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Need to Know

Episode #304

JEFF GREENFIELD ANCHORS.

On the second of two inauguration specials examining the advocacy group "Common Good's" proposals to end bureaucratic gridlock and get the United States moving forward, Need to Know anchor Jeff Greenfield explores how malpractice lawsuits contribute to rising healthcare costs. Correspondent William Brangham travels to Denmark, where medical disputes are settled by experts without ever going to court. [26 minutes] Closed Captioning

This episode has not aired in the past few months on Iowa Public Television.

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Series Description: NEED TO KNOW is an integrated broadcast and online current affairs project, uniting broadcast and web in an innovative approach to newsgathering and reporting. It breaks through the limitations of the broadcast schedule by means of a web-based production model that empowers audiences to "tune in" anytime and anywhere. A cross-media initiative built around a wide community of journalists and producers, with input from an engaged audience, NEED TO KNOW covers five primary beats: the economy; the environment and energy; health; security; and culture. Stories, interviews, blogs and photo features are continually added to and updated online, with the production teams inviting interaction and input from online readers and users who are on the lookout for the latest information on a given subject. Each week's online story development culminates in the weekly broadcast, curated from the week's reporting by the various beat teams. The broadcast features documentary-style field reports, both domestic and international, short features and studio-based interviews and conversation to complement and advance the produced reports.

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    As the oil slick spreads in the Gulf, examine the reach of the oil industry in the coastal region. [56 minutes]

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  • Episode #102

    A U.S. military team faces challenges training the Afghan National Army in an embattled outpost. [56 minutes]

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  • Episode #103

    Stephen Handelman of Americas Quarterly discusses America's role in the Mexican drug situation. [56 minutes]

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  • Episode #104

    Money laundering in U.S. banks is investigated and a whistleblower from Wachovia bank appears. [56 minutes]

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  • Episode #105

    The oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico and its implications on oceans and marine life are investigated. [52 minutes]

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  • Episode #106

    Abrahm Lustgarten from Pro Publica discusses BP and its faulty safety and compliance record. [52 minutes]

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  • Episode #107

    Will Obama's proposal help Louisiana residents who are facing economic ruin from the Gulf oil spill? [56 minutes]

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  • Episode #108

    An inside look at the Afghanistan Counter-Insurgency and President Mahmoud Ahmadinajad's Iran. [56 minutes]

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  • Episode #109

    Tim Weiner, author of "Legacy of Ashes: The History of the CIA" discusses the Russian spy ring news. [56 minutes]

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  • Episode #110

    A look at "Veterans' Courts," set up to help veterans with PTSD who land in the criminal system. [56 minutes]

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  • Episode #111

    Elizabeth Warren of the Congressional Oversight Panel discusses consumer financial protection. [56 minutes]

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  • Episode #112

    Bloomberg News investigative reporter Bob Ivry discusses how the financial reform bill falls short. [56 minutes]

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  • Episode #113

    A look at the life of prison reform advocate David Lewis and the economic crisis on the Gulf Coast. [47 minutes]

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  • Episode #114

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  • Episode #115

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  • Episode #116

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  • Episode #117

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  • Episode #118

    The record amounts of money being spent on the midterm elections are discussed with Monica Youn. [56 minutes]

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  • Episode #119

    The US strategy post 9-11 for stopping homegrown terrorists before they strike is investigated. [56 minutes]

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  • Episode #120

    A dramatic video report on US soldiers in the frontlines of battle in Afghanistan is featured. [56 minutes]

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  • Episode #121

    A community based program is being used to combat childhood obesity in Somerville, Massachusetts. [56 minutes]

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  • Episode #122

    Changes in campaign finance laws are resulting in floods of corporate money flowing to campaigns. [56 minutes]

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  • Episode #123

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  • Episode #124

    A program aimed at promoting the welfare of native Alaskans may have enriched non-native executives. [56 minutes]

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  • Episode #125

    Firms that help employers process, and in many case challenge, unemployment claims are examined. [56 minutes]

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  • Episode #126

    Expert show how easy it is to tamper with the voting system by hacking machines and other methods. [56 minutes]

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  • Episode #127

    An in-depth terrorism update looks at the Yemeni explosives found on two airliners bound for the US. [56 minutes]

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  • Episode #128

    A look at whether the Southeast Asian nation of Burma may be trying to build nuclear weapons. [56 minutes]

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  • Episode #129

    A look at the mixed signals the U.S. Department of Agriculture sends when it comes to nutrition. [56 minutes]

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  • Episode #130

    A dramatic video report on U.S. soldiers in the frontlines of battle in Afghanistan is highlighted. [56 minutes]

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  • Episode #131

    The flare-up between North and South Korea is testing the power of the U.S. and China in the region. [56 minutes]

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  • Episode #132

    A reports about coal mine safety, focuses on a company involved in the West Virginia mine explosion. [56 minutes]

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  • Episode #133

    Natural gas pipeline safety and oversight and a fatal pipeline explosion in Texas are investigated. [56 minutes]

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  • Episode #134

    Cleopatra biographer Stacy Schiff, Israeli author David Grossman and biblical scholar Robert Alter. [56 minutes]

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  • Episode #135

    A profile of Salva Dut, a Sudanese "Lost Boy" who returned to Sudan to help provide clean water. [56 minutes]

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  • Episode #136

    Examines the current state of gun-control laws in the U.S. and Haiti one year after the earthquake. [56 minutes]

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  • Episode #137

    DEVELOPMENTALLY DISABLED ADULTS AND THEIR PARENTS: Need to Know looks at the challenges parents face as they struggle to get services for children with developmental disabilities who are becoming adults at a time when states are strapped and budgets are being cut. Maria Hinojosa reports from Indianapolis, Indiana. CHINA AND THE U.S.: T The firestorm ignited by author Amy Chua's recently published book on parenting the Chinese way is evidence of a larger, looming fear American's have of Chinese dominance. With Chinese President Hu Jintao in town for an official state visit, hosts Jon Meacham and Alison Stewart and their guests discuss China's geopolitical importance and U.S.-China relations. MICHAEL VICK'S DOGS: After serving two years in prison for running a brutal dog fighting ring, Michael Vick got a second chance. But what happened to the dogs? Need to Know reports. [56 minutes]

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  • Episode #138

    NEWSMAKER INTERVIEW (FINANCIAL CRISIS COMMISSION REPORT) - The bipartisan federal commission created by Congress to get to the roots of the 2008 financial crisis issues its final report this week. Stacy-Marie Ishmael, an editor with the Financial Times, talks with host Alison Stewart about why it was so hard for the commission to determine who was to blame. INTERVIEW: ALAN BRINKLEY- Host Jon Meacham talks with historian Alan Brinkley about President Obama's ambitious government programs and whether or not a second "New Deal" is possible or practical in today's world of political partisanship. REAL HOUSEWIVES OF ROSEVILLE- A BLUEPRINT AMERICA SPECIAL REPORT -For Blueprint America, correspondent Maria Hinojosa reports on the huge number of older Americans living in car-dependent suburbs and asks what happens when it's time to take their collective car keys away. CONGO LEGACY - Alison Stewart interviews author Adam Hochschild on the tragic and troubled history of the Congo, on the 50th anniversary of the assassination of its first democratically elected Prime Minister, Patrice Lumumba, by Belgian, and it is speculated, American operatives. STEVE BRODNER - Editorial cartoonist Steve Brodner looks at Afghanistan's future through the eyes of all the different power players envisioning a favorable outcome -- for themselves. IN PERSPECTIVE- A JON MEACHAM ESSAY- Host Jon Meacham assesses the President's State of the Union address, and discusses the difficulties President Obama will have in turning big ideas into big accomplishments in the political environment in which we live. [56 minutes]

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  • Episode #139

    INTERVIEW: EUGENE JARECKI - Jon Meacham speaks to award-winning documentary filmmaker Eugene Jarecki about his latest film "Reagan." AMERICA AND THE EGYPTIAN CRISIS - A CLOSER LOOK- As the protests in Egypt intensify, how does America navigate between its democratic values and its geopolitical interests? Need to Know examines the diplomatic moves the U.S. is likely to make as the Obama Administration tries to find the balance between leadership and being perceived as overbearing in a volatile situation. HEALTH CARE REFORM ACT UPDATE - As the Health Care Reform Act is attacked in courts and Congress, Need to Know discusses the quiet removal of one controversial provision, funding for End-of-Life Counseling (so-called "Death Panels") with Dr. Atul Gawande, author and medical writer for The New Yorker. ALZHEIMER DISEASE BREAKTHROUGH - Medical correspondent Dr. Emily Senay explains the importance of a new brain scan that can help doctors diagnose Alzheimer's Disease earlier than ever. [56 minutes]

