Welcome to Iowa Public Television! If you are seeing this message, you are using a browser that does not support web standards. This site will look much better in a browser that supports web standards, but it is accessible to any browser or Internet device. Read more on our technical tips page.

Iowa Public Television

 

To The Contrary

Episode #918

The Marriage Penalty Tax...The Senate passes a marriage tax cut that is almost sure to be vetoed by President Clinton, so why did they pass it? It's the close of the political season and everyone is vying for the best position before the upcomming election. We'll look at how these changes will affect both married and single women. ~~The Black Student Fund.... For decades a small private company in Washington DC has been quietly helping inner city African-American students attend private schools in the area to improve their education. How are programs like this one helping to change the face of inner city education? Panel: Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton, D-Washington, DC Representative Connie Morella R-MD Laura Flanders, Political Commentator Toni Ford, Republican Commentator [26 minutes] Closed Captioning

This episode has not aired in the past few months on Iowa Public Television.

PBS Video

Series Description: This all-female news analysis program, hosted by Bonnie Erbe, examines major issues of the day with participants of all ethnic and political backgrounds.

« Upcoming Episodes

All Episodes

  • Positive Aging (#641)

    This new analysis series continues to feature a diverse panel of women engaging in provocative and insightful discussions on issues of national importance. Hosted by Bonnie Erbe. [26 minutes]

  • Welfare to Work: Interview with Labor Secretary Al (#643)

    This new analysis series continues to feature a diverse panel of women engaging in provocative and insightful discussions on issues of national importance. Hosted by Bonnie Erbe. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #644

    This new analysis series continues to feature a diverse panel of women engaging in provocative and insightful discussions on issues of national importance. Hosted by Bonnie Erbe. [26 minutes]

  • Women and the President's Problems (#645)

    This new analysis series continues to feature a diverse panel of women engaging in provocative and insightful discussions on issues of national importance. Hosted by Bonnie Erbe. [26 minutes]

  • Black Women In History (#646)

    This new analysis series continues to feature a diverse panel of women engaging in provocative and insightful discussions on issues of national importance. Hosted by Bonnie Erbe. [26 minutes]

  • Japanese Women In Business (#647)

    This week's topics include: a discussion of the ongoing presidential sex scandal, whether there should be special privilege protecting mothers from having to testify against their daughters, and the possibility that men will avoid fostering mentoring relationships with women in the fear that they might be charged with sexual harassment; a look at the "Bamboo Ceiling" blocking Japanese women from leadership roles; the efforts of some women to form their own companies; and how they are faring compared to their American counterparts. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #648

    This week's topics include: discussion on the gender gap in national polls over willingness to launch a military strike against Iraq; a debate on whether infertility should be classified a disability and health insurance companies compelled to cover fertility treatments; an interview with White House Women's Office director Audrey Tayse Haynes on her mandate to put women's issues on the presidential agenda and a debate on whether the office gives equal voice to conservative viewpoints. [26 minutes]

  • Ripping Paula Jones Apart (#649)

    This week's topics include: a debate on whether the attempts by President Clinton's defense team to destroy Paula Jones' credibility represent progress for women or will discourage them from seeking legal redress for sexual harassment; a debate on the Equal Opportunity Commission's charge that the popular woman-owned Miami restaurant Joe's Stone Crabs was guilty of "unintentional discrimination" by showing hiring preference to male waiters; an interview with Dr. Hendrie Weisinger on how women can manage and display their emotions most effectively in the workplace. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #650

    This special edition, taped at KUHT Houston, featured prominent Texas women. The program included a discussion on the value and implications of the Texas Watch Me! program, in which parents are allowed to watch frequently updated still photos of their children over the Internet via "nanny-cams" installed in daycare and preschool facilities, including: concerns about the privacy of daycare workers, the importance of password-protecting the system to block access by pedophiles; and the panel's conviction that the system is in the best interest of parents and children. The program included a brief interview with author P.J. Pierce, who was working on a book about Texas women over 50, and a follow-up panel discussion on how Texas women are different, including their pioneering spirit and their involvement in ranching, business and politics. [26 minutes]

  • Women and the Lewinsky Scandal: Whom Do We Believe? (#651)

    Discussions center on Paula Jones' and Kathleen Willey's allegations against President Clinton. Later, panelists examine the pros and cons of gender segregation in the military and in the classroom. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #652

    The first segment of this program featured a debate about the issues surrounding fertility and technology. The panel addressed such issues as the large sums of money being offered for "desirable eggs," the fact that public policy and the law are all behind technology ?making it difficult to pass regulatory legislation? and the missing element of sp irituality in this whole matter. The panel discussed the women's conference in Beijing, whether or not the U.N. should fund global conferences, the importance of the international experience, and the actual needs of women in third world countries. This discussion was followed by an interview with Congresswoman Anne Northup from Kentucky, in which she addressed the subject of product liability laws. Ms. Northup gave examples of how these laws can be limited to protect small business owners. After the interview, the panel commented on her remarks. [26 minutes]

  • The Law of Sexual Harassment (#701)

    The first segment of this program focused on the tragedy in Jonesboro, Arkansas, where four students and their teacher were killed. The panel addressed subjects such as the proposal by the Center for Disease Control to treat guns like cars, rendering them useless by anyone accept the owner; the likelihood of Congress passing a law banning ownership of firearms; the lack of morality in society today allowing this type of tragedy to occur; and the problem of regulation of arms in a free market society. The second segment included a discussion on employer liability in sexual harassment cases. The panel addressed the need for employees to take responsibility for their own actions and the employer's responsibility to outline procedures for getting help in the company in the event of a sexual harassment occurrence. The program wrapped up with an interview with Christina Hoff Sommers in which she addressed the inclusion of women's history in school curriculum. She raised such points as the validity of some of the women schools are focusing on, the importance of focusing on the women that actually did contribute, and in her opinion that if this attitude continues, boys will become the second sex. The program concluded with a panel debate on her comments. [26 minutes]

  • The Argument Culture and. . . Hiv Infection As A D (#702)

    The first segment of this program contained a discussion of how women are reacting to the dismissal of Paula Jones' lawsuit against the president. The discussion included speculation on how this decision will affect women coming forward in the future with sexual harassment cases and whether women support the president or Paula Jones. The second segment focused on a new survey from Girls Incorporated that found that girls feel significantly less confident about managing their finances than do boys. The panel addressed the confidence levels of girls and suggested that girls are more likely to go to their mothers for advice on finances. The program wrapped up with a conversation with author Deborah Tannen in which she discussed her new book and told how our culture's tendency to approach everything as a fight is corrosive to American society. This phenomenon is the subject of her book, and she has named it "The Argument Culture." After the interview, panel members debated her theories. [26 minutes]

  • Smaller Class Sizes (#703)

    The first segment featured women's views of the Ken Starr investigation. The panel debated issues such as the alleged paralysis of the presidency, the loyalty of women to the president, feminist issues he has addressed, and the importance of holding the president accountable for his actions. Following was a discussion on nanny tax evasion. Panelists discussed the amount of money owed the government each year by nannies who are not declaring income, the fear of deportation if records of employment are found, and the lack of benefits and pension for these workers. The final topic was President Clinton's announcement of a new commitment to smaller school classes. The panelists discussed whether class size makes a difference; whether class size is a federal problem; the importance of hiring teachers who are committed to the classroom and not to a union; the economic issues behind this proposal; and the importance of good parenting in our children's education. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #704

    This week the panel discussed the issue of quid-pro-quo sexual harassment in cases of threat and no action. The women discussed the differences between the Burlington Northern case (Kimberly Ellerth) and the Paula Jones case against the president; how this issue affects American employers; whether an employer should be held accountable for an employee's actions; and how far this issue should go. In addition, the panel discussed the new PBS children's program, "Teletubbies," aimed at children ages 0-3. Issues touched upon included whether children should be watching television at this young age; whether allowing children to watch television at this age will promote lethargy; and whether adults should be concerned about a half-hour, quality PBS program in light of the fact that most other programming likely falls well below this standard. The program closed with an interview with Chicago native Janet Jagan, who was elected leader of Guyana last December. Ms. Jagan discussed her involvement in the labor movement of the 40's; discrimination on the basis of sex from male leaders of other countries; and what she has achieved for the women of Guyana. Following the interview, the panel discussed the female leaders of the world. [26 minutes]

  • After School Care (#705)

    This program began with a discussion about the National Organization for Women's (NOW) announcement that it would not file a friend of the court brief on behalf of Paula Jones; whether NOW deserves the criticism it is receiving for their stand on the Paula Jones case; why they are not defending the rights of all women; whether NOW should back a woman whose case is being financed by the conservative movement; the perceived double standard because of NOW's support for Kimberly Ellis; and the selective outrage of women's groups. In the second segment, the topic was the new sex drug, Viagra. The panel debated their approval/disapproval of the drug and covered issues such as the lack of a discussion on side effects of this drug; the reasons why men are being focused on and not women; whether the pill will help women's sexual dysfunction; and the danger of missing other problems because of the quick solution of the pill. The final discussion focused on after-school care: the fact that our children go to school less than children in other countries; whether it is the federal government's responsibility to fund after school care; the opinion that the tax rate forces both parents to work so staying at home is not an option for parents; and the opinion that parents who are making personal and financial sacrifices to keep one parent in the home with the children should not be forced to subsidize wealthier parents who choose to use daycare instead of staying at home with their children. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #706

    This program began with a discussion about preventing teen pregnancy. A study conducted by the National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy found that teens who communicate with their parents about sex are more likely to be responsible about their own sexuality. The panel discussed whether parental involvement is the only factor in preventing teen pregnancy; the importance of transference of values; the need for quality sex education in schools; and the lack of an ethical framework for sex education. The second topic of the program was the care of elderly women. It was reported that women are likely to live longer than men and that our nation is not equipped to meet the needs of these women. The panel discussed whether Congress is working to solve this problem; the lack of respect for the elderly; and the role of the federal government. The program wrapped up with a report about spare time and a recent study that found women may have more spare time than originally thought. Following the report was a discussion about the results of the study, including its parameters. [26 minutes]

  • Breast Cancer Breakthroughs (#709)

    This episode of began with a discussion on the recent breakthroughs in breast cancer research. Topics included the rapid surfacing of many new drugs; the benefits of non-traditional treatments; the rising number of mastectomies; the need for cooperation between experts in order to achieve a victory; and the rising number of young women with cancer. The program continued with a discussion about the Christian Coalition's criticism of Ms. Jane Swift's decision to run for office while pregnant; the Christian Coalition's attitude towards women; how the public views pregnant women; the positive example she is setting for young women; and whether this situation helps Republican candidates. The program concluded with an interview with Lani Guinier, author of "Lift Every Voice and Sing." Ms. Guinier spoke about civil rights; her disagreement with President Clinton; and how the end of affirmative action might affect women. Following the interview, the panel discussed the consequences of the end of affirmative action; the fear of change in American culture; and the need for an active dialogue on racial issues. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #710

    This program began with a discussion about the latest double standard in women's health: insurance companies are paying for the drug Viagra for men but are still refusing to pay for female birth control pills. Topics for discussion included the setback in equality in women's health; whether the two issues are parallel; and whether there is a medical difference between the drugs upon which the insurance companies can base their decision. Next was a discussion about the Hollywood cliche portraying old men and young women; the decreasing number of older actresses in films; and whether younger women are only concerned about the money of older men. The final segment was about women in politics in Japan. The report compared the number of Japanese women in politics to the number of American women in politics and profiled the accomplishments of some female members of Japanese government. The panel discussed the problems of incumbency, campaign finance, and the cultural pressures on women in Japan. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #711

    This program began with a discussion about Attorney General Janet Reno's claim that violence against women is on the decline and the Violence Against Women Act of 1998 that is being considered by Congress. The second topic was older women and substance abuse. The panel discussed a new study from Columbia University, which shows that more than four-and-a-half million women over age 59 are addicted to alcohol or prescription drugs. Topics for discussion included the lack of diagnosis of this problem by physicians, why so many women are going without treatment, and why they are suffering alone. The program concluded with a debate about the California decision to drop bilingual education. Topics included the English-only policy and whether the children dropped into immersion programs will be more vulnerable to falling behind. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #712

    This program began with a discussion about child labor in America. Discussion topics included the extent and severity of this problem; what the government can do about it; and the need for America to be the moral leader in this area. Next was a discussion about commercialism in the classroom. Topics included whether corporate sponsorship is ethical and whether it might interfere with the education process. The program concluded with a segment about violence. The program profiled some mothers who are coping with loss by turning pain into power. They are fighting violence in their communities through the Coalition of Survivors for Violence Prevention. Following the segment, the panel discussed the healing process and the success of the Boston community in its fight against violence. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #713

    This program began with a discussion of the issues surrounding a recent study published by the National Council for Research on Women, including the narrowing gender gap; whether this report portrays women as victims; the need to use the information in the report in a positive way; and whether research focused on the "girls crisis" is creating problems for boys. Next was a discussion about hospitals withholding epidurals for women who cannot pay cash on the spot. The panel covered whether the hospital violated a law and the need to remove bureaucracy from medical procedures. The program concluded with a segment about fatherhood programs, including the need for accountability on the part of fathers; the need to look for ways to rebuild families; and the need for responsibility about birth control. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #714

    This program began with a discussion of the issues surrounding Democrat Blanche Lambert Lincoln's decision to run for senator of Arkansas while raising twins, including the generational split on the issue; whether she will have enough time to spend with her children; and the need for the perspective of mothers in elective office. Next was a segment that focused on "the cocaine mom" bill that would allow authorities to confine and treat pregnant women who are caught using drugs and alcohol. Topics included the lack of treatment programs; whether this program would encourage women to become pregnant in order to get drug treatment; and the need to treat drug addiction as a disease not a crime. The program concluded with a segment that focused on the Preventing Adolescent Pregnancy Program, a group that attempts to decrease teen pregnancy through open communication in families and raising self-esteem. The panel then discussed whether this program should be offered in the public school system and the need for a similar program for boys. [26 minutes]

  • Food Safety (#715)

    This program began with a panel discussion about Linda Tripp's testimony in the Monica Lewinsky scandal, including public opinion of Ms. Tripp; whether she has been vilified; and whether her testimony helped her public image. Next was a discussion of Hillary Clinton's role in the presidential trip to China, including Chinese respect for the first lady; feminism in China; and US-Chinese relations. The program concluded with a segment about food safety that began with an interview with Senator Susan Collins (R-ME), who discussed prevention of infection; the lack of federal inspection of imported food; and the amount of fruit and vegetables the US imports. Following the interview, the panel discussed her comments. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #716

    The program began with a discussion on issues related to the women's rights movement and the National Organization for Women(NOW), including the definition of feminism in the twenty-first century; whether there is equality for women; and whether NOW needs a new declaration of sentiments. Next was a discussion about education, including the increasing number of women with a college education; the pressure on institutions to admit more women; and the increased number of women in non-traditional fields. The program concluded with an interview with Alexis Herman about issues related to affirmative action, including what the program can offer in the twenty-first century; how affirmative action has helped her; and whether it has increased the rights of women. Following the interview, the panelists discussed her comments. [26 minutes]

