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The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer

The NewsHour with Jim Lehrer

THE NEWSHOUR WITH JIM LEHRER provides in-depth analysis of current events with a news summary, live studio interviews, discussions, and both foreign and domestic on-site reports.

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  • Continuing Coverage Spots

    [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6003

    "Problem Solved?", a Kwame Holman report on an apparent breakthrough in the three-week standoff against Iraq, after Saddam Hussein agreed to allow U.N. weapons inspectors, including American members, to return to Baghdad, followed by a conversation in which U.N. ambassador Bill Richardson commented on the United Nations' and the United States' insistence that no concessions had been granted to Iraq, skepticism about Saddam Hussein's willingness to follow through on the agreement, documentation of Iraq's attempts to avoid weapons inspections, UNSCOM's authority to destroy the weapons it discovered, concerns about what Iraq might have done during the three week-long standoff, Russia's role in brokering the agreement, and the United States' position on Iraq's call for a loosening of sanctions. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6004

    "No Precedent," a discussion on the surprise settlement of an important affirmative action case in New Jersey scheduled to go before the Supreme Court in January, in which Hugh Price of the National Urban League and Clint Bolick of the Institute For Justice commented on civil rights groups' decision to contribute to the settlement costs of Piscataway School Board v. Taxman, concerns that the court might use the case to make a broad ruling against affirmative action, the extent to which the action was unprecedented in American juris prudence, affirmative action's current standing in the courts, the court's past rulings on the issue, and the outlook for Supreme Court consideration of similar affirmative action cases. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6005

    "Money Troubles," an Elizabeth Farnsworth report from Vancouver on the APEC conference's focus on the abrupt reversal of Asia's economic fortunes, a series of events likened by some to the sudden unraveling of Soviet-led socialism, followed by a conversation in which Arthur Alexander of the Japan Economic Institute commented on the failure of the Yamaichi brokerage house, questions about Japan's capacity to resist the contagion of economic collapse, the Japanese government's response to the crisis, questions about the vulnerability of Japan's banking system, the consequences of inadequate deregulation in the Asian financial markets, the extent to which Japan's economic problems were unique, Alexander's belief that the situation needed to deteriorate further in order to lay the foundation for long-term health, and questions about the United States' vulnerability to Japan's economic woes. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6006

    "Growing Threat," excerpts from a news conference in which Secretary of Defense William Cohen called efforts by United Nations inspectors to uncover Iraq's chemical and biological weapons a "long-term project" and said there were no plans to withdraw the extra warships and planes that the United States had rushed to the Persian Gulf in anticipation of a possible military showdown with Iraq, followed by a conversation in which the chairman of the United Nations Special Commission on Iraq (UNSCOM), Richard Butler, commented on Iraq's efforts to evade and deceive inspectors, evidence that the Iraqis had concealed and moved weapons-making equipment and ingredients during the month-long standoff against the United Nations, evidence that Saddam Hussein had produced the VX nerve agent, questions about where the Iraqis were storing the deadly toxin, Butler's failure to understand both why Saddam wanted such weapons and why he was willing to incur such costs in order to retain them, questions about how the Iraqis' gained advance notice about some of UNSCOM's activities, and the size of Iraq's weapons-building and "defeat UNSCOM" industries. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6007

    "Summing Up," a conversation on the recently-concluded Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation meeting in Vancouver, in which deputy treasury secretary Lawrence Summers commented on the value of the gathering, common elements in Asia's troubled economies, the particular problems faced by Japan, the sense in which the current situation could be seen as a "21st Century crisis," the IMF's role in bail-out efforts, charges that the United States bore some responsibility for the current state of affairs, America's interest in financial stability there, speculation that the worst might not be over for Asia, and the importance of building confidence in the region's economic future. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6008

    "Giving Thanks," U.S. Poet Laureate Robert Pinsky's reading of 19th Century poet Lucy Larcom's poem, "The Volunteers' Thanksgiving." [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6009

    "Great Expectations," a Kwame Holman report on the outlook for the all-important holiday shopping season, followed by a discussion on the retail climate, in which WEFA group economist Sandra Shaber, J.C. Penney CEO Jim Oesterreicher, Cobra Electronics Corporation president Jerry Kalov, and National Black Chamber of Commerce president Harry Alford spoke to Phil Ponce about the generally high level of consumer confidence, the outlook for their particular sectors, evidence that inner city consumers were planning to spend more of their shopping dollars locally, the high level of consumer debt in America, the extent to which current global concerns like the economic turmoil in Asia and the global warming conference in Kyoto affected the behavior of American consumers, the low level of unemployment at present, conflicting data on the level of customer service demanded by the shoppers, worries about over-capacity in the retail sector, and the relatively low level of self-employment among African Americans. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6015

    "What Went Wrong?", a Tom Bearden report on the National Transportation Safety Board's hearing into the July 17, 1996 crash of TWA Flight 800, an enduring mystery whose likeliest explanation -- a central fuel tank explosion -- raised questions about how best to safeguard against similar disasters in the future and whether or not it was wise to institute expensive new safety recommendations based only on a theory. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6016

    "Independent Decision," a Kwame Holman report on congressional testimony in which Attorney General Janet Reno and FBI director Louis Freeh explained their conflicting views on whether an independent counsel should be appointed to investigate the administration's fund-raising activities, followed by a discussion in which Reps. Tom Lantos (D-CA) and John Shadegg (R-AZ) commented on the significance of the hearings, the extent to which they revealed new information about fund-raising practices, Reno's and Freeh's refusal to provide detail about their conflicts, charges that Reno and Free were incapable of conducting a credible investigation into the politicians who hired them, charges that public confidence in the justice department was at risk in the current controversy, claims that committee chairman Dan Burton's hearings were driven by partisan concerns. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6017

    "Clearing the Air," a Margaret Warner report on the major obstacles to agreement at the U.N. convention on global climate change, followed by a conversation in which deputy national security adviser Jim Steinberg commented on the outlook for agreement among the developed countries, the United States' insistence that developing countries subscribe to the agreement, the controversy over the proposed trading of emissions credits, the Senate vote to reject any treaty that didn't include developing countries, reports that the United States was willing to agree to emissions levels 7% below 1990 levels, questions about the president's "market-based" approach to emissions reductions, the outlook for enactment of a global warming pact, and the business and environmental lobbyists' impact on the Kyoto deliberations. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6018