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  • Episode #140

    Brockton High proves that big schools can be top schools - In 1998, when Massachusetts implemented new standardized testing, administrators at Brockton High School, the largest public school in the state, learned that more than 75 percent of their 4,000 students would fail to graduate. But thanks to a small group of dedicated teachers who implemented a school-wide program to bring reading and writing lessons into every classroom, even gym, Brockton is now one of the highest performing schools in the state. Brockton's principal, Susan Szachowicz, says, "I think the concept of turnaround is one of the most deceptive words that you can use. Because it implies people from the outside leaping into the school to turn everything around? We did not fire all the teachers. We did work with a team that we had. And we had some pretty dramatic results." Physical education spurs higher test scores in Naperville, Illinois -While physical education has been drastically cut back across the country -- in response to budget concerns and test score pressures --Naperville Central High School, in the Chicago suburbs, has embraced a culture of fitness: PE is a daily, graded requirement. And for one group of struggling students, there's an innovative program to schedule PE right before their most challenging classes. In the six years since that program started, students who signed up for PE directly before English read on average a half year ahead of those who didn't, and students who took PE before math showed dramatic improvement in their standardized tests. Reinventing science education at one Maryland university - Most people agree that for the U.S. to remain competitive in the global economy, we need more people in the fields of science, technology, engineering and math (STEM). But today, two-thirds of college students who start out majoring in the sciences end up switching concentrations. One university in Maryland is bucking that trend. Under the leadership of Dr. Freeman Hrabowski, the University of Maryland, Baltimore County is transforming the way science is taught, emphasizing lab settings and small group problem solving. The results: more students majoring in subjects like chemistry and more students passing the class. The University has also been a leader in minority achievement in STEM fields. In the school's Meyeroff Scholars Program, which focuses on high-achieving minority students, nearly 90 percent graduate with degrees in science or engineering. Panelists: Dr. Susan Szachowicz, principal of Brockton High School in Massachusetts and one of the reform leaders; Zakiyah Ansari, parent leader with the Coalition for Educational Justice in New York; Dr. Pedro Noguera, Professor of Education at New York University and author of "The Trouble with Black Boys? And Other Reflections on Race, Equity and the Future of Public Education". [56 minutes]

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  • Episode #141

    THE WATCH LIST - Update: Fracking- Following release of a new congressional report alleging potential violations of the clean water act, Need to Know and ProPublica update an investigation of the gas drilling process known as Fracking. ProPublica's Abrahm Lustgarden is interviewed. FOR EGYPT...WHAT'S NEXT? - Alison Stewart interviews Michael Wahid Hanna of the Century Foundation to discuss the likely new political structure in Egypt. A PERSONAL ESSAY - Need to Know's producer Mona Iskander, an Egyptian-American, watched the ouster of Hosni Mubarak with special interest. She shares her personal observations, and introduces us to a blogger/activist she first met while reporting on Egypt several years ago. INTERVIEW- PARAG KHANNA - Jon Meacham interviews author Parag Khanna about his new book, "How To Run the World". A LOOK AT THE UNIVERSE - Theoretical physicist and New York Times best-selling author Brian Greene explains, among other things, how the universe is like a muffin, and why there's actually not one universe at all. [56 minutes]

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  • Episode #142

    THE WATCHLIST: THE CALIFORNIA NATIONAL GUARD - Have millions of dollars in incentive bonuses been wrongly paid out to California National Guardsmen and women who had not earned them? An investigation by the Sacramento Bee along with NEED TO KNOW. CLIMATE CHANGE AT THE DOORSTEP - NEED TO KNOW travels to Norfolk, Virginia, which is trying to deal with regular flooding caused by a combination of rising sea levels and the shoreline sinking. THE TROUBLE WITH PIRATES - In the wake of the murders of four Americans held hostage by Somali Pirates, NEED TO KNOW reprises part of the film "The Trouble with Pirates," which provides a rare insider view of Somali pirates---who they are, and why they do what they do. [56 minutes]

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  • Episode #143

    UNION SALARIES AND STATE BUDGETS - Are public unions to blame for states' budget woes? Governors from a number of states - not just in Wisconsin -- say that public union workers' salaries and benefits are wreaking havoc with their state budgets. But are state workers really to blame for the economic plight of states? Need to Know examines the facts behind one of the most contentious arguments in the news today. BLOOD DANGER: WHAT YOU DON"T KNOW ABOUT BLOOD - Since World War II, blood has been considered the gift of life. But today a growing number of experts are questioning whether it should be so widely used in transfusions. Need to Know investigates whether the risks of transfusions outweigh the benefits....and what alternatives some hospitals have discovered. HIGH SPEED RAIL - As part of PBS's Blueprint America project, correspondent Rick Karr travels to the mid-west where President Obama's vision for high speed passenger rail has been rejected by Wisconsin's newly-elected Republican governor Scott Walker as expensive and unnecessary and embraced by Illinois' Democratic governor Patrick Quinn as a far-sighted way to create jobs and grow the economy. As Congress begins debate on how to control the deficit, Karr asks whether Obama's vision will ever become a reality. INTERVIEW: STACY SCHIFF - Jon Meacham talks with Pulitzer Prize-winning biographer Stacy Schiff about her best-selling book about the last queen of Egypt - Cleopatra. NO TOMORROW - A preview of an upcoming documentary by filmmaker Roger Weisberg airing March 25th on PBS. When a young woman featured in Weisberg's PBS documentary AGING OUT, is brutally murdered, the film itself becomes central to whether the killer lives or dies. This chilling personal story takes viewers inside a suspenseful death penalty trial and challenges their beliefs about capital punishment. *JUST ASK PETER SAGAL- In this edition of "Just Ask," advice columnist Peter Sagal offers some handy strategies to a struggling cable news channel. A STEVE BRODNER EDITORIAL CARTOON - Editorial cartoonist Steve Brodner conducts an "illustrated interview" with author Eduardo Porter about income inequality in America. [56 minutes]

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  • Episode #144

    [56 minutes]

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  • Episode #145

    Brockton High proves that big schools can be top schools - In 1998, when Massachusetts implemented new standardized testing, administrators at Brockton High School, the largest public school in the state, learned that more than 75 percent of their 4,000 students would fail to graduate. But thanks to a small group of dedicated teachers who implemented a school-wide program to bring reading and writing lessons into every classroom, even gym, Brockton is now one of the highest performing schools in the state. Brockton's principal, Susan Szachowicz, says, "I think the concept of turnaround is one of the most deceptive words that you can use. Because it implies people from the outside leaping into the school to turn everything around... We did not fire all the teachers. We did work with a team that we had. And we had some pretty dramatic results." Physical education spurs higher test scores in Naperville, Illinois -While physical education has been drastically cut back across the country -- in response to budget concerns and test score pressures --Naperville Central High School, in the Chicago suburbs, has embraced a culture of fitness: PE is a daily, graded requirement. And for one group of struggling students, there's an innovative program to schedule PE right before their most challenging classes. In the six years since that program started, students who signed up for PE directly before English read on average a half year ahead of those who didn't, and students who took PE before math showed dramatic improvement in their standardized tests. Reinventing science education at one Maryland university - Most people agree that for the U.S. to remain competitive in the global economy, we need more people in the fields of science, technology, engineering and math (STEM). But today, two-thirds of college students who start out majoring in the sciences end up switching concentrations. One university in Maryland is bucking that trend. Under the leadership of Dr. Freeman Hrabowski, the University of Maryland, Baltimore County is transforming the way science is taught, emphasizing lab settings and small group problem solving. The results: more students majoring in subjects like chemistry and more students passing the class. The University has also been a leader in minority achievement in STEM fields. In the school's Meyeroff Scholars Program, which focuses on high-achieving minority students, nearly 90 percent graduate with degrees in science or engineering. [56 minutes]

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  • Episode #146

    WOUNDED IN WAR, SEVEN YEARS LATER - A group of injured soldiers reflect back on the day in Iraq that changed their lives forever, some for the worse, some for the better. On April 7th, 2004, the Renaud brothers were embedded with the US Army in Iraq. Their cameras were rolling as a rocket attack struck an American military base in Baghdad, killing four soldiers and severely wounding Wayne Irelan, Adam Zomont and Anthony Smith. WOUNDED, SEVEN YEARS LATER - brings together these soldiers and tells the story of how those few seconds in Iraq changed their lives forever. Wayne is a true patriot who never complains, but has suffered as a result. Anthony endured 161 surgeries, lost an arm and most of his hip, but refuses to quit and has become an inspiration to many. This story brings together footage of the attack that wounded them, footage of their struggles with recovery, and finally brings the men together for the first time to discuss the lasting effects of that day in Iraq that changed their lives forever. INTERVIEW: LEYMAH GBOWEE - Alison Stewart talks with Leymah Gbowee who spearheaded the women's peace movement in Liberia, which brought down the brutal government of President Charles Taylor. Gbowee has continued to push for reforms in her home country but also in other countries in West Africa. BREAST CANCER RESEARCH - Correspondent Dr. Emily Senay takes a look at the difficult road to advancement in cancer treatment by examining three clinical trials for breast cancer. One is a revolutionary way to test new chemotherapy treatments; another explores whether freezing breast cancer tumors can one day replace surgery; and the third investigates whether scalp cooling can save the hair of patients who undergo chemotherapy. INTERVIEW: ARNE DUNCAN - Education Secretary Arne Duncan talks with Jon Meacham about the Obama administration's push to revise No Child Left Behind and his thoughts on how the U.S. can regain lost ground when it comes to educational excellence. [56 minutes]