  • Seneca Falls (#717)

    This program began with a discussion about the issues surrounding the patients' bill of rights, including whether the Republican or Democratic bill would be better for women; whether government should be involved with health care; and the escalating costs of health care. Next was a discussion about President Clinton's promise to veto the Education Savings Act for Public and Private Schools, including whether the bill, allowing parents to save up to $2000 each year after taxes if they send their children to private schools, would only help middle to upper income families. The program concluded with a report from Lisa Mara about the 150th anniversary of the Women's Rights Movement in Seneca Falls, New York. Following the report, the panelists commented on the celebration. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #718

    This episode began with a discussion about the population explosion, including whether society will be able to care for its elderly. Next was a discussion about the decline in the number of women who read newspapers, including what women are missing in the newspaper and other topics that women are interested in. The topic then turned to child care in America and an interview with Secretary of Health and Human Services Donna Shalala, who discussed whether child care should be a national issue; the need to give parents choices; and the low salary paid to child care providers. Following the interview, the panel discussed her comments. [26 minutes]

  • Juvenile Justice (#719)

    This episode began with a discussion of issues related to the investigation of the president. The panel discussed whether women are standing behind the president; how this scandal is effecting women candidates and voters; and whether there is a delineation of the public and private character. The second segment focused on sexual misconduct in the military, including the Defense Department's new guidelines for officers and enlisted persons in the military. The panel discussed whether these new guidelines are better; and why male-male relationships have not been barred in the military yet female-male relationships have. The program concluded with an interview with Attorney General Janet Reno about juvenile justice for kids accused of serious crimes, including whether children should be tried as adults; whether children who have committed murder can be rehabilitated; and whether there has been an increase in crimes committed by girls. Following the interview, the panel discussed her comments. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #720

    This episode began with a discussion about the issues related to the number of minorities on welfare, including whether this is evidence of further discrimination; the issue of education and illegitimacy in welfare recipients; the language barrier; and what change is needed in the welfare reform bill. Next, the panel discussed polygamists who are not being prosecuted for their crimes in Utah. Topics included whether plural marriage is covered by religious freedom; examples of religious practices that are not covered by the first amendment; and whether polygamy is damaging to the children in the relationship. The program concluded with an interview with Brenda V. Smith, Director of Women in Prison Project, about the problem of abuse of women in prisons, including the types of abuse these women endure; trading sex for favors in prison; the lack of public support for women prisoners; and ways in which prisons have become an industry. Following the interview, the panel discussed her comments. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #721

    This episode began with a discussion of the issues surrounding President Clinton's grand jury testimony, including whether polls are indicative of the opinions of American women; why the first lady, a proclaimed feminist, has remained by the president's side; ways in which the president is acting guilty; and what America should require of its leaders. Next was a discussion about the decision by a Florida court of appeals to give custody to a stay-at-home dad instead of a working mom. Topics included the cultural tradition of a woman's role in the family; the need to remember the welfare of the children; whether there should be an automatic legal presumption about the role of the mother; and whether there is such a thing as maternal instinct. The program concluded with a segment about the Global Summit of Women in London, which covered women in politics; the need for women to engage in international trade; and the number of small businesses owned and operated by women. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #722

    This episode began with a discussion about the issues related to two Kentucky high school girls who claim to have been denied National Honor Society Membership as a result of becoming pregnant, including whether the girls should have been punished for becoming pregnant; the fact that it is a private club; whether allowing the girls to receive the awards would be sending the wrong message; and the fact that everyone is not entitled to everything in life. Next was a segment about recent studies showing that women are more likely to resort to violence in an argument; whether television violence contributes to the problem; the difference between aggression and violence; and the desensitization resulting from watching television. The program concluded with an interview with Michele Mitchell, who discussed the way in which generation X women view politics, as portrayed in her new book, "A New Kind of Party Animal"; the way in which they have changed politics; whether they feel that men are in control; the political views of generation Xer's; and whether they believe in feminism. Following the interview, the panel discussed her comments. [26 minutes]

  • Sexual Harassmentt at School (#723)

    This episode began with a discussion on issues related to the presidential scandal and the November elections, including whether American women are willing to accept the president's behavior; whether support of the president condones his behavior; why feminists continue to defend the president; and why the first lady, a self-proclaimed feminist, has chosen to stay with her adulterous husband. The next topic was sexual harassment in schools. Verna L. Williams joined Bonnie Erbe for a discussion about the handbook developed by The National Women's Law Center to help understand and prevent sexual harassment in schools. Following the interview, the panel discussed her comments, touching on whether schools are going overboard trying to prevent sexual harassment; how unacceptable behavior might be determined; and the need for parental involvement. [26 minutes]

  • Labor Day 1998 (#724)

    This episode began with a segment about working couples and the new trend in relocating on behalf of the woman's job and not the man's. The panel discussed whether gender specific roles are changing and the low unemployment rate. The program continued with a segment about the lack of high-skilled workers and the request of the government to allow more immigrants into the country to fill those jobs, including the lack of female role models in the high tech industry; whether working conditions are up to par at the high tech companies; and whether women match the market. The program concluded with a discussion about pay equity for women. Linda Chavez-Thompson of the AFL-CIO joined Bonnie for a discussion about what women can do to ensure that they are being paid equally. Following the interview, the panel discussed her comments. Topics included why there is a gap in compensation related to gender; whether women are more anxious to join unions than men; and the need to teach women as girls not to settle for less than men. [26 minutes]

  • Boys and Aggression (#725)

    In this episode, the panel discussed issues surrounding the investigation of the president, including the way in which women are reacting to the report; the Democratic fallout in Congress; whether the private lives of all public officials are now open to criticism/investigation; whether Democratic women are likely to stand by the president after the details of the report are released; the way in which women are likely to receive the details of the report; and whether the first lady is likely to make a statement in the president's behalf. Next, the panel discussed the new genetic technology that allows parents to choose the sex of their baby. Topics included whether the technique should be regulated; whether sex selection is morally acceptable; whether a disequilibrium between the sexes might occur; and problems that arise when genetic research is done by commercial institutions. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #726

    This episode began with a discussion about issues related to the upcoming election in November, including whether Democrats have been demoralized by the Lewinsky scandal; whether the electorate will separate out the president's deeds from the issues behind the candidates; whether Republicans are immune to moral criticism; and how candidates might energize women voters. The next segment focused on the issue of child abuse. Topics included the "Healthy Families" program designed to help teenage mothers raise their children in loving homes; the way in which the program helps new moms to understand their children; whether intervention at an early stage can prevent abuse; whether programs like this one can help to break the cycle of abuse; and whether there should be a similar program that helps and encourages fathers to become involved in their children's lives. [26 minutes]

  • Work/Family/ Congress (#727)

    This program began with a discussion about feminist support for the president, including whether women's groups should be supporting men; whether this administration has been good for women; whether there is a difference between the Monica Lewinsky scandal and the situation involving Bob Packwood; whether Hillary Clinton has emerged from this scandal stronger than the president; and the way in which the scandal has affected the way couples think about fidelity. Next was a segment about Working Mother Magazine's top 100 companies for working mothers in 1998. Several corporate women joined Bonnie Erbe to discuss the measures their companies take in order to accommodate working mothers. Following the interviews, the panel discussed their comments, including what these companies are doing in the area of child care; whether these amenities are offered from the top down; and whether men are taking advantage of these benefits as well. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #728

    This episode began with a panel discussion about the issues surrounding women in advertising, including whether sex still sells products as well as the need to remember the basic purpose of advertising and whether it should be viewed as a marker of women's accomplishments. The next topic was a survey by the National Council on the Aging which indicated that nearly half of all Americans age 60 or over are sexually active. The panel discussed whether the sexuality of elderly persons is now more acceptable; the number of open discussions about intimacy; and the way in which longer life expectancy has affected how this issue is discussed. The program concluded with a discussion with Marie Wilson, head of the Ms. Foundation and The White House Project, about her Ballot Box Initiative across the country aimed at getting a woman in the White House by the year 2008. She discussed why the project was developed, whether the Lewinsky scandal has impacted the initiative, and whether there are many qualified women from which to choose. Following the interview, the panel discussed her comments, including whether this is a good way to get a woman elected president; reasons why people would not vote for a woman; and who might be considered for the ballot. [26 minutes]

  • Boys & Aggression (#729)

    This episode began with a panel discussion about issues surrounding the impeachment inquiry of President Clinton, including whether the House vote was partisan; whether time limits should have been imposed; whether the public is tired of the scandal; whether the polls are truly representative of public opinion; whether Hillary Clinton should have been lobbying members of Congress; and the impact of this ongoing scenario on Democratic women candidates. In the next segment, Bernard Lefkowitz, author of "Our Guys," joined Erbe for a discussion about boys and aggression. Topics included the way in which male aggression begins; society's view of male behavior; and how the violent crime in Glennridge, New Jersey could have been prevented. Following the interview, the panel discussed his comments, including whether imposing no consequences on the president's behavior is sending the wrong message and whether America's fascination with sports contributes to this problem. The program concluded with a segment about Vanity Fair's selection of the 200 most powerful women in America today, including whether Oprah Winfrey is the most influential woman in the world. The panel discussed why the magazine did not feature a woman on the cover of this issue; whether the choices were appropriate; and whether women in the media should be chosen as influential people. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #730

    This episode began with a discussion about issues surrounding Title IX, a law baring sex discrimination in all educational institutions, which will be reviewed by the Supreme Court in two cases this term. Topics included why there is so much confusion about this law; the lack of discipline in schools; and whether there are unintended consequences of Title IX. Next was a discussion about women and campaign ads, including whether women are less willing to run a negative ad; whether women are held to a higher standard than are men; and whether the number of negative ads is increasing. The next segment began with a conversation with Karen Narasaki about the impact of ignoring women in the national debate about Affirmative Action, covering the way in which this is hurting women. Following the interview, the panel discussed whether women actually benefit from Affirmative Action. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #731

    This episode began with a panel discussion on issues related to the 105th Congress, including whether the Monica Lewinsky scandal has affected Congress' ability to develop legislation; and whether the budget approval was disappointing. Next was a discussion about gymnast Dominique Moceanu, who is suing for independence from her parents. The program concluded with a segment about Health Watch, a program designed to improve the health status of minorities with a special focus on women and teens. Bonnie Erbe spoke with Dr. Norma Goodwin, President and founder of Health Watch, about culturally appropriate messages that are being used in the program; diseases to which women of color are more susceptible; and the way in which the program works. Following the interview the panel discussed her comments. Topics included why these types of programs are more effective in the minority sector; whether health care is becoming a function of wealth; and the lifestyle and cultural differences in minorities. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #732

    This week's episode began with a panel discussion about issues surrounding the upcoming elections, including whether voters are now accustomed to women running for office; whether women are held to a higher standard; the biggest issues on the minds of women voters; and whether there will be a large number of women at the voting booth on election day. Next was a discussion about marriage skills being taught in schools. The panel considered whether public school is the place to teach children about marriage and whether discussing marriage as a hypothetical is effective. The program concluded with a segment about The Courage in Journalism Awards. The segment featured several women journalists who have risked their lives to print their stories. Following the segment, the panel discussed the accomplishments of these brave women. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #733

    This episode began with a discussion about issues related to the mid-term election, including why the gender gap narrowed in this election; whether Republicans have given up on minorities and women; the lack of Republican issues; why some Christian conservatives voted for Democrats; and the need for candidates to appeal to those who have not voted in past elections. Next was a short segment on impeachment, including the reaction of women voters to the impeachment issue and whether impeachment turned out to be a black issue in this election. The program concluded with a discussion about the drop in the teen pregnancy rate. The panel discussed why the rate has dropped; programs that help to decrease the numbers; and whether the threat of AIDS has contributed to increased abstinance. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #734

    This episode began with a panel discussion about issues related to a recent New Jersey court decision in which the court decided that a lesbian couple must share custody of the boy they have been raising together. Topics included whether the decision defies rationality; whether the child's best interest is being considered; and whether gay couples should be allowed to marry. The next topic was the increased number of stay-at-home dads, focusing on Oakton Community College's 3rd annual conference for these fathers who have changed roles. The panel discussed whether women feel threatened by the increased number of fathers in the maternal role; whether society accepts these fathers; and the importance of having a family member caring for children. The program concluded with a discussion about media coverage of women athletes. Topics included the focus on men's athletics in the US; whether there is a market for women's sports in America; and the difference between equal opportunity and equal outcome. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #735

    This episode began with a panel discussion about issues related to the impeachment hearings. Topics included why the American public is so disinterested in the hearings; whether the hearings have been bipartisan and fair; and what women think of the hearings. The next topic was violence against women. The panel discussed the shocking new statistics released by the Department of Health and Human Services and the Department of Justice; the need for shelters and protection for these battered women; and the astonishing number of girls under the age of seventeen who have been forced into sex. The program concluded with a segment about animal rights and human health. Lauri Chonko joined Bonnie Erbe to discuss the fat and cholesterol in Turkey; food-born illnesses; and making the transition to vegetarianism. Following the interview, the panel discussed her comments, including the benefits of animal testing for human health purposes and drawbacks to vegetarianism. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #736

    This episode began with a segment about consumerism in North America. Discussion topics included the need for balance in this country so that we do not spend all of the natural resources; whether US consumers spend too much; whether Americans spend wisely; the importance of recycling; and the need to teach our children to be responsible consumers. The second segment contained an extensive report on the population problem in India, focusing on the family planning program; maternal and child health; failed sterilization programs; and cultural obstacles that prevent women from getting birth control. Following the report, the panel discussed issues surrounding India's problem, including why Americans should be concerned; the difficulty of passing foreign aid for family planning through the Congress; and the need for more effective forms of birth control. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #737

    This special edition of the show featured two programs that are giving girls confidence and strengthening families. The first segment focused on Girls Incorporated in Wilmington, North Carolina, covering what the program tries to accomplish; the importance of targeting girls when they are young; and why the programs work. The panel discussed whether the program should be offered in public schools; the need for a similar program targeted at boys; the importance of involving the mother in the program; and funding problems for programs like this one. The next program featured was Healthy Families America, focusing on how the program prepares new mothers and offers them the support of home visitors to stop abuse before it even starts. The panel discussed the need to provide support before the child is born; whether state and federal funding should go to support these types of programs; whether the program is successful; whether there should be programs to help fathers become more involved in their children's lives; and whether middle income parents have similar problems. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #738