    "Clearing the Air," a Margaret Warner report on the details of the agreement reached by delegates to the Kyoto conference on global warming, followed by a discussion in which Sens. Joseph Lieberman (D-CT) and Pat Roberts (R-KS) commented on the significance of the agreement, concerns about the treaty's impact on the American economy, complaints about developing countries' failure to sign on to the treaty, the amount of time the treaty granted for compliance, the outlook for the development of new energy-saving technologies, questions about the treaty's impact on the operations of the U.S. military, and concerns about the proposed trading of pollution credits. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6019

    "Big Bailout," a Kwame Holman report on the workings of the International Monetary Fund (IMF), both generally and in regard to its recent bailout of South Korea, followed by a conversation in which IMF managing director Michel Camdessus spoke to Margaret Warner about the continuing plunge of the South Korean currency, the IMF's failure thus far to reverse investors' skepticism about that country's economic situation, evidence that South Korea's debts were greater than originally estimated, the Korean people's resentment over the bailout, the close relationship between the private and public sector in South Korea, claims that the IMF's terms were so strict that they would stifle future growth there, questions about the propriety of bailing out private businesses, speculation about whether the situation in South Korea might grow even worse, Camdessus' rejection of the term "bailout," and the chances of Japan suffering an economic collapse like that of South Korea. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6020

    "Interim Appointment," excerpts from a news conference in which President Clinton announced his appointment of Bill Lann Lee as acting assistant attorney general for civil rights, bypassing the Senate confirmation process and angering congressional Republicans who objected to Lee's history of support for affirmative action, followed by a discussion in which Sens. Larry Craig (R-ID) and Diane Feinstein (D-CA) commented on the significance of the president's action, the basis of Republicans' opposition to Lee, threats of retribution by Republicans, the president's decision not to make Lee his recess appointment, the distinction between "recess" and "acting" appointments, charges that the Republicans' principal motivations were political, and the possibility of additional slowdowns in the confirmation process. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6021

    "Q & A," excerpts from a press conference in which President Clinton answered questions about tax reform, affirmative action, the U.S. troop deployment in Bosnia, Saddam Hussein's continued defiance of the United Nations and United States, and the outlook for a "dialogue" with Iran. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6022

    "Creating Confidence," a Paul Solman report on the Japanese government's decision to reduce income taxes in an effort to increase consumer confidence, which was badly shaken in the wake of the economic turmoil that had swept through Asia. followed by a discussion in which Hugh Patrick of Columbia University and Mike Mochizuki of the Brookings Institution commented on Japanese business leaders' current pessimism about the economy, Japan's importance to the U.S. economy, that country's historically restrictive fiscal policy, the reason it took the government so long to address Japan's economic problems, questions about the tax cut's likely impact, the uncompetitive nature of Japan's service sector relative to the strength of its manufacturing sector, concerns that a collapse of the Japanese economy could lead to a global depression, the high level of risk aversion among Japanese consumers, and the American economy's vulnerability to the Japanese and emerging markets. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6023

    "Bosnia," excerpts from a news conference in which President Clinton called for an open-ended extension of the U.S. troop deployment in Bosnia; followed by a conversation in which national security adviser Samuel Berger commented on the achievements of the peace-keeping forces, the importance of maintaining an international troop presence in the war-torn country, the goals of the U.S. military, the likely timetable for withdrawal, the outlook for the apprehension of indicted war criminals, and the current standoff between the United Nations and Iraq; and a discussion in which Sens. Kay Bailey Hutchison (R-TX) and Joseph Lieberman (D-CT) commented on the lack of a "clear mission" in Bosnia, the administration's past promises to withdraw its troops by dates certain, the lack of economic stability in Bosnia, the results of the recent elections there, the possibility that Congress might try to withhold funding for the deployment, and calls for the apprehension of indicted war criminals like Radovan Karadzic. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6024

    "Korean Crossroads," a report on the presidential election in South Korea, where Kim Dae Jung became the first opposition candidate elected in fifty years, followed by a discussion in which Asia analyst Chung Min Lee, Han Park of the University of Georgia, and former U.S. ambassador to South Korea Donald Gregg commented on the significance of the election, Kim Dae Jung's long history in Korean politics, his international reputation as a crusader for democracy, the extent to which his victory owed to a split in the ruling party, his move toward the political center, the precarious condition of the Korean stock and currency markets, the immediate challenges Jung faced upon assuming office, questions about his economic agenda, and the effect of the election on relations with North Korea. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6025

    "Extended Mission," a Charles Krause report on President Clinton's visit to Sarajevo, where he announced an extension of the U.S. troop deployment in the still-troubled region; followed by a discussion in which Balkan analyst Obrad Kesic, former NATO supreme commander Gen. George Joulwan (ret.), and author David Rieff spoke to Margaret Warner about the achievements of the allied troops, the difference between preventing war and achieving peace, the status of efforts to rebuild Bosnia, the difficulty of establishing new democratic institutions there, the large number of refugees who were still unable to return to areas where their ethnic groups were not in the majority, speculation about whether Bosnia would end up as a multi-ethnic state or a partitioned one, NATO's refusal to assist in refugee return; and a discussion in which newspaper editors Lee Cullum of the Dallas Morning News, Cynthia Tucker of the Atlanta Constitution, Mike Barnicle of the Boston Globe, Patrick McGuigan of the Daily Oklahoman, and Robert Kittle of the San Diego Union-Tribune commented on the president's decision, public opinion on the issue, the outlook for American casualties there, and the consequences of pulling out of Bosnia too early. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6026

    "World View," a Margaret Warner report on the United States' position in the world as 1997 drew to a close, followed by a discussion in which Fareed Zakaria of Foreign Affairs magazine, Jim Hoagland of the Washington Post, and Trudy Rubin of the Philadelphia Inquirer commented on the Clinton administration's world view, charges that the administration had placed too much emphasis on the "televised crisis du jour" to the neglect of more fundamental foreign policy issues, the president's focus on economic issues over political ones, the United States' achievements in Bosnia, evidence that other countries had begun to form united fronts against America on particular issues, charges that the Congress was undercutting the president's ability to exercise foreign policy, continued uncertainties associated with the end of the Cold War, concerns about the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, downsides to the global spread of capitalism, dangers associated with the spread of "illiberal democracies," and the larger ramifications of globalization, [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6027

    "Nichols Verdict," a report on the reaction of survivors and family members to the conviction of Terry Nichols on charges of conspiracy and involuntary manslaughter -- but not murder -- in the second Oklahoma City bombing trial, followed by a discussion in which Tim Sullivan of Court TV and criminal defense attorney Dan Recht commented on reactions in the courtroom, the judge's decision to allow jurors to consider the death penalty for Nichols, the sense in which the verdict amounted to a victory for the defense, apparent contradictions in the jurors' reasoning, the major differences between the trials of Timothy McVeigh and Terry Nichols, and the outlook for the sentencing phase in the latter trial. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6028