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  • Episode #147

    TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY (TBI) UPDATE - Need to Know has been following the story of military families who have given up everything to care for wounded veterans at home. Correspondent Maria Hinojosa revisits the story to find out why they are still waiting for support promised in legislation that President Obama signed last year. AN INSIDE LOOK AT CAMDEN - In January of this year Camden, New Jersey, one of the poorest, most violent cities in our nation, lost half of its police force. The lay-offs are a result of massive budget deficits on both the local and state level and the cuts beg the question of how cities like Camden that have long struggled to provide their citizens with the basics will survive the nation's financial crisis. Need to Know goes to Camden to see first hand the challenges on the ground and explore possible solutions for the city. SCORECASTING - Need To Know correspondent Win Rosenfeld talks with Jon Wertheim, senior writer at Sports Illustrated and co-author of Scorecasting, about how morality, psychology and economics play out on the sporting field, in our offices and at home. INTERVIEW: JEFF GREENFIELD - Jon Meacham speaks with journalist veteran journalist and author Jeff Greenfield about his new book "THEN EVERYTHING CHANGED: Stunning Alternate Histories of American Politics: JFK, RFK, Carter, Ford, Reagan." IN PERSPECTIVE - A JON MEACHAM ESSAY. [56 minutes]

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  • Episode #148

    DIVIDED ISLAND- The Dominican Republic resumes mass deportations of Haitians after a one year moratorium since the devastating earthquake in Haiti. Need To Know investigates reports that Haitians are being wrongfully removed from the country. Human Rights activists say race plays a role in the treatment of Haitians in the Dominican Republic. INTERVIEW- EDWIDGE DANTICAT - Correspondent Rafael Pi Roman interviews award-winning Haitian-American author Edwidge Danticat about the immigrant struggle for a sense of belonging and why Americans don't get a chance to hear about the Haiti that exists beyond the stereotypes and traumas of big news stories. THE BATTLE OVER MEDICARE/MEDICAID - What would the Republicans' newly proposed changes to Medicare and Medicaid mean to Americans? With interviews and animation, Need to Know delves into the details. INTERVIEW-FORMER GOVERNOR ED RENDELL - Rendell, a Democrat and co-chair of Building America's Future -- a non-partisan advocacy group for infrastructure investment -- makes his case for spending NOW on modernizing the national infrastructure even Republicans move to cut government spending. A BLUEPRINT AMERICA special report. PROFILE: JULIANO MER KHAMIS OF THE JENIN FREEDOM THEATRE - This week Need to Know looks at the life and work of Juliano Mer Khamis, the Israeli Palestinian actor and the director of the Jenin Freedom Theatre. He was killed earlier this week in the Jenin refugee camp by unknown gunmen. He was a controversial figure who believed that art and theatre could be used for social change and justice. IN PERSPECTIVE: A JON MEACHAM ESSAY - Jon Meacham offers a comparison between President Kennedy's mistakes during the Bay of Pigs with the difficulties President Obama faces in the current political climate. JUST ASK PETER SAGAL - Former President Bill Clinton recently announced that he's moving the office of the Clinton Global Initiative out of its Harlem home. NPR's Peter Sagal goes to the neighborhood to get reaction from the residents. [56 minutes]

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  • Episode #149

    GRAND ISLE ONE YEAR LATER - BP OIL SPILL UPDATE - On the one year anniversary of the BP gulf spill, Need to Know returns to the community of Grand Isle, Louisiana to visit with the families and business owners who we profiled during the spill. At the time, their businesses were practically shuttered by the spill, and they were just beginning the process of filing claims against BP. How have they fared a year later? OIL SPILL HEALTH UPDATE - Nearly a year after the Deepwater Horizon rig exploded in the Gulf of Mexico, residents and spill workers are still looking for answers about how the spill may have impacted their health. The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences has launched the largest study ever to look at long and short-term health effects from an oil spill. But for many those answers won't come soon enough. Need to Know reports. INTERVIEW: CARL SAFINA AND ABRAHM LUSTGARTEN - Ecologist Carl Safina and investigative reporter Abrahm Lustgarten join Alison Stewart to discuss the regulatory failures that led to the BP oil spill and its impact on the environment. INTERVIEW: LISA MARGONELLI - Author and energy policy expert Lisa Margonelli joins Alison Stewart to talk about America's energy policy going forward in the post-BP spill era. Are we stuck on silver bullet solutions when small, incremental adjustments may be the game changer? FIXING AMERICA: EDUCATION - In the latest installment of Need To Know's "Fixing America" series, we asked educators, policy makers and other big thinkers how they would put the country's education system on the path to straight A's. Among the voices are Linda Darling-Hammond on policy consensus; NEA President Dennis Van Roekel on the importance of teaching as a profession; and Asia Society CEO Vishaka Desai on global literacy. INTERVIEW: JIM SIMONS - Jon Meacham sits down with Jim Simons, one of the richest men in the world and founder of Math for America, to find out why Simons has devoted so much of his time - and money - to improving math education in this country. IN PERSPECTIVE: A JON MEACHAM ESSAY - Jon Meacham explains the reasoning behind the Framers decision that only native-born Americans could be President and argues that it's time to change it.. [56 minutes]

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  • Episode #150

    THE WATCH LIST: HOME SICK - In a Watch List investigation in cooperation with Pro Publica and investigative journalist Aaron Kessler, Need to know examines the difficulty consumers can encounter when trying to sue foreign manufacturers over products suspected of causing harm. Some drywall manufactured in China is emitting sulfur gases, which American homeowners allege is making them sick. The Consumer Product Safety Commission is investigating, and thousands of homeowners are attempting to sue for damages, but face jurisdictional and enforcement roadblocks. NEED TO KNOW follows one homeowner, whose family was forced to abandon their home, and has taken her case all the way to Congress. BLUEPRINT AMERICA: DETROIT - A report on the controversial plan by Mayor Dave Bing to "right-size" Detroit, by shrinking the sprawling city down to a more manageable size, through financial and other incentives to get residents to move. DESIGNING THE FUTURE CITY - In conjunction with Detroit Public Television, Need to Know follows students at a Detroit middle school as they compete against students from around the city and more affluent suburbs in a national engineering contest to design the city of the future. ANATOLE KALETSKY INTERVIEW - Anatole Kaletsky, economics commentator and author of "Capitalism 4.0," speaks with Need to Know financial Correspondent Stacey Tisdale about a new era of capitalism that requires a balance between free markets and stricter government regulation. JON MEACHAM ESSAY - Jon Meacham comments on the controversy in some Christian communities over an evangelical minister's book, which questions the existence of hell. [56 minutes]

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  • Episode #151

    INTERVIEW: JOE NOCERA- Need to Know's Shoshana Guy speaks with New York Times OP-ED columnist Joe Nocera about his reporting on one of the "little fish" who went to jail after being convicted of lying on a mortgage application, while many of the "biggest fish" responsible for subprime mortgage crisis haven't faced criminal prosecution. INTERVIEW: LOUISE STORY- Alison Stewart sits down with New York Times reporter Louise Story to discuss why, in the aftermath of the financial crisis that generated hundreds of billions in losses, no high-profile participants in the disaster been criminally prosecuted or jailed. INTERVIEW: TAVIS SMILEY- PBS talk show host and author Tavis Smiley talks with Alison Stewart about his new book, "Fail Up: 20 Lessons on Building Success from Failure." IN PERSPECTIVE: A JON MEACHAM ESSAY- After reports that President Obama is considering an executive order to require federal contractors to disclose political spending, Jon Meacham discusses why we need transparency in corporate political contributions. THE PEOPLE'S MUSIC SCHOOL - Need to Know is there as dozens of Chicago families wait in line for days and nights, attempting to win one of the limited spaces in a music school that provides free lessons to the lucky students who get in. The People's Music school is trying to fill the gap in music education left by budget cuts to public school music programs. JUST ASK PETER SAGAL- Former President Bill Clinton recently announced that he's moving the office of the Clinton Global Initiative out of its Harlem home. NPR's Peter Sagal goes to the neighborhood to get reaction from the residents. [56 minutes]

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  • Episode #152

    BIN LADEN ECONOMICS - Need to Know examines the economic toll that Osama bin Laden and 9/11 exacted on the United States. TO ADOPT A CHILD - Need to Know travels to Nepal to meet Americans who've adopted children there, but can't bring them home, because the U.S. State department has just suspended adoption of Nepalese children, citing numerous examples of unreliable and potentially fraudulent documents. THE UNITED STATES OF WOMEN - Alison Stewart is joined in the studio by three women with distinct viewpoints to talk about the political, legal and economic status of women today and the recent battle over women's reproductive rights. INTERVIEW: BERNARD HAYKEL - Alison Stewart speaks with Princeton Professor Bernard Haykel who believes that al Qaeda's jihadism is far from over, despite the so-called Arab Spring because, he says, al Qaeda responds, and gives voice to, a profound sense of humiliation and injustice felt by some in the Arab world. NEW YORKER CARTOONIST ROZ CHAST - Famed New Yorker cartoonist Roz Chast gives us her unique take on the fable of the Ant and the Grasshopper in an animated cartoon. "IN PERSPECTIVE": JON MEACHAM ESSAY - Jon Meacham considers whether the death of Osama Bin Laden will give President Obama a new opportunity to adjust the nation's agenda, allowing a new focus on improving national security by investing in America's economic future. [56 minutes]