    This special edition honoring women around the world began with a segment about the winners of the 1998 Courage in Journalism Award. The segment focused on Blanca Rosales of La Republica, Anna Zarkova of the Tru Daily, and Elizabeth Neuffer of the Boston Globe. The next segment was about how the women of Japan are coping with the economic downturn by striking out and starting their own companies. The report focused on how the culture of Japan is changing; the number of women who are currently in the work force; and examples of companies that are female-friendly. The program continued with a discussion about reproductive health services for women in Morocco. Topics included the controversy surrounding USAID funding for family planning programs; the increase in the use of birth control; and the way in which grassroots organizations make Moroccan women aware of the programs that are available. The program concluded with a segment the history on female rulers in ancient Egypt, covering obelisks and monuments for Pharaoh Hatshepsut; the lack of artwork depicting her as a woman; and her work for trade with other parts of Africa. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #739

    This episode began with a panel discussion about how women feel about the impeachment proceedings. Topics included why public opinion on impeachment has changed so much over the past months; whether the public would support the president's resignation; what is likely to happen in the Senate if the House impeaches the president; and whether the House should be allowed to vote on censure. The next topic was the increase in the number of single fathers caring for their children. The panel discussed whether the new statistic represents progress; why this is a growing trend; the importance of the father's role in the development of the children; and the number of men who are fathers who have never been married. The program concluded with a segment about the amount of stress associated with the holiday season. The panel discussed the focus on materialism during the holiday season; how women can reduce stress; and whether men help in the preparation for the holidays. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #740

    This episode began with a discussion about issues related to conscience clauses for pharmacists, including whether pharmacists should be able to make these decisions; whether the market will take care of the problem; and whether this conflicts with consumer protection. The next subject was the recent practice of divorced couples trying to minimize the traumas of joint custody by alternative living arrangements. Discussion topics included whether these arrangements might be effective and the need to maximize the stability in children's lives. The program concluded with a look at the year in review, focusing on the Clinton-Lewinksy affair; the number of women who won in the mid-term elections; the Paula Jones sexual harassment case; the development of Viagra; and the passing of Bella Abzug. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #741

    This episode began with a discussion on the birth of octuplets to a Texas woman and the subsequent medical and ethical issues, such as possible long-term medical problems the children will face, the financial drain on taxpayers, and whether there should be regulation placed on fertility technology. Next was a discussion on a class action lawsuit against the International Longshore and Warehouse Union and the Pacific Maritime Association brought by women who work on docks in Los Angeles and Long Beach, who charge the unions have not fulfilled a 1983 federal order to hire more women. Finally a "behind the headlines" segment featuring an interview with Rep. Judy Biggert on Social Security reform, followed by a discussion by the panel on whether Social Security can be saved and its importance to women. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #742

    This program featured a panel discussion on Florida's efforts to curtail teen smoking by taking away the driver's licenses of third-time offenders and initiatives in other states to restrict teen driving deaths by instituting graduated licenses; a questionable study of the British aristocracy linking having children later in life to living longer; and the efforts of the Miss Senior American Pageant and other groups to promote, in our youth-oriented culture, the idea that older people are wise, elegant, attractive, dignified, active and healthy. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #743

    In light of the Senate trial of President Clinton and Hustler Magazine publisher Larry Flynt's allegations of marital infidelity against Rep. Bob Barr (R-GA) , the panel debated the media invasion of politician's private lives and its impact on American families. Following the discussion, a taped segment looked at "shareholder primacy," the corporate policy of keeping costs low and stock prices high, often at the expense of employees. The panel discussed the fiduciary responsibility companies have toward their shareholders as well as the value of motivating "stakeholders," employees and their dependents, through stock option plans and other services. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #744

    This program featured panel discussion and debate on a recent study concluding that removing the breasts of high-risk women reduces their risk of developing cancer by 90%. The group also discussed the potential candidacies of Elizabeth Dole for president and Hillary Clinton for New York senator, their credentials, and the possibility that their popularity will decrease if they move past their traditional roles as wives. The program concluded with an interview with Cindy Hall of Women's Policy Inc., a Washington group that tracks women and family issues in Congress, and a follow-up discussion on upcoming political battles in Congress, including patient's rights, reproductive rights, and Social Security. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #745

    In this episode, the panel discussed developments in the Senate trial of President Clinton, focusing on the high-profile role of women senators--some of whom were crafting a plan to find the president guilty of perjury and obstruction of justice without removing him from office. The group also discussed the implications of a recent poll indicating that women are more open to the mixing of church and state issues, including more support for limitations on abortion. Finally, the program featured an interview with author Kathy Peiss and a follow-up discussion on her book, Hope in a Jar, about cultural changes in the use of makeup, the overly negative attitude of the feminist movement towards cosmetics, women's participation in the cosmetics industry, the role of beauty in women's lives and the evidence that women use makeup largely for themselves as a way of developing their own image. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #746

    This program featured a discussion on new programs addressing the need for after-school care for middle school students; an advertisment in 15 campus newspapers, placed by the conservative public-policy law firm the Center for Individual Rights, entitled "Guilty by Admission: Nearly Every Elite College in America Violates the Law. Does Yours?"; and a new report suggesting that Americans study European approaches to adolescent sexual behavior to help reduce teen pregnacies, abortions and sexually transmitted diseases. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #747

    This program began with a panel discussion on the aftermath of the Clinton trial and its impact on women. The group exchanged views on the cynicism that has developed across the country as a result of the trial, the challenge of voter apathy among women, sexual harrassment in the workplace, how to change the public's expectation that politics are corrupt and venal, and the progress the trial has effected for women in politics. The second portion featured a report and panel discussion on the latest statistics showing that women, for the first time, are outnumbering men on college campuses, focusing on the reasons behind the numbers and what this means for women in the future. The program concluded with a conversation with author Amity Shlaes, in which she discussed her recent book, The Greedy Hand, which focuses on the unfair tax burden imposed on women by the government, followed by a panel discussion on whether or not these taxes are warranted and how they can be altered to be fit for today's working woman. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #748

    In this episode, panelists discussed The Family and Medical Leave Act following recent efforts made to expand the coverage of the bill, which provides employees permission to take extended unpaid leave for family or health reasons. They discussed whether or not it is likely to pass, and how it will affect families covered by it. Other topics discussed included the growing trend of women Internet users; the reasons behind this; and what this means for women. The program concluded with a conversation with author Cathy Young, who addressed how the ongoing battle of the sexes is deterring women and men from achieving equality. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #749

    In this episode, panelists discussed how recent allegations made by Juanita Broaddrick that President Clinton sexually assaulted her may affect women's opinions of the president, focusing on the difference between consensual and nonconsensual sex. Panelists then discussed the prospect that Hillary Clinton may run for New York Senate, questioning her ability as a politician despite her all-time-high ranking in the polls. The program finished with a conversation on voter participation among women, in which Amy Gaiazza of the Institute for Women's Policy noted various voting trends, including a higher turnout in the north/northwest and the lowest in the south. This was followed by a panel discussion addressing the factors that determine women voter participation. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #752

    This week's episode began with a panel discussion on the current partisan debate over education legislation in Congress and whether Democrats have an edge over the Republicans. The group discussed whether class size relates to educational improvement; whether it is possible to improve education without taxpayer's dollars, as proposed by Republicans; and how the issue of class size resonates with the public. This was followed by a discussion on recent calls by some states to ban the use of cell phones while driving, focusing on whether such legislation is plausible; how this will impact women's lives, who happen to be the greatest cell phone users; and whether women are taking on too many tasks at a time. A background report followed on the recent trend of US companies to implement programs and services to better accommodate the needs of their employees, followed by more discussion with the panel on how companies are implementing these programs in efforts to keep valuable employees, especially women; if programs such as child care should be supported by the government rather than by the company; the financial burden imposed on small businesses from the programs; and the need for the company to look to the long-term benefit of these programs rather than at the sharp cost that they incur in the short-term. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #801

    This week the panel discussed the role that women are taking in the Kosovo conflict both politically and militarily, following the NATO assault on the region. This was followed by a discussion on a recent report carried that concluded that women and children don't get enough sleep, which sparked Rep. Zoe Lofgren to propose legislation that would call for schools to begin at a later hour. The program concluded with an interview with the founder and CEO of the new Internet site and cable channel, Oxygen Media, Geraldine Laybourne. She discussed the nature of the organization, which focuses on women, and detailed how women benefit from the information given by this news source. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #802

    In this episode, panelists debated whether churches should sanctify the union of gay men and women in light of the suspension of a United Methodist Church pastor for honoring the marriage of two men. They talked about whether a church is sending a negative moral message to the public by refusing to recognize gay marriages; the prospect that churches could bless the union of two gay people without recognizing marriage and whether it should be up to the individual religion to decide whether to accept gay marriages. This was followed by an interview with author Natalie Angier on her book, "Woman: an Intimate Geography," that negates the principle that women are the weaker of the two sexes. Topics discussed included women's tendencies to act aggressively; evidence that women are built sturdier than men and have as great sex drives as men, and evolutionary theories on menstruation and on post-menopausal women's place in society. The program concluded conversation with Phyllis Greenberger of the Society for Women's Health Research on this new scientific research and the validity of its hypothesis that women are stronger than men and a panel discussion on the ways this new science is benefiting women today. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #803

    In this episode, panelists discussed the latest polls on the Kosovo crisis, which indicate that women are in support of NATO's mission and in sending ground troops to the region. Topics discussed included: the way in which pictures of refugees on national television have influenced women; whether women support troops because they don't feel any personal connections with the military; whether the military unfairly represents the United States with its high proportion of minorities; and why women's reactions to war have changed since previous wars. This was followed by a conversation on welfare reform, looking at whether recent efforts made by the federal government to improve the way in which child support is enforced will succeed. They discussed the legislation under which child support claims are automatically deducted from a father's salary, focusing on whether this will be more efficient than previous initiatives and whether the current child support system is improving. The program concluded with a report on the Hearts and Minds Collaborative, the San Francisco-based group dedicated to improving race dialogue in the community in light of predictions that California will be a minority state by the year 2010. Panelists discussed how majority-minority communities are likely to change politics and culture across America. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #804

    In this episode, panelists first discussed a recent study on American parenting tactics and practices, and looked at the extent to which parenting affects children's development. They discussed whether immigrants have proved to be better parents and their parenting behaviors as compared to other Americans. The panel then discussed the problems women face in the military, including the possibility of installing video camera surveillance in coed barracks. The last segment included an interview with Pat Kirby, a former FBI profiler, about how serial killers are no longer only men, followed by a panel discussion on this new phenomenon among women, discussing why women are now more likely to carry out these serious crimes. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #805

    In this episode, panelists first addressed the issue of teen violence in the wake of the deadly school shooting at Columbine High School in Littleton, Colorado. They discussed whether kids are parents' responsibility, if parents should be held accountable for their children owning guns and whether stricter gun laws would prevent massacres like Littleton from taking place. This was followed by a discussion on the merger between Radcliffe College and Harvard University, ending Radcliffe's history as one of the seven Ivy League sister universities. The panel debated whether this would be a positive move for Radcliffe students. A report looking at the financial stature of women who have become wealthier and more independent in recent years and how this change in wealth has increased their interest in the stock market. The report looked at the different investment patterns between men and women and the way in which companies have implemented programs to help guide women into investment, followed by a panel discussion on women's cautious investment behavior and adversity to risk. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #806

    The program began with a panel discussion on Clinton's biggest insurance initiative program, Children's Insurance Program (CHIP), which would give states funding to support uninsured children not covered under welfare health insurance. They discussed whether the legislation has bipartisan support, who would be covered by it and if universal health care should be a priority in Congress. The next segment contained an interview with Heidi Hartmann, Ph.D., of the Institute for Women's Policy, on the pay gap that exists between states for women and whether this causes migration to those states that better serve women. The panel followed with discussion on the reasons behind the regional differences and the need to look at specific jobs men and women hold before blaming the pay gap on discrimination. The panel finished the program with a discussion on a recent poll stating that a high percentage of men see women who make more money than them threatening in marriage but women do not share this feeling. They discussed whether this is rooted in women's desire to adhere to the principle that men are the bread-winners of the household and should be responsible to provide for the family. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #807

    Panelists first looked at how Congress is handling the issue of teen violence in the wake of the school shootings in Colorado. They discussed the partisan divide over how to prevent violence, including two measures to be debated in Congress next week that would toughen up laws against juvenile delinquents and curb violence in the media. They discussed the negative impact of television and the need for parents to be better nurturers to their children. The next segment featured a report on a recent study that concluded that women control more personal wealth than men and looked into whether women are high contributors to charity. The panel then discussed whether society should rely upon women for philanthropic giving and whether it should be based on gender. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #808

    Panelists first discussed recently proposed legislation that would encourage premarital couples to seek voluntary counseling courses before their marriage in return for a deduction in wedding fees. The group exchanged views on whether this is a good idea for couples and whether there is any real value in this type of counseling. The group then debated whether an ordinance that would require all fur coat manufacturers to issue warning labels detailing the inhumane way in which the animals were killed is relevant and a useful mechanism for public awareness, discussing the merits of the current animal rights movement. Following a report in which political commentator Molly Ivans touted political commentary for being too conservative, panelists discussed why opinion writers tend to be right-wing, the way in which public opinion has moved to the center and if there are any outlets for left-wing voices. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #809

    This week panelists first discussed women's role in gun control, noting women's tendency to support gun control more than men despite their political party. They exchanged views on the problem of youth violence and its many causes, including lack of parenting, guns, drugs and depression. Then they discussed a case in which a woman who shot her daughter after being told she would be taken to a nursing home was charged with murder after the daughter took herself off life support for the gun wound and died. They discussed whether the mother should be charged with first degree murder and whether this is a case of euthanasia. Following a report on women's networks, which are a way to help women network in the workplace and have been implemented in many companies, the panel discussed whether these programs benefit women and whether women need them or if they can network the same way as men. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #810

    The program began with a panel discussion on the prospect of Hillary Clinton running for New York Senate, including whether she would do well in the race, how not being a native New Yorker may affect her appeal, how her campaign would benefit the Democratic party and whether or not she should win. The panel then discussed new bankruptcy legislation that would make it more difficult for custodial mothers to receive child support claims from their husbands who file for bankruptcy by forcing them to pay first some of their accrued credit card debt to companies, focusing on whether this is fare to single mothers or whether it would benefit them by causing fewer bankruptcy claims. Following a background report talking to Gov. Jane Hull (R-Arizona) on Arizona's reputation for having powerful women politicians, the panel discussed the pioneering spirit of women in the west, the significance of four of them being Republican and why there is such a small percentage of women representatives in Congress. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #811

    The program began with a taped interview with second lady Tipper Gore, in which she discussed the first ever White House Conference on Mental Health, where she will speak about her own battle with clinical depression and why she feels Americans should have full coverage for mental health problems. Topics discussed included: why she decided to impart her own story with mental illness after her son was in poor health; why it is important for people to feel okay about having mental health problems, and the extensive cost that people suffering with this illness have to incur under current health programs. The panel discussed the problem of mental health today and whether it should be covered under government and health management organizations. The program finished with a discussion over current welfare programs, which are not providing sufficient benefits to children and mothers due to stringent laws about training programs. The panel discussed whether current welfare reform needs further changes to provide true benefits to recipients. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #812

