(800)383-6124 www.iptv.org/livinginiowa Comments and Story Ideas [29 minutes]

  • Artists Respond/ Marvin Bell/ Noble Popcorn Factory (#1147)

    LINCOLN HIGHWAY SPECIAL HOST: Paul Berge ('Sideroads' host takes us onan 'extended sideroad') SUMMARY: Traveling is a way of opening one's horizons, seeing the world through someone else's eyes. And, on Livi ng in Iowa, viewers will meet people from across Iowa. The Lincoln Highway once connected our state to both the east and west coasts, and some of the people we visited in the early '90's came up with stories about the old days of this now embattled road. These people include Marvin Wolfe, whose hobby is traveling the Lincoln Highway, collecting facts and figures. We'll view an interesting Chelsea wood carver and a Jefferson man who makes Lincoln Highway memorabilia. Elderly Mechanicsville resident, Pagie Wilson, tells of the highway in the days it was only a dirt road. And, in Tama, Heidi and Travis remind us of our youth by catching frogs under a busy Lincoln Highway bridge. Sideroads host Paul Berge visits the Lincoln Highway via the Living in Iowa archives. This project uses footage shot in 1992 & 1993, so some of the people shown are now deceased. We're grateful that we caught some first-hand history before it was too late, and this makes these features all the more precious to us now. FOR INFORMATION: Contact Producers: Chris Gourley or Nancy Heather FEATURE #1: Marvin Wolfe (from Downers Grove, Illinois) FEATURE #2: Bob Owens (Jefferson) FEATURE #3: Pagie Wilson (deceased)(Mechanicsville) FEATURE #4: Roger Clause (Carroll Co.) FEATURE #5: Hank Zaletell (Ames) FEATURE #6: Archie Sparks (Beaver) FEATURE #7: Ken Huffaker (Nevada) FEATURE #8: Bob Ausberger (Greene Co.) FEATURE #9: Heidi (Tama) FEATURE #10: William P. Kupka (deceased) (Chelsea) FEATURE #11: Marvin Wolfe / 'Babes in Arms' ADDITIONAL CONTACT INFO: College class on'Lincoln Highway' no longer exists COLO CORNER RECONSTRUCTION The Colo Development Group P.O. Box 294 Colo, Iowa 50056 ph: (515) 377-2238 email: colocity@netins.net [28 minutes]

  • Climatologsit Elwynn Taylor (#1148)

    P - Feature Drawings/ Lasansky - Laurel B - Feature Chris In honor of Holocaust Remembrance month, Living in Iowa takes a look at 33 drawings created by world-renown print artist Mauricio Lasansky of Iowa City. Also on the program, ISU Extension Climatologist Elwynn Taylor, of Ames, reveals his not-so-secret passion for teaching us about the weather. And, Iowa students relate their experiences living as ambassadors of the World Food Prize Youth Institute. FEATURE #1 Climatologist/Taylor 'Let's Talk Weather' Producer: Nancy Heather Contact: Elwynn Taylor Address: 2104 Agronomy Hall, ISU Extension, Ames Iowa 50011-1010 Phone: 515-294-1923 E-mail address: setaylor@iastate.edu Web page: www.extension.iastate.edu (click on WEATHER) [26 minutes]

  • Veterans' Stories (#1201)

    WWII Glider Pilots (Statewide) Peace Ladies/Olive Wilson, (Primghar) Protesting Grandmothers in Prison/Hennessey & Hohenshell, (Des Moines, Dubuque) Veteran’s Play/Jane Cox, (Ames) This program for Veterans’ Day features stories about Iowans and their different ways of being patriotic, including WWII heroes that quietly made their mark by flying glider planes, some grandmothers who say that peace is patriotic, and the stories of World War II veterans captured by an Ames playwright . ADDITIONAL FOR WEB #1201 Side Roads: Carroll War Monuments Close: Fall colors [28 minutes]

  • Margarete Toomey, Land Speed Record (#1202)

    Margaret Toomey, (Des Moines) Land Speed Record/Bob Folkestad, (Des Moines) Meet some Iowans making their marks in different ways. Margaret Toomey who has made life better for many low income Des Moines families, and, as a single parent, has also adopted special needs children. And, Bob Folkestad, of Des Moines, whose modified mini Ford pickup truck raced for the world land speed record at the Bonneville Salt Flats in Utah in August. ADDITIONAL FOR WEB #1202: Side Roads: Carter Lake Close: Day Lilies (Fairfield) A variety of colors, shapes and textures that are Day Lily flowers. They [27 minutes]

  • Iowa Artists Respond: Beyond Words (#1203)

    'Iowa Artists Respond' Thoughts in Clay/Dean Schwarz, (Decorah) Thoughts in Song/Kelly Pardekooper (Iowa City) Thoughts in Poetry/Marvin Bell, (Iowa City) (several others will be added) A creative collection of Iowa artists [29 minutes]

  • "Blast" (#1204)

    Have a 'Blast' with a stage production that marches to the beat of a different drummer. Then, meet a singing lawyer and visit a garden that harvests Storm Lake's diversity. [28 minutes]

  • 76 Year Old 100 Meter Dash Champ, Worm Farm (#1205)

    P – Feature Mel Larson I – Feature Cochlear Implants B – Feature Worm Farm SR-- (?) Big Stuff #2 C- Patriotic Fireworks A 76-year old champion of the 100 meter dash describes how he leaps the hurdles of age to become a world champion track star. Also on the program, a Johnson County worm farm with a sense of humus, and a summer camp where kids learn to hear with cochlear implants. [28 minutes]

  • Doll Lady, Patricia Tice, (#1206)

    P – Feature Patricia Tice I – Feature Sing for the Cure B – Feature Doll Lady (short feature) B- Feature TBA (short feature) by Chris G. Side Roads Bentonsport/Van Buren County C- Stan’s Stars A proper cup of tea is a ritual with many healthy returns, according to Patricia Tice of West Des Moines, who’s featured on this program. Also this week, breast cancer survivors and friends 'Sing for the Cure.' [28 minutes]

  • Holiday Special (#1207)

    HOLIDAY SPECIAL: Savor the Season Morgan Halgren 'Savors the Season' with chefs from many different Iowa cultures and discovers: Mohamad Khan’s Muslim sweets; Swedish cheesecakes called 'Ostkaka' from Swedesburg; and secret ingredients used for 'Holiday of Lights' (Hanukkah) delicacies. [27 minutes]

  • Best of Show (#1208)

    'BEST OF' SHOW P- Mississippi Trash/Pegrake I--Meth Education/Amy Cresswell B- Rock Stacker/Zobeck SR – Bridges of Marion Co. C- Winter Memories A special collection of the best features from Living in Iowa’s past season. [27 minutes]

  • Falcon Special (#1209)

    Falcon Special (Decorah) LII revisits the story of Bob Anderson, the Decorah man who has dedicated himself to returning peregrine falcons to the skies over Iowa and the historic nesting sites along the upper Mississippi River. In this special, we’ll find there is good news. [28 minutes]

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  • Blue Band, Ospry (#1210)

    Blue Band/Door (Cedar Falls) Osprey (Central Iowa) Iowa Women Artists/Robinette (Des Moines) Side Roads Plow in the Tree Close Turtles Meet Bob Dorr, a Cedar Rapids musician who’s celebrating 20 years as part of the well-known 'Blue Band.' Find out how volunteers and county conservationists are working to bring the 'fish hawk' (otherwise known as osprey) back to Iowa’s waterways. And see how Jane Robinette is sharing the words and works of Iowa’s female artists with her 'Iowa Women Artists Oral History Project.' [27 minutes]

  • Christy Vilsack, Old West Shootist (#1211)

    Christy Vilsack (Des Moines)(not confirmed) Fatmobile (Mason City, Plymouth) Old West Shootists (Ackley) Side Roads Corn Cam Close Country Churches (various Iowa locations) Black smoke filled the air as the posse's guns blazed through the windows of the saloon. Is it the beginning of an old western novel? No, it's a day in the life of a club of 'Old West Shootists' in Ackley. Also, take a spin in the Fatmobile, a Volkswagen Rabbit that Craig Howard of Plymouth, Iowa has converted to run on discarded cooking oil. [28 minutes]

  • No Smoking Restaurants, Alley Oop (#1212)

    Liz Clark/chef (Keokuk) No Smoking restaurants (Ames, Iowa City, etc.) Alley Oop/Lambert (Waterloo, DM, Muscatine) Side Roads Big Statues Part 2 (various) Close Driftwood (various) Liz Clark, Keokuk chef, teacher, and restauranteur, takes Morgan Halgren on a tour of her home overlooking the Mississippi River, and teaches her a special recipe. LII also looks into the 'No Smoking' debate in Ames. Plus, LII discovers that 'Ally Oop' has a Iowa roots, and Des Moines lawyer, Mark Lambert, is creating a television documentary about the comic strip’s creator, V.T. Hamlin of Perry. [29 minutes]

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  • Lincoln Highway, White Collar Immigration (#1213)

    White Collar immigration (tbd) In Studio Interview: More immigration Lincoln Highway or Bust (various) Side Roads Manning Hausbarn (Manning) Close Butterflies (various) Find out how the nation’s oldest interstate highway, the Lincoln Highway, brought three Iowans together to repair a bit of history. And explore some of the ins and outs of immigration in Iowa. [27 minutes]

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  • Bob Black, Pine Creek Grist Mill (#1219)

    Meet Bob Black, from North English, who plays a mean five-string banjo and has an album called 'Banjoy.' Then visit the Pine Creek Grist Mill, built in 1848 and now preserved in Wildcat Den State Park. [27 minutes]

  • Effigy Mounds National Monument (#1220)

    (Johnston, Iowa) –Effigy Mounds National Monument preserves some of the few remaining structures built centuries ago by Native Americans in Iowa. In 2001, a new 1,000 acre addition was made, which contains several state-endangered species, two bear effigies, some linear mounds and other archaeological sites. The new Heritage Addition will also connect the mounds to the Yellow River State Forest, protecting the birds which migrate along the Yellow River. This week, Living in Iowa hikes the trails and rides the waters of this area, which will not be open to the public for several years. Also on Living in Iowa, meet Manchester native Susan Werner, who writes songs that interpret life and love with Midwestern honesty. When she’s not recording, Werner is travelling, playing over 200 shows in a typical year – in places ranging from The Civic Center in Des Moines to The Beacon Theatre in New York City. Living in Iowa spent some time with Werner at her family’s farm in Manchester, and caught an Ames performance by one of the state’s premier singer/songwriters. [27 minutes]

  • Battle Bots, Amana Photos (#1221)

    In the mid 1800 mmunal and religious society in eastern Iowa known as the Amana Colonies. Photography was forbidden because it was considered to be a worldly vanity in a society that wanted to be separate from the influences of the outside world in order to focus on a spiritual life. This week on Living in Iowa, learn how a group of prominent members of Amana society felt that documenting their lifestyle in a rapidly changing world was more important than following the rule against taking pictures. The photographers took great care in capturing images from still life photos to documentation of local disasters. They left behind a time capsule of a gentler way of life. On the program this week, viewers can learn more about these historical photos from author Abigail Foerstner, who wrote 'Picturing Utopia, Bertha Shambaugh and the Amana Photographers.' Foerstner goes a step further by telling the stories of the photographers who took these fascinating photos. Also this week, Living in Iowa travels to Ankeny to introduce viewers to Linda Farr and her dog Keeper, who are national champions in a sport called Canine Musical Freestyle. According to the World Canine Freestyle Organization, Linda and Keeper of Ankeny, Iowa are the best in the U.S. when it comes to dog dancing. They have danced to everything from country to disco and have performed in competitions throughout the United States. Then viewers will visit the Cedar River Festival, a two-day event in July that was launched in 1988. The festival is part environmental clean-up and part celebration of the river through music and the arts. Visit with Living in Iowa as volunteers talk about their work with the festival and their love of the river. And finally this week, Living in Iowa takes a look at the wildflowers and prairie grasses blooming near the ancient rock outcroppings at Gitchie Manitou State Preserve in Lyon County, Iowa. Plant communities includ [28 minutes]

  • Female Cantor Soloist (#1222)

    Laura Berkson, cantorial soloist at Temple B’nai Jeshurun, found her love of music and her love of the Jewish faith could make happy music together in Des Moines. Besides her work with the temple singing solo and directing choirs, she’s also making inroads on the local music scene as a singer-songwriter. She grew up on the east coast, and says she’s always surprised when people ask, “Why did you move here-?” because she loves her new home. [28 minutes]

  • Dancing Dog. Janusz, Bardach (#1223)

    Dancing Dog He has two left feet but knows how to cut a rug. Meet Keeper, a golden retriever and Linda Farr, his dance partner, from Ankeny. Together they are National Champions in the world of Canine Musical Freestyle. Janusz Bardach Janusz Bardach tells his story of surviving five hellish years in the Soviet slave labor camps during W.W.II. He has revisited the painful memories in order to write a book about his experiences called, 'Man is Wolf to Man: Surviving the Gulag.' It's an extraordinary story of human brutality, human kindness and human ability to survive under the most inhuman conditions imaginable. [28 minutes]

  • TV We Grew Up On (#1224)

    TV We Grew Up On Fifty years ago, when television was first becoming popular, it was common for local television stations to host afternoon shows for children. In Iowa, kids spent their afternoons watching TV programs hosted by space commanders, river boat captains, clowns, and puppets. This nostalgic Living in Iowa program looks back on those days with the hosts of those shows from around the state. They include 'Commander Four' of Sioux City, 'Captain Ernie' of Davenport, 'Dr. Max & Mombo the Clown' from Cedar Rapids, Betty Lou Varnum from 'The Magic Window' in Ames, and Bill Riley's several childrens' TV and radio shows in Des Moines. Waterloo's 'Romper Room' and Mason City's 'Bart's Clubhouse' are also remembered. [26 minutes]

  • Dr Van Allen (#1225)

    Defying the odds, a space probe navigates successfully through the asteroid fields between Mars and Jupiter, sending back data about distant planets, while continuing its trajectory toward the edge of our solar system. This is the mission of Pioneer 10, watched closely by Dr. James Van Allen of Iowa City. This week on Living in Iowa, meet Dr. Van Allen and discover how he designed the only instrument on board the Pioneer 10 that is still sending back information that will help determine the boundary of our solar system. Celebrating its 30th Anniversary, the Pioneer 10 mission is 7.5 billion miles out in space, or about twice the distance to Pluto. Also this week, Living in Iowa begins a limited series of student productions. Iowa college students produce work for Living in Iowa entitled 'My Hometown.' This week, Aaron Siskow takes viewers to Sheffield, which has preserved the traditional values of small town life, while still having the savvy to compete in the world of 21st century technology. Siskow is a graduate student at Iowa State University studying journalism and mass communications. Craig Cronbaugh of Brooklyn, Iowa, is a huge fan of 1950s recording star Frankie Laine. Cronbaugh recently displayed his collection for Living in Iowa. The extensive collection includes nearly every recording Laine ever made, clips of Laine ngs of the many themes Laine sang for motion pictures. And finally this week, take a Side Road with Paul Berge to the Sergeant Floyd Monument in Sioux City. The 100-foot tall monument marks the grave of Sergeant Charles Floyd, the only person to die during the Lewis and Clark Expedition. [28 minutes]