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  • Episode #153

    CRISIS MAPPERS - Need to Know host Alison Stewart reports on a breakthrough technology that uses cell phones to locate disaster victims and get them help. Created after the earthquake in Haiti, it's now being used to help victims of the tornados in the Midwest, the earthquake in Japan and the unrest in the Middle East. DETAINEE ABUSE - In a joint investigation with The Nation Institute Investigative Fund and reporter Joshua Phillips, Need to Know reveals a little-known U.S. military task force charged with investigating abuse of detainees in Iraq. Despite hundreds of allegations of abuse and torture, one of the special agents in charge of the Army's Detainee Abuse Task Force describes it as under-resourced, overwhelmed and unable to adequately investigate cases. HIGH FIBER - Correspondent Rick Karr reports on why The United States, where the internet was born, has now fallen badly behind in the race to the online future. Broadband service in the U.S. lags behind a dozen or more industrialized countries - and we're doing worse every year. Karr went to Europe - in collaboration with Engadget - to find out how two countries there have jumped ahead of us. "IN PERSPECTIVE" A JON MEACHAM ESSAY - Jon Meacham salutes a true public servant, Defense Secretary Robert Gates, who retires this year, after serving both Democratic and Republican administrations with distinction. INTERVIEW: FREEDOM RIDERS - In conjunction with the airing of American Experience: Freedom Riders airing on PBS May 16th on PBS, Alison Stewart talks Francis and Laura Randall who, 50 years ago, were part of the courageous band of American civil rights activists who risked their lives on the Freedom Rides, taking buses together through the deep south to demonstrate against Jim Crow laws. [56 minutes]

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  • Episode #154

    [56 minutes]

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  • Episode #155

    [56 minutes]

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  • Episode #156

    [56 minutes]

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  • Episode #157

    [56 minutes]

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  • Episode #158

    VOTER REGISTRATION - With nearly a dozen states rewriting their voting laws, Need to Know examines the potential impact on voter turnout in Ohio. INTERVIEW: CHARMAINE YOEST - Dr. Charmaine Yoest, the head of Americans United for Life, talks about how the strategy of the anti-abortion rights movement has changed in recent years, and what the movement has achieved by focusing on changing law at the state level. TOURETTE'S SYNDROME - A new alternative therapy is proving to be as effective as medication in treating the symptoms of Tourette's Syndrome. Need to Know meets a 12 year-old boy showing marked improvement since he began the therapy. IN PERSPECTIVE: A JON MEACHAM ESSAY - Jon Meacham discusses a new documentary--"The Last Mountain"--and how its message on the destructiveness of the West Virginia coal mining industry speaks to our need for a consensus on a national energy plan. SCIENCE OF DENIAL - Need To Know correspondent Win Rosenfeld talks to science journalist Chris Mooney about how our pre-existing beliefs, far more than facts, color our conclusions about the world. INTERVIEW: BENJAMIN SKINNER - Alison Stewart interviews Benjamin Skinner, investigative journalist and author of A Crime So Monstrous about his work exposing the world of modern-day slavery and human trafficking. [56 minutes]

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  • Episode #159

    [56 minutes]

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  • Episode #160

    INTERVIEW: SIMON JOHNSON- The epicenter for the Europe's economic crisis is Greece, a country with only 11 million people. Why has this country's debt created so much turmoil within Europe and how could this crisis threaten to involve the United States and the world? Simon Johnson, a former chief economist at the International Monetary Fund talks with host Alison Stewart about how debt, on both sides of the Atlantic, will shape our economic futures for many years to come. REDISTRICTING- While the media and political junkies are following the candidates' every move and statement, the real action is happening out of the public eye, where congressional districts are being redrawn, and some of the most familiar members of Congress risk losing their seats before a vote is cast. But the state of California is blazing new ground with a radical approach to statewide redistricting. Need to Know's Mona Iskander sits down with redistricting expert David Wasserman of the Cook Political Report to help put that new plan into context. "PAGE ONE": CARR/STELTER- Alison Stewart interviews two of The New York Times journalists featured in the documentary "Page One: Inside The New York Times." The documentary goes inside the paper's newsroom at its low point in 2009 when it was forced to make significant layoffs and adapt to the changing media landscape. GRIDLOCK, HEADLOCK- Editorial cartoonist Steve Brodner provides animated commentary on the inability of Congress and the Administration to come to terms on a deficit deal. ENCORE: THE DOGS ARE All RIGHT- After serving 18 months in prison for running a brutal dog fighting ring, Michael Vick got a second chance. But what happened to the dogs? The remarkable story of the rescue and redemption of these dogs. (Original Air Date: January 21, 2011) And a new "In Perspective" essay by Jon Meacham [56 minutes]

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  • Episode #161

    [56 minutes]

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  • Episode #162

    [56 minutes]

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  • Episode #163

    INTERVIEW: GABRIELLA COLEMAN - Alison Stewart sits down with author and anthropologist Gabriella Coleman to discuss the tricky and complicated world of hackers. INTERVIEW: JEFF SCHAPIRO INTERVIEW -Need to Know interviews Jeff Schapiro, a political reporter and columnist for the Richmond Times-Dispatch, about Republican Congressman Eric Cantor, who has emerged as a leading opponent of the White House's attempt to broker a deal on the debt ceiling. INTERVIEW: RICHARD BROOKHISER - Need to Know turns to historian and senior editor at the National Review, Richard Brookhiser, for a broader perspective on the recent political machinations in Washington, and the age old discussion over the size of government. NUCLEAR WASTE SOLUTION? - As the U.S. continues to try to resolve the decades old issue of what to do with nuclear waste, Need to Know visits a possible solution, a half-mile below the desert in New Mexico. The Department of Energy's WIPP (Waste Isolation Pilot Plant) is the nation's only operating deep geologic nuclear waste disposal site. Alison Stewart goes underground for a tour. SOMALIA PHOTO ESSAY - This week, for the first time since the devastating famine in Ethiopia in the 1980s, the United Nations has declared a famine in parts of southern Somalia. An estimated 4,000 people are leaving the country every day to seek refuge. Adrian Edwards, a spokesperson for the United Nations Refugee Agency, tells Need to Know about his recent experience in the refugee camps in Kenya and Ethiopia. [56 minutes]

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  • Episode #164

    ADULT AUTISM: When we think of autism, we tend to think of children -but what happens to those children when they grow up and leave the educational system where federal law requires they get the services they need? And what happens to them when their parents are gone? Need to Know looks at two families struggling to provide a future for their adult sons with autism. INTERVIEW: PETER BELL: Peter Bell, executive vice president of Autism Speaks and father of a teenage son with autism, discusses what some of the major autism advocacy groups are doing to try to meet the ongoing needs of adults with autism, and the special challenges presented by tough economic times. TRICIA ROSE ESSAY: Guest essayist Tricia Rose of Brown University talks about how the growing inequality of wealth distribution in America is defining who we will become as a nation in the coming years. FOOD SAFETY: A report on the leading cause of food choking incidents among children, and efforts by the American Association of Pediatrics to get government and industry to address the danger. HIGH FIBER: Correspondent Rick Karr reports on why the United States, where the internet was born, has now fallen badly behind in the race to the online future. Broadband service in the U.S. lags behind a dozen or more industrialized countries - and we're doing worse every year. Karr went to Europe - in collaboration with Engadget - to find out how two countries there have jumped ahead of us. [56 minutes]

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  • Episode #165

    BREAST CANCER RESEARCH - Dr. Emily Senay takes a look at the difficult road to advancement in cancer treatment by examining three clinical trials for breast cancer. One is a revolutionary way to test new chemotherapy treatments; another explores whether freezing breast cancer tumors can one day replace surgery; and the third investigates whether scalp cooling can save the hair of patients who undergo chemotherapy. NEW: KEN HERMAN INTERVIEW - This Saturday Texas Governor Rick Perry is holding a call to prayer in Houston. This is the just latest in a series of steps that seem to put Perry in line for a presidential run in 2012. Need to Know Host Alison Stewart talks to Ken Herman of the Austin American-Statesman about Governor Rick Perry's accomplishments in Texas and his national ambitions. BENJAMIN SKINNER INTERVIEW - Alison Stewart interviews Benjamin Skinner, investigative journalist and author of A Crime So Monstrous about his work exposing the world of modern-day slavery and human trafficking. HIGHLINE - BLUEPRINT AMERICA - Need to Know visits the High Line, a flowering oasis built atop an old train trestle on Manhattan's west side. It has drawn millions of admiring locals and tourists. But it's more than just a nice place to relax and take in the view--it's an economic engine. The project is being credited with generating more than $2 billion in urban development, everything from condos, to restaurants, to art galleries. STUXNET - As the White House unveils a new international cyber security strategy, Need To Know delves into the story of Stuxnet -the sophisticated and devastating computer virus that may launch a 21st century global arms race. [56 minutes]