    Panelists first discussed why George W. Bush is leading the polls among women for the 2000 presidential election despite women's previous tendency to vote Democratic. They predicted what this election's biggest issues for women will be, including education, health care and family values. In the second segment, they discussed whether school officials are overreacting to the Columbine incident by suspending students for their clothing, hair color and expression techniques or whether schools should resort to uniforms. Following a background interview with feminist writer Germaine Greer on her recent book, "The Whole Woman," which details women's quest for the impossible, in which she says women are trying to accomplish too much in today's world and that they need to prioritize and voice their true concerns, the panel debated whether or not her concerns for women were relevant, whether she was over-exaggerating the problems women now face and whether feminism is in its infancy. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #813

    The panel first discussed the gun control legislation debated in the House and later defeated that would require three day background checks for purchasers from non-licensed manufacturers at gun shows and how women's testimony in Congress differed. They debated whether the vote was influenced by the NRA and why gun control needs to be strengthened despite the legislation's defeat. The next segment featured a report on the measures being taken by the Savannah Youth Futures Authority to keep at-risk families together and prevent youths from being placed in foster homes, followed by a panel discussion over the success of these types of organizations to lift people out of poverty, whether community problems should be solved on the community or federal level, and why more social programs in communities would benefit those in poverty. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #814

    First, panelists discussed the growing trend of Americans to work past retirement after it was reported that over eighty percent of baby boomers plan to work full or part time after they turn sixty five. They exchanged view on why women feel pressured to work longer, including to maintain financial security, a certain lifestyle, or because Social Security doesn't appear financially stable or efficient. Then the panel discussed a recent finding that discovered a gene that could be manipulated to slow the onset of menopause and could lead to a decrease in post-menopausal conditions such as osteoporosis and allow women to bear children at later ages. They exchanged views on whether women are trying to beat nature's cycle, whether it is good for children to be born into older families and why women are delaying aging. Following a taped interview with Sen. Barbara Boxer(D-CA) on her recent proposed legislation, entitled the "Children's Environmental Protection Act" which would protect children from pollutants and toxins, the panel discussed whether legislation for children is only aimed at getting laws passed and whether the EPA needs to set standards for children rather than only for adults. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #815

    First, panelists discussed a report indicating teens' growing skepticism towards marriage and move to alternative lifestyles, including cohabitation and non-wed parenting. They exchanged views on whether this is a positive move to establishing better relationships or whether it breeds more teen pregnancies, discussing the need for pop culture to stop glorifying unwed mothers and the need for better role models for young women. Then the group talked about whether recent statistics of an eight percent increase in demand for domestic work indicates a booming economy or less opportunity for the rising number of immigrants. They discussed how women working from home brought on this trend, whether domestic workers should have better compensation for their work and whether middle-class families should use this type of help. Following a conversation with Nicola Godrey of the Working Mother Magazine in which she discusses states' poor childcare programs and why these government programs are suffering from lack of funding, employment and public support, the panel discussed why certain states are more advanced in their child care systems and debated the extent to which states should fund them. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #816

    First, panelists discussed Hillary Clinton's campaign for New York Senate launched this week, including her chances against Mayor Giulianni in case he runs, what she should focus on in her campaign, and whether she should run on any of Bill Clinton's issues. Then, the panel discussed a recent survey that found a startling pay gap between teenage women and men, with women earning forty-six more percent in wages yet thirteen percent less likely to hold a job than men. They exchanged views on whether this is due to job-types, bargaining skills or occupational discrimination. This was followed by a pre-taped interview with Brian Menzies, the president of Charity Cars International, a non-profit organization to help transition welfare recipients into the workplace by donating used cars to help them find and sustain a job. The panel discussed the importance of charity in society and whether all welfare recipients should be given cars. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #817

    First, panelists discussed the current Patients' Bill of Rights legislation being debated in the House and Senate, focusing on whether the Republican or Democrat version benefited women the most, especially on the contested issues of whether a woman's gynecologist/obstetrician should be her primary physician and how long women should be allowed to stay in the hospital following a mastectomy. The group then exchanged views on how the US women's World Cup win against China is influencing women athletes in America, whether it will provoke young girls to take sports more seriously, the likelihood of female athletes ever attaining the same status as male athletes and why this win is so important for women. Panelists ended with a discussion over a recent study that reported that woman can earn equal pay rates as men in some professions but that there is still a long way to go before the pay gap disappears. The group debated whether this is good news for women and if they should change careers to get better pay. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #818

    First, panelists discussed recent US Census Bureau statistics that reported 18 million adults between eighteen and thirty-four live with their parents as a result of dropping out of school, debt, saving money or drugs, focusing on whether parents should support children as adults, how the transition from school to work is more difficult in the current economy and with today's high cost of living, and the need for parents and schools to discipline children more. The next segment featured a report on a California initiative to invoke child support reforms after the state has been continually criticized for its low child support collection rate. The report profiled families whose collection money was lost in the system and who have suffered needlessly and spoke to politicians who have attempted to restructure the support system. This was followed by a panel discussion over whether California should give up the district attorney's rights to monitor child support for a more central system, the need to diminish the bureaucracy by which child support is collected, and how the problem would be helped if couples could stay married in the first place. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #819

    Following the week's debate in the Senate and House over a Republican proposed tax cut, panelists exchanged views on whether women would benefit more from tax relief or from supplemented Medicare and Social Security programs. They debated whether women should be responsible for their retirement savings, the uncertainty in forecasting economic conditions ten years in advance, and whether the president will veto the bill. The next segment included a two-part look at women and retirement. First, a report examined recent statistics that found only 25% of women are eligible for pension benefits, looking at how women face precarious retirement conditions and are increasingly unprepared financially to stop working at 55 as compared to their male counterparts. Then, panelists engaged in discussion on whether the government or women should be held responsible for their benefits, the need for employers to be more clear on pension benefits early in a woman's career, and the need to educate women on Social Security and retirement and in make saving a priority. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #820

    First, panelists discussed the rising number of women executives in today's workforce and whether or not this trend is good for family life and children. They exchanged views on the prospect of stay-at-home dads, how a family with two working parents affects children, whether there should be more women CEOs and whether they sacrifice their womanhood to get to the top. Then the panel focussed on the ever-increasing trend - on-line dating and the recently reported number one cause of divorce - discussing whether chatting on-line should be considered adultery, what the statistics are saying about marriage, and how email should be addressed in marriages. Lastly, following an interview with former surgeon general Joycelyn Elders, M.D. in which she discussed how women's health needs are changing and being addressed by doctors, the panel discussed how technology is altering treatments for women and the problems associated with lack of research on long-term effects of new drugs. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #821

    First, panelists discussed violence in schools. As reports show that children feel less safe upon returning to school this September in light of the number of school shootings in recent years, the panel exchanged views on how to ensure school safety and eradicate students' fears, focusing on whether guns should be banned, the nature of the problem, and the media's twenty-four-hour breaking news coverage. The next topic discussed was on the race for the 2000 presidency, after it was reported that George W. Bush frequently uses profanity and evades questions on previous drug use, discussing how this information will influence women's opinion on the governor. The panelists all agreed that as Bush releases more information on his campaign and on himself to the public women will form their own opinions. Finally, following a report on a recent survey carried out by the Center for a New American Dream that found 80% of children have become more materialistic as a result of greater advertising, the panel exchanged views on the effects of commercialism on children and parent's role in curbing television consumption. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #822

    The program began with a panel debate over whether private programs should have the right to pay drug-addicted women to become sterile or use long-term birth control. They discussed the ethics behind this proposal, discussing the need to prevent these women from giving birth but the need to protect their rights. The panel then discussed a recent move by schools across the nation to remove the teaching of evolution as a mandatory course, allowing schools to decide whether they teach the creation theory or evolution to their students, focusing on whether students should be required to learn scientific theories and the need for parents to become more involved in state decisions on the issue. This was followed by a behind-the-scenes interview with Sen. Patty Murray (D-WA) over her proposal that parents get 24 hours of leave each year to participate in their children's education. The panel agreed that allowing parents more quality time and involvement in their children's lives would benefit society [26 minutes]

  • Episode #823

    First, panelists discussed women and body image, focusing on the results of a recent study that reported women are not influenced by advertisements to emulate model body sizes. The group exchanged views on whether current body image standards are acceptable, the extent of eating disorders in America, why children need to be involved in more rigorous activity and less computers and television, and why women tend to gain weight at the onset of college. Then the program featured a report in which it was reported that minority women face smaller pensions, smaller 401k's, and small Social Security payments in retirement than white women due to lower wage earnings and inequality in the job force. The panel discussed how the government needs to ensure that women are adequately compensated after retirement, the need for minority women to be better informed about saving, and the problem of gross consumerism in the minority community. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #825

    The panel began with a discussion about the 2000 presidential election, focusing on whether Democratic candidates have addressed women's issues, including abortion, taxes, and education. They discussed whether women's issues differ from men's, whether women are supporting Bill Bradley over Al Gore, and how candidates are looking to gain independent women's votes. The next segment featured a conversation on recent statistics reporting that a large amount of grandparents are rearing children, discussing how more women are ending up in jail from drug use, whether grandparents are fit to raise children, and whether the welfare system promotes grandparents serving the role of parent. Following a pre-taped interview with Diane Rehm on her book, "Finding My Voice," which relays her longtime battle with a neurological disorder disabling her voice, the panel discussed whether enough older women are on the radio. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #826

    The panel began with a discussion on a Massachusetts anti-discrimination case filed by fathers who claim the state restraining law unfairly prohibits them from contact with their children. The next segment included a pre-taped interview with Verna L. William of the National Women's Law Center, on the Supreme Court case she won this year, which gives public schools the right to be sued for student sexual harassment, discussing the impact of the decision on schools in the coming year. The panel followed with a discussion on whether it is a good idea for schools to implement new guidelines for student behavior, whether it will lead to unwarranted lawsuits, and why the case will force schools to take a greater part in the students' lives. The panel closed with a conversation on how casual dress for women is affecting their careers, focusing on whether women are losing respect in the office place, how a Democratic government affects dress codes, and whether dressing down makes women appear less serious about work. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #827

    This week panelists began with a conversation on Bob Dole's public denouncement of his wife's efforts to become the first female president of the United States. The panel discussed why her husband would feel this way and whether he is envious of her success in any way, her approach to her campaign, and whether she would serve as a successful female president. The panel then focused on a new report that found divorce rates to be declining, exchanging views on why couples are less likely to split, whether working parents are becoming more compatible with each other and whether the family has become a more important priority in American's lives. The program finished with a pre-taped interview with Ellen Galinsky, president of Work Life Institute, on how families are better incorporating duel-working lifestyles into their children's lives. The panel followed with discussion on how women are trying to balance children and work, new roles husbands have taken on and how families are attempting to reduce stress out of their lives through quality time with their children. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #828

    The program began with a panel discussion on recent Census Bureau statistics that said immigrants will account for ten percent of the US population in light of next year's predicted global population of an all-time high of 6 billion, focusing on how rising immigration and population rates may affect women. The next topic addressed was on why pregnant teens are reluctant to marry during this time of unprecedented economic prosperity in America, looking at why teen mothers feel better served by staying single, why people no longer value the idea of a lifetime partner, and how this trend adversely affects children born out of wedlock. The program finished with a taped interview with National Association of Women's Business Owners president Terry Neese, CPC, about her initiative to ensure that Congress continues to fund women's business centers across the US and to promote women entrepreneurs. The panel discussed whether women business owners' plea to obtain tax cuts in current tax legislation is likely to pass. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #829

    First, the panel discussed Al Gore's initiative to shore up support from women voters by moving his headquarters to his home state of Tennessee and implementing a more casual appearance in his campaign style. They exchanged views on whether the polls accurately depict women's views this early in the race, why women are likely to welcome an invigorated Gore campaign, and why the two parties will vie for women voters throughout the campaign. The panel then focused on the first sanctioned boxing match between a woman and man, questioning whether a co-ed match in a violent sport should be promoted or whether it prevents female boxing from evolving, teaches a negative message to young children by supporting violence on women, and will lead to other unnecessary equities between the sexes. The last segment was an interview with Dr. Sylvia Rimm on her book, "See Jane Win," in which she hypothesizes that the more competitive girls are in childhood, the more likely they will succeed in adulthood, discussing the need to encourage young girls to take risks and face losing. The panel discussed why women must learn how to win and lose early in life. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #830

    The panel began with a conversation about recent national efforts to help women in business combat discrimination by creating a government fund for women entrepreneurs and small business owners for being "socially disadvantaged." They exchanged views on whether women are in need of federal aid for business and how funding would affect other minority groups. The next topic covered the debate over whether courts should be allowed to bar grandparents from visitation rights, discussing whether legal action is becoming too prevalent in family matters, whether the state has the right to determine a grandparent's role in grandchild rearing, and how therapy could prevent legal action. Then, the panel discussed Wisconsin, Arizona and Minnesota state initiatives to improve educational performance by delaying high school start times in light of Rep. Zoe Lofgren's (D-CA) proposed legislation that would increase national high school start times by one hour. Following a pre-taped interview with Lofgren on scientific studies showing adolescents need more sleep, the panel agreed that schools begin and end too early, discussed how a delay would decrease juvenile crime, and debated whether Congress is likely to pass Lofgren's legislation. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #831

    First, the panelists discussed the dropout of Elizabeth Dole from the race for the Republican presidential nomination, focusing on whether she was a victim of discrimination in fundraising, her effect on Republican voters, the effect of her dropout on the women's movement, and whether she is likely to run for vice president. The next topic discussed was Congress' controversial approval of an education program allowing non-profit groups to lecture students on abstinence, discussing the need for sex education in schools and questioning whether the federal government should have the right to impose moral behavior on society. The panel finished with a conversation on the Internet and women, looking at how professional women entrepreneurs and small business owners are using the Internet to locate and obtain venture capital, discussing whether the Internet is unbiased and whether women are benefiting from the Internet more than men. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #832

    The panel began with a panel discussion on Viagra use for women. As the drug is increasingly being prescribed to women for sexual dysfunction, the panel discussed whether a drug will succeed in restoring women's sex drives, the difference between male and female sex drives, and why perceptions about sex are changing in light of increasing life expectancies. Next, the panel exchanged views on whether the Harry Potter book series is acceptable reading for children after various state school boards have considered banning the series for containing a story line about witchcraft. The last segment was a behind-the-scenes look at the extent to which images of thin women in the media are adversely affecting women's health and body images, the focus of a meeting of over 2000 influential women in the media held this week in Boston, followed by a panel discussion about women's health and the media. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #833