    "Seeking Spirituality," a Richard Ostling report on the pursuit of sacred experiences in everyday life through devotional practices drawn from one's own and other traditions, including the Christian, Jewish, Buddhist, and "New Age" disciplines. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6029

    "Money In Motion," a report on the IMF's decision to provide an additional $10 billion in rescue loans to the troubled South Korean economy, followed by a discussion on whether South Korea's stock and currency markets had bottomed out, in which Republic of Korea spokesman Hyuck Choi, international investor Andrew Kim, and Stanley Fischer of the IMF spoke to Phil Ponce about the rallying of Korean markets following the recent announcement, the package of reforms to which the Korean government had agreed, the importance of opening the Korean economy to international investment, the apparent diminishing of domestic obstacles to such changes, the problem of overcapacity due to over-leveraging and over-borrowing by the South Korean private sector, questions about the extent of liabilities there, the accuracy of current data on South Korea's economic condition, charges that the international community had no interest in bailing out mismanaged economies, evidence of a change in investor confidence about South Korea, the importance of dismantling the "historic collusion" between that country's government and business, and the likely impact of the recent change in South Korea's political leadership. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6030

    "Penalty Phase," a discussion on the penalty phase of the Terry Nichols trial, in which Tim Sullivan of Court TV commented on the prosecution's and defense's opening statements, the likely course of the penalty phase, jurors' reactions to the arguments and testimony, Nichols' reactions in the courtroom, and the options available to the jury. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6031

    "Banking On Korea," a conversation on the private banking industry's participation in the Korean economic bailout, in which economic historian Ron Chernow spoke to Margaret Warner about the extent to which South Korea's foreign debt was owed to private banks, the short-term nature of that country's foreign debt, treasury secretary Bob Rubin's role in orchestrating the show of support, South Korea's importance as a kind of buffer between the Southeast Asian currency crisis and Japan's economic problems, the inadequacy of the IMF's $57 billion rescue package as originally conceived, the private banks' decision to roll over their loans for thirty days in order to lessen the chances of default in South Korea, fears that the Korean bailout would precipitate economic crises in other countries, charges that the IMF money would ultimately be used to repay private western banks, and South Korea's responsibility to institute long-overdue economic reforms. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6032

    "Global Economy," a Spencer Michels report on the growing interdependence of the world's economy's, as evidenced by the global reverberations from the economic turmoil in Southeast Asia, followed by a discussion in which Michael Mussa of the IMF, journalist William Greider, and Paul Krugman of MIT commented on the ramifications for the American economy, charges that the world's leading economic powers had made unreasonable assumptions about the health of the Asian economies, the current health of the American economy, calls for less government intervention in developing economies, and the Federal Reserve's power relative to that of the International Monetary Fund. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6033

    "Family Tragedies," a Betty Ann Bowser report on the Kennedy family and their long history of personal tragedy, followed by a discussion in which Haynes Johnson, Doris Kearns Goodwin and Michael Beschloss commented on how the family's tragedies have become almost Shakespearean in their number, and the possibility that the Kennedys tempt fate more than others with their ethos of "living life fully." [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6034

    A conversation with Senators Hatch and Leahy over Supreme Court Chief Justice Rehnquists complaint that the Senate is not confirming new federal judges quickly enough and a debate over whether confirmation delays are a result of partisan politics. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6035

    "Unibomber Trial" a discussion by Elizabeth Farnsworth and David Jackson over what happened during the opening arguments of Theodore Kaczynski's trial, the defendant's concerns over his representation by his attorneys, and what was in store for the rest of the week. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6036

    "Expanding Care," a Margaret Warner report on President Clinton's proposition to let seniors age 62-65 buy into the Medicare plan, followed by a discussion with Donna Shalala and Rep. Bill Thomas in which Shalala addressed how many Americans this plan would actually affect, the inability of private insurance companies to take care of this group, and how the Kennedy/Kassenbaum bill relates to the proposal, and Rep. Thomas gave his reaction to the proposal, and voiced his concern that the President made this proposal before the commission recently set up to study Medicare had had a chance to look at the system and make their recommendations. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6037

    "Passing Judgment," extensive excerpts of the press conference with jury forewoman Niki Deutchman discussing the jury's inability to pass sentence on Terry Nichols for his role in the Oklahoma City bombing, followed by a discussion with Elizabeth Farnsworth and Tim Sullivan about the scene in the courtroom, why the judge didn't send the jury back to deliberate more, the reaction of Nichols and the victims to the development, the judge's options, and Ms. Deutchman's criticisms of the prosecution's case, followed by another discussion in which Oklahoma Governor Frank Keating and Robert Macy shared with reporter Phil Ponce their reactions to the verdict, their plans to prosecute both Nichols Tim McVeigh in state court once the federal trial is over, and why this would not constitute "double jeopardy". [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6038

    "Unibomber Trial," a conversation in which David Jackson, David Dratman, and Donald Heller discussed with reporter Elizabeth Farnsworth the possible suicide attempt by Theodore Kaczynski, his desire to represent himself and his subsequent agreement to a psychological evaluation, what the challenges would be to the prosecutors and what the role of the defense attorneys would be should Kaczynski represent himself, and what will likely be brought up in the opening statements of the trial. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6039

    "Indonesia's Woes," a Margaret Warner report on the economic trouble in Indonesia, which traced the country's rapid economic growth, beginning in 1965 when Suharto first took office to its present-day economic turmoil and infrastructure steeped in cronyism, followed by a discussion in which Robert Barry and Nariman Behravesh addressed just how real Indonesia's growth was and why it collapsed, why Indonesia continued its economic slide despite the IMF's bail-out package, why Suharto isn't living up to the IMF's expectations, how socially volatile the country is becoming as a result of the collapse and why the Untied States has such an interest in Indonesia. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6040

    "View of Asia," a Steve Levinson report on the reassurances but continued guarded watch by Western countries in response to Asia's economic downslide, followed by a discussion in which Walter Mondale, Winston Lord, Micheal Armacost, and Paul Krugman considered the notion that economic stability could return to Asian markets if the countries were willing to take the steps to do it, whether the push for reform by Western countries would cause social and political unrest, Japan's ability to aid Asian markets and their current role, the political will of the countries to reform and the United States' stake in the issue, and whether the "tiger economy" will ever return. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6041