  • Marshalltown, Immigration (#1226)

    Things are changing in Marshalltown. In 1990, 97 percent of Marshalltown residents were white, largely of European decent. By the 2000 census, almost 13 percent of Marshalltown escendents of the Purhepecha Indians of Mexico. As in all towns experiencing a rapid and significant influx of immigrants, both the new-comers and old-timers must make adjustments in their daily lives. On Living in Iowa this week, explore how the demographic changes in Marshalltown have affected the police department, the schools and the local hospital. All of these institutions must face challenges in making the community work for everyone. In early 2001, Marshalltown became a Model Community in a statewide effort to recruit new Iowans, including skilled immigrants. Viewers can learn more on this week his week, Living in Iowa catches up with singer/songwriter Dan Bern. Bern has made quite a name for himself in folk music circles. He has been described as 'the next Bob Dylan' by more than one music critic, and is known for his sharp wit and biting satirical lyrics. Bern and his band, 'The International Jewish Banking Conspiracy,' recently opened for fellow folksinger and producer, Ani Difranco at Carnegie Hall. Living in Iowa was on hand for the band and also spent some time in the artist hen asked why he writes songs, he replied, 'Why did you stop? All children make up songs. They put their thoughts into music. I just didn stop doing that.' [29 minutes]

  • Iowa Glider, Peace and Patriotism (#1227)

    Iowa ith a G. The G stood for 'Glider' but there are those who wore the emblem who will tell you it stood for guts. They were the original stealth pilots. They were glider pilots who during World War II would deliver troops, munitions and supplies behind enemy lines. With the help of glider pilots from Iowa, Side Roads host Paul Berge tells the story of the men who quietly helped win World War II on silent wings. Peace and Patriotism As long as there have been wars, there have been those protesting for peace. In this story, meet some Iowa veterans of the protest movement who say they would like our nation or alternatives to bombing, even in light of recent events. What are those options, and what are the costs of violence? Olive Wilson of Primghar, editor of the 'Peace Links' newsletter, and Rita Hohenshell of Des Moines, who was recently imprisoned for entering a military base to protest the 'School of Americas,' reflect upon the causes of terrorism and their interest in peace. World War II on Stage Jane Cox, a faculty member in Iowa State University d herself in the stories of Iowa World War II veterans for more than two years. And last December, at ISU ne Every War On Side Roads this week, Paul Berge visits a cemetery in Carroll where there is a monument for each war, beginning with the Civil War and ending with Desert Storm [29 minutes]

  • Ww2 Glider Pilots (#1228)

    This special episode features Iowans and the way they show their patriotism, including World War II glider pilots, peace advocates, and a playwright who is honoring World War II veterans. [28 minutes]

  • Land Speed Record, Former Oakridge Director (#1229)

    Iowa can now boast one of the fastest trucks in the world, thanks to a Des Moines auto parts salesman. A Ford Ranger mini pickup truck was the star of a race at the Bonneville Salt Flats in Utah this past summer. The goal: to break the land speed record in the modified mid/mini pickup truck class. This week Living in Iowa follows the project that made the 'Rocket Ranger' pickup the fastest in the world. Led by auto parts distributor Bob Folkestad and his team of local racing experts, construction of the truck began just two months before the race in Utah and culminated in a top racing speed of 202 miles per hour. This shattered the old record of 188 miles per hour in its class. [27 minutes]

  • Blast, Diversity Gardens In Storm Lake (#1230)

    Living in Iowa meets Richard L. Richards, Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of Iowa, who has performed with the Des Moines Metro Opera company in Indianola since 1991. His first role didn lve singing, but since then has performed many lead vocal roles. While sharing the stage with people steeped in opera is intimidating, performing in the courtroom is more so: 'I can tell you that I find practicing law and appearing in court is actually far more stressful than being on the stage because this is the theatre of the real,' he said. Also this week, viewers can see how Storm Lake helping the influx of immigrants adjust to a new life, while helping community members cope with change. The gardens were created two years ago to provide members of the town the opportunity to have their own garden plots, and to help them acclimate to their new community. This successful project has influenced other Iowa towns to try their own diversity gardens. This week, Living in Iowa also visits Jim Mason, the producer, artistic director, and creator of the Tony- and Emmy-award winning hit 'Blast.' Mason, originally from Cedar Rapids, created the show, which was performed in Des Moines at the Civic Center last fall. On Side Roads this week, Paul Berge takes viewers on a whirlwind tour of larger-than-life statues around the western half of Iowa h, a huge duck, a statue of Pocahontas, and a 50 foot golden railroad spike. [28 minutes]

  • Mel Larson 78 Year Old Track and Field (#1231)

    Living in Iowa catches up with Mel Larsen of Ames. At 78, Larsen holds nearly a dozen world track and field records for his age group. He runs hurdles, sprints, 400-meter relays, and excels at the long jump. To keep in shape for athletic competition, Larsen does what any athlete would do nice, but Larsen day aches and pains he experiences. He r to continue to compete. 'I od Lord has allowed me to have a body that permits me to do these things. I think I should do the best I can with that body. I love competition.' Also this week, Living in Iowa visits a special summer camp. At the University of Iowa, hearing-impaired children learn to use cochlear implants, electronic devices designed to help the deaf hear. Living in Iowa followed three children who practiced listening and speaking skills for six hours every day in a camp-like atmosphere that mixes learning with fun. Living in Iowa also profiles the D & D Ranch in Swisher. Ranch-owners Deb and Dave Hoffman are growing a business with worms to conserve resources. The worms are available for bait, and the worm manure is available for compost. It omposting, and the Hoffmans say anybody can do it. Paul Berge visits Anamosa for his weekly Side Roads segment. In the middle of Grant Wood country, Berge found more than American Gothic hat all of Fame' offers wide variety of two-wheeled wonders for visitors. [28 minutes]

  • Bob Dorr The Blue Band (#1232)

    This episode features Bob Dorr of the Blue Band; volunteers bringing the fish hawk back to Iowa; and the Iowa Women Artists Oral History Project. [27 minutes]

  • Saving Iowa's Barns (#1234)

    Iowa and corporate ownership of farmland, are difficult to see. One noticeable symbol of rural culture disappearing rapidly is the barn. It is estimated that a thousand Iowa barns a year are either falling down from neglect or being bulldozed. The barns s, often the people least financially able to save them. Members of the Iowa Barn Federation are trying to save Iowa in all 99 Iowa counties, the organization selects barns to receive grant money for repairs. In Saving Iowa ial, visit some of the restored barns of the first-ever Iowa Barn Tour, and find out why people are dedicating themselves to saving Iowa arns. Visit a unique four-gabled barn near Harlan built in 1901, the only one of this design in the area still standing. Then travel to Woodbine, where a 1936 barn is easily visible and a Loess Hills landmark. The community support for this barn has been surprisingly strong, as passers-by have stopped by to express their gratitude. Then near Winterset visit the Gillespie barn, built in 1874, with wooden pegs used to secure beams and a foundation of thick limestone. Other barns featured include a Hampton barn built in the 1800s, a Latimer barn built in 1950 with clay tile and a round laminated roof with matching silo, a barn near Carroll with hip-roof rafters, the Mulcahey Pioneer Barn built in the 19th century near Colo, and a barn near Massena built in 1920. [28 minutes]

  • Dr Nancy Andreason, No Smoking Restaurants (#1235)

    Dr. Nancy Andreasen is a world-renowned psychiatrist, whose groundbreaking work with schizophrenia has earned her the 2000 National Medal of Science. This week, Living in Iowa visits with this University of Iowa professor to discuss her work with the disease that afflicts one in every 100 Americans. Using the latest advances in computer imaging, Andreasen and her associates have developed a new model of schizophrenia, one that links the disease to abnormalities in brain circuitry. In this model, disruption in communication between portions of the brain are responsible for the hallucinations, paranoia, and other symptoms schizophrenics suffer. On August 1 of last year, Ames passed a no-smoking ordinance making it the first city in Iowa to pass a law of its kind. The smoking ban applies to all public places unless food and nonalcoholic beverage sales at the establishment are less than 10 percent of the dollar amount of its total sales. Under the ban, smoking is not allowed in the establishment from 6 a.m. to 8:30 p.m., but is allowed in designated smoking sections from 8:30 p.m. to 6:00 a.m. After only three months of the ordinance, eight restaurant owners in Ames filed a lawsuit against the city saying the ban had a negative effect on their businesses. Living in Iowa visits with people on both sides of the issue. As we worked on this story, Iowa City also passed a no-smoking ordinance and we'll tell you how it differs from the one in Ames. Also this week, host Morgan Halgren learns how a house restoration changed the life ambitions of chef Liz Clark, who has been called the 'Julia Child of Iowa.' This Keokuk native holds cooking classes in the kitchen of her home, and she enjoys finding fresh ingredients at her nearby farmer west s to choose to make her home here in Iowa. [29 minutes]

  • Lincoln Highway, Character Counts (#1236)

    Character does count. Just ask the people in Fort Dodge who have implemented a program throughout the community called Character Counts!, a national program aimed at teaching young people and adults the principles of character. This week, Living in Iowa profiles Fort Dodge rts to become a community of character. Focusing on what it calls 'The Six Pillars of Character,' Character Counts! works to give people the skills they need to live successful lives and create a civil community. Host Morgan Halgren will also discuss this effort with former Iowa Gov. Robert Ray during an in-studio interview on the program. Ray is chairman of the board of the Institute for Character Development at Drake University. The Institute is a statewide partner with the national Character Counts! program. Also this week, find out what it takes to put pieces of the past back together along the Lincoln Highway. Thirty years ago, vandals damaged monuments that provided a tribute to the history of the nation the work of three Iowans, the damage has been repaired and the monuments again stand as a tribute to the past. [27 minutes]

  • Anne Sedars, Big Loser, Iowa Viticulture (#1237)

    This week Living in Iowa introduces viewers to a ars is proud to be a big loser and encourages others to be losers as well. Anne has been a Weight Watchers team leader for 13 years, winning awards for largest meeting and biggest losers - of weight, that is. More than 1000 people a week come to Anne with humor, but also contain a serious message about her personal struggle to beat the battle of the bulge. Also this week, meet two Iowans who are trying to reintroduce grapes to Iowa ranked sixth in the nation in grape production. With Prohibition, the ease of row-crop farming and the destructiveness of farm chemicals to vineyards, the grape farms almost completely disappeared from Iowa landscape. See how two vintners, Ron Mark and Paul Tabor, are having success with their own grape crops, a growing industry in Iowa. Iowa African-American history is also examined in this week ing World War I, Fort Des Moines was transformed into the first training camp for black officers. Among the men assembled there was William Morris' grandfather. In his contribution to the recently published book 'Outside In: African-American History in Iowa,' Morris tells the story of the camp and its far reaching effects on such acclaimed military figures as Colin Powell. Morris will discuss his book and progress on The Fort Des Moines Memorial Park and Education Center, a monument to both the black World War I officers and the WACs who trained there during World War II. Finally, Paul Berge takes a Side Road to Council Bluffs, to the Pottawattamie county jail which is an experiment in incarceration. The ch level cut into 10 pie-shaped cells. One guard could look in on each cell by turning a large crank and rotating the cylinder. It is now open as a museum. [28 minutes]

  • Raptor Tagger, Therapuetic Riding (#1238)

    Have you ever met a fisherman who doesn k on Living in Iowa meet Jon Stravers who joins a group of friends to fish the skies for birds of prey which are migrating south along the Mississippi River. Each bird caught helps scientists get a better understanding of migratory patterns and bird populations. Last year Stravers coordinated the research and field trip for the Audubon sissippi River Campaign aboard a small paddlewheel known as the on Ark. ong the Mississippi River by increasing the appreciation for one of nature tion is so important when it comes to preservation. Also this week, visit the Jennifer Steensen Field of Dreams. Like many young girls, Jennifer Steenson loved horses. Even though she couldn ur of her limbs were affected by cerebral palsy, she rode, until May 1998 when this 14-year-old nation inspired others to create a therapeutic riding program for people with mental and physical disabilities. Learn about therapeutic horse riding with host Morgan Halgren. Another feature this week introduces viewers to Boone resident Jamie Aaron Kelley. Kelley loves everything Elvis, including the movies, the music, and even the clothes. Kelley dresses like Elvis, combs his hair like Elvis and even sings like Elvis. Being an from father to son. Join Living in Iowa as we walk a mile in his blue suede shoes. Finally, Paul Berge takes a Side Road to Chariton, Iowa. Throughout the Midwest, Chariton is known as the corporate headquarters of the grocery giant Hy-Vee. Internationally, however, Chariton is known for its small corner grocery known as Pipers. Come take a Side Road to Pipers for the sweet facts concerning this unique little grocery store. [28 minutes]

  • Spetmber 11, 2001 (#1240)

    Iowa of September 11, 2001. Americans had never experienced anything like the horrors of the terrorist attacks, and it was no wonder words were hard to come by. In times like these, we tend to turn to the arts, andespecially poetry to help us come to terms with all that has happened . Late the night of September 11, Bell sat down to write e Resurrected Dead Man in a private reading on the University of Iowa campus. Also this week: More than 25 years ago, former Governor Bob Ray helped bring a group of people to Iowa to escape their war-torn homeland. These people were the Tai Dam people, whose homeland included parts of Vietnam, China, Laos and Thailand. Living in Iowa gets an inside look at the traditions and history of the Tai Dam people who now make their home in Iowa, and visits with local experts who give their insight on the culture. Also this week Living in Iowa catches up with Roger Williams, who has been called the world mous musician, came home in December 2001 to celebrate the 70th anniversary of his first public recital. Living in Iowa was in the audience for the concert and also went along with him to his alma mater, North High, where he received a special declaration. During his long and prolific career, Williams has recorded 115 albums, 18 of which have gone gold or platinum. Finally this week, take a Side Road with Paul Berge who introduces us to Williamsburg, Iowa native Eugene Ely. Ely made aviation history in 1910 by becoming the first pilot to take off from and land on a ship. [28 minutes]

  • Cael Sanderson (#1241)

    Cael Sanderson ughout the country this past spring. But who is the man who has been called the greatest wrestler in a generation? This week, Living in Iowa introduces viewers to the humble, yet intensely motivated, collegiate superstar in a feature produced as Sanderson was on his way to his fourth title. Sanderson, an Iowa State University senior majoring in art and design, is from a Mormon family in Utah. He is the third of four brothers who are wrestlers, and was the first collegiate wrestler ever to finish his career both undefeated (159-0) and with four individual NCAA championships. Sanderson has won numerous awards since accomplishing this feat, including an ESPY Award as College Male Athlete of the Year, the cover of a Wheaties box, and recognition in the U.S. Congress and Iowa Legislature. Also this week, Living in Iowa introduces viewers to Jane Farrell-Beck of Iowa State University mily and Consumer Sciences. Farrell-Beck has co-authored a book on the history of the bra called Uplift: The Bra in America. Her new book is a comprehensive examination that places the development of the bra in the context of economics, business conditions over the last 100 years, women arn more about the book that studies this important piece of women ashion history this week. Living in Iowa will air at 8:30 p.m. Friday, August 30 and at 6:30 Tuesday, September 3 on all Iowa Public Television stations. Living in Iowa invites phone calls at 800-532-1290 and email at its web site: iptv.org/livinginiowa. For more information, visit www.iptv.org. [27 minutes]