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  • Episode #166

    [56 minutes]

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  • Episode #167

    CONSUMER FINANCE PROTECTION BUREAU - Can an agency protect consumers from making bad decisions about their finances? Need to Know visits one military family whose situation seems tailor-made for the mission of the new Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. INTERVIEW: JEFF MADRICK - Jeff Madrick, author of "Age of Greed: The Triumph of Finance and the Decline of America, 1970-Present", talks with host Alison Stewart about the new consumer protections enacted as part of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act. SEEDS OF PROGRESS - Detroit's urban farming movement is thriving, supplying fresh produce, jobs and revived communities. Large-scale industrial farms are now knocking at Detroit's door with their own plans. Desiree Cooper examines this new food-based economy and the issues holding it back. KINECT - The Microsoft Kinect has launched a revolution in gaming technology by turning the game player into the controller. Now, hackers have repurposed the Kinect to allow people to control computers and the digital world using just their body movements. Known as gesture technology, this innovation will change the way we live, from how we cook in the kitchen to the way doctors perform surgery. AMAZON GOLD - With the price of gold at an all-time high, veteran war photographer Ron Haviv documents the environmental destruction illegal gold mining has caused in the Peruvian Amazon. [56 minutes]

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  • Episode #168

    TEXAS TEXTBOOKS - Despite Governor Perry's statement that Texas schools teach evolution and creationism, Texas recently voted not to add creationism or intelligent design to its science texts. But the actions of the state's school board continue to be closely watched by the nation. Need to Know caught up with the Board last May, as it was considering changes to be made in its social studies curriculum -changes that critics said inserted politics and religious beliefs into textbooks. Shot in Austin, Mt Pleasant and Bryan Texas. Interviews include Don McLeroy (SBOE), Thomas Raitliff (SBOE), and Kathy Miller (TX Freedom Network). SOMALIA - As Somalia struggles with a devastating famine, Need to Know takes a rare look inside Somalia's capital, Mogadishu, a city struggling from decades of civil war, Islamist militants, famine and piracy, to learn more about how the nation came to be in the state it's in today. WEATHER AND CLIMATE CHANGE - As the first major hurricane of the season threatens the Eastern Seaboard, Need To Know investigates the links between extreme weather and climate change. MARK BITTMAN - New York Times food writer, op-ed columnist, and author Mark Bittman on the politics of food policy. WILD HORSES - There are thousands of wild horses roaming America's western states. We speak to filmmaker and wildlife activist, Ginger Kathrens about how the wild horses live and interact with one another and about the controversial removal of horses from the wild by the Bureau of Land Management. [56 minutes]

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  • Episode #169

    "SEMPER FI": Need to Know interviews a retired Marine and a filmmaker about a new documentary that tells the story of a massive water contamination incident at the Camp Lejeune marine base. Up to a million people may have been exposed to dangerous chemicals from the 1950s to the 1980s, and while the rare cancers suffered by former camp Lejeune residents can't be traced for certain to the contaminated water, many believe that it was responsible. POLLS AND MARKETS: Need to Know travels to Iowa to examine a unique futures market that may be better at predicting winning political candidates than traditional polling methods. IN PERSPECTIVE: "THE HELP": Desiree Cooper of Detroit Public Television offers her perspective on the controversy over the film "The Help." CRISIS MAPPERS: Need to Know host Alison Stewart reports on a breakthrough technology that uses cell phones to locate disaster victims and get them help. Created after the earthquake in Haiti, it's now being used to help victims some of the victims of Hurricane Irene, the tornados in the Midwest last spring, the earthquake in Japan and the unrest in the Middle East. SIS, BOOM, BUST: While State budget deficits force administrators at public colleges and universities to make painful cuts, one area not feeling the budget knife much is intercollegiate sports. Need to Know travels to Ohio University in Athens, Ohio to see how the pressure to compete as a NCAA Division I program is affecting the classroom. Is athletic success OU's ticket to surviving tough times or an obstacle to fulfilling OU's academic mission? [56 minutes]

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  • Episode #170

    6 WORD MEMOIRS- Three people who lost loved ones in the 9/11 attacks tell how their lives have changed, using the technique of six word memoirs. INTERVIEW: PAUL GOLDBERGER- Architectural critic Paul Goldberger of The New Yorker reflects on the 9/11 Memorial and the social, political and economic challenges of rebuilding at Ground Zero. IN PERSPECTIVE: A JON MEACHAM ESSAY- A decade after one of the most tragic days in America's history, Jon Meacham reflects on the legacy of September 11, 2001 and wonders how it will be remembered in years to come. INTERVIEW: TOM KEAN- On the ten year anniversary of September 11th, Need to Know host Alison Stewart talks with the Chair of the 9/11 Commission, Tom Kean, about where our country has come since 9/11 in terms of security, and what remains to be done. THE WAR AT HOME- The 9/11 attacks resulted in the nation's longest war effort, although it remains peripheral to most Americans' lives. Not so for the military families whose loved ones are deployed to a war zone. Children with a deployed parent are two and half times more at risk to develop psychological problems than children in general. So on the 10th anniversary of 9/11, But we found that military children are also incredibly resilient. Need to Know profiles three families to get an intimate view into their lives and the sacrifices military children make every day. INTERVIEW: DAVID POTORTI- David Potorti, a founder of September 11 Families for Peaceful Tomorrows, discusses with host Alison Stewart his organization's anti-war and anti-conflict efforts . [56 minutes]

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  • Episode #201

    INFRASTRUCTURE - As communities across the country struggle to make ends meet, leasing public assets to private investors is an increasingly attractive way to generate much needed cash. Need to Know correspondent Rick Karr travels to Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, a town on the brink of bankruptcy that's considering leasing its parking infrastructure, and Chicago, Illinois, a city that decided in 2008 to plug its budget gaps by leasing its parking meters to investors for 75 years. INTERVIEW: CHRISTINE TODD WHITMAN - Need to Know host Scott Simon talks to former New Jersey Governor Christine Todd Whitman about the difficult choices states are facing in this tough economic climate. IN PERSPECTIVE: A JON MEACHAM ESSAY - As the Republican Presidential debates continue, Jon Meacham weighs in on the complicated and delicate balance between government and the private sector. [26 minutes]

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  • Episode #202

    GREEN JOBS: "Need to Know" visits one Michigan town that is trying to reinvent itself as a green community after the biggest employer in town moved its operations to Mexico. MARCOS VILLATORO ESSAY: GARAGE SALES: A Salvadoran-American writer, teacher and filmmaker who lives in a hardscrabble Latino neighborhood in Los Angeles explains how the American garage sale has changed because of these harsh economic times. What was once a way to get rid of an abundance of possessions bought during times of affluence has become, for many families, a way to keep their heads above water. JENNIFER GRANHOLM INTERVIEW: Host Maria Hinojosa talks with former Michigan Governor Jennifer Granholm about the Governor's efforts to rebuild her state's economy in the midst of the fiscal crisis. [26 minutes]

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  • Episode #203

    RAY SUAREZ ANCHORS. CHEMICAL REGULATION- Need to Know takes a look at a small town plagued by chemical pollution and disease, and the regulatory system some say has failed its residents. INTERVIEW: MATT KIBBE- Need to Know anchor Ray Suarez interviews Matt Kibbe of Freedomworks to discuss his take on the proper role of the Environmental Protection Agency. IN PERSPECTIVE: A JON MEACHAM ESSAY- Jon Meacham examines the effect that programs initiated by FDR and LBJ continue to have on Americans, despite unawareness of the role government plays in our everyday lives. [26 minutes]

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  • Episode #204

    SCOTT SIMON ANCHORS. OHIO JOBS- Correspondent John Larson travels to Cuyahoga County in northern Ohio for an in-depth look at America's job crisis. Even some of those with work there are feeling extraordinarily insecure, struggling to pay their bills, as their pay stagnates, and their hours and benefits decline. THE CORNER- Need to Know anchor Scott Simon goes with author David Simon to Baltimore's inner city to talk to young men with little or no work, who often simply hang out on the street. Though they are rarely counted and rarely talked about, they are among America's chronically unemployed. [26 minutes]

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  • Episode #205

    JEFF GREENFIELD ANCHORS. POLITICS OF RESENTMENT- Anchor Jeff Greenfield explores the "Occupy Wall Street" and Tea Party movements in a report that examines the politics of resentment throughout American history. Included are interviews with Tony Perkins of the conservative Family Research Council and liberal author Thomas Frank, author of works including "What's The Matter With Kansas." [26 minutes]