    "Dealing with Iraq," an interview with Ambassador Richard Butler about Iraq's refusal to cooperate with the weapons inspection team led by Scott Ritter; Iraq's accusations that there are too many Americans on the team, that the UN is dishonest and possibly run by Western intelligence agencies, and that Ritter is an American intelligence agent; the fact that other weapons inspection teams are able to conduct inspections unhindered;and the possibility that Iraq's objections were a smokescreen because Ritter's team was getting close to finding something. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6042

    "Newsmaker Interview with Nizar Hamdoon," in which the Iraqi U.N. ambassador commented on the United Nations' criticism of Iraq's continued obstruction of weapons inspections, Iraq's claim that the inspection teams contained too many British and American members, his country's belief that the US and Britain were hostile to it, charges that American weapons inspector Scott Ritter was a spy, claims that Iraq was trying to hide something from the teams, Iraq's claim that it no longer possessed weapons of mass destruction, Saddam Hussein's belief that the US would maintain sanctions regardless of Iraq's compliance with the U.N. inspection teams, the United States' refusal to rule out military action against Iraq, and charges that chief U.N. weapons inspector Butler had not treated Iraq fairly. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6043

    "Targeting Teens," a Betty Ann Bowser background report which looked at recently released documents from R.J. Reynolds which shows Reynolds had a long-term plan to attract under-age smoking, followed by a discussion in which Henry Waxman, Bruce Reed, John McCain, and Manny Goldman talked about whether the documents will prompt faster passage of tobacco legislation, President Clinton's desire to have changes to the tobacco settlement before Congress votes upon it; whether the tobacco issue is a partisan one; what the tobacco industry would do if the settlement were changed; and the issue of immunity for the tobacco companies. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6044

    "Newsmaker," an interview with Secretary of the Treasury Robert Rubin, in which he discussed the current status of the economic instability in the Asian markets; the United States' interest in Asia because of the export markets and currency depreciation; the concerns by members of Congress that the IMF plans are just "welfare for reckless bankers"; why the IMF didn't involve themselves before the situation became a crisis; and whether Asian governments will become Western-style because of the IMF conditions. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6045

    "Student Safety," a Phil Ponce report on the recent robbery and rape in Guatemala of students from St. Mary's College, and a look at other incidents of attacks on American students in foreign countries, followed by a discussion in which John Sommer and Terry Bigalke addressed whether it is getting more dangerous for students to study abroad; how a school determines if it is safe to send students to a particular country and how the schools addresses concerns from parents about the welfare of their children abroad; and how concerned the universities are over liabilty. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6046

    "Food Fight," an Elizabeth Bracket report on the lawsuit brought by Texas cattle ranchers against Oprah Winfrey for disparaging remarks she made about beef during one of her broadcasts, and background of the legislation under which the ranchers brought the suit; followed by a discussion with John Bode and David Bederman in which they addressed why the legislation is important; whether the law is aimed at media organizations and its potential chilling effect; how many other states are enacting such food laws, and the likelihood that more such cases will be brought to trial. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6047

    "Newsmaker," an extended interview with President Bill Clinton in which he addressed allegations about a former aid lying about having an affair with him and his denial about instructing her to lie or that there was an improper relationship; the Pope's visit to Cuba and whether this was the time to reconsider policy towards Cuba, the Pope's desire to have the US's embargo policy change, and why Cuba is different than other Communist countries with which we trade; Netanyahu's visit to the US and the on-going Middle East peace talks, why it matters to the US that a peace agreement is reached and whether Netanahu and Arafat really want to have peace; why the US needs to help save the failing Asian economies and his response to charges by members of congress that this is just "welfare for international bankers"; where the situation stands in Iraq with weapons inspections, whether the US would use force without other countries' assistance, and whether he would lift sanctions if Iraq complied with all the UN's demands; whether the situation in Bosnia was turning out as he had hoped and if there should be a suspension of deadlines for withdrawal; if he considered the US's role to be in the forefront of all these world situations and why the US sometimes must contribute more than its fair share to global problems; why it has been difficult to get discussions started about racial divisions within the country; how being under allegations affects his ability to do his job and at what point it becomes demeaning to the Presidency; his eagerness to begin the Paula Jones trial so he can prove his innocence; and his desire to keep working in the best interest of America. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6048

    "Gathering Storm," an in-depth look at allegations that President Clinton had a sexual relationship with a White House aid and then instructed her to lie. Kwame Holman began with a report on the day's developments, including Kenneth Starr's statement to the press and Vernon Jordan's statement; followed by a discussion with Ponce, Taylor, Webb and Ben-Veniste over the legal issues, looking at what happens in a Grand Jury session, how hard it is to prove perjury, how the Whitewater council ended up with this investigation, if the prosecutor can use the tape recordings, does the independent council have the authority to bring criminal charges against the President, and if any of the allegations could justify impeachment; then a discussion with Kearns Goodwin, Beschloss, Johnson, Gergen and Drew over whether this was either the largest smear or largest self-destruction ever seen in the history of Presidency, the frenzied atmosphere of the press, the comparisons to Watergate, the speed in which the events are taking place, and how well the President can function while being surrounded by the allegations; then a discussion with Warner, Sheilds and Gigot over how perilous this is to the Presidency, how much control the White House has over how the events will unfold and how much this will damage Clinton's credibility, the "wait and see" attitude of both the Democrats and Republicans, whether there is anything to be gained from Clinton making another statement about the situation, and the consensus that Clinton will put up a fierce fight over the allegations. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6049

    "The Pope in Cuba," a Phil Ponce report on the Pope's message to the Cuban people and his visit to Palace of the Revolution in Havana, followed by a conversation in which Rafael Penalver, Alfredo Duran, Father Thomas Reese and Father Joseph Nangle discussed the Pope's effect on Cuba; the sense that the visit was empowering the citizens, but their concern for the future; the impact of the visit on the Cuban Catholic church; what Castro stands to gain; whether the Pope was subject to manipulation; whether this was an event which will change Cuba forever; and if the visit had a personal dimension for Castro. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6050

    "Tracking the Story," a discussion with Margaret Warner and Dan Balz about the day's developments in the Monica Lewinsky scandal, including what led the President to make such a strong public denial; an update on negotiations between Kenneth Starr and Lewinsky's lawyer; Starr's investigations on other fronts; and his attempts to acquire some of the depositions in the Paula Jones case. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6051