  • Episode #1243

    [27 minutes]

  • Effigy Mounds National Monument (#1244)

    Effigy Mounds National Monument preserves some of the few remaining structures built centuries ago by Native Americans in Iowa. In 2001, a new 1,000 acre addition was made, which contains several state-endangered species, two bear effigies, some linear mounds and other archaeological sites. The new Heritage Addition will also connect the mounds to the Yellow River State Forest, protecting the birds which migrate along the Yellow River. This week, Living in Iowa hikes the trails and rides the waters of this area, which will not be open to the public for several years. Also on Living in Iowa, meet Manchester native Susan Werner, who writes songs that interpret life and love with Midwestern honesty. When she's not recording, Werner is travelling, playing over 200 shows in a typical year - in places ranging from The Civic Center in Des Moines to The Beacon Theatre in New York City. Living in Iowa spent some time with Werner at her family's farm in Manchester, and caught an Ames performance by one of the state's premier singer/songwriters. [24 minutes]

  • Amana Photos, Doggie Dancing (#1245)

    In the mid 1800 ommunal and religious society in eastern Iowa known as the Amana Colonies. Photography was forbidden because it was considered to be a worldly vanity in a society that wanted to be separate from the influences of the outside world in order to focus on a spiritual life. This week on Living in Iowa, learn how a group of prominent members of Amana society felt that documenting their lifestyle in a rapidly changing world was more important than following the rule against taking pictures. The photographers took great care in capturing images from still life photos to documentation of local disasters. They left behind a time capsule of a gentler way of life. On the program this week, viewers can learn more about these historical photos from author Abigail Foerstner, who wrote raphers. photographers who took these fascinating photos. Also this week, Living in Iowa travels to Ankeny to introduce viewers to Linda Farr and her dog Keeper, who are national champions in a sport called Canine Musical Freestyle. According to the World Canine Freestyle Organization, Linda and Keeper of Ankeny, Iowa are the best in the U.S. when it comes to dog dancing. They have danced to everything from country to disco and have performed in competitions throughout the United States. Then viewers will visit the Cedar River Festival, a two-day event in July that was launched in 1988. The festival is part environmental clean-up and part celebration of the river through music and the arts. Visit with Living in Iowa as volunteers talk about their work with the festival and their love of the river. And finally this week, Living in Iowa takes a look at the wildflowers and prairie grasses blooming near the ancient rock outcroppings at Gitchie Manitou State Preserve in Lyon County, Iowa. Plant communities includ [28 minutes]

  • Quilts for 9/11 Victims, Female Cantor (#1246)

    After the horrific events of September 11, Varina, Iowa resident Betty Nielson felt compelled to do something about her grief. Betty decided to make quilts for each family of the 9/11 victims. What started out as a generous goal has become even bigger as families are in need of not one, but sometimes two or three quilts at a time. This week on Living in Iowa, meet Betty Nielson and her friend Pat Archer who together started Freedom Quilts. Also this week, meet Laura Berkson, cantorial solist at Temple B ove of the Jewish faith could make happy music together in Des Moines. Berkson is a singer/songwriter who was considering becoming a rabbi when she moved to Des Moines. Her short-term job as a cantorial soloist changed her mind, and she g as an s living in Iowa so much, and how she came to be involved with her two loves, music and faith. Then on Living in Iowa, see the spring buds along a nature trail in Nine Eagles State Park whose grace and beauty caught the attention of our videographer. Viewers will be refreshed with the scenes of a day in May. And finally on Living in Iowa, take a Side Road with Paul Berge to Marne, Iowa, the home of Baxter Cycle. Owned by Randy Baxter, this cycle shop is home to over 80 motorcycles, mostly classic European models like Norton, B.S.A. and Triumph. Baxter started his collection as a result of buying a British motorcycle in need of repairs. In his search for parts he bought over 20 British parts dealerships. Baxter Cycle has many parts and motorcycles now sold worldwide. [28 minutes]

  • Janusz Bardach, Micheal Carey (#1247)

    During World War II, Janusz Bardach, a 20-year-old Polish Jew, escaped the Nazi invasion by fleeing to Russia. There he was forced to enlist in the Red Army, but Stalin to labor camps in Siberia. This week on Living in Iowa, learn how this Iowa City man made the journey from slave laborer to world-class plastic surgeon during one of the last interviews he gave before his death in the summer of 2002. Also, learn how Bardach told his story through his book, in Iowa, meet Michael Carey, a poet from New Jersey who met and married an Iowa woman. Carey moved to Farragut to help out on his wife fth-generation family farm, only to have a rude yet magical awakening. Also this week, meet General Jack Pershing. During World War I, General Jack raised over $40,000 for the American Red Cross. This is a considerable achievement for anyone, but considering General Jack is a rooster, it is even more incredible. This week Living in Iowa tells viewers the story of General Jack and how he raised the funds. And finally this week, Living in Iowa takes viewers to Nine Eagles State Park to a windy day in May. Watch the wind play with the forest and the various plants within the park. Living in Iowa will air on Thursday, October 10 at 7 p.m., Friday, October 11 at 8:30 p.m., and on Tuesday, October 15 at 6:30 p.m. on all Iowa Public Television stations. Living in Iowa invites phone calls at 800-532-1290 and email at its web site: iptv.org/livinginiowa. For more information, visit www.iptv.org. [28 minutes]

  • TV Iowa Grew Up On (#1248)

    Fifty years ago, when television was first becoming popular, it was common for local television stations to host afternoon shows for children. In Iowa, kids spent their afternoons watching TV programs hosted by space commanders, river boat captains, clowns and puppets. This week, Living in Iowa takes viewers on a journey across the state to the various local television stations that produced these programs, and explores how these programs became a part of Iowa ic Living in Iowa program looks back on those days with the hosts of these shows from around the state. They include ux City, om Cedar Rapids, Betty Lou Varnum of Bill Riley erloo embered. [26 minutes]

  • James Van Allen, Frankie Laine Collection (#1249)

    Defying the odds, a space probe navigates successfully through the asteroid fields between Mars and Jupiter, sending back data about distant planets, while continuing its trajectory toward the edge of our solar system. This is the mission of Pioneer 10, watched closely by Dr. James Van Allen of Iowa City. This week on Living in Iowa, meet Dr. Van Allen and discover how he designed the only instrument on board the Pioneer 10 that is still sending back information that will help determine the boundary of our solar system. Celebrating its 30th Anniversary, the Pioneer 10 mission is 7.5 billion miles out in space, or about twice the distance from Earth to Pluto Also this week, Living in Iowa features this segment, Siskow takes viewers to Sheffield, which has preserved the traditional values of small town life, while still having the savvy to compete in the world of 21st century technology. Siskow is a graduate student in journalism and mass communications at Iowa State University. Craig Cronbaugh of Brooklyn, Iowa, is a huge fan of 1950s recording star Frankie Laine and he shares his collection with Living in Iowa on this episode. The extensive collection includes nearly every recording Laine ever made, clips of Laine ances and recordings of the many theme songs Laine sang for motion pictures. And finally this week, take a Side Road to the Sergeant Floyd Monument in Sioux City. The 100-foot tall monument marks the grave of Sergeant Charles Floyd, the only person to die during the Lewis and Clark Expedition. [28 minutes]

  • Nauvoo Temple, Rowan Community Theater (#1250)

    More than 150 years ago, a building that symbolized an entire religious community was destroyed. It was the temple in Nauvoo, Illinois. Even though the temple he Mormon of the Mormon faith. Church members fled through Iowa to Salt Lake City, Utah, and the church now claims more than 11 million members. This week Living in Iowa tours the recently-rebuilt Mormon temple, which was dedicated on the anniversary of the murder of the church l leader, Joseph Smith, Jr. In the few months before the official dedication, tourists were able to enter the temple and learn about the sacred rites of the oth Mormon and non-Mormon townspeople about the temple and the town place in history. Then on Living in Iowa, meet Belmond sisters Luanne Krabbe and Kathy Schnell. These women have started a multi-community theatre in the small town of Rowan. In just two years the theatre success is unimaginable. Learn how volunteers from surrounding communities have given their time, money and other resources to the cause of entertaining residents in the area. Also this week, Living in Iowa takes a look at Grant Wood lithographs which were displayed at the Cedar Rapids Museum of Art this past summer. Grant Wood is world-renowned for his colorful paintings like of Iowa e his artwork more available to the public, and created some lithographs in black and white. In this Living in Iowa musical montage, see some of Wood through winter. And finally this week, take a Side Road with Paul Berge to The Castle on the Hill. Built in 1892 it served as Sioux City Central High School until 1972. The school was heading toward demolition when Sioux City residents Lois Littl [28 minutes]

  • Peregrine Falcons (#1273)

    [28 minutes]

  • Mexican Culture In Iowa (#1301)

    In the 13th season premiere, the program discovers a colorful culture, right here at home. From the traditional Mexican hat dance to the mod ern Macarena, Latino culture is alive in Iowa. Viewers can see Meringue dance lessons, sample traditional dances in Davenport and Des Moines, and celebrate the 'Dia de los Muretos' or 'Day of the Dead.' [27 minutes]

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  • Astronaut Peggy Whitson (#1302)

    Mount Ayr native Peggy Whitson is at a high point in her life. This biologist is currently orbiting 200 miles above the earth as an astronaut aboard the International Space Station. This week, Living in Iowa host Morgan Halgren talks to Whitson from space about her perspectives on earth, life in space, and how her trip has affected Iowans. Also this week, Living in Iowa looks at Iowa State University rsary celebration of Art on Campus. From 1930s Grant Wood murals and the Christian Petersen sculptures to the G-Nome project that is the molecular biology building, art at ISU is as old as the campus itself. This week the program traces some of that history and explores the role Art on Campus plays at ISU. Continuing the November series of Latino features is the history of two areas in the Quad Cities that began in the 1920s. Holy City and Cook and boxcars that housed Mexican railroad and factory workers and their families. With no electricity or indoor plumbing, the living conditions were poor. In spite of the hardships, two proud and close-knit communities developed. In this episode, former residents look back at the annual Cook nd of these unique communities. And on Side Roads this week, host Paul Berge takes viewers on a tour of the Anamosa Prison Museum for a detour from the straight and narrow for a trip down incarceration lane. [28 minutes]

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  • Latino Media In Iowa (#1303)

    Living in Iowa meets the state atino media are providing valuable information to this growing community. We media and hear how they serve their constituencies. [27 minutes]

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  • English Language In Iowa (#1304)

    Living in Iowa will explore the impact of the English Language Reaffirmation Act, Iowa's law declaring English the state's official language. The legislation has generated diverse reactions from Iowans. Living in Iowa will explore the legislation by interviewing people from both sides of the issue -- a leader in the Latino community and a Legislative sponsor of the act -- to learn how the legislation is affecting Iowans. [27 minutes]

  • Cedar Rapids Mosque (#1305)

    Islam has a long history in Iowa: Cedar Rapids is home to the oldest mosque in North America, and there has been an Islamic congregation in Cedar Rapids since the 1930s. Despite this history, few Iowans know much about Islam or their Muslim neighbors. This week, Living in Iowa travels to the Cedar Rapids Islamic Center to get to know some Iowa Muslims. In this traditional season of giving, Living in Iowa also looks at Goodwill Industries. This charitable organization with Iowa roots has been serving people for more than 100 years, and has touched 5 million lives. On Side Roads this week, part two of Paul Berge Hills adventure takes him to a portion of the Loess Hills National Scenic Byway along Iowa , Murray Hill Scenic Overlook, Small a, and more. In Living in Iowa Des Moines Register music critic Kyle Munson introduces viewers to Mike and Amy Finders. Their music is self-described ove- though sometimes bitter - is mostly just sweet. [28 minutes]

  • Tanzanian Choir In Iowa (#1306)

    In June of 2002, a choir from Tanzania visited Iowa as guests of the Evangelical Lutheran Church omen, known as the owans during their 20-day visit. This week, Living in Iowa finds out what these choir members from a third-world country learned about Americans during their stay, and sees how the choir e Iowans who met them. Viewers can discover how music can dissolve the cultural and economic differences between Christians from a Third World country and those who live in America. Also this week, Living in Iowa introduces viewers to an Iowa music mogul - 32 year old David Zollo of Iowa City. Zollo plays many different roles in his band David Zollo and the Body Electric, including singer, songwriter, keyboardist, manager, and producer. He has one more important role that not many Iowans can claim - record label owner. As founder and owner of Trailer Records in Iowa City, Zollo provides 12 Iowa artists an avenue to have their music produced. Zollo ic has been a staple in Iowa and throughout the Midwest for nearly 10 years. His blossoming music career was nearly halted, however, by a throat condition. Following surgery and intensive therapy, Zollo has been able to continue his unique brand of entertaining Iowans. Living in Iowa tells his comeback story, and showcases his talent in several venues, including an in-studio performance. [28 minutes]

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  • Christmas Special (#1307)

    To celebrate the season, this year atures historical Iowa traditions. These traditions include songs, stories, and food. Viewers can see all three in a special Midwestern Christmas celebration called Perry. rmance based on 1913 newspaper stories and songs of the era, accompanied by a four-course meal. Living in Iowa host Morgan Halgren hosts the special from the Hotel Pattee ecutive chef David North. The Lamb ill also perform at the Hotel oliday edition, Living in Iowa travels to Algona, where German prisoners of war were held during World War II. While held captive, the German soldiers created a large nativity scene, which was left to the city as a gift with the stipulation that it would only be open to the public during the Christmas season. In the wa Paul, who will perform her song for Christmas called y is Born. [27 minutes]

  • Roger Williams (#1308)

    He has been called the world owa e 70th anniversary of his first recital. This time he didn hare the piano bench with his music teacher. Living in Iowa was in the audience for the concert, and went along with him to his alma mater, North High, where he received a special declaration. Williams also tells the story of his first big break, the recording of , , Williams has recorded 115 albums, 18 of which have gone gold or platinum. Also this week, viewers can witness a time capsule for a gentler way of life through the eyes of Amana photographers. Though photography was forbidden in the mid-1800s among Amana Colonies settlers, a group of prominent members of Amana society felt that documenting their lifestyle in a rapidly changing world was more important than obeying the rule against taking pictures. The photographers took great care to capture photos and Living in Iowa shares them and tells their stories this week. Finally this week, Living in Iowa introduces viewers to Canine Musical Freestyle - dog dancing. Linda Farr of Ankeny and her golden retriever Keeper are the national champions in this sport, dancing to everything from country to disco in competitions around the U.S. [28 minutes]

  • Marshalltown Hispanics (#1309)