    First, panelists discussed Sen. Jesse Helmes' public denouncement of Sen. Carol Moseley-Braun's nomination as US ambassador to New Zealand for ethical concerns, discussing whether his move was driven by personal feelings, whether his move was an example of political maneuvering against Bill Clinton or discrimination, and the likelihood of Moseley-Braun obtaining the position. The panel then turned to the controversial decision of an elementary public school to suspend a third grader for writing a Halloween story depicting himself shooting fellow schoolmates and his teacher, discussing whether the school's reaction was too severe or whether it is the only way to curb violence and adolescent crime. The last topic included a pre-taped interview with Republican National Committee Co-Chairman Pat Harrison and EMILY's List president Ellen Malcolm on women's role in the presidential elections in light of the significance money is playing in campaigns this year, followed by a panel discussion on whether women are becoming better fundraisers, the necessity for women to compete on a national campaign level with men, and the need to ban soft money donations. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #834

    First, panelists began with a discussion on a recent survey that found the number of women CEO's to be increasing despite a declining number of women line officers, focusing on whether this signifies less gender discrimination in the workplace or whether women are being kept from the managerial, male-dominated jobs. The next topic discussed was a recent Western Michigan University study that found that overweight women earn less money than thin women, focusing on whether it is irrational to discriminate against someone for their weight, the need for women across America to lose weight, and whether weight discrimination is valid. The next topic was a behind-the-scenes interview with Working Woman Magazine contributor Adele Stan on the difference between career women and stay-home mom's campaign issues of interest and how presidential contenders are playing to the two groups' concerns. The panel then exchanged views on how women are likely to vote in the coming election. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #835

    First, panelists began with a discussion on a recent survey that found the number of women CEO's to be increasing despite a declining number of women line officers, focusing on whether this signifies less gender discrimination in the workplace or whether women are being kept from the managerial, male-dominated jobs. The next topic discussed was a recent Western Michigan University study that found that overweight women earn less money than thin women, focusing on whether it is irrational to discriminate against someone for their weight, the need for women across America to lose weight, and whether weight discrimination is valid. The next topic was a behind-the-scenes interview with Working Woman Magazine contributor Adele Stan on the difference between career women and stay-home mom's campaign issues of interest and how presidential contenders are playing to the two groups' concerns. The panel then exchanged views on how women are likely to vote in the coming election. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #836

    First, panelists began with a discussion on the controversy over whether disabled and ill adults should have the right to adopt children, focusing on whether ill adults could provide care equal to healthy adults, whether it is considered discrimination to deny the right to adopt to this group, and why a parent should not be judged on her physical capabilities. Then, the panel turned to a discussion on the newest issue among young boys, in which it has been reported that the media portrays men to embody impossible physical ideals as in the GI Joe doll, which has become more muscular than it was in its inception. The panel discussed the extent to which boys obsess about their body images as compared with young girls, whether the media has an obligation to portray attainable body standards to both sexes and how prevalent the problem really is in society. Finally, the panel exchanged views on recent legislation proposed to help ease the financial restraints placed on workers when called on to help loved ones battle health problems, discussing whether the government or individual companies should be accountable for the financial burden. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #837

    The program featured a look at the year in review, beginning with a reprise of a To The Contrary taped segment looking at "shareholder primacy," the corporate policy of keeping costs low and stock prices high, often at the expense of employees. The panel discussed the fiduciary responsibility companies have toward their shareholders as well as the value of motivating "stakeholders," employees and their dependents, through stock option plans and other services. The next segment featured a report on a recent study that concluded that women control more personal wealth than men and looked into whether women are high contributors to charity. Next, a report examined recent statistics that found only 25% of women are eligible for pension benefits, looking at how women face precarious retirement conditions and are increasingly unprepared financially to stop working at 55 as compared to their male counterparts. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #838

    This special episode of To The Contrary featured various segments looking at how some non-profit groups are making efforts to enrich the lives of youths around the country. First, it looked at a program sponsored by the Family Resources Coalition of America in Savannah, Georgia that provides housing and services for at-risk youths and low income households in an impoverished part of the city known as area C. The second piece examined the program headed by Healthy Families America, which was created to prevent child abuse before its inception by establishing relations with overburdened families before the birth of a new child. Next, the program looked at a California state initiative to improve it flailing child support system after millions of dollars of collections have been lost by the state. Finally, the program investigated a San Francisco-based organization, the Hearts and Minds Collaborative, which focuses on creating dialogues between minorities as the state heads toward a minority majority population by the year 2010. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #839

    First, panelists began with a discussion about women and politics, debating whether more women are likely to head to the polls in light of the growing trend of presidential candidates' daughters becoming visible in the campaigns. The group discussed whether this kind of family help is a ploy to obtain women's votes, whether it will dissuade young women from voting, or whether it only signifies the more public role of women in politics. Next, panelists discussed the impact of George W. Bush's declaration that his wife would not hold political responsibilities under his presidency, followed by a conversation on the surgeon general's first mental health survey in which it was reported that more than 20% of Americans suffer from mental disorder, yet two-thirds of those suffering forgo treatment, discussing the need for healthcare plans to include mental disorder treatment and the significance of depression being touted as a "woman's disease." Finally, following a pre-taped interview with Dr. Jane E. Smith of the National Council of Negro Women about the recent biannual conference in Washington, DC, the panel discussed the biggest issues and obstacles facing African American women in the 21st Century. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #840

    First, panelists began with a discussion on a womenconnect.com survey in which women were found to be unsatisfied with online shopping for being non-customer friendly, inconvenient, and a hassle; focusing on why retail shopping is better handled in a store, why virtual shopping will grow without replacing traditional methods, and the extent to which Internet advertising should be trusted. Next, the group exchanged views on recent statistics surrounding the American family that found divorce rates to have risen significantly, families to have shrunk by half, and society's welcome of non-traditional families as the norm over the past twenty years. The panel discussed the possible cultural and political implications of the study, including the loss of respect for the male figure in the family, the demise of the value of a two-headed household, and the dissolution of marriage. The program finished with a behind-the-scenes interview with Jill Miller, executive director of Women Work, about the difficulties women are having in reentering the work force after raising children, provoking women to accept low-wage employment. The panel discussed the extent to which employers should be responsible for providing training programs and opportunities to these women. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #841

    This special millennium episode looked at the changing role of women throughout the century. Following a brief outline of the most influential women of the millennium, panelists shared their views on their favorite heroines of the past centuries and discussed the way in which women's roles have evolved from having limited rights to having the ability to vote, to work, and to lead lives on their own terms. Finally, panelists discussed the challenges facing women heading into the new millennium, including learning how to balance women's new equality in the work force with family life, the increasing financial demands on family, financing elderly healthcare, and placing more importance on life out of work. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #842

    First, panelists engaged in a discussion on the Labor Department's posting calling for telecommuters' home offices to comply with company safety standards, discussing whether such a rule is feasible and how it would negatively affect women who work from home. The program then featured a behind-the-scenes look at the ongoing abortion controversy in Mexico, where abortion supporters are fighting hard to overturn the predominately Catholic society's anti-abortion rule of law. Frances Kissling of Catholics for a Free Choice joined the program, discussing the way in the Catholic Church is using Mexico to disseminate its pro-life message to the US, and panelists discussed why the US should be interested in population control of developing countries, the health toll that illegal abortion takes on Mexican women, why it is a global necessity to legalize abortion in Mexico and other developing countries, and the extent to which US pro-life organizations are growing and challenging the women's movement. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #843

    First, panelist began with a conversation on custody issues, beginning with a debate on whether 6-year-old Cuban immigrant Elian Gonzalez should be allowed to return to his father in Cuba or be required to stay in the US with distant relatives. The panel then turned to the current Supreme Court case questioning whether parents should have the right to determine the role of grandparents in their grandchildren's lives, focusing on whether the issue at hand is over parental rights or state vs. federal power; a brief interview in which National Organization for Women president Patricia Ireland discussed the prospects for women executive office holders; and a panel discussion on a recent poll suggesting women are apprehensive over a women president, discussing why Elizabeth Dole failed to shore up female support, the likelihood of younger voters being more politically open minded, and the public's over-concern with the private lives of women public officials. The program finished with a behind-the-scenes conversation with Reform party consultant Jackie Salit on women's role in the Reform party, followed by a panel discussion on whether the party should be eradicated. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #844

    First, panelists exchanged views on Al Gore and George W. Bush's lead among women voters in light of the approaching Iowa caucuses, discussing women's interest in education and health care, McCain and Bradley's appeal to men, women's tendency to lean Democratic, and whether positions this early in the race matter. Next, the panel discussed recent Labor Department statistics showing adolescents receive an average of $50/week allowance, including whether teens are too concerned with fashion and consumerism, how this impacts a child's basis for self-worth, and whether parents are replacing quality time with their children with cash allowance. Following a pre-taped interview with Deidre Mulligan of the Center for Democracy & Technology discussing Internet privacy issues facing women, including how some Internet sites access site browsers' information without their knowledge or consent, panelists discussed whether customer customization is helpful or a hindrance and whether the free flow of information should be granted on the Internet. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #845

    First, panelists exchanged views on President Clinton's final State of the Union Address the previous day, including his focus on healthcare coverage, his efforts to appeal to women, whether his initiatives for Social Security, healthcare, and education are affordable given the high number of proposals outlined, and the speech's impact on Gore's presidential campaign. Next, the panel discussed the upcoming primaries in New Hampshire, including McCain's growing popularity among independents and women and the need for Bush to become more involved in local campaigning efforts in the state. Finally, the panel discussed a recent report showing an under diagnosis of Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder in young girls, thwarting previous beliefs that the condition mainly afflicted boys, discussing why girls are in need of attention for the disorder, whether the condition should be treated by behavior therapy or medication, and whether some cases are not severe enough to warrant prescription drugs. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #846

    First, the panel discussed the controversial book "A Natural History of Rape," in which two professors define rape as a biological and natural potential of man, including why both women and men should be angered by the claim, the authors' goal to obtain media coverage, and whether the media is only further promoting the notion. Next, the panel discussed the rising gap among the middle and lower African American classes, focusing on whether the divide is creating hostility within the African American community and its impact on racial solidarity in America. Following an interview with Ernestine Schlant Bradley, wife of presidential hopeful Bill Bradley, in which she discussed her sidelines approach towards her husband's political career, the panel exchanged views on Hillary Clinton's role as first lady and the future of presidential wives in politics. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #848

    First, panelists discussed the role of religion in the 2000 presidential elections, exchanging views on the significance of an ivillage.com poll showing a majority of women care about the future president's religious beliefs, favoring a candidate who believes in God. Next, the panel discussed statistics demonstrating that a population increase in the world's most bio-diverse regions may result in the extinction of environmental remedies for women's health issues, such as extracts used for cancers and depression, focusing on whether American women should become more involved in anti-deforestation efforts and whether the affected countries should have population controls. Finally, a behind-the-scenes look at new information about the positive affects of strength training on aging and in preventing osteoporosis, followed by a panel discussion on whether elderly women are likely to heed the information and increase their exercise. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #851

    First, panelists discussed the women's vote in the 2000 presidential elections in light of a recent Intersurvey poll that showed women favor Gore to Bush by five percent, focusing on why women are favoring a Republican candidate more than in previous years, the impact of Bush's focus on the far right conservatives on women, and whether Bush's attack campaign will turn away women's voters. Next, the group exchanged views on whether laws allowing mothers to leave unwanted newborns in safe places to circumvent prosecution would prevent mothers from abandoning their babies in dangerous places, discussing the need for more programs to educate young women on pregnancy, motherhood, sex education, and responsibility. Finally, the program finished with a report on the third annual To the Contrary and Mistubishi Motors Foundation Unsung Heroines award luncheon, in which women who make differences in their community through nonprofit work were honored for their services. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #852

    First, the panelists discussed the recent trend of baby intelligence enhancing products, such as Baby Einstein and Brilliant Beginnings, which have been advertised to increase a person's intellectual capabilities if taught during an infants' early years, focusing on whether brain development is a real science and can be enhanced at a young age, whether the products are money making gimmicks, the need for parents to interact more with their children, and the proper government role in providing quality day care programs. Next, the group exchanged views on statistics showing that married couples are working irregular hours to be able to stay home with their children, discussing whether the stress from irregular work schedules is too much of a burden for women and whether companies should be responsible to provide daycare programs for their employees. Finally, following a pre-taped interview in which Sen. Blanche Lambert Lincoln (D-Arkansas) discussed the problem of prescription drug benefits, the panel discussed whether a bipartisan prescription drug benefit is likely to pass this fiscal year, how it would affect the pharmaceutical market, whether seniors capable of affording prescription drugs should be exempt from the benefits, and why women are more affected than men. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #901

    Seeking rules on Ritalin...First Lady Hillary Rodham outlines federal plans for reversing the number of school age children on powerful psychiatric drugs. Death Penalty Tap Dance...Texas Governor George W. Bush's attitudes oncapital punishment may sound a death knell for the women's vote in his presidential campaign. Internet Innovations for women... We'll give you a first look at some of the technology in development that will make women's everyday lives easier. Panel: Bonnie Erbe, Host Rep. Ellen Tauscher, D - California Pat Schroeder, Fmr. Representative, Colorado Amy Holmes, The Independent Women's Forum Rosalynn O'Connell, National Women's Political Caucus Toni Ford, Republican Commentator [26 minutes]

  • Episode #902

    Women want Affirmative Action: A group of Florida women protests the "One Florida" proposal which bans affirmative action. Teen Drivers: A new study reveals that when teens drive in groups, each additional teen passenger in a car dramatically increases the teen death rate in car accidents. And some states are considering severe limits on the number of teens who can drive together. Women and Corporate Boards: In our segment that goes behind the headlines, women gaining parity on corporate boards. We'll talk to one of the top headhunters in the country whose job it is to place women in Fortune 500 board seats. Panel: Bonnie Erbe, Host Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton, D- Washington, DC Kellyanne Fitzpatrick, The Polling Company Pat Schroeder, Fmr. Representative, Colorado Elaine Chao, The Heritage Foundation [26 minutes]

  • Women's Vote 2000: Guns and Social Security (#903)

    Could the weight of the gun control issues determine who will secure the women's vote in the 2000 elections? Texas Governor George W, Bush says the gun issue isn't that important for women, Vice President Al Gore counters that this belief isn't the only weakness in the Republicans' bid for women's support. Then, Al Gore champions two landmark changes in the social security system that will help balance inequalities for elderly women. Day care and Early Childhood Education...Recent studies indicate a child's learning potential is serious impacted in the first three years of development. We'll talk to one expert who says it is more critical than ever to focus on the quality of our day care programs around the country. Panel: Bonnie Erbe, Host Rep. Ellen Tauscher, D - California Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton, D- Washington, DC Susan Molinari, Former Representative, New York Amy Holmes, The Independent Women's Forum [26 minutes]