    "President's Crisis / Tracking the Story," edited exerpts from an interview with Hillary Clinton and Matt Lauer from The Today Show, in which she accuses a vast right wing conspiracy of conspiring against her husband, and an excerpt from a 1996 interview with Clinton in which he raised the conspiracy issue; followed by a discussion with Margaret Warner and Dan Balz about why Mrs. Clinton did the interview; the White House's desire to raise doubts about Kenneth Starr's motivations; the proffer made by Lewinsky's lawyer; and Betty Currie's testimony before the Grand Jury. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6052

    "Tracking the Story," a discussion with Margaret Warner and Dan Balz about the day's events in the Monica Lewinsky scandal, including Leon Panetta's testimony before the Grand Jury; the role of the Grand Jury and the rights of witnesses; who else Starr has subpoenaed and if Clinton could be subpoenaed; what else Starr has acquired for evidence in the last 24 hours; and whether there was anything new in the Starr/Lewinsky negotiations. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6053

    "Newsmaker," a background report by Kwame Holman on what led tobacco executives to reverse their earlier statement that nicotine was not addictive, to admitting that it is addictive; followed by an interview with Steven Goldstone who discussed at what point RJR Nabisco determined smoking was addictive; what age they target new consumers; the effect the national settlement will have on business; whether he considers smoking is dangerous to health; whether the industry should be punished for targeting the young or be responsible for health costs; how comfortable he is in heading a tobacco company; and if RJR has ever considered getting out of the tobacco business. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6054

    "Exhausting All Options," a Kwame Holman background report on the refusal by Iraq to give UN weapons inspectors access to "sensitive sights", including Presidential compounds; the rapid exhaustion of diplomatic negotiations and the strong support from Congress for a military strike; followed by a discussion in which Kelly, Carroll, Wolfowitz, and Murphy gave their reaction to the prospects of using military force; their concern over the objective of air strikes, and whether the goal should be to eliminate Hussein; the ability of the US to help Iraq liberate itself, and whether Hussein's rationality would lead him to use biological weapons. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6055

    "In the Black?" a Kwame Holman report on the details of Clinton's 1999 budget proposal, the Republicans response, and Clinton's projections of a surplus in the coming years; followed by a discussion in which Franklin Raines and Pete Domenici addressed whether the Clinton budget violates the budget agreement reached last year with Congress, whether it will increase the size of government, and if there will really be a surplus in the next few years. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6056

    "Chain Reaction," a Spencer Michels report on the continuing crisis in Asian markets and the effect its having on trade in the US; followed by a discussion in which Englund, Annable, Shoesmith, and Rosen addressed the positive and negative impact that the crisis is having on imports and exports in different US regions, its effect on investment bankers, how and why mortgage rates have dropped as a result, and whether the net effect is positive or negative in each region. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6057

    "Use of Force," a Margaret Warner report on Iraq's continued defiance of weapons inspectors and Madeleine Albright's diplomatic mission to prepare the groundwork for a possible military strike; followed by a discussion with Erlanger and Wahby in which they addressed to what degree Albright's trip is moving US towards military action and what she's gained in terms of concrete commitments; how Arab governments view the US's intentions and why US planners consider Saudi Arabia so important; and how concerned the US is over Russia's position in the stand-off [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6058

    "Starr Investigation/Tracking the Story," extended excerpts from Independent Counsel Kenneth Starr's press conference regarding the investigation of allegations involving President Clinton and Monica Lewinsky, followed by an excerpt of President Clinton's remarks on the subject during a press conference with Britain's Prime Minister Tony Blair; Dan Balz of the Washington Post then commented on where matters stand with the White House possibly claiming executive privilege, the negotiations for immunity between Starr and Lewinsky's lawyer, a recap of who has been testifying before the grand jury, and where Balz thinks the investigation is leading. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6059

    "Presidential Investigation," a Kwame Holman report on the events happening in the Starr/Lewinsky investigation, including extended excerpts from a press conference with British Prime Minister Tony Blair and President Clinton answering questions about the investigation; excerpts from an impromtu press conference held by Kenneth Starr over allegations that his office is leaking information from the grand jury proceedings to the press; and the announcement by Clinton attorney David Kendall that he is undertaking legal actions to stop the leaks. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6060

    "Ready of Not?" excerpts from a press conference with Britain's Prime Minister Tony Blair in which he addressed the Iraq situation and Britain's alliance with the United States; followed by regional reaction with Lee Cullum, Mike Barnicle, Patrick McGuigan, Cynthia Tucker and Robert Kittle who discussed if the Clinton administration has sufficiently prepared the American public for military action against Iraq; should the goal be to get rid of Saddam Hussein's arsenal or get rid of Hussein; if the American public would be willing to use ground troops to get rid of Hussein; and whether Americans would accept an on-going policy of limited airstrikes. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6061

    "The Iraq Debate," following excerpts from Secretary of State Madeleine Albright's appearance before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee over the use of military action in Iraq, Sen. Lugar, Sen. Lieberman, Sen. Brownback and Rep. McKinney discussed whether they support the Administration's decision to strike Iraq; if the US should be more flexible with Hussein; why the United States is leading the military effort; whether this action would impact upon the Middle East peace process; and whether our past allies have an obligation to support the United States. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6062

    "Independent Decision," a Kwame Holman background report on Janet Reno's announcement to seek an independent counsel to investigate whether Interior Secretary Bruce Babbitt mislead Congress when he testified in conjunction with an Indian casino application, followed by a conversation in which Roberto Suro discussed the details of Reno's petition for the investigation of possible perjury; whether the independent counsel could go beyond to investigate the underlying facts; and the process of finding an independent counsel, including how they find the individual and who decides the finances, length of investigation, etc. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6063

    "Presidential Investigation," a Kwame Holman background report on the Secret Service, their duty to the President, and their reluctance to testify against him, followed by a discussion with Jonathan Turley and Ronald Noble in which they addressed whether Secret Service agents should be compelled to testify against the President; the relationship which must be maintained between the President and the agents for the sake of national security; whether there is an executive-based privilege for the Secret Service and if there would be any occasion for them to be compelled to testify; and the distinction between past allegations attributed to the Secret Service and the possibility of leaks from the agency. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6064

    "Acting Independently," a Kwame Holman report on the history of the independent counsel, followed by a discussion with Doris Kearns Goodwin, Micheal Beschloss, Haynes Johnson and Katy Harriger who addressed the premise on why independent counsels were created; how matters were resolved before the introduction of independent counsels and special prosecutors; the notion that it is impossible for the Justice Department to investigate their own; if these counsels are too independent; the public's growing cynicism over the independent counsel, and whether it was possible to have a fair non-political investigation and have the American public accept the results. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6065