    Things are changing in Marshalltown. In 1990, 97 percent of Marshalltown residents were white, largely of European decent. By the 2000 census, almost 13 percent of Marshalltown descendents of the Purhepecha Indians of Mexico. As in all towns experiencing a rapid and significant influx of immigrants, both the new-comers and old-timers must make adjustments in their daily lives. On Living in Iowa this week, explore how the demographic changes in Marshalltown have affected the police department, the schools and the local hospital. All of these institutions must face challenges in making the community work for everyone. In early 2001, Marshalltown became a Model Community in a statewide effort to recruit new Iowans, including skilled immigrants. Also this week, Living in Iowa catches up with singer/songwriter Dan Bern. Bern has made quite a name for himself in folk music circles. He has been described as re than one music critic, and is known for his sharp wit and biting satirical lyrics. Bern and his band, onspiracy, Carnegie Hall. Living in Iowa was on hand for one of the band rts in Iowa City and also spent some time in the artist Mount Vernon. When asked why he writes songs, he replied, stop? All children make up songs. They put their thoughts into music. I just didn tured this week. The Art Center was recently host to an exhibit of the can Art Museum. Living in Iowa takes viewers on a tour of the exhibit of some of America ian American Art Museum. [28 minutes]

  • First Lady Christie Vilsack (#1310)

    First Lady Christie Vilsack was a teacher for 28 years. Today, the whole state is her classroom. Whether she aries or schools, the First Lady is dedicated to encouraging literacy and reading, and getting all Iowans to read and share their stories to create stronger communities. A self-described political activist since the age of 10, the First Lady is a mother, a teacher, and a writer. But as First Lady, her issue of choice has been reading. She has visited more than 300 of the state their communities. Host Morgan Halgren talks with the First Lady on this week re a group of Old West itage by wearing historically accurate or authentic clothing and sporting firearms from 1866 to 1899. The National Congress of Old West Shootists was started by Iowan George Glenn and now has 1200 members in the U.S., Canada, and Europe. In Mason City, Living in Iowa takes a spin in the Fatmobile - a VW Rabbit that Craig Howard of Plymouth converted to run on used cooking oil that he gets free from restaurants. Craig shares how and why he turned his petrol-powered VW diesel into a Rabbit with an appetite for vegetable oil. This week on the Side Roads segment, host Paul Berge ventures out on a virtual Side Road, into the CornCam.com fields in rural Prairieburg. People all over the world can take a close-up look at Iowa to learn about Iowa [27 minutes]

  • Tom and Christie Vilsack (#1311)

    Rock and roll helps Governor Tom Vilsack relax and unwind from his hectic schedule. First Lady Christie Vilsack is a good cook, but the ingredients are often everywhere in the kitchen. Think you know Iowa First Couple? Experience the personal side of two public figures, as Living in Iowa host Morgan Halgren sits down for an intimate and informative conversation with the Governor and First Lady at Terrace Hill. Iowa wo sons, the loss of their parents, and early childhood influences, including Governor Vilsack youth. You r personalities complement each other. Sometimes humorous, sometimes poignant, this casual yet candid conversation is a unique opportunity to see the personal side of Iowa ring the week in which Governor Vilsack and Lt. Gov. Sally Pedersen celebrate their inauguration to a second term in office. [28 minutes]

  • Joy Sadler. 30th Anniversary Roe V. Wade (#1312)

    After four months of captivity in an Indonesian prison, Waterloo nurse Joy Sadler has returned home to her family in Iowa. Sadler, who was imprisoned under harsh conditions for violating the terms of her visa last year, was in Indonesia to provide humanitarian aid when she was arrested in September and jailed along with a British counterpart. She returned home January 12 and sat down with Living in Iowa host Morgan Halgren for her most extensive television interview since her return to the United States. The interview is the focus of this week n Iowa, which airs Thursday, Jan. 23 at 7 p.m., Friday, Jan. 24 at 8:30 p.m., and Tuesday, Jan. 28 at 6:30 p.m. on statewide Iowa Public Television. This week, Living in Iowa also explores the value and belief systems that motivate the pro-choice and pro-life movements on the 30th anniversary of Roe vs. Wade, the January 1973 U.S. Supreme Court ruling that women have a constitutional right to an abortion. Also on this week three-year-old Ray Elliott disappeared while playing near his home. Fourteen months later a boy was returned to the Elliott family. Was the lost boy Ray? On Side Roads this week, Paul Berge goes on a road trip to an abandoned three-mile road-racing course that winds through wooded hills southeast of Indianola. Living in Iowa is there for a trip down memory lane in vintage sports cars at Greenwood Roadway, where there hasn't been a race since 1966. [27 minutes]

  • Dan Eldon, Robert James Waller (#1313)

    How is a young war photographer who was killed on the job in 1993 still inspiring young people today- even students in Iowa? Find out as Living in Iowa remembers Reuters photographer Dan Eldon, and visits with his mother and people in Iowa who are using his art and way of life to influence others. s, their real potential, Eldon. ng that could happen if you don rsonal journey to find meaning in her brother is documented in Dying to Tell the Story, which will air Thursday, January 30 at 7:30 p.m. following Living in Iowa on all Iowa Public Television stations. Also this week, Living in Iowa visits Robert James Waller, who grew up in Rockford, Iowa near the banks of the Shellrock and Winnebago rivers. Before the Madison County fiction that made him famous, Morgan Halgren interviewed Waller about his passion for photography and the environment in this 1991 interview. The following week, on February 6 and 7, Living in Iowa will get caught up with Waller in a new interview recorded this past fall at Francesca rset. On this week Bob Cook and Gary Audsley, long-time Des Moines musicians with a unique blend of folk music. This duo has been performing together for nearly 30 years, and their audiences keep coming back to dance - and roll - in the aisles. [28 minutes]

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  • Robert James Waller, Col Ballroom (#1314)

    Catch up with Robert James Waller to see what he's up to these days and visit the Col Ballroom, owned by the Quad Cities Mexican American Organization, a group of people who were once denied entrance because of their skin color. Musical guest--The Blue Band. [28 minutes]

  • Iowa's Tuskegee Airmen (#1315)

    Meet some Iowan heroes who helped defeat our enemies abroad during World War II. Not only did the Tuskegee Airmen have outstanding records, they excelled despite facing institutionalized racism. (** Shorter version: Meet the Tuskegee Airmen from Iowa, World War II heroes who excelled despite racism in the military.) [28 minutes]

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  • 6 On 6 Basketball, The Mothers (#1316)

    At one time, basketball was the only game in town for high school girls in Iowa. Through the direction of E. Wayne Cooley, however, Iowa grew to be known as a utopia for girls d as executive director of the Iowa Girls High School Athletic Union. This week, Living in Iowa talks with Cooley about nearly half a century of service to the anted the girl to walk down the street equally tall with the boy, maybe no taller, but certainly no less tall, . Also this week, Living in Iowa introduces viewers to members of the Mothers tradition going back to 1918, the Mothers are a group of older women who have dedicated themselves to helping church members and others, too. They help by example, through living a life of faith. They help by doing things as simple and profound as giving a hug or a word of encouragement. And they help by sharing things like wisdom, food, and concern. On this week o The Nadas. Their name literally means aks volumes. This Iowa-based rock quartet runs the gamut of modern acoustic folk balladeering to good old Rock or a Side Roads that will take viewers back in time. The Carstens 1880 Farmstead is an 80-acre working farm exhibit that is a celebration of Iowa of the yard and restored buildings of the farmstead that is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. [28 minutes]

  • Meredith Wilson, Jane Elliot (#1317)

    The Music Man, is one of America in Iowa profiles the charming musical genius who wrote it-Mason City s Meredith Willson. The list of Willson d long. Throughout his career he performed with the band of John Philip Sousa, and the New York Philharmonic, and served as the music director on NBC for more than 20 years. He also received commendations and awards from every realm, including three awards from American presidents. During his life, Willson enjoyed spending time with his friends in Mason City, Iowa, just as well as rubbing elbows with the rich and famous. He visited home often, and memories of these visits are still told by those who knew him. This week, Living in Iowa tells the story of this remarkable man who took his home town roots along with him to the top of the charts. Also this week, Living in Iowa talks with Jane Elliott, the teacher from Riceville, Iowa who divided her third-grade students by eye color to teach them about racism over 30 years ago. While she no longer teaches third grade, Elliott still conducts her exercise for various civic groups and corporations around the world. Spend time with Elliott at her home in Osage and find out how racism can color a person [28 minutes]

  • Blandon Memorial Art Museum (#1318)

    This week, Living in Iowa visits the Blanden Memorial Art Museum in Fort Dodge, which mounted a major effort to help the community deal with the September 11 tragedy. Artists and citizens all contributed by sharing their feelings through writing, painting, photography, drawing, and other ways. The effort culminated with the premiere of ffirmation, rinnell College. The piece was performed on September 22, 2002 and was dedicated to Ann Nicole Nelson, a young woman who died in the World Trade Center. Also this week, Living in Iowa meets three Iowa students-Katy Miller from Iowa City, Brian Claeys from Eldridge, and Maggie Mulvey from Cedar Falls-who have such a strong devotion to helping others that they are among the winners of the Herbert Hoover Uncommon Student Award. The award is designed to identify and honor Iowa high school students who are making a difference in their communities and the world. And on Side Roads this week, find out about the airie as Paul Berge takes viewers to the Prairie Learning Center at the Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge near Prairie City. Living in Iowa airs Thursday, March 20 at 7 p.m. and Friday, March 21 at 8:30 p.m. and Tuesday, March 25 at 6:30 p.m. on statewide Iowa Public Television. Living in Iowa invites phone calls at 800-532-1290 and email at its updated web site: iptv.org/livinginiowa. For more information, visit www. iptv.org. [28 minutes]

  • Iraqi Girl In Iowa, Robert Larson (#1319)

    This week on Living in Iowa, viewers can meet a young woman who is truly caught in the middle. Born in the United States in 1980 to Iraqi parents, Hend moved to Iraq at the age of two and spent most of her formative years there. She lived there during the Gulf War and in 1999 came to Iowa to be a student at Iowa State University. Today, she is torn between her ties to and memories of Iraq, and the freedom and independence she has experienced here. "I don't know with whom to be sympathetic. I don't know who is to blame," she said. "I don't' know what's happening. I don't know why it's happening, actually." Host Morgan Halgren talks with Hend about her life in Iraq and in the United States, and about her feelings about the current war. Also this week, Living in Iowa will continue its on-going series of excerpts from war journals being kept by Iowans at home and overseas. Also on the program this week, viewers can meet Dr. Robert Larsen, director of the Des Moines Metro Opera. When opera singers of national prominence think of the ultimate summer singing experience, many of them think of Indianola and the Des Moines Metro Opera, mainly because of Larsen. Living in Iowa meets Larsen and finds out how his passion for opera has put Indianola on the national map. [28 minutes]

  • Iowa Veterans of Several Wars (#1320)

    As Iowans search for perspective in these uncertain times, Living in Iowa will take a look back this week, with stories that shed light on Iowans the World War I black officer training camp at Ft. Des Moines, as tol d by William Morris, a Des Moines attorney and military historian. Morris y in Iowa. pilot in World War II. Yellin speaks to young people about the war, his experiences in it, and how he was able to let go of his hatred of a country he knew only through war. Robert Gates of Urbandale is a Korean War veteran, and he feels his work to make a difference in the lives of South Koreans was worthwhile. He saw his tour of duty as an important job, and can identify with the soldiers currently serving in thePersian Gulf. Veterans of the Vietnam War had starkly different expe riences when they returned home from the war than previous soldiers. Faced with protestors and strong anti-war sentiment at home, Samuel Sours week escribed for us the start of the war, her living conditions, what it like to go to church in a gas mask with an M16, and her memories of I owa. Also this week, Living in Iowa will continue its on-going series of excerpts from war journals being kept by Iowans at home and overseas. Emmetsburg other will read a diary entry from him. Adam Schenck, a student at Buena Vista University, and Maggie Mulvey, a high school student from Cedar Falls, will read their journal entries as well. [28 minutes]

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  • Iowa and the Iraq War (#1321)

    Young Iowans have questions and concerns about the war in Iraq. This week on Living in Iowa they ng Iraqi adult who lived through the Gulf War, made it to America, and has a unique perspective on the country, culture, and political climate in Iraq. Students from Perry Middle School and Johnston High School will ask questions of Alen Gisso, a 25-year-old from Baghdad now living in Des Moines. Gisso left Iraq when he was 17 to avoid the Iraqi military and to find freedom in the United States. After spending four years as a temporary refugee in Switzerland, he moved to the United States four years ago and will become a citizen later this year. Also this week, Living in Iowa introduces viewers to a program that ping create a fresh start. The Iowa Department of Natural Resources has turned to the state ries with a diversity of plant species. Doing the labor-intensive work of seed collection, germination, and transplantation, inmates are helping restore 3,000 acres of state land with species that would be too cost-prohibitive otherwise. Also this week, Living in Iowa will continue its ongoing series of excerpts from war journals being kept by Iowans at home and overseas. [27 minutes]

  • Artist Mauricio Lasansky (#1322)

    Artist Mauricio Lasansky is one of the country and he helped establish the University of Iowa as the printmaking capital of the United States in the 1940s. He was also a well-known artist, whose f man play at the University of Iowa represents the ewing a U.S. military film showing the victims and the aftermath of Nazi atrocities. This week, Living in Iowa takes a special look at these drawings, and tells the story of Mauricio and his artwork. Lasansky is also featured in a national, award-winning documentary by Iowa City independent filmmaker Lane Wyrick. The Nazi Drawings by Mauricio Lasansky explores the history and passion behind these powerful drawings. Also this week, Living in Iowa visits a place where prayer and prairies go together, the Prairiewoods Franciscan Spirituality Center in Hiawatha. The center, run by Franciscan nuns, aims to integrate ecology and spirituality. In recognition of Earth Day, Living in Iowa visits the center set within 70 acres of woods and prairies to see how children and adults have learned to appreciate the earth by interacting in this place. Viewers can also meet the Bunny Band this week. These music lovers meet each Easter weekend to play and record rare European band marches, saving them from obscurity. It all happens at Maquoketa High School. Also this week, Living in Iowa will continue its ongoing series of excerpts from war journals being kept by Iowans at home and overseas. Desert Strom veteran Mary McFarland-Stabe shares her thoughts with us as she remembers serving her country. She and her husband, Jason Stabe, were both deployed during Desert Storm. Mary reflects on her past experiences in the first war against Iraq, and shares her thoughts on today's events. Mary and Steve live on her Great-Great Grandfather's farm in rural Fredericksburg. [27 minutes]

  • Astronaut Peggy Whitson (#1323)

    (Johnston, Iowa) - Beaconsfield native Peggy Whitson is a NASA Astronaut who recently spent six months aboard the International Space Station orbiting 240 miles above the earth at 17,500 miles per hour. This week, Living in Iowa catches up with Whitson as she tells stories and shows pictures from her summer trip during public appearances at the Science Center of Iowa in Des Moines, and at her alma mater, Mount Ayr High School. s of a very, very special place ver be able to capture everything that makes it so special, aid. Also this week, viewers meet a teacher with a rock and roll past. Layton Zbornik was known as Jerry Martin in 1957, and when he recorded his song Janet it was the first rock and roll song recorded in Iowa. Known to his Nora Springs students as make the world a better place through his Peace Alliance seminars. Travel with Living in Iowa on the long and winding road that took Jerry Martin from rock and roller to Layton Zbornik, high school teacher. [27 minutes]