  • Episode #904

    Women's Vote 2000: Missteps on the campaign trail. As Presidential hopefuls Texas Governor George W. Bush and Vice President Al Gore continue to woo women voters, they've been making what some pundits are calling huge mistakes. Prime Minister takes Paternity Leave...Britain's Prime Minister Tony Blair says he will cut back on his hours when his fourth child is born. Similarly, American Chief Executives are under increasing pressure to set good examples by staying home with their kids and proving their companies are family-friendly. Genetic Discrimination...Scientific experts believe genetic testing will save lives and lead to cures for a variety of diseases. But civil rights organizations want to make sure personal genetic information is not used against workers, especially women. Panel: Bonnie Erbe, Host Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee, D - Texas Michelle Conlin, BusinessWeek Laura Flanders, Pacifica Radio Amy Holmes, The Independent Women's Forum [26 minutes]

  • Episode #905

    Tech Gap.... A gender gap in the computer technology field. Despite enormous efforts during the last decade-and-a-half to lure more girls and women into engineering programs, the number of women entering those programs is tumbling. Erin Brockovich.... Box office smash Erin Brockovich has some feminists wondering whether clothes do make the woman. Shop Floors....New manufacturing technologies are helping women take charge on the production line AND saving American jobs that used to be going overseas. Panel: Bonnie Erbe, Host Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton, D - Washington, DC Laura Flanders, Political Commentator Amy Holmes, Independent Women's Forum Karen Miller, Political Commentator [26 minutes]

  • Episode #906

    Elian Gonzalez....Republicans aren't convinced Janet Reno's hand was forced when she sent INS officials to raid the home of Elian Gonzalez's Miami relatives to seize the six-year old boy and return him to his father. Testosterone... Testosterone has become the rage. Men are charging their doctors' offices to get their hands on the hormone's new gel form. Elder Care....In our segment that goes behind the headlines, elder care has become a women's issue. We'll talk with Congresswoman Connie Morella (R-MD) about how elder care has evolved into a women's issue and about her participation in the effort to increase benefits for some of these caregivers. Panel: Bonnie Erbe, Host Julianne Malveaux, Syndicated Columnist Irene Natividad, Women Vote 2000 Heather Nauert, Political Strategist Karen Miller, Political Commentator [26 minutes]

  • Episode #907

    Million Mom March...Hundreds of thousands of moms prepare to march on Washington for more stringent gun control. Paying without paternity...When DNA tests disprove paternity, should child support payments stop? A growing number of would-be fathers say yes and are fighting to change laws that force them to dish out dough for children who aren't theirs. Women Waging Peace...We'll introduce you to one group that is recognizing the essential contribution of women in preventing violent conflict and working to sustain peace in war-prone areas around the world. Former Ambassador to Austria and now Harvard University's Women and Public Policy Program Director Swanee Hunt formed the group Women Waging Peace to bring more women to the international peace process. Panel: Bonnie Erbe, Host Julianne Malveaux, Syndicated Columnist Irene Natividad, Women Vote 2000 Heather Nauert, Political Strategist Karen Miller, Political Commentator [26 minutes]

  • Episode #908

    Million Moms Vs. Second Sisters....the million moms and second amendment sisters are duking it out over gun control issues, while others are wondering how this issue will effect events leading up to November's election. Cybersex... cybersex addiction is spreading and contrary to popular belief, a recent study shows that women make up half of these cybersex participants. Mother-Teenage Daughter Conflicts: "I'm Not Mad, I Just Hate You"... in our segment that goes behind the headlines, we'll talk with Dr. Roni-Cohen Sandler who gives mothers some advice on how to maintain a good relationship with their daughters during the turbulent teenage years and beyond. Panel: Bonnie Erbe, Host Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-Washington, DC) Ruth Conniff, The Progressive Magazine Linda Chavez, Center for Equal Opportunity Karen Miller, Political Commentator [26 minutes]

  • Episode #909

    After-school Education Programs...Keeping children after school --not for detention, but for more school. After-school education has proved to be an effective means of curbing juvenile crime in some areas. Now educators and lawmakers across the country are working to expand it to meet the needs of an estimated five to seven million " latchkey children" who would otherwise be home alone after school. I~~California Tech Up... A look at how women activists in California aretransforming political and social organizing for the twenty-first century: via the Internet. Panel: Bonnie Erbe, Host Senator Barbara Boxer (D-California) Irene Natividad, Women Vote 2000 Amy Holmes, Independent Wome's Forum Ann Stone, Republicans for Choice [26 minutes]

  • Episode #910

    NOW Grades the Networks...The National Organization for Women grades the networks on their portrayals of women and the Fox network comes in with a big D. Prospective Running Mate...As Texas Governor George W. Bush continues his now-certain bid for the Republican Presidential nomination, political analysts are speculating about prospective running mates. They're saying a popular pro-choice Vice Presidential candidate, like Pennsylvania Governor Tom Ridge, could score big with women voters and all but seal victory for the Republican Party. Play Like a Man, But Win Like a Woman_top CNN executive Gail Evans lays out what she believes are the rules to help women get ahead in the business world without losing their identity. Panel: Bonnie Erbe, Host Lynn Martin, Former Secretary of Labor Julianne Malveaux, Syndicated Columnist Amy Holmes, Independent Women's Forum Michelle Conlin, BusinessWeek [26 minutes]

  • Episode #911

    The pill turns forty... The Birth control pill that freed women and allowed them to plan their families, and sparked a social and cultural revolution in the process, remains the most widely used medication around the world. The Happiness Index...Social scientists are expanding the definition of progress to determine why Americans appear to be less happy than they were thirty years ago, despite the fact they are a lot richer. ~~Senator Feinstein on Gun Control...An interview with Democratic Senator Diane Feinstein of California on whether Congress will now move on gun control using the impetus of the Million Mom March. Panel: Bonnie Erbe, Host Lynn Martin, Former Secretary of Labor Julianne Malveaux, Syndicated Columnist Amy Holmes, Independent Women's Forum Pat Schroeder, Former Rep. (D) Colorado [26 minutes]

  • Episode #912

    Beijing + 5...It's been five years since the UN Women's Conference in Beijing and a lot has been accomplished for womens' rights. We will celebrate the anniversary of this monumental affair, and will examine what the women who were there five years ago, have to say today about their achievements. Women VP's...As they get closer to the conventions, pundits are speculating that the chances of a woman being given the Vice Presidential nomination are growing slim. Panel: Bonnie Erbe, Host Irene Natividad, Women Vote 2000 Ruth Conniff, The Progressive Magazine Elaine Chao, The Heritage Foundation Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton, D-Washington, DC [26 minutes]

  • Episode #913

    For Father's Day..Does society prevent men from being better dads? Some experts say negative images of uninvolved and deadbeat dads in the media hurt fathers and children. Working Woman 500...Bernadette Grey, Editor-in-Chief of Working Woman Magazine on her magazine's picks for the top 500 women-owned and run businesses in America. Panel: Bonnie Erbe, Host Kellyanne Fitzpatrick, Republican Pollster Ruth Conniff, The Progressive Magazine Elaine Chao, The Heritage Foundation Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton, D-Washington, DC [26 minutes]

  • Episode #914

    Mikulski on Social Security-Social Security is a hot issue going into the 2000 Elections, especially for women voters because women on average earn less and live longer than men. Maryland Senator Barbara Mikulski explains why she supports legislative initiatives aimed at securing a healthy and stable safety net for America's 34.1 million seniors. Menopause - With life expectancies higher than ever, women today can expect to live more than one third of their lives after menopause, and treatment options are abundant. However, with all of these options comes confusion and conflicting studies about the pros and cons of the different treatments. We'll help you navigate through the wealth of information with our special report. We begin, however, Social Security and Election 2000 Panel: Bonnie Erbe, Host Toni Ford, Republican Commentator Irene Natividad, Women Vote 2000 Ann Stone, Republicans for Choice Megan Beyer, Political Commentator (1/2) Phyllis Greenberger, Society for the Advancement of Women's Health ( 1/2) [26 minutes]

  • Episode #916

    To The Contrary will have a special Guest Host this week! U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services, Donna Shalala, will be sitting in for Bonnie Erbe who will be away on vacation. Prescription Drugs for Seniors.....The prescription drug bill is at the top of the Senate's priority list when Senators re-convene after their July 4th recess. A bill to do so passed the Republican-led House by a narrow margin last week. Connecticut Parental Leadership Training Institute....... During the past year, To The Contrary has been running a series on programs that support and strengthen families. Family Support America is the driving force behind a variety of creative approaches designed to help families. In part three of To The Contrary's special series of reports, Bonnie Erbe takes us to Connecticut for a course that trains parents to be leaders in their communities. Panel:U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services, Donna Shalala Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton, D-Washington, DC Amy Holmes, Independent Women's Forum Megan Beyer, Political Commentator Karen Miller, Political Commentator [26 minutes]

  • Episode #917

    To The Contrary will have a special Guest Host this week! Former New York Republican Representative Susan Molinari, will be sitting in for Bonnie Erbe who will be away on vacation. Working Women Narrow the Wage Gap...Working Woman magazine's recent national survey says women have narrowed the wage gap, even reversing it in certain professions. The TTC panel discusses where women have made progress and look at where women still have work to do. Women, the Internet and Election 2000. Bonnie Erbe reports on how the Internet is revolutionizing the way women participate in politics. Panel: Former NY Representative Susan Molinari, GUEST HOST Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton, D-Washington, DC Amy Holmes, Independent Women's Forum Megan Beyer, Political Commentator Kellyanne Fitzpatrick, Republican Pollster [26 minutes]

  • Episode #919

    The Ad Gap...The two-hundred billion dollar advertising industry says women don't respond to humorous television ads like men do. Flexible Jobs...According to a new Catalyst study, women CAN have it all, and they can even have the "best of it all." Today, women can raise their children and build their careers at the same time, thanks to flexible work schedules. Behind the headlines_ One welfare to work program that is training women in non-traditional jobs and opening up the job market for them. Panel: Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton, D-Washington, DC Amy Holmes, Independent Women's Forum Laura Flanders, Radioforchange.com Kellyanne Fitzpatrick, Republican Pollster [26 minutes]

  • Episode #921

    Paid Parental Leave...President Clinton's bill to allow parents of newborn children up to 12 weeks of paid leave is shot down in 15 out of 15 states where it was proposed. We'll discuss if paid leave is a nessesity, or a niceity. Empty Nest?... A new poll done by JobTrak. com shows that more college students are returning to their parents homes to live after graduation. Is this a smart financial move or are twenty somethings shying away from the real world? Behind the headlines_ The nine women of the US Senate have gotten together to write a new non-partisan book about being women in the Big Boys Club (the US Senate). We have an interview with Senator Kay Bailey Hutchison (R-TX) who tells us how this all came about. Panel: Host Bonnie Erbe Arianna Huffington, Political Commentator Julianne Malveaux, Syndicated Columnist Karen Miller, Political Commentator Ruth Conniff, The Progressive Magazine [26 minutes]

  • Episode #922

    Women & The Internet...A recent study shows more women than men are using the Internet. Women are also using the Internet to learn about politics and get involved in this year's Presidential election. Behind the headlines_ The Democratic convention is over and we'll take a look at some of the more important issues among women voters. Also, we'll see what the Democratic party is doing to lure the women' s vote. Panel: Host Bonnie Erbe Amy Holmes, USA Today Columnist Kellyanne Fitzpatrick, Republican Pollster Irene Natividad, Women's Vote 2000 Pat Schroeder, Former Rep. (D-CO) [26 minutes]

  • Episode #923

    Capital Punishment... The state of Texas has seen an increase in executions in recent months. We'll look at how this will effect Governor George W. Bush's run for the Presidency. Education Topic in the Elections.... A recent poll shows that education is the number one issue on voters minds this election season. We look at the candidates views on education, and discuss the discrepancy on the issue of school vouchers. Behind the headlines_ The Digital Divide. Some schools have computer equipment and courses which are above par, while others are quite inadequate. We spoke with Senator Barbara Mikulski (D-MD) about what steps Congress is taking to close the digital divide. Panel: Host Bonnie Erbe Amy Holmes, USA Today Columnist Kellyanne Fitzpatrick, Republican Pollster Irene Natividad, Women's Vote 2000 Pat Schroeder, Former Rep. (D-CO) [26 minutes]

  • Episode #924

    Prescription Drugs.......Vice President Al Gore has launched an aggressive ad campaign talking about his prescription drug plan for seniors. The Single Vote...Single voters have largely supported democratic candidates in past elections dating back to 1980, but they claim they are being overlooked in this upcoming election. Behind the headlines_ It's a term we've all heard in discussions- but what exactly is the function and purpose of a corporate board? Lynn Stout, a law professor at Georgetown University, shares the inside secrets of what goes on around the mahogany table, behind closed doors. Panel: Host Bonnie Erbe Alicia Montgomery, Salon.com Elaine Chao, The Heritage Foundation Barbara Olson, New York Times Bestselling Author Patricia Ireland, President of the National Organization for Women~ [26 minutes]

  • Episode #925

    Congress Back in Session.......We'll look at the confounding array of women's issues Congress will be tackling before it adjourns for the November elections. Hispanic Heritage Month...We discuss what effect the Latina vote will have on the upcoming elections. Behind the headlines_ The Wealth of Choices, a new book by Wall Street Journalist Alan Murray on investing in the new economy. Panel: Host Bonnie Erbe Alma Riojas, President and CEO of Mana Irene Natividad, Women Vote 2000 Elaine Chao, The Heritage Foundation Barbara Olson, New York Times Bestselling Author [26 minutes]

  • Episode #926

    The Gender Gap in the vote...A recent CNN/USA Today/Gallup poll shows Vice President Al Gore and Texas Governor George W. Bush remain in a statistical tie with Gore leading by 7 points overall. Another poll released this week by voter.com shows support for the leading two presidential candidates appears to be breaking along gender lines with Gore leading among women, and Bush leading among men. Behind the headlines_There are two schools of thought regarding the healthiest way to approach teen sexuality. One of the two prevailing attitudes is to provide teens with the tools for an open and healthy sexual attitude while the other theory is to encourage an abstinence-only attitude. Panel: Host Bonnie Erbe Rep. Ellen Tauscher D-10th/CA Amy Holmes, USA Today Columnist Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton, D-Washington, DC Ann Stone, President, Republicans For Choice Dr. Aliza Lifshitz, Child Psychologist [26 minutes]

  • Episode #927

    Women Olympiads..... The 2000 Olympic Games are well under way, we take a look at how women are fairing so far in the games. Behind the headlines_Distance Learning or taking college or graduate level classes over the internet is becoming increasingly popular, especially for women who are trying to balance busy schedules. Panel: Host Bonnie Erbe Sen. Patty Muray Amy Holmes Victoria Toensing Julianne Malveaux Ellen Tauscher [26 minutes]