    "Assessing the Threat," a Phil Ponce background report on the vastness of the Iraqi weapons arsenal and the U.N.'s attempts to locate and destroy them, followed by a discussion with Raymond Zilinskas and Neil Livingstone on the potential threat of biological and chemical weapons in Iraq; how nerve gas works and the range of destruction should Iraq arm scud missiles with the gas; how long it would take Hussein to make fully operational weapons; and whether US air strikes would be effective in getting rid of those weapons. "Moving In," a Tom Bearden report on the rise of immigrants moving to small towns such as Rogers, Arkansas to work in places such as the Tysons poultry factory; the big-city issues now facing the small towns such as racial tension, gang activity, increased demand for health services, and non-English speaking students in schools; and the rise of groups such as Americans for an Immigration Moratorium, who oppose mass immigration into their community. "Eyewitness to History," a Charles Krause profile of Poland's Foreign Minister Bronislaw Geremek's political life, his role in the Solidarity party, and his present duty to try and secure a place for Poland in NATO, followed by an interview with Geremek in which he discussed how significant anti-semitism is in Poland today; the Pope's influence in the Solidarity movement; why Poland wants to join NATO; whether NATO's acceptance of Poland and the Czech Republics would mean Europe is being re-divided again; and whether belonging to NATO would allow Poland to change its tragic history as the result of being sandwiched between powerful countries. "A Presidential Poem," in honor of President's Day, Robert Pinsky read and commented upon "My Childhood Home I See Again" by Abraham Lincoln. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6066

    "Use of Force," excerpts from President Clinton's speech at the Pentagon, reiterating the United States' position on Iraq; followed by a report by Margaret Warner on the military buildup in the Persian Gulf, and a discussion with Gen. John Sheehan, Adm. Leighton Smith, Gen. Merrill McPeak, and Lt. Gen. Bernard Trainor about the chances of a military option achieving the President's goal to reduce Iraq's weapons of mass destruction, how the military action would possibly unfold and the targets, how much more accurate the US weapons are now than in the Gulf War, Saudi Arabia's decision not to let the Untied States launch strike aircraft from there, and the risks to US troops and Iraqi civilians; followed by a report by Kwame Holman on the debate in Britain's House of Commons for formal approval to sending troops to Iraq in support of the United States. "Women on Ice," a Phil Ponce report on the United States women's hockey team beating Canada in the Nagano Olympics for a gold medal and the growing popularity of women's hockey in the U.S., followed by a discussion with Lucy Danziger and Erin Whitten about the difference between men's and women's hockey, such as checking and body blocking; the appeal of the sport for women; where the women players come from and if they are now role models for young girls; and the prospects for a women's professional hockey league. "Goodbye New York," a Roger Rosenblatt essay on New York City's crumbling buildings. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6067

    "Making the Case / Showdown," excerpts from a town meeting in Columbus Ohio, where Secretary Madeleine Albright, Wiliam Cohen, and Sandy Berger faced a rowdy crowd to answer questions about the United State's military intentions towards Iraq, followed by a discussion with Richard Helms, Edward Djerejian, Robert Pelletreau, and William Maynes over whether Iraq is being unfairly singled out while other countries have weapons of mass destruction; if this is just a struggle by the United Nations to try and get Hussein to do what they want; the need for the U.S. to be very clear in their strategic objectives; whether the real issue is Saddam Hussein or the threat Iraq poses to surrounding countries; and the possibility of a last chance for diplomacy. "Tracking the Story," a discussion with Dan Balz about the latest developments in the Lewinsky/Starr investigation, including Bruce Lindsay's testimony before the grand jury and the concept of executive privilege; Marcia Lewis' lawyer's attempt to postpone her having to return for further testimony; and the President's lawyers' filing a motion for dismissal in the Paula Jones case. "Focus," an Elizabeth Farnsworth profile of Sylvia Plath, her marriage and relationship with Ted Hughes, her work, and her suicide, followed by a discussion with Robert Hass and Diane Wood Middlebrook about Hughes' book "Birthday Letters" and why the book is so popular; why there is so much interest in Sylvia Plath; their impressions of Hughes' book; and whether the poems stand on their own or only because of their biographical material. "The Color Brown,"a Richard Rodriguez essay on the racial mixing , or "browning", of America. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6068

    "Showdown / Making the Case," excerpts from a White House press conference in which President Clinton again reiterated the United States' position about Iraq and answered questions about the willingness of Americans to go to war, followed by a discussion with Andy Kohut, Doris Kearns Goodwin, Robert Dallek, and Haynes Johnson on what the polls show on how the public feels about the use of force vs. sanctions and diplomacy; the public's mood at other times when the US has chosen to take military action; how much of the public's reaction today against using ground troops is based on the memory of the Vietnam War; and whether there is a pattern of ebb and flow of public opinion during a conflict. "Prepared for the Worst?" a Kwame Holman report on the arrests of Larry Wayne Harris and William Leavitt in Nevada on charges of possession of a dangerous biological agent, followed by a Betty Ann Bowser report on new response training given to firefighters, paramedics, and emergency medical technicians in case of a biological or chemical attack and the criticisms about the program. "Starr Investigation / Executive Privilege," a discussion with Margaret Warner, Jack Quinn, and C. Boyden Gray over the issue of the possible invoking of executive privilege in the testimony of Deputy White House Counsel Bruce Lindsay in the Monica Lewinsky investigation; the reasons why the White House would want to invoke executive privilege and whether it applies to this case; what possibly could have happened in the court room that day in the negotiations over the issue; and what would happen if Starr and Lindsay's lawyers cannot reach an agreement and a confrontation ensues. "Exiles in Paradise," an Anne Taylor Fleming profile of Argentine artist Claudia Bernardi who returned to Argentina in the 1990's to help exhume the 30,000 people who disappeared between 1976 - 1983, and now reflects that experience in her art. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6069