  • Nurses In Iowa (#1324)

    By 2009, it is projected that 64 percent of the current registered nurses will be retired or over the age of 65. By 2010, surveys indicate that almost half (49 percent) of Iowa re. Iowa, like the rest of the nation, is facing a critical shortage of nurses. How does the state plan to improve the shortage when it ranks 50th in the median hourly pay for nurses? As the profession celebrates Nurse ws from those who know about the shortage firsthand. Mary Mincer Hansen, the first nurse to lead the Iowa Department of Public Health, hopes to use her new position to improve morale in her profession. Living in Iowa gets her perspectives on the issue, as well as the perspectives of Lorinda Inman with the Iowa Board of Nursing, Jean Logan, head of the division of nursing at Grand View College, and other nursing professionals past and future. Also this week, viewers can learn about young dancers in Iowa who dream of dancing professionally but who will most likely need to leave the state to do so. But a Des Moines couple is working to create an environment where the next generation of dancers can dance professionally right here in Iowa. Albert d Elizabeth Harano Adams are sharing their talent and training to teach young people in a professional environment. This week, Living in Iowa profiles the Adams n Iowa. Finally this week, viewers can visit the Blank Park Zoo Discovery Center with Side Roads host Paul Berge. Paul oad takes him through both the woods and the rain forest in Blank Park Zoo [28 minutes]

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  • Isabel Bloom, Youth Incentives (#1325)

    This week, Living in Iowa remembers the late Isabel Bloom, a Davenport artist whose creations are cherished by generations. Bloom studied under Grant Wood, married an accomplished artist, produced an art-based children mbol of the Quad Cities area. A lifetime spent experimenting with materials and techniques resulted in a business that manufactures and sells thousands of reproductions of her sculptures each year. Also this week, Living in Iowa will take a look at Youth Incentives, a Des Moines organization that is working to motivate inner city young people through connections with adults n hopes will motivate young people to become caring, productive, and responsible citizens. On this week Paul follows the Burma Shave-style signs to the north central Iowa town of Dows, where the restored train depot doubles as a welcome center, the blacksmith shop houses items from as far back as the 1830s, and the mercantile market displays area antiquers' newest old stuff. The Blue Band returns to Living in Iowa this week in the Iowa Spotlight segment. Music host Kyle Munson welcomes one of Iowa revered and requested bands, a group that performs original and cover blues, soul, rockabilly, and R & B grooves. [27 minutes]

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  • Ww2 Pow's In Iowa (#1326)

    This week Living in Iowa takes a look back at when prisoners of war were held in Iowa. Many stories from overseas POWs in World War II are filled with terrible cruelty and death. In America, however, prisoners of war were kept in camps that met the standards of the Geneva Convention. These POWs received not only humane treatment, but were surprisingly involved in their local communities. Many German and some Italian and Japanese prisoners were held in the Midwest, coming in by train to Algona, Iowa, where they would be deployed to satellite camps. Long-forgotten stories of the best side of a difficult time have been discovered recently by amateur historians, and showcased by a nonprofit organization, TRACES, a group with Iowa and German connections. In the past few years, the group once ushered through the Iowa POW camps. He recently brought some of these former prisoners and their families through the Midwest so they could explore the remains of these camps and walk in their ancestor ootsteps. Living in Iowa spent several days with these visitors, and discovered that while the remnants are hard to find, the interpersonal connections are alive and well. Viewers can also meet Hector Ibarra on this week acher, says if you teach children to solve problems, think critically, and be creative you have taught them how to learn for a lifetime. That think, rather than memorize for a test. Also this week, two of central Iowa combine for a duet performance from IPTV t woodwind instruments, while Taylor plays an incomparable piano. Both men write their own music, and Taylor red in introduce viewers to this talented duo. [28 minutes]

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  • Episode #1327

    [26 minutes]

  • Mental Illness, Creativity Index (#1328)

    Changing perceptions about mental illness Moines-based troupe, whose vignettes target the stigma associated with mental illness, is featured on the next Living in Iowa. The troupe players hope that by educating the general public about mental illness ut people with mental illness. Every member of the s a mental illness, and hopes to educate the public about the impact common stereotypes have on their lives. Also this week, Living in Iowa profiles a new slant on Iowa ortance of creativity to economic development. Iowa has three cities in the top ten of Richard Florida's "Creativity Index." So, the Department of Cultural Affairs invited Richard to lead a lively discussion of how having lots of creative people in an urban area can provide economic benefit. Called an "Unconference," this event, held in the snowy month of March 2003, drew together an unlikely mix of business patriarchs, artisans, musicians, and state leaders, all interested in seeing how arts and economics interact. On this week c segment, jazz musician Rob Lumbard performs in Iowa Public Television on where he's playing, he can be found covering a jazz standard, Robert Johnson, Lyle Lovett, or doing a set of his own tunes in his finger-picking guitar style During the last weekend in June, the town of Riverside takes a trip into the future - to the year 2228 to be exact. That's when Starship Enterprise Commander, James T. Kirk, will be born. Confused? All the better reason to join Side Roads host Paul Berge as he joins the rest of the Trekkies, Vulcans, Klingons, and tribbles who journey to Riverside for the annual event. [28 minutes]

  • Paul Berge Side Roads (#1329)

    This summer, Living in Iowa will offer something a little different the opportunity for weekend travelers to visit unique and fun-filled locations in Iowa with Side Roads host and humorist Paul Berge. Each week, Paul will take any transportation necessary ne, or horse funny bits from around the state. This week, in North Central Iowa, Living in Iowa visits several unique and interesting places, including: Hobo Museum in Britt The Fossil and Prairie Park in Rockford Also this week, the popular band rt performance in Des Moines. Des Moines Register music critic Kyle Munson provides some background information on the Des Moines-based band, which has recently completed a coast to coast concert tour. Also this week, Living in Iowa brings viewers a reunion of sorts. At the end of World War II Merle Gerry walked away from the bomber known as the Superfortress and didn't look back. In July of 2002 the only B-29 Superfortress still flying landed in Cedar Rapids, which gave Merle and other World War II veterans from Iowa a chance to see a plane that they hadn't seen in over 50 years. From the traditional Mexican hat dance to the modern Macarena, Latino culture has come to Iowa. Viewers can see dance lessons and sample a celebration of the "Dia de los Muretos" or "Day of the Dead" as Living in Iowa discovers a colorful culture, right here at home. [28 minutes]

  • Holy City and Cook, Iowa (#1330)

    Living in Iowa wa City and traditional tunes in country, folk, and blues. Amy will sing her composition, River he history of two areas in the Quad-Cities that began in the 1920 Holy City and Cook that housed Mexican railroad and factory workers and their families. With no electricity or indoor plumbing, the living conditions were poor, but two proud and close-knit communities developed. Former residents looked back at friendships and hardships during the annual Cook int reunion, which celebrated the 50th anniversary of the end of that area and era. In a student production this week, Rachel Bevins takes us to Belle Plaine, a town where three generations of her family live. Rachel is the daughter of Daniel and Susan Bevins and a 1998 graduate of Belle Plaine High School. Rachel majored in journalism with an emphasis in political science at the University of Iowa, graduating in 2002. [28 minutes]

  • Paul Berge Side Roads Features (#1331)

    (Johnston, Iowa) little different que and fun-filled locations in Iowa with Side Roads host and humorist Paul Berge. Each week, Paul will take any transportation necessary car, tractor, airplane, or horse of tourist tips and funny bits from around the state. This week, in South East Iowa, Living in Iowa visits several unique and interesting places, including: s House in Burlington t Bellevue (Now known as Fort Madison) D) Museum near Morning Sun he Mississippi in Keokuk Living in Iowa s music is a combination of jazz, blues, folk, and pop. His guitar finesse will soothe viewers, make them blue, and take them down the bayou. Iowa wa talks with Iowans who are reaching out to the Hispanic community, and finds out how they share the issues that have an impact on Latinos in Iowa. Living in Iowa was there when the whole town of Bristow came out to honor an American veteran and unsung hero . This adventurer and inventor has launched balloons to the edge of space to study cosmic radiation prior to manned space flight. [28 minutes]

  • Paul Berge On Northeast Iowa (#1332)

    This summer, Living in Iowa will offer something a little different the opportunity for weekend travelers to visit unique and fun-filled locations in Iowa with Side Roads host and humorist Paul Berge. Each week, Paul will take any transportation necessary ne, or horse funny bits from around the state. This week, in North East Iowa, Living in Iowa visits several unique and interesting places, including: Sturgis Falls Festival in Cedar Falls Factory in Waterloo Cedar Valley Nature Trail enter in Waterloo Then Living in Iowa Ashanti, one of the Midwest d, high-energy band has a distinctively wide-ranging repertoire. Andy Goldsworthy, an artist who grew up in rural England and now hails from Scotland, has much to say about nature, art, and how he sees the Midwestern United States. This week, Living in Iowa tells the story of his new sculpture that links Iowa with both coasts. Goldsworthy has found a way to use Iowa limestone in an egg- or seed-shaped design he calls a cairn. His temporary cairns have weathered waves of the Pacific and Atlantic oceans and the weather in the Midwestern prairie as part of a nine-part art project displayed around the country. His permanent structures, also made of Iowa limestone, are three interconnected displays standing in Des Moines, New York, and California. Their central focal point is in Greenwood Park, near the Des Moines Art Center [27 minutes]

  • Paul Berge, East Central Iowa (#1333)

    This summer, Living in Iowa will offer something a little different the opportunity for weekend travelers to visit unique and fun-filled locations in Iowa with Side Roads host and humorist Paul Berge. Each week, Paul will take any transportation necessary ne, or horse funny bits from around the state. This week, in East Central Iowa, Living in Iowa visits several unique and interesting places in Cedar Rapids, including: ble Cars Cedar Rapids Museum of Art The History Center Also this week, viewers can learn more about All Iowa Reads 2003. The purpose of this project is to encourage Iowans statewide to read and talk about a single title in the same year. Peace Like a River by Leif Enger has been selected for the initiative, which is a project of the Iowa Center for the Book. Living in Iowa also looks at Goodwill Industries. This charitable organization with Iowa roots has been serving people for more than 100 years, and has touched 5 million lives. Then Living in Iowa ight features Cedar Rapids singer/songwriter/guitarist Gayla Drake Paul, who has been playing and writing guitar music for over a quarter of a century. The Iowa Women's Foundation named Gayla Iowa Woman Musician of the Year in 1996, and for the past four years she has won an award from the ASCAP Popular Music Board. [27 minutes]

  • Deneese Becker, Paul Berge In South Central Iowa (#1334)

    Few can imagine the life of Denese Becker, an Iowan by adoption. Denese came from Guatemala where at age nine, as Dominga Sic Ruiz, her parents were massacred, and all alone, she had to bury a baby sister. On Living in Iowa Denese talks with Lorenzo Sandoval and shares her story with viewers. Then, on Tuesday, July 8 at 9 and 11:30 p.m. PBS -winning series P.O.V.: Discovering Dominga follows Denese as she returns to her hometown in the hills of Guatemala. Also this week, Living in Iowa continues to offer something a little different - the opportunity for weekend travelers to visit unique and fun-filled locations in Iowa with Side Roads host and humorist Paul Berge. Each week, Paul will take any transportation necessary - car, tractor, airplane, or horse - to bring viewers just the right mix of tourist tips and funny bits from around the state. This week, in South Central Iowa, Living in Iowa visits several unique and interesting places, including: Warren County Fairgrounds in Indianola Osceola side Casino Resort Prairie Trails Museum in Corydon Stephens Forest near Lucas Francesca ts Iowa State University. In the 2002-2003 school year, ISU celebrated the 20th anniversary of Art on Campus. An integral part of the educational experience, art at ISU is as old as the campus. Join Living in Iowa as it traces some of that history and explores the role Art on Campus plays at ISU. [28 minutes]

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  • Tanzanian Choir In Iowa, Paul Berge, Central Iowa (#1335)

    This summer, Living in Iowa will offer something a little different -the opportunity for weekend travelers to visit unique and fun-filled locations in Iowa with Side Roads host and humorist Paul Berge. Each week, Paul will take any transportation necessary - car, tractor, airplane, or horse - to bring viewers just the right mix of tourist tips and funny bits from around the state. This week, in Central Iowa, Living in Iowa visits several unique and interesting places, including: the Iowa Summer Games in Ames, Seven Oakes Recreation ski resort near Boone, the Kate Shelley Museum in Moingona, Living History Farms in Urbandale, Ledges State Park near Lucas. In June 2002, a choir from Tanzania visited Iowa as guests of the Evangelical Lutheran Church theast Iowa Synod. These 15 men and women, known as the e, Living in Iowa finds out what these choir members from a third-world country learned about Americans during their stay, and explores how the choir lso explores the value and belief systems that motivate the pro-choice and pro-life movements on the 30th anniversary of Roe vs. Wade, the 1973 U.S. Supreme Court ruling that women have a constitutional right to an abortion. Then, Living in Iowa style, an energetic quintet of talented professional musicians from the Des Moines area. Each member broad musical background. [28 minutes]

  • 50th Anniversary Korean War (#1336)

    July 27, 2003 is the 50th anniversary of the end of the Korean War. Living in Iowa learns about the experiences of veterans of this war by speaking with Paul M. Edwards, PhD., who has started a Korean War archive. The Center for the Study of the Korean War, started by Edwards in the 1980s, is a collection of 140,000 documents that detail the American experience in Korea. It is the largest archive of Korean War documents in the nation. Graceland University has taken up care of the archive, which, at last count contained 11,000 photos, 225 motion pictures, 75 oral histories, 2,500 books, 200 flight maps, 75 painting and drawings by soldiers and thousands of articles, letters, diaries and journals kept by soldiers. This summer, Living in Iowa will offer something a little different unique and fun-filled locations in Iowa with Side Roads host and humorist Paul Berge. Each week, Paul will take any transportation necessary mix of tourist tips and funny bits from around the state. This week, in East Iowa, Living in Iowa visits several unique and interesting places, including: Fenelon Place Elevator in Dubuque, the Bix Beiderbecke Jazz Festival in Davenport, the Quad City River Bandits baseball team, the St. Francis Xavier Basilica in Dyersville, Maquoketa Caves State Park near Maquoketa. Also this week, Living in Iowa examines a puzzle that has taken over 100 years to be solved. Ray Elliott was kidnapped in broad daylight and went missing for over a year. But was the boy who was suspiciously returned to the Elliotts really their son? Playwright Tom Johnson and modern DNA technology work together to solve this Marengo mystery [27 minutes]

  • Dan Eldon, Paul Berge In Southwest Iowa (#1337)