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  • Episode #206

    MARIA HINOJOSA ANCHORS. THE NUCLEAR OPTION- Professor Richard K. Lester, who heads MIT's Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering in Cambridge, Massachusetts, tells NEED TO KNOW that despite Japan's Fukushima disaster, now is not the time for America to give up on nuclear energy. Lester makes the case that nuclear power is more cost-effective, environmentally friendly and safer than many believe. POWER TO THE PEOPLE- This spring, German chancellor Angela Merkel announced that her country would be the first in the world to completely abandon nuclear power. This radical policy change was motivated in part by the disaster at Japan's Fukushima nuclear reactor plant, but it also has roots in the work of another German woman, Ursula Sladek. From her small corner in the Black Forest, anti-nuclear activist Sladek showed her country - and the rest of the world - that it's possible to entirely replace nuclear power with renewable energy sources. INTERVIEW: DAMON MOGLEN- Maria Hinojosa interviews Damon Moglen, Climate and Energy Director for Friends of the Earth, who says nuclear power will not solve our country's energy and environmental problems. [26 minutes]

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  • Episode #207

    RAY SUAREZ ANCHORS. JOBS IN THE BALANCE- STORIES INCLUDE: MANUFACTURING JOBS- Hundreds of thousands of American jobs are still on the line nearly twenty years after the passage of the most controversial trade deal in recent U.S. history. Need to Know's Rick Karr travels to Evansville, Indiana to learn how NAFTA, the North American Free Trade Agreement, continues to impact the community and its residents, including laid off workers, the mayor and a local economist. INTERVIEW: MICKEY KANTOR- Need to Know host Ray Suarez interviews Mickey Kantor, the United States Trade Representative under President Clinton, on the legacy of the North American Free Trade Agreement. IN PERSPECTIVE: A JON MEACHAM ESSAY-Jon Meacham proposes the case for free trade, and the need for innovation and investment in education. [26 minutes]

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  • Episode #208

    JEFF GREENFIELD ANCHORS. HELP WANTED: CREATING OPPORTUNITY - Need to Know travels from one coast to the other to highlight two statewide initiatives that have helped curb unemployment. The show also launches a new series, "American Voices," featuring essayists from diverse backgrounds with diverse points of view. SEGMENTS INCLUDE: JOB SHARE - Rhode Island is using unemployment insurance to keep workers on the job. The so-called "workshare plan" enables businesses thinking of firing workers to reduce their hours instead. The state makes up most of the difference in pay. This means the state pays out less than if the workers had been fired, employees get to keep their jobs, and companies keep their workforces essentially intact. SELF STARTERS - Oregon encourages workers who have been fired to use their unemployment benefits to start new businesses. The idea is that if the new businesses succeed -- and they do at an unusually high rate -- these new employers will hire workers of their own. AMERICAN VOICES: REIHAN SALAM - An essay by Reihan Salam of The National Review. He says private initiatives, not federal subsidies, are the way to get the country back on track [26 minutes]

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  • Episode #209

    MARIA HINOJOSA ANCHORS. This Veteran's Day, Need to Know focuses on the economic and emotional difficulties many U.S. troops endure when they return home. The program is called, "Coming Home: The Enduring Sacrifice." Segments include: Anchor Maria Hinojosa explores joblessness and homelessness among veterans who fought in Iraq or Afghanistan. Because many of these young veterans enlisted without going to college, they often find it difficult to get work once they return, especially in a difficult economy. This sometimes leads to extreme financial hardship, causing some of them to lose their homes. In an essay for Need to Know, documentarian Sebastian Junger says more needs to be done to care for American troops scarred by their experiences in battle. He proposes that a memorial be built where veterans can go to help cope with any civilian deaths they might have caused. In our recurring "American Voices" series, which offers a platform for essayists with diverse backgrounds and diverse points of view, Marcos Villatoro of Los Angeles profiles a housekeeper whose son is now serving in Afghanistan. He says her job is like her son's: they both clean up the mess left by others [26 minutes]

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  • Episode #210

    RAY SUAREZ ANCHORS. "The Pentagon: Hard Times, Hard Choices" -- A special edition examining whether the $700 billion Pentagon budget can be cut and, if so, how and by how much. Former NBC Pentagon correspondent Fred Francis hosts a panel of military experts who discuss the wisdom of spending on multi-billion-dollar airplanes and ships and whether it compromises troop training and safety. They also explore whether military health care benefits and pensions should be cut, if overseas troop deployments dating from the 1940s and 1950s are still necessary and how the Pentagon can deal with foreign threats without spending too much during difficult economic times. [26 minutes]

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  • Episode #211

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  • Help Wanted (#212)

    In its latest edition of "Help Wanted," coinciding with the release of the monthly jobs report, Need to Know revisits northern Ohio for an updated look at how many Americans WITH jobs are struggling to make ends meet because of the difficult economy. The show profiles: a teacher who was fired, then rehired at half-pay, and is now trying to avoid foreclosure; a factory worker with health problems who spent nearly a year and half without work before being rehired without benefits and for significantly less money; and a married couple who started their own contracting business but have little work and can't secure loans despite a very high credit rating. The couple suffered an additional setback recently when the wife had to undergo back surgery, further depleting their savings. [26 minutes]

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  • Episode #213

    [26 minutes]

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  • Episode #214

    Big-city mayors across the United States are under growing pressure to balance their budgets and still provide necessary services, as foreclosures soar and federal and state aid and property tax revenues decline. Typical is the story of two-term Democratic mayor Tom Barrett of Milwaukee. His city has a 10 per cent unemployment rate and a nearly 30 per cent poverty rate. And now that city, like so many, has to make do with less. Need to Know spent three days with Barrett this fall, documenting how one mayor spends his time trying to drum up business, even while facing withering attacks from some of his hard-pressed constituents. Anchor Maria Hinojosa interviews Steven Malanga of the conservative-leaning Manhattan Institute about how to restore the health of the nation's cities. In the show's "American Voices" segment, Tricia Rose, professor of African American cultural politics at Brown University, offers an essay about how to create jobs for inner city minority residents. [26 minutes]

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  • Episode #215

    After a recent trip to Baghdad, Need to Know correspondent Martin Himmel reports this Christmas weekend about the now-precarious position of Iraqi Christians. In the years since the capture and killing of Saddam Hussein, hundreds of thousands of Christians have fled that country following attacks by Muslim extremists. Now that American troops have departed, the future of the Christian community there is even more uncertain. Anchor Ray Suarez interviews New York Times correspondent Anthony Shadid, who offers his perspective on Muslim-Christian relations throughout the Middle East. On "American Voices," essayist Jon Meacham comments on the path to reconciliation among Muslims, Jews and Christians. [26 minutes]

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  • Iowa Caucus (#216)

    [26 minutes]

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  • Episode #217

    [26 minutes]

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  • Sexual Politics (#218)

    MARIA HINOJOSA ANCHORS. Need to Know looks at "Sexual Politics" --how the Republican candidates' opposition to gay marriage will affect the outcome of the nomination fight and the general election. David Brody, political correspondent for the Christian Broadcasting Network, is interviewed. Christine Quinn, speaker of the New York City Council, offers her ideas about how gays can achieve equality. And Need to Know correspondent Mona Iskander reports from Minneapolis about a model program designed to rescue gay teens who have been rejected by their families and become homeless. [26 minutes]

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  • Episode #219

    JEFF GREENFIELD ANCHORS. Nearly half a century after the passage of the federal Voting Rights Act, African-Americans throughout the deep south still find themselves with little real power. In a report from South Carolina on the eve of the GOP primary there, anchor Jeff Greenfield describes how the sharp rise in the number of black state lawmakers creates the misimpression of greater black power. In fact, the state's 70 percent white population now votes overwhelmingly Republican, leaving the state's 30 percent black population, which still leans very heavily Democratic, as part of a permanent political minority. Redistricting also has led to more "majority minority" districts, creating more safe black seats but eroding black power elsewhere in the state. Greenfield also interviews two of the state's leading political analysts about the GOP presidential primary. Need to Know's "American Voices" essay features Bernard Lafayette, a prominent civil rights leader from the 1960s who reflects on the struggle for black voting rights then and what he believes are organized efforts to undo them now. [26 minutes]

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  • Episode #220

    [26 minutes]

  • Episode #221

    RAY SUAREZ ANCHORS In the monthly "Help Wanted" special tied to the release of the national unemployment report, "Need to Know" visits Nevada on the eve of the Republican presidential caucuses and reports on the state's enduring foreclosure problem. Nevada has had the nation's highest foreclosure rate for more than four years. The show interviews the state's attorney general and examines why federal programs designed to alleviate the problem haven't had greater impact. "Need to Know" also looks at Nevada's efforts to improve high-tech job training to attract jobs to the state. In "American Voices," Los Angeles essayist Marcos Villatoro argues that work creates happiness and says FDR's decision to create the Civilian Conservation Corps saved a generation of unemployed Americans, including his own father. [26 minutes]

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  • Episode #222

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  • Episode #223

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  • Episode #224

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  • Episode #225

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  • Episode #226

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  • Episode #227

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  • Episode #228

    [26 minutes]

  • Episode #229

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  • Help Wanted (#230)