  • Episode #929

    The Supreme Court.........This week included the First Monday in October which means the Supreme Court came back into session. We'll look at what's turning out to be a surprisingly important issue in this campaign: the next President's selection of Supreme Court justices. Behind the headlines_Child Support Assurance. California is working hard to make sure child support gets where it belongs---into the hands of custodial parents. This is especially hard these days because of time limited public assistance. Panel: Host, Bonnie Erbe Rep. Lynn Woolsey, D-CA Toni Ford, PoliticalCommentator Karen Miller, American Legislative Exchange Council Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton, D-Washington, DC [26 minutes]

  • Episode #930

    Women & Election 2000...Debate number two is behind us, with Vice President Al Gore holding on to his steady lead among women voters and Texas Governor George W. Bush holding onto his lead among male voters. Behind the headlines_Cancer patients suffer from many side effects in addition to the cancer itself. The most prevalent and longest lasting of those side effects is fatigue. We'll look at what' s being done to help these cancer patients, especially women, who suffer from fatigue in greater numbers than their male counterparts. Panel: Host, Bonnie Erbe Karen Miller, American Legislative Exchange Council Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton, D-Washington, DC Amy Holmes, USA Today Columnist Phyllis Greenberger, Society for the Advancement of Women's Health Research Alicia Montgomery, Salon.com [26 minutes]

  • Episode #931

    The Great Homework Debate... Are school aged children being swamped with too much homework? Some reports show elementary aged children doing 2 hours of homework a night. Behind the headlines Polypharmacy dangerous drug interactions and the elderly. Older Americans are taking more drugs then ever- from prescription drugs to over the counter remedies to herbal supplements, we'll speak with the experts on how to avoid these medicinal dangers. Panel: Host, Bonnie Erbe Pat Schroeder, Former Representative (D-CO) Janet Parcial, Family Research Council Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton, D-Washington, DC Amy Holmes, USA Today Columnist Phyllis Greenberger, Society for the Advancement of Women's Health Research [26 minutes]

  • Episode #932

    Election 2000 Update... What the polls are showing about women voters going into the last two weeks before the election. Behind the headlines_ Saving Family Farms. Increased urbanization is making it difficult for consumers to locate fresh, organic, local produce and making it hard for the family farms to compete with the rising cost of land. Panel: Host, Bonnie Erbe Ruth Conniff, The Progressive Magazine Julianne Malveaux, Syndicated Columnist Ann Stone, Republicans for Choice Cherylyn Harley, Republican National Committee [26 minutes]

  • Episode #934

    Presidential Election Results...We examine the results and the impact of the elections and what lies ahead for women. Women in Election 2000...We look at the role women played in the elections, women's gains in congress, at the gubernatorial level, and how the new administration may address issues women care about. Panel: Host, Bonnie Erbe Ruth Conniff, The Progressive Magazine Kellyanne Fitzpatrick, Republican Pollster Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton, D-Washington, DC Amy Holmes, USA Today Columnist [26 minutes]

  • Episode #935

    Women and Breast Feeding...Breast milk is considered the perfect food for babies, but a new government report says not enough American moms breast-feed their infants. Behind the Headlines... Alzheimer's disease -- it has a profound impact on women because they live even longer than men and are more likely to be the primary care takers for people suffering from the disease. We take you to Wisconsin to introduce a model program for Alzheimer's patients and care-givers. ~~Panel: Host, Bonnie Erbe Ruth Conniff, The Progressive Magazine Karen Miller, American Legislative Exchange Council Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton, D-Washington, DC Toni Ford, Political Commentator [26 minutes]

  • Episode #936

    Family Support Programs.....This week we focus on special programs designed to keep families together, and ultimately to grow closer by opening the lines of communication. With so many outside influences keeping families apart---from undo media influences that parents don' t like, to a highly mobile society where jobs and economic strains can separate kids geographically---- families can use a little extra help understanding each other. We'll show you how family support programs are helping parents and kids find news ways to reach one another. We'll also examine how young girls are affected by images in the media, and how this translates to their own physical and emotional definitions of themselves. Panel: Host, Bonnie Erbe [26 minutes]

  • Episode #937

    Election Analysis...We will examine the recent events surrounding the Presidential Election. The 25th Anniversary of NAWBO (The National Association of Women Business Owners)...To The Contrary is joining the National Association for Women Business Owners in celebrating their 25th anniversary. We will take a look back at some of the accomplishments of the organization over the last 25 years for women in business. Panel: Bonnie Erbe, Host Arianna Huffington, Political Commentator Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton, D-Washington, DC Cherylyn Harley, Republican National Committee Julianne Malveaux, Syndicated Columnist [26 minutes]

  • Episode #938

    Grading Parents... Schools are trying to get parents more involved in their kids education by grading how well parents do on that front. Administrators in certain schools have launched a new Parental Involvement report card, rating parents on everything from making sure children have adequate school supplies; to whether parents check homework each night. How We Listen...New research reveals fundamental differences between the way men and women listen, which may go a long way toward explaining why men and women sometimes have such trouble communicating. Behind the Headlines...Behind the headlines, the agenda for older women. We introduce you to Deborah Briceland-Betts of the Older Women's League who talks about what older women want from the new administration. Panel: Bonnie Erbe, Host Arianna Huffington, Syndicated Columnist Laura Flanders, radioforchange.com Cherylyn Harley, Republican National Committee Del. Holmes Norton, D-Washington, DC [26 minutes]

  • Episode #939

    Who will be our next President?...We'll take a look at the results of The Supreme Court's decision this past week, and who will be our next President. Behind the Headlines...Millions of women suffer from chronic pain, and it may be needlessly. New advances in medicine have made it so that no one should have to "grin and bear it." More women than men suffer from chronic pain and To The Contrary takes a special look at this important health topic. Panel: Bonnie Erbe, Host Elaine Chao, The Heritage Foundation Del. Holmes Norton, D-Washington, DC Victoria Toensing, Former Federal Prosecutor Phyllis Greenberger, Society For The Advancement of Women' s Health Research Cecilia Munioz, La Raza [26 minutes]

  • Episode #940

    Women & Holiday Shopping...Women control 80 cents of every consumer dollar spent in this country. Merchants fear when the final tally is in, the Christmas shopping season, when stores get their biggest boost, it may not be as big as last year's. We'll look at the role women play in this. Educating unwed teen mothers...The New York Civil Liberties Union charges New York City school counselors and teachers with discriminating against pregnant and parenting teens by strongly encouraging them to leave mainstream schools for "special" high schools Behind the Headlines...the 107th Congress will welcome four new Democratic women Senators. We introduce you to Senator-Elect Debbie Stabenow of Michigan who talks about the rising number of women Senators and what this will mean for the incoming Congress. Panel: Bonnie Erbe, Host Elaine Chao, The Heritage Foundation Del. Holmes Norton, D-Washington, DC Karen Miller, American Legislative Exchange Council Ruth Conniff, The Progressive Magazine [26 minutes]

  • Episode #941

    Women go High-Tech...This week, a special show dedicated to women and technology. Women go hi-tech_.we'll look at how the Internet and technology are changing women's lives. In the year 2000 the number of women on-line in the United States surpassed the number of men. The internet also played a role in the election as well as the post election drama, and in political movements, with the organizing of both the Million Mom March and the World Trade Organization protests online. We'll begin with the political uses of this new technology for women. Then, we'll investigate how women are taking advantage of a new type of education called distance learning.We will also try to sort out some pretty confusing information which says that technology is a man's game and most technological applications are aimed at boys or men. However, survey after survey shows women control 80 cents of every consumer dollar spent in this country. According to Working Woman Magazine, women purchase 66% of all computers and more than 50% of all women use the Internet for business communication, compared with 40% of men. Panel: Bonnie Erbe, Host [26 minutes]

  • Episode #942

    The women of Bush's Cabinet...What effect will these women have on the future of the women of this country. Fewer men on college campuses...Recent studies show that the number of women who attend college has surpassed the number of men. Behind the headlines...An in-depth interview with outgoing Health and Human Services Secretary Donna E. Shalala on her accomplishments as Secretary over the past eight years, and what's in store for her. Panel: Bonnie Erbe, Host Rep. Jennifer Dunn, R-WA Pat Schroeder, Former Representative (D-CO) Elaine Chao, The Heritage Foundation Irene Natividad, Women's Vote 2000 [26 minutes]

  • Episode #943

    HMO's Jump Ship...HMO's are dropping elderly and disabled patients from their plans citing inadequate government reimbursements as the reason. The Meaning of Sex...America's boys and young men seem to be confused and uninformed as to what constitutes risky sexual behavior, a message possibly further confused by President Bill Clinton's sexual scandal which blurred the lines between sexual acts. Behind the headlines...Affirmative Action. Some argue it's a women's issue, not just a minority issue. Panel: Bonnie Erbe, Host Karen Miller, American Legislative Exchange Council Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton, D-Washington, DC Elaine Chao, The Heritage Foundation Michelle Conlin, Business Week [26 minutes]

  • Episode #944

    Attorney General-Designate John Ashcroft's Confirmation Hearings... Confirmation hearings for Attorney General-Designate John Ashcroft were met by enormous protests from liberal women's and civil rights groups. Online Adoptions...A transatlantic battle over twins born in St Louis. Behind the headlines...A conversation with newly-elected Representative Susan Davis of California on bipartisan cooperation among women members. Panel: Bonnie Erbe, Host Amy Holmes, USA Today Columnist Irene Natividad, Women Vote 2000 Arianna Huffington, Syndicated Columnist Megan Beyer, Political Commentator [26 minutes]

  • Episode #945

    Mind Your Manners... A California school district is considering a voluntary code that encourages students to formally address their teachers as "sir" or "ma'am" and stand when they enter the classroom. Women Shopping on the Internet...A new finding shows that women are car shopping on the Internet in order to avoid pushy sales people, and are saving money in the process Behind the headlines...An interview with Senator Mary Landrieu of Louisiana about the Senate's New Democrats. Panel: Bonnie Erbe, Host Arianna Huffington, Syndicated Columnist Irene Natividad, Women Vote 2000 Amy Holmes, USA Today Columnist Ruth Conniff, The Progressive Magazine [26 minutes]

  • Episode #946

    Bush's Religion-Based Plan....President George W. Bush wants to open government funding to religious-based social services. Reality TV... A live birth on national television---is reality TV going too far? Behind the headlines...A conversation with newly elected Republican Representative Melissa Hart of Pennsylvania on issues she'll be championing, and the influence of Republican women in Congress. Panel: Bonnie Erbe, Host Cherylyn Harley, Republican National Committee Michelle Singletary, Washington Post Columnist Kellyanne Fitzpatrick, Republican Pollster Ruth Conniff, The Progressive Magazine [26 minutes]

  • Episode #947

    Parents Who Give Too much...American parents, often criticized for not doing enough to help their children, may be doing too much. Bush's Prescription Drug Plan...Critics argue that it excludes too many people. Behind the headlines...The incidence of breast cancer has been increasing steadily. To The Contrary introduces you to a movement that is looking at possible environmental causes for this trend. Panel: Bonnie Erbe, Host Cherylyn Harley, Republican National Committee Rep. Louise Slaughter, D-NY Devra Davis Ph.D., Visiting Professor Carnegie Mellon Univ. Michelle Singletary, Washington Post Pat Harrison, Former Chair RNC [26 minutes]

  • Episode #948

    Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton... Senator Clinton is facing a barrage of negative publicity - yet again - in her first few weeks in office as she attempts to remake her image once again. More women than men hurt by banned drugs...More women than men have been hurt by drugs originally approved for distribution by the FDA and then banned shortly thereafter. Behind the headlines...Maryland Democratic Senator Barbara Mikulski clues us into the secrets of the women senators how they transcend party lines to tackle issues affecting women, children and families. Panel: Bonnie Erbe, Host Del. Holmes Norton, D-Washington, DC Rep. Sue Myrick, R-NC Rep. Susan Davis, D-CA Amy Holmes, USA Today Columnist [26 minutes]

  • Episode #949

    Welfare Marriages...Conservatives in Congress want women on welfare to get married Diggin' Out of Debt...Gen-X'ers are carrying higher-than-ever debt: an average of almost $3000 dollars on their credit cards--- and most seem unfazed by it. Behind the headlines... Missouri Democratic Senator Jean Carnahan picks up her late husband's fight for better public education. Panel: Bonnie Erbe, Host Del. Holmes Norton, D-Washington, DC Janet Parshall, Family Research Council Megan Beyer, Political Commentator Amy Holmes, USA Today Columnist [26 minutes]

  • Episode #952

    Women's History Month........March is Women's History Month, but some critics argue that this month long memorial to women is no longer necessary. To The Contrary spoke with prominent feminists on both sides of the issue. Teens Too Soon... Scientists have noticed an alarming trend, girls as young as six years old reaching puberty. Behind the headlines... Unsung Heroines. Each year To The Contrary honors women who are pillars in their communities. We'll introduce you to this year's awardees. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #1001

    Pay Equity....A new Census Bureau report this week shows that 13% of full-time working men compared to four percent of full-time working women make over $75,000 per year. Drug testing in pregnant women... In a Supreme Court ruling this week, Justices found it unconstitutional to test pregnant women for drugs without their consent. Behind the headlines... The Healthy Steps Program educates parents on child rearing issues. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #1002

    U.S. Census Numbers...The number of Hispanic Americans now roughly equals that of African-Americans. We'll talk about the impact of this major demographic change on race relations, particularly among women. Behind The Headlines... Women & Heart Health. Heart disease is the number one health threat facing women today. While 36% of American women will die of heart disease, a recent American Heart Association survey finds only eight percent fear heart disease as the leading cause of death. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #1003

    The Wage Gap... A U.S. Census Bureau report says women strengthened their presence in the business world in the 1990's. However, a Labor Department survey of Federal contractors shows the average woman working for a government contracting firm is paid only 72 cents for every dollar a man earns. Behind The Headlines... Spirituality & Healing. To The Contrary looks at a new movement that claims spiritual people live longer, healthier lives. Panelists: Bonnie Erbe, Host Ruth Conniff, The Progressive Magazine Arianna Huffington, Syndicated Columnist Cherylyn Harley, Republican Strategist Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton, D-Washington, DC [26 minutes]

  • Episode #1005

    School Violence...This week marks the anniversary of the tragedy at Columbine. Certain school districts are cracking down on an outbreak of school violence with ant-bully policies. Men's Biological Clocks.. .Women aren't the only ones whose biological clocks start ticking as they get older. A recent study suggests that a man's age could be an important factor in reproduction, and later, a child's development. Behind The Headlines...Conservative women are feeling empowered with a new Republican-led administration. We sat down to talk with one of the movement's chief crusaders for over 35 years, Phyllis Schlafly, President of The Eagle Forum. Panelists: Bonnie Erbe, Host Maria Echaveste, Former White House Deputy Chief of Staff Pat Schroeder, Former Representative (D-CO) Angela McGlowan, FOX News Correspondent Kellyanne Fitzpatrick, Republican Pollster [26 minutes]