    "Iraq's Agenda," excerpts of President Clinton's remarks during a special broadcast distributed by the U.S. Information Agency to the people of Iraq, followed by a discussion with Edmund Ghareeb, Oleg Grinevsky, Kanan Makiya, and Amatzia Baram about Saddam Hussein's motivations and why he feels he has nothing to loose in risking bombing; what incentives are there for him to make a deal; how worried is he over the possible collapse of his regime; and how inclined is Iraq to make a military strike against Israel. "Of the People," Elizabeth Farnsworth discussed with Denver voters the United States' position on Iraq, and whether they would support military strikes against Iraq; whether the US' objectives are clear enough; the lack of support from the Arab region; the need for a long-term plan; bombing as a means of containment; and whether Americans are getting the information they need or if the President is fully preparing the American people for the casualties. "Political Wrap," Mark Shields and Paul Gigot discussed how they read the public's support for striking Iraq, whether Congress has let the public down in their lack of debate on the issue, and why there has been no resolution passed; the problem of trying to have a debate about "taking out" Hussein without mentioning assassination; and whether they think the situation will end up in some sort of conflict. "Dialogue," in discussing the incident in 1937 when Japanese swept into the Chinese city of Nanking and killed 300,000 and raped 80,000 women within 6 - 8 weeks, author Iris Chang recounted to David Gergen stories of how citizens were tortured and killed; how normal Japanese individuals became such butchers; why the public does not remember Nanking; and why the Japanese have not appologized for the atrocities. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6070

    "Newsmaker," excerpts from a White House press conference where President Clinton announced a diplomatic agreement had been reached between the U.N. and Iraq, followed by an interview with Secretary of State Madeleine Albright on the possibility that the United States would accept the deal and the clarifications that need to be made on the agreement; the issue of the number of Americans on inspection teams; whether she envisions an Iraq with Hussein in power and without the sanctions; the connection between the agreement and the US troops in the region; whether the US was trapped into whatever the UN reached for an agreement; and whether this was sub-contracting out US foreign policy to the UN. "Good Deal," a discussion with John Bolton, Charles William Maynes, Robert Pelletreau and Jim Hoagland on whether this UN/Iraq agreement was a good outcome for the US; the possibility that if Hussein breaks this agreement that the US would gain a much greater coalition; how difficult it will be to get Hussein to comply and what he is getting from this; whether there is a shift or softening in US policy about economic sanctions; and if they perceive this as the US sub-contracting foreign policy to the UN. "Olympic Review," an Elizabeth Farnsworth report on the highlights and low points of the Olympic Games in Nagago, followed by a discussion with Cindy Nelson, Frank Deford, and Richard Lapchick in which they addressed what was most impressive and memorable to them; whether the games were as riveting as in the past and the need for television to create a fresh presentation to keep viewers interested; the American versus Canadian TV coverage; the waining interest in sports in general by viewers; and the hypocrisy and commercialization of the Olympic games. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6071

    "Good Deal / Newsmaker," excerpts from a news conference with UN secretary Kofi Annan where he discussed the agreement reached with Saddam Hussein, followed by a Newsmaker interview with UN Ambassador Bill Richardson about the general sense of approval for the agreement from the UN security counsel; the ambiguities to the agreement that need to be worked out; when and how it will be tested and how it differs from past agreements; the doubt that this would lead to lifting of sanctions; and Richardson's past opposition not to Annans' mission but to him initially intending to go without consulting the security counsel; followed by reaction by James Baker and William Perry to the agreement; what details concern them; the need to keep US troops in the region until Iraq fully complies with the agreement; whether it is inevitable that the agreement will be broken; and the need for the US to make clear to Iraq that this is the end of diplomatic negotiations and that existing resolutions will be enforced by the military. "Abuse of Power?" a Phil Ponce report on Kenneth Starr's subpeonas of White House aide Sidney Blumenthal and investigator Terry Lenser and the White House's response with attacks against Starr's tactics, followed by a debate with Richard Ben-Veniste and George Terwilliger on whether these subpeonas go beyond what ordinarily occurs in the investigation of a serious case; if members of a defense team talking to reporters would be considered an obstruction of justice; and why there is so much skirmishing over tactics by both the White House and Starr's office. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6072

    "Unfettered Access?" a Charles Krause report on the history of UNSCOM, it's role in the weapons inspections in Iraq, and the events leading to the present agreement between the U.N. and Iraq which should allow UNSCOM to continue inspections; followed by a discussion with Rolf Ekeus, Raymond Zilinskas, and Jonathan Tucker about whether the agreement will weaken or strengthen the role of the inspectors; how an inspection is set up, if there is an element of surprise to inspections and if the agreement would hamper that procedure; what effect the presence of diplomats will have on inspection teams; and how the past four months of crisis has effected the inspecting process. "Going for the Silver," a Paul Solman report on the soaring price of silver; the history of its use as a medium of exchange; the debate over its use as the economic standard in the 1896 McKinley/Bryan Presidential campaign; and whether Warren Buffet's current massive investment in 1/4 of the world's silver and whether his massive buying is what has currently driven the price so high. "Campaign Finance Reform," a Kwame Holman report on the McCain-Feingold campaign finance reform bill which is stuck in parlimentary gridlock, the debate over its provisions and the introduction of the Snowe-Jeffords amendment; followed by a debate with Sen. Joesph Lieberman and Sen. Robert Bennett about Bennett's opposition to the compromised bill on First Amendment grounds; whether this will be the end of campaign finance reform if the bill doesn't get enough votes; whether a Senate minority is holding up the process; how much heat will there be from the public if a reform bill is not passed; and what kinds of changes could be introduced in the future. "A Birthday Memory," a birthday tribute to the late Congresswoman Barbara Jordan by Robert Pinsky who read his poem "On 'Eve Tempted by the Serpent' by Defendente Ferrari, and in Memory of Congresswoman Barbara Jordan of Texas". [70 minutes]

  • Episode #6073

    "Speaking Freely," a Margaret Warner report on Kenneth Starr's subpeona of Sidney Blumenthal to inquire whether it was he who has been giving negative information to news organizations about Starr's staff, excerpts from Blumenthal's press conference held after he testified, and excerpts of Starr reiterating his position, followed by a discussion with Anthony Lewis, Terry Eastland, Floyd Abrams, and Otto Obermaier about whether the subpeona was an abuse of power and if it infringed upon First Amendment rights; if it was an attempt to suppress speech or to maintain the integrity of the investigation; and could the dissemination of negative information about the prosecution constitute an obstruction of justice. "Taking Questions" a Phil Ponce report on United Nations chief weapons inspector Richard Butler's news conference where he commented on the agreement reached by Kofi Annan and Iraq, and answered questions regarding comments made by Iraq that some inspectors have a "cowboy mentality", whether he ever considered resigning due to Iraqi criticism, and his opinion of the new commissioner who will oversee inspection of the Presidential palaces. "Avoiding Conflict," a discussion with Doris Kearns Goodwin, Haynes Johnson, Micheal Beschloss, and Jeane Kirkpatrick about the Iraq agreement and whether Kofi Annan's deal was consistent with what the U.N. is set up to do; how the Cold War had hindered the U.N. from fully achieving its mission as peacekeepers; the need for countries to be willing to give up some of their own power for the U.N. to be successful; and the diplomatic success and skill of Kofi Annan. "Barbie's Rainbow," a Clarence Page essay on the ethnic diversity of the modern Barbie doll. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6074