    This summer, Living in Iowa will offer something a little different -the opportunity for weekend travelers to visit unique and fun-filled locations in Iowa with Side Roads host and humorist Paul Berge. Each week, Paul will take any transportation necessary - car, tractor, airplane, or horse - to bring viewers just the right mix of tourist tips and funny bits from around the state. This week, in Southwest Iowa, Living in Iowa visits several unique and interesting places, including: the Iowa Aviation Museum at the Greenfield Airport, the Rodeo Grounds in Sidney, Shenandoah llisca, Lake Icaria near Corning, and the Printing Museum in Diagonal. How is a young war photographer who was killed on the job in 1993 still inspiring young people today-even students in Iowa? Find out as Living in Iowa remembers Reuter photographer Dan Eldon, and visits with his mother and people in Iowa who are using his art and way of life to influence others. es, their real potential, y Eldon. ing that could happen if you do it? k, tune in for a performance by Red Cedar Chamber Music, founded by concert artists Jan Boland and John Dowdall. The group erform chamber music with virtuosity, energy, and artistic excellence. [27 minutes]

  • Paul Berge In Northeast Iowa (#1338)

    This summer, Living in Iowa will offer something a little different the opportunity for weekend travelers to visit unique and fun-filled locations in Iowa with Side Roads host and humorist Paul Berge. Each week, Paul will take any transportation necessary ne, or horse funny bits from around the state. This week, in Northwest Iowa, Living in Iowa visits several unique and interesting places, including: the Threshermen and Collectors Show in Albert City, a canoe trail near Ruthven the Grotto of the Redemption in West Bend the Living Heritage Tree Museum in Storm Lake and the ornate Woodbury County Courthouse in Sioux City. Also on Living in Iowa this week, meet an Iowa music mogul ter, keyboardist, manager and record producer for his band David Zollo and the Body Electric. Tune in to see Zollo and his band in performance at a concert in Des Moines, go behind the scenes on a 3 ert tour from Nashville to New York, and watch Zollo perform solo material in IPTV s in Grimes is home to Champagne Branson, an American Saddlebred horse who loves his peppermints and performs explosively in the show ring. Living in Iowa looks at the unique qualities associated with the American Saddlebred and how horses and riders prepare for a show. And on Living in Iowa this week, meet Joy Sadler, the Waterloo nurse who went to Indonesia to care for the war-torn country wound up in an Indonesian prison for four months. Sadler returned home January 12 and sat down with Morgan Halgren for an extensive television interview. [28 minutes]

  • Robert James Waller, Quad City Mexican Assn (#1339)

    When the members of the Quad Cities Mexican American Organization were teenagers, a night of dancing at the Coliseum Ballroom was something many only dreamed about. While some could not afford the price of admission, others were denied entrance because of the color of their skin. On Living in Iowa this week, find out how the Quad Cities Mexican American Organization has turned one of America multi-cultural meeting place. Also this week, Living in Iowa catches up with Robert James Waller, 12 years after our first interview in 1991 to explore how The Bridges of Madison County changed his life and to find out what program this week, viewers will meet Jean Haviland, who lost her cousin, Laurel Clark, on the Columbia space shuttle. Haviland and her second grade class at Carroll s on the mission and were eagerly anticipating Clark . Living in Iowa will interview Haviland and a few of her students. On this week proclaimed Purple Martin capital of Iowa. [28 minutes]

  • Iowa's Tuskegee Airmen (#1340)

    During World War II, a group of African American soldiers known as the Tuskegee Airmen battled enemies abroad and racism at home. This week, Living in Iowa attends the dedication of the first statue honoring Iowa outstanding records, they excelled despite facing institutionalized racism in the American military. Also this week, Living in Iowa visits with Thomas Sutherland. In 1985, Sutherland was taken hostage in Lebanon, and was held captive for six and a half years st period of time any Western hostage has been held in captivity. Host Morgan Halgren talks to this Iowa State University graduate about his first-hand experience with terrorism. On this week , Kyle Munson introduces viewers to Fat Tuesday and the Greasefire Horns. Octogenarian Iowa Blues Hall of Fame inductee Jimmy Prior leads the group, who is accomplished in both original and cover material. Their blues style can go anywhere from soft acoustic to an in-your-face electric sound that will leave your ears ringing and wanting more. It s a Living in Iowa version of aul Berge travels a Side Road that takes him to the Brucemore Mansion in Cedar Rapids. [28 minutes]

  • Old Thrersher's Reunion (#1341)

    Every year at the Old Threshers Reunion in Mount Pleasant a variety of engines are fired up. This week, Living in Iowa visits the reunion to see how farming used to be done with massive steam engines and to check out all of the sights and sounds of this annual event. When opera singers of national prominence think of the ultimate summer singing experience, many of them think of the Des Moines Metro Opera in Indianola, Iowa. Why? Much of the credit goes to its highly esteemed director, Dr. Robert Larsen. Living in Iowa meets Larsen and finds out how his passion for opera has put small-town Iowa on the national map. Also this week, Paul Berge takes a Side Road visit to the smallest town in Iowa Founded by Varlen and Fern Calrson, it was voted Iowa tion of the Year in 1991. [27 minutes]

  • 6 On 6 Basketball (#1342)

    At one time, basketball was the only game in town for high school girls in Iowa. Through the direction of E. Wayne Cooley, however, Iowa grew to be known as a utopia for girls d as executive director of the Iowa Girls High School Athletic Union. This week, Living in Iowa talks with Cooley about nearly half a century of service to the anted the girl to walk down the street equally tall with the boy, maybe no taller, but certainly no less tall, . Also this week, Living in Iowa introduces viewers to members of the Mothers tradition going back to 1918, the Mothers are a group of older women who have dedicated themselves to helping church members and others, too. They help by example, through living a life of faith. They help by doing things as simple and profound as giving a hug or a word of encouragement. And they help by sharing things like wisdom, food, and concern. On this week o The Nadas. Their name literally means aks volumes. This Iowa-based rock quartet runs the gamut of modern acoustic folk balladeering and good old Rock for a Side Roads that will take viewers back in time. The Carstens 1880 Farmstead is an 80-acre working farm exhibit that is a celebration of Iowa y of the yard and restored buildings of the farmstead that is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. [28 minutes]

  • Revisiting Sept. 11, 2001 (#1343)

    This week, Living in Iowa revisits the ways Iowans responded to the events of September 11, 2001. During the show, Living in Iowa speaks with Jean Cleere. Jean September 11 for a business meeting. He was one of seven Iowans or former Iowans who were killed during the terrorist attack. Jean was married to Jim for 23 years and in her interview she tells us who he was and how she is dealing with this tragedy. After the tragedy, more than 250 Iowans left their homes to volunteer in the stricken areas. These volunteers, coordinated through the American Red Cross office in Des Moines, spent from three to six weeks dispensing whatever information and help they could find. Living in Iowa speaks with a first-time volunteer as well as a veteran responder to see how spending time at Ground Zero has changed their lives. Also during the show, hear how Iowa Muslims have dealt with having their faith put under a microscope. avid Koresh did what he did and when Tim McVeigh did what he did, people didn't look at Christians as a whole. They looked at just that particular person. But people are putting us in one lump and saying you are all the same," said Miriam Amer, a fourth generation Arab-American Muslim in Cedar Rapids. Living in Iowa will also speak with officials about how public agencies around the state reacted to the terrorist attack of September 11, interview an Iowan who moved to New York City in 1976 and recently returned to West Des Moines, visit the Night to Iowa children as well as people whose job it is to serve and protect the population on how September 11, 2001 changed their lives. [28 minutes]

  • Meredith Wilson, The Music Man (#1344)

    The Music Man, is one of America in Iowa profiles the charming musical genius who wrote it s Meredith Willson. The list of Willson d long. Throughout his career he performed with the band of John Philip Sousa, and the New York Philharmonic, and served as the music director on NBC for more than 20 years. He also received commendations and awards from every realm, including three awards from American presidents. During his life, Willson enjoyed spending time with his friends in Mason City, Iowa, just as well as rubbing elbows with the rich and famous. He visited home often, and memories of these visits are still told by those who knew him. This week, Living in Iowa tells the story of this remarkable man who took his home town roots along with him to the top of the charts. Also this week, Living in Iowa visits the Blanden Memorial Art Museum in Fort Dodge, which mounted a major effort to help the community deal with the September 11 tragedy. Artists and citizens all contributed by sharing their feelings through writing, painting, photography, drawing, and other ways. The effort culminated with the premiere of "Elegy and Affirmation," a musical composition written by Jonathan Chenette from Grinnell College. The piece was performed on September 22, 2002 and was dedicated to Ann Nicole Nelson, a young woman who died in the World Trade Center. [27 minutes]

  • Neal Smith Native Wildlife Preserve (#1345)

    This week, viewers can catch a collection of stories from the past 12 years of Living in Iowa, all related to Iowa 987, Rayford Ratcliff planted a large part of his yard with prairie plants so he wouldn love for prairies has grown, and he now volunteers by picking seeds for the Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge. Living in Iowa visited the Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge to look at the tall grasses and flowering plants of the prairie during a late summer trip. While a prairie can look like an abandoned pasture from a distance, a close-up look reveals its true natural beauty. Viewers can also learn more about efforts to preserve Iowa there is something spiritual about this western Iowa treasure, and he has taken an unusual step to preserve it from development. He has donated 750 acres in the Loess Hills as a conservation easement. By doing this, he has forfeited future sale of the land that could have potentially brought $4 million in profit, a sacrifice he preserve the land he loves. Host Morgan Halgren walks through old and new prairies to learn about their ways in this week As she walks, she talks with writer Richard Manning about his views of how we can learn from the "history" of the grasslands. She also talks with Gene Kromray of Ottumwa, who has devised ways of harvesting and planting prairie seeds with his 1953 Ford Jubilee tractor. In different ways, both men say that prairies are "good for the soul." [26 minutes]

  • Episode #1346

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  • Dance In Iowa, Nursing Shortage (#1347)

    Dance in Iowa: Young dancers in Iowa who dream of dancing professionally most likely need to leave the state to do so. But a Des Moines couple is working to create an environment where the next generation of dancers can dance professionally right here in Iowa. Albert "Hank" Adams and Elizabeth Harano Adams are professional dancers who are sharing their talent and training to teach young people the way real dancers learn. This week, Living in Iowa profiles the Adams place for professional dance in Iowa. Also this week, Living in Iowa addresses the state ion, is facing a critical shortage of nurses. How does the state plan to improve the shortage when it ranks 50th in the median hourly pay for nurses? Find out on this week le in the nursing profession. Finally this week, take to the Blank Park Zoo Discovery Center with Side Roads host Paul Berge. Paul oad takes him through the woods and the rain forest of Blank Park Zoo. [28 minutes]

  • Isabel Bloom, Youth Incentives (#1348)

    This week, Living in Iowa remembers the late Isabel Bloom, a Davenport artist whose creations are cherished by generations. Bloom studied under Grant Wood, married an accomplished artist, produced an art-based children l of the Quad Cities area. A lifetime spent experimenting with materials and techniques resulted in a business that manufactures and sells thousands of reproductions of her sculptures each year. Also this week, Living in Iowa will take a look at Youth Incentives, a Des Moines organization that is working to motivate inner city young people through connections with adults - connections the organization hopes will motivate young people to become caring, productive, and responsible citizens. On this week e-style signs to the north central Iowa town of Dows, where the restored train depot doubles as a welcome center, the blacksmith shop houses items from as far back as the 1830s, and the mercantile market displays area antiquers' newest old stuff. The Blue Band returns to Living in Iowa this week in the Iowa Spotlight segment. Music host Kyle Munson welcomes one of Iowa at performs original and cover blues, soul, rockabilly, and R & B grooves. [27 minutes]

  • Ww2 Pow's In Iowa (#1349)

    This week Living in Iowa takes a look back at when prisoners of war were held in Iowa. Many stories from overseas POWs in World War II are filled with terrible cruelty and death. In America, however, prisoners of war were kept in camps that met the standards of the Geneva Convention. These POWs received not only humane treatment, but were surprisingly involved in their local communities. Many German and some Italian and Japanese prisoners were held in the Midwest, coming in by train to Algona, Iowa, where they would be deployed to satellite camps. Long-forgotten stories of the best side of a difficult time have been discovered recently by amateur historians, and showcased by a nonprofit organization, TRACES, a group with Iowa and German connections. In the past few years, the group ushered through the Iowa POW camps. He recently brought some of these former prisoners and their famlies through the Midwest so they could explore the remains of these camps and walk in their ancestor eps. Living in Iowa spent several days with these visitors, and discovered that while the remnants are hard to find, the interpersonal connections are alive and well. Viewers can also meet Hector Ibarra on this week says if you teach children to solve problems, think critically, and be creative you have taught them how to learn for a lifetime. That at he does everyday, challenging West Branch rather than memorize for a test. Also this week, two of central Iowa s talented young jazz artists r a duet performance from IPTV nstruments, while Taylor plays an incomparable piano. Both men write their own music, and Taylor to the 308." [28 minutes]

  • Mental Illness Stigma Busters (#1350)

    Changing perceptions about mental illness nes-based "Stigma Busters." This volunteer improvisational theatre troupe, whose vignettes target the stigma associated with mental illness, is featured on the next Living in Iowa. The troupe hat by educating the general public about mental illness us way mental illness. Every member of the "Stigma Busters" has a mental illness, and hopes to educate the public about the impact common stereotypes have on their lives. Also this week, Living in Iowa profiles a new slant on Iowa tivity to economic development. Iowa has three cities in the top ten of Richard Florida's "Creativity Index." So, the Department of Cultural Affairs invited Richard to lead a lively discussion of how having lots of creative people in an urban area can provide economic benefit. Called an "Unconference," this event, held in the snowy month of March 2003, drew together an unlikely mix of business patriarchs, artisans, musicians, and state leaders, all interested in seeing how arts and economics interact. On this week musician Rob Lumbard performs in Iowa Public Television bard's music is based in blues and folk, but depending on where he's playing, he can be found covering a jazz standard, Robert Johnson, Lyle Lovett, or doing a set of his own tunes in his finger-picking guitar style During the last weekend in June, the town of Riverside takes a trip into the future - to the year 2228 to be exact. That's when Starship Enterprise Commander, James T. Kirk, will be born. Confused? All the better reason to join Side Roads host Paul Berge as he joins the rest of the Trekkies, Vulcans, Klingons, and tribbles who journey to Riverside for the annual event. [28 minutes]

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  • Grant Wood's American Gothic (#1601)

    One of the most recognized paintings in the world, Grant Wood's 'American Gothic' was back in its home town last fall. The classic painting of a stern couple standing in front of a farm house was part of an exhibit of Grant Wood's work shown at the Cedar Rapids Museum of Art through the end of 2005. Living in Iowa received a guided tour from the museum well as many works that probably seemed surprising. Wood was also a master at craftsmanship, producing items for homes in the area, including classic doors, iron works, and designs for stained glass windows. Living in Iowa's Morgan Halgren was delighted to see the masterpiece, and to also visit the very studio where it was painted, a place Grant Wood called '5 Turner Alley,' just a few blocks away from the museum. The studio, still much like it was when Grant lived there, has recently been opened to the public. Also in this episode, take a stroll down memory lane with Morgan Halgren to one of her favorite Living in Iowa segments from 1998 with members of the Iowa Grotto, a local chapter of the National Speleological Society. Cold Water Cave is one of the largest caves in Iowa and gets its name because cold water is constantly running through it. The cave also has several large speleothems which are mineral deposit formations such as flowstones, stalactites and stalagmites. Then, join Paul Berge on a Side Road that leads to Forest City where Kurt Knapp is having Mower Racing Association where mild mannered mowers are turned into fire breathing monsters driven by men that are a cut above the rest. [27 minutes]