    MARIA HINOJOSA ANCHORS. In this month's "HELP WANTED" edition, Need to Know travels to Philadelphia to examine the city's ambitious plan to reach out to and re-engage high school dropouts. The story is part of the Corporation for Public Broadcasting's "American Graduate" initiative. Princeton economics professor Cecilia Rouse explores how the nation's high dropout rate undermines the nation's competitive position in the world. Jon Meacham contributes an essay on "American Voices." [26 minutes]

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  • Episode #231

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  • Episode #232

    [26 minutes]

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  • Episode #233

    SCOTT SIMON ANCHORS. This week on Need to Know: how the city of Norfolk, Virginia is grappling with massive flooding caused by sea-level rise. An interview about whether the Federal government actually encourages people to build in flood-prone areas, and, An update to last week's investigation into the death of an illegal immigrant a short time after he had been beaten and tased by U.S. border agents - an event captured on videotape. [26 minutes]

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  • Episode #234

    MARIA HINOJOSA ANCHORS. In this month's "HELP WANTED" edition, Need to Know explores "The View From Main Street" - how one small town in Washington state is coping with the economic crisis; An interview with Joshua Foust, a Fellow at the American Security Project, a columnist for The Atlantic, and a contributor to the Need to Know website, about the state of the war in Afghanistan and current U.S. exit strategy; From Need to Know's "American Voices" series, Dan Savage, a nationally syndicated sex advice columnist and co-creator of the "It Gets Better" project, a social media movement which helps prevent suicide among LGBT youth, looks at the effects on the military since "Don't Ask Don't Tell" was repealed. Note: HELP WANTED is an ongoing series tied to the day the national unemployment figures are released. The series will continue on the first Friday of every month through Election Day 2012, to coincide with the jobs report. [26 minutes]

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  • Episode #235

    MARIA HINOJOSA ANCHORS. In this edition of Need to Know, the program explores the debate about legal immigration. First: should the government make it easier for foreign-born, hi-tech workers to stay in the United States, as companies like Google, Facebook and Microsoft argue? Or are these workers already undercutting the job market for Americans? Need to Know's Rick Karr travels to Silicon Valley and to New York City to investigate. Also, Need to Know's Mona Iskander goes to Atlanta, Georgia for a look at foreign-born entrepreneurs. The U.S. Small Business Administration says people who immigrate to the United States are 30 percent more likely to start a business than American-born citizens. And a Jon Meacham essay about how the federal legislation passed in 1965 under President Johnson fueled immigration. [26 minutes]

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  • Episode #236

    JEFF GREENFIELD ANCHORS. Need to Know's Stacey Tisdale travels to Missouri, where activists are collecting signatures for a ballot initiative that would cap payday loan rates at 36 per cent. They are now more than 400 percent. Supporters of the measure say the measure would protect the poor from usurious loans. Opponents say it would hurt the very people it's designed to help by denying them the only loans they can get. Anchor Jeff Greenfield interviews journalist Gary Rivlin, who has written extensively about extra charges placed on the poor. He says "it's expensive" being poor. Need to Know's "American Voices" essay features Cy Richardson. He is a vice president at the National Urban League, where he is responsible for programs that "promote asset building and wealth creation for people of color in urban America." [26 minutes]

  • Episode #237

    JEFF GREENFIELD ANCHORS. "It's Not Easy Being Green" - Need to Know Correspondent Mona Iskander updates her report from Greenville, Michigan about a town that tried to reinvent itself by bringing in a solar panel manufacturing company. But the company has struggled greatly in part because of global economic forces. Prices for solar panels have plunged in the face of Chinese competition. Jeff Greenfield interviews David Biello, the associate editor of Scientific American, about the future of the American solar power industry. And to coincide with Memorial Day, on "American Voices," David Kippen, essayist and formerly the Director of Literature at the National Endowment for the Arts, talks about the value of volunteerism -- and the threat it poses to working people. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #238

    SCOTT SIMON ANCHORS. HELP WANTED Edition. The show's medical correspondent, Dr. Emily Senay, travels to Massachusetts to examine how that state's healthcare system is working six years after the legislature there adopted an individual mandate requiring individuals to buy health insurance and businesses to provide it or face fines. The individual mandate is part of the federal healthcare plan championed by the Obama administration that is now under review by the U.S. Supreme Court. Massachusetts's plan was adopted when presumptive GOP presidential nominee Mitt Romney was that state's governor. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #239

    RAY SUAREZ ANCHORS. "International Justice" - The show explores how to prevent genocide and how to punish those behind it. It features a report from Cambodia, where former leaders of the Khmer Rouge are being tried for the mass murders committed there decades ago. Anchor Ray Suarez interviews "New Yorker" writer Philip Gourevitch, who has written extensively about genocide in Cambodia and Rwanda. In the "American Voices" essay, Sadia Hameed of Human Rights First comments on the U.S. obligation to prevent genocide. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #240

    RAY SUAREZ ANCHORS. As part of its "Fixing America" series, Need to Know anchor RAY SUAREZ hosts a panel discussion about America's immigration policies. Among the topics: has President Obama reneged on his promises of immigration reform? Is Republican candidate Mitt Romney's proposal for "self-deportation" realistic? The guests include Eliseo Medina of the Service Employees International Union; Renku Sen, publisher of the new site "Colorlines," former Reagan administration official Linda Chavez and Mark Krikorian of the Center for Immigration Studies. [26 minutes]

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  • Episode #241

    SCOTT SIMON ANCHORS. This week's "Need to Know" examines how long-term care for veterans wounded in Iraq and Afghanistan is placing a growing strain on America's health care providers. As a result, nurses are now playing an increasingly prominent role in the treatment of wounded vets and in the education of their spouses. The "American Voices" essay features Lt. Commander Pam Wall, a psychiatric nurse about to deploy with the marines to the Middle East. Scott Simon anchors. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #242

    An experimental program in Oakland, CA is designed to help the working poor emerge from poverty. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #243

    Ray Suarez hosts a panel of tax experts including Eliot Spitzer, Dorothy Brown and Bruce Bartlett. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #244

    Better Markets, a nonprofit advocacy organization, believes more banking regulations are needed. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #245

    Allegations that US Border Patrol agents are cruelly punishing illegal immigrants is investigated. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #246

    A look at the difficult spending decisions facing the working poor profiles a Newark, NJ family. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #247

    Chicago's crumbling infrastructure and a plan to fix it by partnering with business is investigated. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #248

    The nation of Palau tries to hold major industrial powers responsible for environmental damages. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #249

    The high obesity and diabetes rates among children in poor, inner-city communities are examined. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #250

    A report on Republican efforts to win Ohio is given from Tampa, FL, the site of the GOP convention. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #251

    Anchor Jeff Greenfield looks ahead to next week's Democratic national convention in Charlotte. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #252

    JEFF GREENFIELD ANCHORS. Need to Know reports from Charlotte, N.C., the site of the Democratic convention. Anchor Jeff Greenfield looks ahead to what Mitt Romney's first hundred days might look like and what Barack Obama might do in the days immediately after his possible re-election. Greenfield also looks back at historic "black swan" events - unexpected, late developments that helped swing elections one way or the other. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #253

    SCOTT SIMON ANCHORS. Need to Know's Hannah Yi travels to Pakistan to investigate the impact U.S. drone attacks are having on citizens in targeted areas. Anchor Scott Simon interviews Pir Zubair Shad, a Pakistan journalist who grew up in South Waziristan and is now a fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations. The "American Voices" essay is by Khaled Hossein, author of "The Kite Runner" and "A Thousand Splendid Suns." His topic: growing up in Afghanistan before the war years. [26 minutes]

  • America by the Numbers with Maria Hinojosa: Clarkston, Georgia (#254)

    MARIA HINOJOSA ANCHORS. This week, Need to Know airs a special edition titled, "America By The Numbers with Maria Hinojosa: Clarkston, Georgia." In the shadow of Stone Mountain, GA (once a gathering place for Ku Klux Klan cross burnings), Clarkston is a town of 7,500 that has gone from 90% white in the 1980s to less than 14% white and over a third foreign born today. The program explores how changing demographics are reshaping the political landscape. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #255

    JEFF GREENFIELD ANCHORS. This week, Need to Know's Mona Iskander travels to Virginia, a critical swing state in the 2012 election, to examine how the state's Republican-controlled general assembly's efforts to curb abortion could affect the presidential contest. Anchor Jeff Greenfield interviews Elaine Kamarck of the Harvard Kennedy School of Government. Greenfield also offers an historical essay about how the abortion debate has affected past presidential elections. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #256

    RAY SUAREZ ANCHORS. In the latest installment of Need to Know's recurring "Main Street America" series, John Larson travels to Pueblo, Colorado to assess the mood along Main Street in a once-thriving steel town that now depends on the global economy to get by. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #257

    RAY SUAREZ ANCHORS. Anchor Ray Suarez hosts a round table discussion about the likelihood of going over the "fiscal cliff", the effect on the American economy, and possible solutions to avoiding another recession. Guests on the panel include economist Douglas Holtz-Eakin, a former Director of the Congressional Budget Office, former four-term Oklahoma Senator Don Nickles, economist Bo Cutter and Maya Rockeymore, Chair of the National Committee to Preserve Social Security and Medicare. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #258