  • Episode #1006

    INS Deadline...Thousands of illegal immigrants rush to the altar to meet the April 30th deadline after which it is much tougher to stay here legally. Dating Down...The less-powerful boyfriend with so many women achieving positions of high status and power it's no wonder more powerful single women are marrying and dating men with less status. Behind The Headlines...The former co-chair of the Republican National Committee and major Republican fundraiser Pat Harrison tells To The Contrary about the power struggle between men and women behind the scenes in politics. Panelists: Bonnie Erbe, Host Maria Echaveste, Former Clinton Deputy Chief of Staff Kellyanne Fitzpatrick, Republican Pollster Megan Beyer, Political Commentator Toni Ford, Political Commentator [26 minutes]

  • Episode #1007

    A new study shows the number of girls getting arrested and prosecuted has dramatically risen. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #1008

    SENATOR HILLARY RODHAM CLINTON TALKS TO TTC...New York Democratic Senator and former first lady Hillary Rodham Clinton sits down with To The Contrary to talk about her legislative agenda on education as part of our continuing series of interviews with new members of Congress. Child-Free Worker Benefits...As the nation observes Mother's Day, the schism continues between working parents and childfree workers. The latest twist is childfree workers are spearheading the movement toward a new array of benefits for workers with no children. Panelists: Bonnie Erbe, Host Ellen Goodman, The Boston Globe Maria Echaveste, Former Clinton Deputy Chief of Staff Angela McGlowan, FOX News Political Analyst Ann Stone, Republicans for Choice [26 minutes]

  • Episode #1009

    Governor Jane Swift...Governor Jane Swift of Massachusetts is living another American first: she is the first woman to give birth and take maternity leave while running a state, but opponents question the legality of this practice.. Another Clinton?...Florida Governor Jeb Bush quells rumors of an affair at a press conference earlier this week. Behind The Headlines...Broadband Distance Learning. Improvements in technology have made distance-learning classes more like the real thing! Panelists: Bonnie Erbe, Host Rep. Loretta Sanchez (D-CA) Cherylyn Harley, Republican Strategist Victoria Toensing, Former Federal Prosecutor Ruth Conniff, The Progressive Magazine [26 minutes]

  • Episode #1010

    The changing face of the American family....The number of unmarried couples living together has soared by 71 percent in the past ten years, and the number of women raising children without fathers is also way up. Women and the loneliness of cancer...Female patients are eight to twelve times more likely than male patients to go through a divorce or separation after being diagnosed with cancer. Behind The Headlines...To The Contrary kicks off its tenth season, and they said it couldn't be done. We'll show you some of the women and women's issues we've highlighted over the years. Panelists: Bonnie Erbe, Host Rep. Loretta Sanchez (D-CA) Cherylyn Harley, Republican Strategist Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-DC) Karen Miller, American Legislative Exchange Council [26 minutes]

  • Episode #1011

    Au Contraire!...Contrary to popular beliefs the French are no more or less sexual then Americans. He Mail She Mail.....Gender differences in the ways that men and women use e mail. Behind The Headlines... Pesticides in Schools: A new movement has been launched by concerned parents who want answers about pesticide use in schools. Panelists: Bonnie Erbe, Host Michelle Singeltary, The Washington Post Angela McGlowan, FOX News Political Analyst Patricia Ireland, Pres. National Organization for Women Karen Miller, Republican Commentator Claire Barnett, Health Schools Network [26 minutes]

  • Episode #1012

    [26 minutes]

  • Episode #1013

    Men sexually harass men in the work place....Many men are complaining of unwanted sexual advances or lewd remarks made in the work place. Men out of touch with health care system.....A new report finds most men don't see doctors or have regular check ups nearly enough. Behind The Headlines... Father's Day! Our all male panel will examine the role of father's in today's society. Panelists: Bonnie Erbe, Host Steve Roberts, ABC News Tom Squiteri, USA Today Askia Muhammad, The Washington Informer Ray Suarez, PBS [26 minutes]

  • Episode #1014

    Cell Phones on the Road....Most states are considering banning cell phone use while driving Behind The Headlines... Gender Differences in Medicine. A new report from the Institute of Medicine shows medical differences between men and women go way beyond the reproductive system right down to each cell. Panelists: Bonnie Erbe, Host Irene Natividad, Women Vote 2000 JulianneMalveaux, Syndicated Columnist Ann Stone, Republicans For Choice Cherylyn Harley, Republican Strategist [26 minutes]

  • Episode #1015

    Texas mother drowns all five of her children.....We'll examine the phenomena of postpartum depression. The rise of plus sized models!... ..More and more "real sized" women are walking the runways and gracing the covers of fashion magazines Behind The Headlines... Alpha Women. The editor in chief of MORE Magazine, Myrna Blyth, gives us insight into the powerful women of the baby boomer generation the Alpha Woman. Panelists: Bonnie Erbe, Host Del Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-DC) Toni Ford, Projected Reality Cooperation Megan Beyer, Political Commentator Kellyanne Conway, The Polling Company [26 minutes]

  • Episode #1016

    A novel approach to paring down the welfare rolls....One California county is paying welfare recipients to move away. Summer Flicks...... ......This year's crop of summer movies casts women in a new role action hero. Behind The Headlines...Fen-Phen. We'll take a look at the deadly diet-drug combination Fen-Phen, which is now off the market: Panelists: Bonnie Erbe, Host Del Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-DC) Maria Echaveste, Former Clinton Deputy Chief of Staff Cherylyn Harley, Republican Commentator Genivieve Wood, Family Resource Council [26 minutes]

  • Episode #1017

    Bush nominations............The number of women and people of color nominated for top Administration jobs has dropped sharply under President Bush. Survey says........... A majority of white Americans hold misconceptions about the status of minorities, according to a startling new study Behind The Headlines...Marketing to women. Marketing guru Faith Popcorn explains how companies are targeting women consumers Panelists: Bonnie Erbe, Host Michelle Conlin, BusinessWeek Angela McGlowan, Fox News Analyst Michelle Singletary, Washington Post Genevieve Wood, Family Resource Council [26 minutes]

  • Episode #1018

    Single Sex Public Schools.............Single sex public schools in California have apparently failed to eradicate sex discrimination. Flex-time.............Career women who work flexible schedules or telecommute fall behind their full time, in-office counterparts. Behind The Headlines...Affordable Housing. It's increasingly hard to find in today's hot real estate market, and many long-time inner city residents are being priced out. Panelists: Bonnie Erbe, Host Rep. Connie Morella, (R-Maryland) Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton, (D- Washington, DC) Kellyanne Conway, Republican Pollster Irene Natividad, Women Vote [26 minutes]

  • Episode #1019

    American boys in trouble....Young boys do worse in school and get into more trouble with the law than girls. Deadbeat Dad........... The Wisconsin Supreme Court bars a father of nine from procreating until he makes good on child support payments Behind the headlines, Christine Todd Whitman........... Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Christine Todd Whitman on what she calls "The Resource Chicks---the three female members of the Bush cabinet who control environmental regulations. Panelists: Bonnie Erbe, Host Rep. Loretta Sanchez (D-CA) Megan Beyer, Political Commentator Kellyanne Conway, Republican Pollster Cherylyn Harley, Republican Commentator [26 minutes]

  • Episode #1020

    "Social Surrogacy".... Working women forgoing pregnancy for the sake of careers - and hiring surrogate mothers to go through pregnancy for them. His and Hers.......... Joint banking and checking accounts for married couples may be becoming passe... as couples increase financial independence. Also, post-nuptial agreements join pre-nuptial agreements. Behind the headlines, Plastic Surgery........... Liposuction for men? TTC talks to Dr. Scott Spear of Georgetown University Hospital about the latest trends in plastic surgery. Panelists: Bonnie Erbe, Host Megan Beyer, Political Commentator Kellyanne Conway, Republican Pollster Cherylyn Harley, Republican Commentator Karen DeWitt, Producer/Writer [26 minutes]

  • Episode #1022

    Spoiled brats?............. Is this generation of kids more spoiled than those before? Moms with HIV......... Advances in medicine now allow HIV-positive women to have children with little chance of passing the disease down to their babies. Should HIV-positive women procreate? Behind the headlines, the future of feminism........... New National Organization for Women President Kim Gandy talks to To the Contrary about feminism and the Bush Administration. Panelists: Bonnie Erbe, Host Maria Echaveste, Former Clinton Deputy Chief of Staff Kellyanne Conway, Republican Pollster Irene Natividad, Women Vote Angela McGlowan, FOX Political News Analyst [26 minutes]

  • Episode #1023

    In light of increasing research in the area of women's health, host Bonnie Erbe examines three specific topics of interest to women. First, several heart attack survivors are interviewed about their experiences. Statistics about women and heart disease are shared, along with preventative measures women can take. Next women's health in regards to cancer is discussed, in particular the problem of cancer fatigue. Finally, the program examines the problem of drug interaction and looks at ways seniors can ensure they are not taking drugs in dangerous combinations. [26 minutes]

  • A to the Contrary Labor Day Special.... (#1024)

    An interview with U.S. Labor Secretary Elaine Chao on the Department of Labor's new office, the 21st Century Workforce Initiative. - To The Contrary travels to Texas to cover its worker retraining program, Project Quest. Panelists: Bonnie Erbe, Host Michelle Conlin, BusinessWeek Maureen Conway, Aspen Institute Victoria Toensing, Former Federal Prosecutor Karen DeWitt, Writer/Producer Angela McGlowan, FOX Political News Analyst [26 minutes]

  • Episode #1026

    The ethics of medical advertising.... Consumer groups are angry that drugs and medical procedures are being aggressively marketed to consumers. State of the Worlds Children...........United Nations releases a report on the state of the world's children, just in time for the U.N. world conference this week. Behind the headlines..... Interior Secretary Gale Norton discusses the controversy over drilling in the Alaskan Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, and its impact on American families. Panelists: Bonnie Erbe, Host Genevieve Wood, Family Research Council Michelle Singletary, Washington Post Amy Richards, Ms. Magazine Cherylyn Harley,Republican Strategist [26 minutes]

  • Episode #1027

    A Call to War ....President Bush talks to the nation about our upcoming battle with terrorists in the Middle East. Women in the Military...........An interview with retired Army General Claudia Kennedy about the US anti-terrorism efforts and how military women are involved. Behind the headlines..... We hear from the Children's National Medical Center's Department of Psychiatry Chair on how boys and girls react differently to the recent tragedies. Panelists: Bonnie Erbe, Host Rep. Melissa Hart (R-PA) Rep. Loretta Sanchez (D-CA) Victoria Toensing, Former Federal Prosecutor Maria Echaveste, Former Clinton Deputy Chief of Staff [26 minutes]

  • Episode #1028

    This episode focused on the gender differences in medicine and why medical research should be gender-specific. Topics included an interview with country singer Trisha Yearwood, who lost both grandmothers to cancer, advances in gender-based research, women and depression and auto-immune diseases such as lupus and rheumatoid arthritis, which occur predominantly in women. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #1113

    Making Cities Safer: The Canadian city of Montreal is attempting some radical urban design changes to make cities safer places for women. Men Only Club?: No women considered for top network anchor slots. Behind the Headlines: A Father's Day special. Getting young fathers more involved with their children. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #1114

    Spreading Sex Scandal: The priest sex abuse scandal widens to include allegations of abuse of women and girls. Title IX turns 30: It's the 30th anniversary of Title IX, which opened up athletic opportunities for girls and young women, but many schools still aren't obeying the law. Behind the headlines: Welfare reform's impact on children [26 minutes]

  • Episode #1115

    Sex Education Gone Bad: Teacher-student sex goes under the radar. Hey Big Spender: Marrying Mr. Right means finding Mr. Rich for many city women. A new study by Cornell University says urban single women place more importance on a man's income than do rural women. Behind the headlines: Democratic congresswoman Loretta Sanchez of California and her sister Linda, who's also running for Congress, could become the first sisters in the U.S. House of Representatives. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #1116

    This episode of To the Contrary looks at education reform at the administrative level. It explores how recruiting principals and superintendents from outside education may help schools. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #1117

    HIV alert: A new report released at the International AIDS conference says many Americans infected with the HIV virus didn't know they have it. A news flash on hot flashes: A major government study on hormone replacement therapy is abandoned due to increased cases of breast cancer, stroke and heart disease in study participants. Behind the headlines: Racial tensions caused by immigration continue to plague American cities, but one Washington, DC neighborhood is working to relieve those tensions by telling stories. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #1118

    Church Power Slips: the priest sex abuse scandal has weakened the political might of the Catholic Church. Catholic legislators are challenging traditional Church positions on a range of issues affecting women, children and families. Paging Dr. Mom: pharmaceutical companies are aggressively marketing their products to the general public--and many of these ads target women. Are they educating consumers or simply hawking drugs? Behind the headlines: few women know about emergency contraception and even fewer have used it. We speak with Washington Democratic senator Patty Murray about her bill that would create a public education campaign about emergency contraceptives. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #1119

    Nest Eggs Cracked: The market meltdown is forcing many would-be retirees to postpone plans and current retirees to go back to work. Behind the headlines: African-American women are fighting to end smoking in their communities. We highlight "Not in Mama's Kitchen," one very successful anti-tobacco campaign. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #1120

    Plays Well with Others? The traditional ticket to tenure in academia was based on teaching, research, and service to the institution. Today, many female professors are protesting the qualification of "collegiality" in tenure decision. Just Say No: Who needs a husband? is a question more older women are asking themselves, and responding with "I don't." The Supreme Court recently struck down provisions of a federal law that would criminalize so-called "virtual child pornography." A look at this controversial move to protect our first amendment rights. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #1121

    November's gubernatorial elections could produce a record number of woman governors. New Florida adoption law which mandates that women divulge their sexual past when giving a baby up for adoption. Women and Violent Sports: Jennifer Lawler, author of "Punch!" tells us why more women are participating in contact and violent sports. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #1122

    Protecting our Children: President Bush launches a war of a different color: against a recent wave of child murders and abductions. Women on Board: Norway's answer to corporate corruption: bring more women on board! The Norwegian government requires that 40% of corporate board directors be women. Behind the headlines: Child Obesity. An estimated 13 percent of children in the US are overweight, and heart disease and diabetes are striking early. [26 minutes]

  • Episode #1123

    TITLE IX UNDER ATTACK? (new story): Presidential Commission on Equal Opportunity in Athletics to begin hearings on the future of Title IX. Fluke or Cultural Shift?: In an unprecedented move for a major newspaper, the New York Times starts including announcements of same-sex commitments in its Sunday Styles section. Meanwhile a new report says that traditional bastion of the conservative good ol' boy network--corporate America---is overwhelmingly gay-and-lesbian friendly. Behind the headlines: Shamed Wives Philandering husbands are nothing new, but some women experience betrayal complicated by swarms of reporters and cameras rolling. [26 minutes]

« Upcoming Episodes

« Back to Programs A-Z