  • Bats (#1602)

    Bats, the furry flying mammal kind, have been feared and hated for centuries but they are really shy and secretive animals. They are the only mammal that can truly fly. On Living in Iowa this week, Lewis Major, naturalist with Polk County Conservation Board, points out some fascinating facts about bats and discourages the myths and legends surrounding these amazing creatures. Over the next several weeks, Chef Jon Benedict will show viewers how easy it is to spice up meals for get togethers and family gatherings. Tired of that green bean casserole? This week, watch him whip up a delicious puff pastry and saut lternative. Also in this episode, take a stroll down memory lane with Morgan Halgren to one of her favorite Living in Iowa segments from 1992. In this feature, viewers meet Michael Carey, a New Jersey native who came to Iowa to become a poet. While attending the Writer's Workshop in Iowa City, he met and married an Iowa woman and moved to Farragut to help out on her 5th generation family farm. To Carey, this was a rude and magical awakening. Carey combines farming and poetry in a magical way perhaps partly due to his Irish heritage. On this week segment, enjoy a performance from Tonic Sol-fa, one of the premier a cappella singing groups in the nation. The name rom the key musical relationships of do, re, mi, fa, sol, la, ti and do. Its members are from Sioux City, Algona, Sioux Falls and Wyoming. This week on Living in Iowa, the group sings a tune from their newest cd, 'Boston to Beijing. [27 minutes]

  • Paddling Iowa (#1603)

    This week Living in Iowa explores two of the state , the Des Moines and Upper Iowa Rivers with author Nate Hoogeveen. Hoogeveen flows with tips and information regarding the 1,800 river miles found in Iowa. Also this week, Chef Jon Benedict shows us how to prepare Cornish Game Hens with a Cranberry-Orange glaze, another of his four ideas to help spice up your next gathering. During this week , Paul Berge visits the Matchstick Marvels Museum in Gladbrook. Since 1977, Pat Acton has magically transformed tiny sticks into great art cathedral, a battleship and the U.S. Capitol building, just to name a few. Many of Acton Ripley [27 minutes]

  • Iowans On Iwo Jima (#1604)

    During WWII one out of three Americans who fought on Iwo Jima never made it home. Iowa's Barnett brothers survived those odds. In 1942 Bob and Doug Barnett enlisted in the marines. Doug, just nineteen years of age, had to persuade his father to let him sign up. On February 19, 1945, Bob and Doug were among the first U.S. marines to land on Iwo Jima. They returned to the small island in 2005 for the 60th anniversary honoring the fallen of this critical battle. This week, the Barnett brothers share their story. Tune in for this feature that won an Iowa Motion Picture Association Award of Excellence. This week on Living in Iowa, tune in for the second part of Morgan Halgren st Des Moines native Peter Hedges, who burst onto the national scene with his first novel, 'What's Eating Gilbert Grape' and then adapted that story for the acclaimed 1993 movie starring Johnny Depp and Leonardo DiCaprio. In the third of Living in Iowa's cooking segments, Chef Jon Benedict shows us how to prepare Stuffed Roasted Acorn Squash. [27 minutes]

  • Patrck Hazell (#1605)

    According to blues and jazz musician Patrick Hazell, 'Bells were generally designed to be a signal. To think of them as musical instruments is something not commonly done.' This week on Living in Iowa, Hazell achieves the uncommon with his Hawkeye Valley Bell Project, orchestrating nine of Burlington's century-old bells in a unique community-wide concert. Also this week on Living in Iowa, Morgan Halgren travels back to one of the stories she found most moving. In this segment, Barbara Fassbinder, a nurse who contracted the AIDS virus while assisting a patient in the emergency room, told her story and advised other nurses and health care workers to use precautions against blood diseases. In Living in Iowa's final cooking segment, Chef Jon Benedict gives viewers their just desserts with a Warm Chocolate Torte with Fresh Raspberries, another idea to help spice up your next gathering. Dubuque's 'Busted Lift' opened its doors for a special Living in Iowa recording session with Jen Gloeckner and friends. Accompanying Jen's vocals and guitar were Jennifer Barron on cello and Tim Knautz on bass. The group performed the song, 'Hazy Sky,' from Gloeckner's recently released album, 'Miles Away.' Andy Steil of Waterfall Music mixed the sound. [27 minutes]

  • Episode #1606

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  • Episode #1607

    This week on Living in Iowa, Morgan Halgren takes viewers on a tour of the Figge Art Museum in Davenport. The museum was designed by architect David Chipperfield, in conjunction with Iowa architects Herbert Louis Kruze Blunck. Its glass walls help visitors enjoy views of both the Mississippi River and the bustling downtown area. Because of this building, the collections of the Davenport Art Museum now have their first-ever permanent display areas. Living in Iowa also tours the Family Activity Center, where the first display is about -- what else -- architecture's building blocks. In this week aul Berge finds himself in over his head when he searches for shoreline property in Lake City, Iowa. Also in this episode, take a stroll down memory lane with Morgan Halgren for one of her favorite Living in Iowa segments. In this feature from 2002, Living in Iowa traveled to Muscatine County to find what an enthusiastic group of volunteers did to restore a 150 year old grist mill in Wildcat Den State Park. In this week des the backdrop when Living in Iowa sits in with The Soul Searchers. Playing music that's rooted in traditional blues with healthy doses of rockabilly, the group is called the hardest working blues band in Des Moines. The Soul Searchers are Malcolm Wells on vocals and harmonica, Erich Gaukel on bass, Scott Eggleston on guitar, and Mark Grimm on drums. [26 minutes]

  • Clementine Msengi (#1608)

    This week, Living in Iowa introduces viewers to Clementine Msengi, a remarkable refugee from Rwanda who now lives in Cedar Falls, Iowa. In 1994 she survived a war that killed nearly one million people in her country, including most of her family. She came to Cedar Falls in 1995 knowing three languages but not English. She first took an intensive English course at the University of Northern Iowa and then graduated in three years with a degree in Health Promotion. Msengi e and education led her to create an organization called 'Bright Move Network' to help other refugees adjust to American culture and increase mutual understanding within the community. Also in this episode, take a stroll down memory lane with Morgan Halgren for one of her favorite Living in Iowa segments. This segment from 2002 features historical photographs of life in the Amana Colonies in the mid 1800s. The photographs were taken at a time when photography was forbidden in the Colonies because it was considered to be a worldly vanity. Author Abigail Foerstner, who wrote a Photographers fascinating photos. Iowa is known as a tough presidential battleground, but campaigns today are nothing compared to 1864 when, during the Civil War, confederate rebels made their furthest incursion, from the south, into northern union territory. This week local group of Civil War re-enactors telling the story of a little-known raid near Bloomfield. This week iz & the Bellyswirls, a high-energy Quad Cities rock and roll band. Brothers Bob and Leo Kelly provide the saucy licks, Greg Hipskind lays down the beat, but it's lead singer, Liz Treiber, who gives the group its name. [27 minutes]

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  • Chef Benedict, The Decorah Chorale (#1609)

    Chef Benedict prepares a standing rib roast, and the Decorah Chorale performs. [27 minutes]

  • Episode #1610

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  • Favorite Stories (#1611)

    This week, Living in Iowa revisits some favorite features from the past year: First, Living in Iowa speaks with Iowa City photographer Ina Loewenberg about her book to turn 70, she got curious about what other women her age looked like. She placed ads in various newsletters and newspapers asking women who were born in 1931 (the year of her birth) to respond if they would like to be photographed for a book. When Ina met the women, she realized that even great photographs can't express the fullness of a life. She began interviewing the women and ended up with her book which combines portraits of the women at 70 and the story of 42 women who had gone 'from birth to old age against the same backdrop of world history.' This feature also includes a reunion of several of the women featured in the book. Then, Living in Iowa visits an unusual Iowa health spa that's been getting rave reviews by big-name spa magazines. The Raj (pronounced 'Rawzh'), which means 'royal, orth of Fairfield (it was one of the first buildings in Maharishi Vedic City, Iowa), and offers visitors a rural respite. According to its owners, The Raj's 'royal' treatment includes more than just a fluff and buff. Dr. Nancy Lonsdorf and all the specially trained nurses and aides perform holistic 'Ayurvedic' treatments designed to improve their visitors' health. And finally, learn about two distant lands, once at war, that were brought together by one unexpected act of friendship. This event is the unlikely but true premise of a children recounting of the 1960 Iowa Hog Lift story demonstrates what can happen when cultural differences are overcome through kindness. It also illustrates how an unusual gift created an endearing friendship and cooperation that continue more than 40 years later. [27 minutes]

  • Des Moines Art Center (#1612)

    Downtown Des Moines Art Center curator Patricia Hickson recently moved to Iowa. When she was deciding how to showcase Iowa artists in 2005 for the Des Moines Art Center Downtown, she put out a call for entries to find out what people here were creating response which told her Iowa has a vigorous community of creative types, and a wide range of expressions. This week on Living in Iowa, Hickson offers viewers a tour of the final exhibit, which features the works of 11 up-and-coming Iowa artists an Carder from Des Moines; Tova Carlin from Iowa City; Amze Emmons from Iowa City; Jessie Fisher from Iowa City; Andrew McCormick from Ames; Michael Perrone from Iowa City; Brian Roberts from Pella; Le Emma Running from Iowa City; Jean-Marie Salem from West Des Moines; and Pete Schulte from Davenport. This feature is the first in a series. Be sure to stay tuned as Living in Iowa travels the state to visit many of these artists in their studios. With the start of a new legislative session, Living in Iowa takes time out to recall a history-making legislator. During her 36-year tenure, Minette Doderer broke all the stereotypes of governmental power ity Democrat, who retired in 2000, passed away in 2005. Also on Living in Iowa this week, Polk County naturalist Lewis Major prescribes the cure for cabin fever ctivities of winter. Major demonstrates a few traditional outings and some that are a bit more unusual, and shows viewers how to search for signs of nature that are covered in a blanket of snow. All of his adventures are meant to inspire others to be active outdoors, no matter what the season or the weather. He says, 'There is no such thing as bad weather, just inappropriate clothing.' So, come out and play in the snow with Living in Iowa. What weighed ten billion tons and traveled over forty-five thousand miles per hour? T [27 minutes]

  • Iowa Fighter Ron Stander (#1613)

    This week on Living in Iowa, learn about Council Bluffs native Ron Stander. On May 25, 1972, the eyes of the boxing world were set on Council Bluffs because Stander, its hometown hero, had gotten a shot at the World's Heavyweight Champion Joe Frazier. But Stander, nicknamed the Bluffs Butcher, would need more than his impressive 24-1 record to beat Frazier, he'd need a plan der could pull off THE PUNCH, not only would he be the first world heavyweight champ in Iowa history, he would forever make his hometown proud. Amze Emmons draws and paints unusual environments such as offices void of people and filled with an inflatable emergency shelter. He researches the kinds of shelters that are sold over the internet for any number of unusual circumstances: a plane crash, a nuclear blast, a tornado. And then he creates humor in the image by coloring it bubble-gum pink or baby blue, and setting it somewhere out of context. The Iowa Artists series continues this week as Living in Iowa meets an artist with imagination galore. During World War I a network of home knitters and the American Red Cross made socks for British, Canadian and American soldiers. Today a new network of circular sock knitters is once again knitting socks for soldiers, this time for the military men and women serving in Iraq. Tune in to Living in Iowa to find out how two Iowans, Bonnie Smola and Donna Story, are woven into this yarn where one stitch just seems to lead to another. You wouldn't expect to see motorcycles in the middle of an art museum, unless you're Side Roads host Paul Berge. This week, Berge travels to the Sioux City Art Center to view some of the classiest custom and antique motorcycles on display anywhere. [27 minutes]

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  • Iowa Dance and Drill Cmpetition (#1615)

    For more than three decades the Dance and Drill Championships have showcased the state's highest ranked high school teams. Today the competition is the largest in the nation. From a modest beginning in 1974 when nine teams competed, the event has grown to 250 teams and 5,000 competitors. This week, Living in Iowa and the Iowa State Dance and Drill Team Association explore the evolution of the competition, including changes in costumes, pom poms, and dance technique. Though much has changed, dance and drill continues to help participants gain self-confidence, learn to work as a team, and be proud of their accomplishments. Also on Living in Iowa this week, the Iowa Artists series continues with a look at the work of Lee Emma Running. Nature and its fleeting character inspire Running fullest moment of spring, and uses paint, wallpaper paste, and handmade paper to express it on the walls of art galleries. She also enjoys putting Yak hair and mohair on domestic items like scissors and brooms. She says she started her 'domestic animals' series after seeing wild animals in the middle of town and says our taming of the prairies has forced wild animals and plants to grow in a more compressed, man-made environment. Since completing her MFA degree at the University of Iowa, Lee has moved to Grinnell, where she is on the faculty at Grinnell College. On this week he really digs fossils when he visits Fossil and Prairie Park, one of only three known public fossil collecting sites in the nation, located just outside Rockford, Iowa. In this week itar Shop on Des Moines' East Side provided the backdrop when Living in Iowa was treated to a private recording session with The Soul Searchers. Playing music that's rooted in traditional blues with healthy doses of rockabilly and even he hardest working blues band in Des Moi [27 minutes]

  • Meth Epidemic In Iowa (#1616)

    This week, Living in Iowa reports on one town's efforts to stop the meth epidemic. Realizing that children often are meth's forgotten victims, Ottumwa, Iowa, leaders formed the Southeast Iowa Task Force for Drug Exposed Children. Task Force members include a broad range of individuals representing the health, human services, substance abuse treatment, and law enforcement communities. Together they hope to stop the meth epidemic in Iowa. Even though the jungle people of Panama protected their privacy with poison darts and the penalty was death for strangers caught on the nearby islands after sundown, a pioneering female photojournalist from Emmetsburg dared to live with them and became their friend. In the early 1960s, Marjorie Mills Vandervelde studied primitive cultures around the globe with a passion that made a difference in her life as well as theirs. She wrote books for adults and for children, intended to teach respect for native people, hoping to build bridges between primitive cultures and the so called educated world. This week, Living in Iowa explores Vandervelde's photographs, magazine articles and books, and what they say about the unfamiliar lifestyle of the people of Panama. Elle Westercamp of Des Moines was born to swim. Her affinity for the water was apparent from her first visit to a pool at the age of three. By the age of nine, she was swimming in statewide and national competitions and winning. Elle's time in the pool has earned her more than just gold medals; it has also proven therapeutic. Diagnosed at the age of five with asthma, training for swimming competitions has strengthened her lungs and improved her health. This week on Living in Iowa, meet Elle, a young athlete who has earned more gold medals than any other competitor in any age group at the State Games of America, and who hopes her hard work will someday earn her the opportunity to swim in the Olympics [27 minutes]

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  • Episode #1617

    [27 minutes]

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  • Episode #1618

    [26 minutes]

  • Polk County Conservation (#1619)