    MARIA HINOJOSA ANCHORS. In a special edition of Need to Know, titled "Yo Decido," anchor Maria Hinojosa travels to the critical swing state of Florida where one in seven registered voters is Hispanic. The show will examine how both presidential campaigns are courting the Hispanic vote there and how those voters are receiving the candidates' messages. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #259

    Rick Carr reports on controversial changes to election rules in the battleground state of Florida. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #260

    John Larson travels to Dubuque, Iowa, to assess how the people along Main Street are faring, and to hear what they are thinking, in the days leading up to the presidential election. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #261

    JEFF GREENFIELD ANCHORS. Need to Know anchor Jeff Greenfield examines the policy implications and the political repercussions of the presidential election. Among those interviewed are former "New York Times" columnist Bob Herbert and "Time" magazine columnist Rana Foroohar. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #262

    RAY SUAREZ ANCHORS. Need to Know anchor Ray Suarez and a panel of experts examine the impact the Supreme Court's Citizen's United v. Federal Election decision had on the presidential election this year. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #263

    SCOTT SIMON ANCHORS. On a special "Help Wanted" edition, Need to Know updates two reports about innovative state employment programs: the first, in Oregon, to create jobs; the second, in Rhode Island, to preserve them. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #264

    SCOTT SIMON ANCHORS. Need to Know rebroadcasts a report documenting the death of an illegal immigrant who was beaten and tased by U.S. border patrol agents. The story prompted a federal grand jury investigation and a review by the Department of Homeland Security about the use of force by border patrol agents. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #265

    SCOTT SIMON ANCHORS. Need to Know examines how the Texas legislature has slashed funding to reproductive planning programs because conservative lawmakers believe they encourage abortions. Anchor Scott Simon interviews Pam Belluck, a health and science writer for The New York Times, who looks at what's happening to these programs in other states. And from "American Voices," Judy Norsigian, one of the authors of "Our Bodies, Ourselves," provides an historical account of women's health policy debates over the past 40 years. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #266

    RAY SUAREZ ANCHORS. Correspondent Stacey Tisdale travels to Memphis to examine if the city's experimental "Family Rewards" program is helping combat poverty. The program pays low-income students and their parents for everything from good attendance and good grades to regular visits to doctors and dentists. Anchor Ray Suarez interviews Linda Gibbs, Deputy Mayor in New York, where Michael Bloomberg is a major backer of the program. The "American Voices" essay is by playwright Katori Hall. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #268

    SCOTT SIMON ANCHORS. On this week's Need to Know, Karla Murthy reports from California about one family dealing with the emotional and financial stresses of caring for a chronically ill parent. Anchor Scott Simon interviews Robyn Stone, former Deputy Asst. Secretary for Disability, Aging & Long-Term Care Policy under President Clinton, about the broader societal impacts of long-term care in the United States. Additionally, Hannah Yi reports from Rhode Island on an innovative program that is paying family members to care for their loved ones. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #301

    [26 minutes]

  • Episode #302

    MARIA HINOJOSA ANCHORS. With the ongoing discussion in Washington about revising the federal tax code, Need to Know profiles four New Jersey residents with dramatically different incomes to demonstrate how current tax regulations disproportionately benefit some Americans more than others. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #303

    JEFF GREENFIELD ANCHORS. On the first of two inauguration specials examining the advocacy group "Common Good's" proposals to end bureaucratic gridlock and get the United States moving forward, Need to Know anchor Jeff Greenfield explores why it now takes nearly four times as long to complete infrastructure projects in the United States than it did in the 1970's. By comparison, correspondent Rick Karr reports on how German political parties of every stripe are now backing a multi-billion-dollar plan that is expected to end German use of fossil fuels by 2050. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #305

    MARIA HINOJOSA ANCHORS. In a "Help Wanted" jobs special, Need to Know examines how millions of jobs are unfilled, even during a period of high unemployment, because workers don't have the necessary skills. The program focuses on Alabama's efforts to train a new generation of shipyard workers to fight unemployment and attract business to the state. The "American Voices" essay focuses on efforts to end hiring discrimination against the long-term unemployed. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #306

    RAY SUAREZ ANCHORS. Anchor Ray Suarez hosts a panel of experts to explore how to save Medicare. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #307

    RAY SUAREZ ANCHORS. This week Need to Know travels to Tucson, Arizona, where a years-long dispute over a Mexican-American studies program has tensions high; supporters say it has helped re-engage at risk students and improved their test scores. Opponents contend it encourages subversive thinking. The show is anchored by Ray Suarez. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #308

    In the wake of the Newtown tragedy, NEED TO KNOW retraces an earlier shooting incident, exploring the ripple effects that continue to reverberate years later. The program takes an in-depth look at the traumatic results on the victim's family, the killer and the killer's family, others wounded that day and on the community at large. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #309

    JOHN LARSON ANCHORS. As the debate over immigration reform continues in Washington D.C., Need to Know offers an inside look at the lives of Latino farm workers. With the continuation of our "Main Street" series, we visit Salinas, CA, home to John Steinbeck and some of the richest farmlands in the world. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #310

    Need to Know looks at two provocative approaches to tackling climate change. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #311

    A look at how the abortion debate in Texas has led to massive cuts in family planning services. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #312

    EFF GREENFIELD ANCHORS. This week Need to Know medical correspondent, Dr. Emily Senay, examines whether the Food and Drug Administration's medical device review process adequately protects the public and anchor Jeff Greenfield interviews Dr. Josh Rising, project director of the Medical Device Initiative at The Pew Charitable Trusts. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #313

    JEFF GREENFIELD ANCHORS. On this week's Need to Know, Jeff Greenfield leads a round table discussion on economic inequality, mobility, debt, and the state of the American economy four years after the official end of the recession. Guests include Jared Bernstein, former Chief Economic Adviser to Vice President Biden, Rana Foroohar of Time Magazine and John Makin of the American Enterprise Institute. [26 minutes]

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  • Episode #314

    A look at how behavioral economics is being utilized to encourage low-income workers to save. [26 minutes]

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  • Episode #315

    A look at how Ohio workers are faring after losing millions of manufacturing jobs over 35 years. [26 minutes]

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  • Episode #316

    RAY SUAREZ ANCHORS. To mark financial literacy month, "Need to Know" correspondent Stacey Tisdale travels to Mississippi to examine a program designed to help low-income, mostly African-American children save for college - and teach them about banking and money along the way. Anchor Ray Suarez interviews Richard Cordray, the head of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. [26 minutes]

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  • Episode #317

    The history of the Second Amendment and how it shapes the current gun control debate are examined. [26 minutes]

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  • Episode #318

    JEFF GREENFIELD ANCHORS. Even as unemployment remains stubbornly high, millions of jobs remain unfilled because many workers do not have the necessary training to fill them. This week, Need to Know correspondent Rick Karr travels to the state of Washington to report on The National STEM Consortium - a program designed to target this type of structural unemployment by improving the scientific, technical and mathematical know-how of American workers. Anchor Jeff Greenfield interviews Seth Harris, the acting Secretary of Labor. [26 minutes]

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  • Episode #319

    A shooting at a small Western Massachusetts college continues to affect many people 20 years later. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #320

    The deportations and deaths of undocumented workers who worked in the US for decades are examined. [26 minutes]

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  • Episode #321

    JOHN LARSON ANCHORS. As the debate over immigration reform continues in Washington D.C., Need to Know offers an inside look at the lives of Latino farm workers. With the continuation of our "Main Street" series, correspondent John Larson reports from Salinas, California -home to John Steinbeck and some of the richest farmlands in the world. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #322

    SCOTT SIMON ANCHORS. Need to Know's medical correspondent, Dr. Emily Senay, travels to Massachusetts to examine how that state's health care system is working six years (now seven years) after the legislature there adopted an individual mandate requiring individuals to buy health insurance and businesses to provide it or face fines. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #323

    SCOTT SIMON ANCHORS. Correspondent John Larson travels to Ohio to assess how workers there are faring after the loss of millions of manufacturing jobs over the past 35 years. It's the fourth in Need to Know's series of "Main Street" reports. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #324

    RAY SUAREZ ANCHORS. Medical correspondent Dr. Emily Senay investigates readmission penalties, an element of the Affordable Care Act designed to reduce costs and lead to more coordinated healthcare once patients are released from the hospital. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #325

    RAY SUAREZ ANCHORS. This week Need to Know travels to Tucson, Arizona, where a years-long dispute over a Mexican-American studies program has tensions high; supporters say it has helped re-engage at risk students and improved their test scores. Opponents contend it encourages subversive thinking. The show is anchored by Ray Suarez. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #326

    JEFF GREENFIELD ANCHORS. On the second of two inauguration specials examining the advocacy group "Common Good's" proposals to end bureaucratic gridlock and get the United States moving forward, Need to Know anchor Jeff Greenfield explores how malpractice lawsuits contribute to rising healthcare costs. Correspondent William Brangham travels to Denmark, where medical disputes are settled by experts without ever going to court. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #327

    [26 minutes]

  • Episode #328

    [26 minutes]

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