    Lewis Major, naturalist with Polk County Conservation, takes viewers on a safari to search out some of Iowa pecies. He gets pricked by cactus and pinched by crawfish in the diverse but scarce prairie and marsh habitats in Iowa. This week, it erflies, turtles and water bugs on Living in Iowa. Also this week, the Iowa Artists series continues with Michael Perrone. This Iowa City artist has noticed something about America planted in rows, much like the lights along a highway. Perrone uses a palette of bright colors to emphasize the interaction between man-made landscape elements. Some of the wilder colors he uses are to emphasize the attempt of nature to break free from all that orderliness that it's been given. Using unusual paint scraping techniques, Michael puts things together in a fresh new way, according to Patricia Hickson, exhibit curator of the Des Moines Art Center Downtown. Scampi is an Italian word for shrimp so if you are preparing shrimp scampi you are being a bit redundant. This week, chef Jon Benedict accepts the risk of repeating himself as he shares a recipe for shrimp scampi that is both fast and easy but will definitely wow that special someone you're trying to impress. Most Iowans can tell you that First Lady Mamie Eisenhower was born in Boone, Iowa, and can tell you that the only president born in Iowa, President Herbert Hoover, was born in West Branch. But ask who Iowa's other First Lady was and where she was born, and you're likely to get a blank stare. This week Paul Berge takes a Side Road to Waterloo where he digs up the roots of Lou Henry who eventually became Lou Hoover, making her Iowa's first First Lady married to Iowa's first and only president. This week e Bellyswirls, a high-energy Quad Cities rock and roll band. Brothers Bob and Leo Kelly provide the saucy licks, Greg Hipskind lays down the beat, but its lead singer, Liz Treiber, [27 minutes]

  • Moving The Bridge (#1620)

    On March 8, 2006, Jones County residents were treated to one of the biggest moves the state of Iowa has ever seen when an iron bridge weighing more than 50,000 pounds was flown by helicopter from the small town of Hale to Wapsipinicon State Park near Anamosa. This week, Living in Iowa shares what it takes to pull off a move of such mammoth proportions and how a community came together to save this historic resource. Nathan Carder's art might shock some people. But, that's not his intention. He's making large sculptures that help him deal with chronic medical issues not normally spoken of in public. In basic colors, Nathan's sculptures include a bright red colostomy bag, a yellow enema bag 'life raft,' and an oxygen mask attached to a flying machine. The youngest artist in the 2005 Iowa Artists series, Carder is currently working on his M.F.A., having received a graduate fellowship at Virginia Commonwealth University in Richmond, Virginia. Also this week, Living in Iowa travels to Page county to uncover the origins of 4-H. Many residents there claim that 100 years ago a woman named Jessie Field Shambaugh, from Clarinda, planted the idea for 4-H. As a 19-year-old rural schoolteacher, Shambaugh held informal agriculture and home related lessons after school which became the Boys' Corn Club and the Girls' Home Club. Living in Iowa interviewed Shambaugh Watkins, 107-year-old Martin Johnson who was on the first corn judging team that went to compete in Ames in 1909, and Esther Williams, the first 4-H queen to be crowned at the State Girls 4-H Convention in Ames in 1928. On this week e German American Heritage Center in Davenport and learns about an Alpine stringed instrument called a zither. He also listens in during a rehearsal of the Zither Ensemble, which was formed in 1885 and at its peak had sixty players. [27 minutes]

  • Music Therapy (#1621)

    For more than 40 years, Dr. Thelma Volger has been exploring music's unique possibilities. Currently, she's focusing her decades of teaching and research experience on a project using music to help create language for children who, by age two-and-a-half or three, do not speak in words. Founder and director of the Ankeny Academy of Music, Volger developed the Language Delay Replication Project to help children and encourage further scientific research into music's effect on the brain. This week, Living in Iowa speaks with Volger about her project and the progress she Central College football coach, Ron Schipper, last spring, Living in Iowa takes a look back at a football Saturday in 1988. It was opening day of coach Schipper Schipper becoming the second-winningest coach in Division III history. Also this week on Living in Iowa, meet Davenport artist Pete Schulte as the Iowa Artist series continues. Just as music can affect us without words, Schulte's works are effective without being a depiction of a thing. His shapes and colors are messages, and they're formed in his mind as he listens to music, what he calls his fuel. On this week Side Roads, host Paul Berge attempts to educate as well as entertain viewers while visiting Sabula bula is named for the Latin word, sabulum which means sandy soil. And be sure to tune in this week for another recipe from Chef Jon Benedict an apple cobbler that is impressive, yet easy to prepare. [27 minutes]

  • Artis Andrew McCormick (#1622)

    Hulk Hogan, Pinocchio, and even characters from McDonalds' commercials have all shown up on art gallery walls in recent years, thanks to Iowa artist Andrew McCormick. When his daughter was born a few years ago, McCormick wondered how he would change, internally, as he assumed the role of father. This week, Living in Iowa speaks with McCormick about how he uses his art to explore how modern culture has shaped his sense of who he is as a man. Originally from Atlantic, Iowa, McCormick now lives in Ames. This feature is part of Living in Iowa wa Artists series, which was inspired by the 2005 exhibit at the Des Moines Art Center Downtown. Also this week, as Cael Sanderson prepares for his first season as the head wrestling coach at Iowa State University, Living in Iowa revisits his college career. In 2001, Living in Iowa introduced viewers to Sanderson, a sensational wrestler, who is the third of four wrestling brothers from a Mormon family in Utah, and a humble, yet intensely motivated individual. As he wrapped up his career as a wrestler for Iowa State University, he became the first collegian wrestler ever to have won both four NCAA championships while posting an undefeated record. The Blue Band is featured this week in Living in Iowa nds, the group performs original and cover blues, soul, rockabilly, and R & B grooves. [27 minutes]

  • Green Retrofitting Schools (#1623)

    Something good is happening in Iowa schools that has probably not been given enough notice in the press. It's a 'green' revolution that has nothing to do with school books, class size, or grade point averages. It is hidden in school basements but it also shows up in the principal's office as a positive contribution to the school's budget. What is 'it'? Geothermal heating and cooling systems that are replacing old boiler-room furnaces at a surprising rate. Living in Iowa looks into this trend and visits a school in Columbus Junction that replaced its outmoded and somewhat cranky boiler-room system with a geothermal system in the summer of 2005. Also this week on Living in Iowa, a love story about the Swamp White Oak Savanna near Muscatine. This special area, with its unique blend of trees, grasses and wildlife is not quite a prairie, not quite woodland and not quite a wetland, but a mix of them all. It is the only area of this kind known to exist anywhere in the world. Morgan Halgren talks with three people who love this place, now owned by the Nature Conservancy of Iowa. With dwindling prairie and wetland habitat, venomous snakes are only found in a few places in our state. But, Polk County Conservation naturalist Lewis Major found all four species in one place in downtown Des Moines at the Science Center of Iowa. In this feature, animal specialist Mark Rowe helps Major get up close and personal with the rattlers and a few other interesting reptiles. On this week East Side provided the backdrop when Living in Iowa was treated to a private recording session with The Soul Searchers. Playing music that's rooted in traditional blues with healthy doses of rockabilly and even 60's surf music, the group has been called the hardest working blues band in Des Moines. [27 minutes]

  • Saddle Maker (#1624)

    This week on Living in Iowa, meet Will Ghormley, a saddle maker who makes saddles that look like they're a hundred years old. And, he's proud of it. His recreations of 1850s and 1860s western gear have been declared tops in the nation. He makes saddles with old-fashioned hand tools, and uses both his encyclopedic knowledge of old west life and his personal experience as a cowboy. Viewers can see some of Ghormley's recent work in the latest PBS hands-on history series Texas Ranch House, which premieres Monday, May 1 at 7 p.m. When you think of Iowa, images of cowboys and cattle drives probably don't come to mind. However in Buena Vista County the Andersons have been driving cattle for over 100 years. Saddle up and join us as Living in Iowa digs around the roots of what has become a family tradition. For the first time in 50 years, Iowa State University has hired a native Iowan to be its new head basketball coach. Greg McDermott, who grew up on a farm near Cascade, and who attended the University of Northern Iowa before coaching there for the last seven years, will take the reins next season. Among the major college coaches in the state, McDermott has had the best recent success, coaching his teams to three straight NCAA basketball tournaments. For this week , sat down with McDermott to discuss how his Iowa upbringing translates to success on the court. On this week lls the air as bullets fly from antique firearms. Western style shoots are sponsored by The Fort Des Moines Rangers, a posse of an organization called N.C.O.W.S., The National Congress of Old West Shootists. This celebration of western heritage requires participants to use historically accurate or authentic clothing and firearms from 1866 to 1899. Tune in as Paul Berge straps on a six shooter and joins in on the fun. [27 minutes]

  • Youngest Mayor In America (#1625)

    On this week th Sam Juhl. Elected to office at age 18, Juhl is the youngest mayor in America. In high school, he wrestled as a heavyweight, but as mayor he tackles the really heavy issues. Art that makes you exercise? Jamie Burmeister has made that combination happen in several art galleries in Iowa and Nebraska. The Harlan, Iowa, native has a background in physical health so his exercise bikes somehow make sense when they're combined with his love of electronics and recycled materials. This week, Living in Iowa meets this artist at his parents so this week, host Morgan Halgren sits down with Susan Werner, a Manchester, Iowa native who now lives in Chicago. Werner studied classical music, but soon turned to songwriting. She is now touring the country, and has a new CD, ook style, and which The Boston Globe called elegance. chitectural prairie finds a surprising modern reprise of this building style Des Moines. [27 minutes]

  • Artist Jean-Marie Salem (#1626)

    Jean-Marie Salem has an amazing collection of bones. She uses them in her artwork as inspiration to make delicate and subtly colored bones from blown glass. 'Pile of bones on the floor' was one of her submissions to the 2005 Iowa Artists exhibition at the Des Moines Art Center's Downtown gallery. But, there's more to Salem She feels like a hybrid of many aspects of American culture rican-American parentage, but as a baby, was adopted by a Caucasian family in Dubuque. She grew up Catholic, but found out her birth mother was from New Orleans and probably practiced Voodoo religion, which is, itself, formed by the confluence of numerous cultures. Salem explores Voodoo symbolism in her art, talking about it like an anthropologist, and commenting on its many similarities with the practices of Catholicism. This week, Living in Iowa learns about this artist's broad-ranging interests and visits her studios in her West Des Moines home. A volunteer effort is underway in Iowa to detect problems with water quality and report them directly to the state agencies that can do something about them. The program is called s Geological Survey organize lessons in water testing for anyone who is interested. One of the group pshot Day, a day when trained volunteers don knee boots and climb into nearby streams, lakes, and creeks to find out what eature from 2003, Living in Iowa followed Dubuque ition on October 18, 2003 onal Water Monitoring Day, and the 30th anniversary of the passage of the national Clean Water Act. Some notable inventions by Iowans include the trampoline, the Eskimo pie, the screen door and something called the computer. On this week overs that the inventive spirit is alive and well at the University of Iowa, where hundreds of young inventors [27 minutes]

  • Hog Confinement (#1627)

    Hog confinement facilities and who should control where they're built are among the hottest issues in Iowa. They pit environmentalists against agriculturalists, local governments against state government, and neighbors against each other. This week Living in Iowa explores the confines of Iowa and what's behind the issues. Brian Roberts grew up on a farm near Griswold, Iowa, and his art is a reflection of what he learned on the farm. His insights are about life and death, and the cycles of nature. He symbolizes his thoughts using materials like galvanized steel from his family's farm. This week, Living in Iowa looks into this artist's workshop he's planting. In 1840 scores of outlaws and vigilantes in Bellevue, Iowa, shot it out in one of the bloodiest gunfights this side of the O. K. Corral. It storian, Susan K. Lucke. Side Roads host, Paul Berge learned that it safe to walk the streets now in Bellevue and points out a few more pleasant historic places to visit. [28 minutes]

  • Side Roads Special (#1628)

    Side Roads Special: This week on Living in Iowa (Johnston, Iowa) e you looking for a summer of vacation of discoveries? Join Paul Berge as he revisits some of the interesting places and nuggets of history that he has found while wandering the Side Roads of Iowa. This Side Roads compilation includes: A pit stop at an historic intersection in Colo. An about face at the Bily Clock museum in Spillville. A ship shape look at a Naval Museum between Omaha and Carter Lake. A steeple chase in Shelby County. A spin on the Carousel in Story City. An underground tour of the State Historical Society. An unusual ascension in Marshalltown. A trip back in time at Living History Farms in Des Moines. [27 minutes]

  • Great Ape Trust (#1629)

    This week, Living in Iowa visits the Great Ape Trust of Iowa, a world-class research facility dedicated to studying the behavior and intelligence of great apes. The 230-acre campus is located five miles southeast of downtown Des Moines and is currently home to three orangutans and a colony of eight bonobos. Eventually gorillas and chimpanzees will also have a home at the Trust making it the first research facility world-wide to study all four species of great apes. Closer genetically to human beings than any other life form on the planet, great apes are at risk of becoming extinct. Great Ape Trust of Iowa is helping secure the future of great apes through education and conservation programs. For the first time ever, the Special Olympics will hold a national event. And this first-time event is going to be held in Ames, Iowa, July 2-7, 2006. Thousands of athletes, coaches, and family members will arrive for the event, but they won't be able to compete unless 8, 000 Iowans volunteer to help out. Tune in as Living in Iowa listens to organizers and volunteers talk about the importance of this event, and the rewards of volunteering. Go on tour with up-and-coming rock band 20/20 Hindsight. The goal of the group is to play all of Iowa's 99 counties on the road to international stardom. Living in Iowa discovers what these four musicians are giving back as they rock the Iowa music scene. Also this week, Paul Berge takes viewers on a Side Road near Greenfield Iowa where Ray 'Bubba' Sorensen paints a different  tribute each year to American servicemen and veterans. Sorensen’ s palette is a boulder located on Highway 25 north of Greenfield. In 2005 the theme was 'Generation of Valor' and depicted a Pearl Harbor veteran embracing a Marine returning from the war in Iraq. [27 minutes]

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  • Youngest Mayor (#1630)

    Thursday, January 11, will mark the last broadcast of the Living in Iowa series. During its 16 seasons, Living in Iowa covered the state from the Loess Hills to the Mississippi River and beyond, celebrating its famous and not-so-famous, its history, social and environmental diversity, and beauty, all the while introducing Iowa to Iowans. Iowa ou to all of the viewers and their great ideas that kept us busy driving across Iowa, uncovering the best stories our people have to tell. On this week h Sam Juhl. Elected to office at age 18, Juhl is the youngest mayor in America. In high school, he wrestled as a heavyweight, but as mayor he tackles the really heavy issues. Art that makes you exercise? Jamie Burmeister has made that combination happen in several art galleries in Iowa and Nebraska. The Harlan, Iowa, native has a background in physical health so his exercise bikes somehow make sense when they're combined with his love of electronics and recycled materials. This week, Living in Iowa meets this artist at his parents o this week, host Morgan Halgren sits down with Susan Werner, a Manchester, Iowa native who now lives in Chicago. Werner studied classical music, but soon turned to songwriting. She has a new CD, w, lobe called Roads, Paul Berge discovers Iowa st Bend of this building style [27 minutes]

  • Episode #2101

    [24 minutes]

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