    "Capitol Views," a Kwame Holman report on the negative and cautious reaction by Congresspersons to the agreement reached by Kofi Annan and Iraq, followed by a discussion with Sen. Richard Shelby, Sen. Charles Robb, Rep. Cynthia McKinney, and Rep. Dana Rohrabacher about whether the agreement was an appeasement to Iraq; the need for the United States to have a cogent policy for the Middle East and if this was indeed the U.S. sub-contracting foreign policy to the UN; the concern that in a few months the standoff with Iraq will happen again; and the need for the removal of Saddam Hussein. "Crisis of Confidence," a Paul Solmon look at the plunge of Indonesia's currency, the Rupiah; how a currency fails; the IMF's bail-out plan for Indonesia which includes economic reform to restore faith to the currency; and the proposal of installing a currency board instead. "Political Wrap," a discussion with Mark Shields and Paul Gigot about the subpeona of Sidney Blumenthal in Kenneth Starr's investigation and the White House's reaction to the week's developments; the death of the McCain-Feingold campaign finance reform bill; and Trent Lott's strong attack against the UN agreement reached with Iraq. "Expanding Universe," a discussion with Adam Reiss on the discovery that the universe is actually expanding faster now than in the past; how the scientists studied supernovae to determine this theory; the possibility that the universe is speeding up due to a repulsive force; and the other studies which are underway trying to confirm this theory. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6075

    "Newsmaker," an interview with UN Ambassador for Iraq Nizar Hamdoon about why Saddam Hussein personally got involved in the latest UN negotiations; what he perceives the diplomats' role will be in the inspection of the Presidential sights and who will be in charge; what might be done about lifting sanctions; his understanding of what would happen if Iraq were to deny access to sites; and his reiteration of Iraq's intention not to violate the agreement. "Contain or Remove," a debate with Richard Haass and Robert Kagan over the issue of the removal of Hussein or containment of Iraq, with Kagan supporting the stance to support political opposition and also use air power and troops to remove Hussein and Haass arguing it would appear as an invasion and be too costly to lives to remove Hussein now; how long containment would work and if the threat of an ouster would have to be involved; whether the existing Iraqi opposition is a viable force; and what concerns the region has over the stability of Iraq in general. "El Nino," a Jeffrey Kaye report on the intense storms in California and Florida due to El Nino; El Nino changes where they occur and their intensity; El Nino's interplay between the atmosphere and the ocean; the effects on the California coast, marine life, Indonesia and South America; and predictions that by autumn the direct reversal of El Nino-called La Nina-will take place. "Separate and Unequal?" a debate with Lynn Curtis, Hugh Price, Robert Woodson, and Stephan Thernstrom over a report by the Eisenhower Foundation which looked at what has happen with racism in the country since the 1968 Kerner Report; the study's findings of depression-era rates of unemployment for inner cities, a widening gap between rich and poor, and the rising rate of incarceration of blacks; the argument that the study is flawed because it mixed race with economics, didn't look at causes such as family structures, and lacked discussion morality or character; and the ascertation that programs such as safe havens, school mentors, and support for personal responsibility are needed to rectify the cited problems. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6076

    "Tracking the Story," an update with Margaret Warner on the Starr investigation and Vernon Jordan's grand jury testimony;background report on Jordan's relationship to President Clinton and Monica Lewinsky; a discussion with Dan Balz about the importance of Jordan's testimony to Starr's case; how Starr already knew of Jordan from the Whitewater investigation; whether Jordan is an official target; whether Starr could ask about other conversations that Jordan had with the President; and why there have been rumors that Jordan and Clinton's friendship was strained. "Winning Monopoly?" a Kwame Holman report on the Senate Judiciary Committee meetings on Microsoft, with excerpts of Bill Gates' and others testimony and questions from the Committee. A look by Paul Solman at the detractors of Bill Gates who charge that Microsoft is stifling competition by forcing companies to face four options - get crushed, sue, play ball, or hope to get bought out by Microsoft; charges that Microsoft buys new technology only to bury it or introduces "vaporware" to kill competition; the reluctance of companies to make public accusations against Microsoft for fear of retaliation; and Microsoft's response that they have created a unique platform on which programs may run, that they invite competitors to fine-tune their programs at Microsoft, and that they don't imitate, but innovate. "Newsmaker," an interview with the president of Bosnia-Herzogovia, Ejup Ganic, about his visit to Washington DC to remind the US that a decision has to be made about the future of the strategically-located city of Brcko; whether the ethnic situation has improved with the election of Bosnian Serb Prime Minister Dodic; if many refugees have come back to places where they would be a minority; if there is any place in Bosnia which is truly ethnic as before; and how long NATO troops will have to stay in order to keep peace. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6077

    "Newsmaker," an interview with UN secretary general Kofi Annan about the UN resolution stating that there will be severe consequences if Iraq does not comply with the latest agreement; what would constitute a violation of the agreement; if there is any room for a legitimate disagreement over an access question; the role of the diplomats in the inspection of Presidential sights; the necessity of keeping US troops in the area; what Iraq needs to do to get sanctions lifted; and his reply to criticisms from US Republican Senators. "Battle for Power," a Fred de Sam Lazaro report on the Hindu Nationalist BJP party in India; its central theme that India is a nation of Hindu values; criticisms that BJP is anti-Muslim and tries to re-ignite religious tensions; and the people's frustration with the current ruling Congress Party which led to the BJP winning the most seats in Parliament and the Congress Party, now trying to team with smaller parties to keep BJP from ruling. "Supreme Court Watch," a discussion with Stuart Taylor, Ellen Bravo, and Kathleen Neville about the Supreme Court's decision that same-sex sexual harassment can violate federal law; how this decision will help both employers and workers define sexual harassment; how widespread same-sex harassment is and the responsibilities of employers; how much guidance the Supreme Court provided on how to define sexual harassment; and whether the case provides an opening for gay rights advocacy. "In Memoriam," a Spencer Michels report on the life and career of broadcaster Fred Friendly, followed by a discussion with Daniel Schorr and Ed Bliss about Friendly's greatest contributions, what he was like to work with, his relationship to Edward Murrow, why Friendly left CBS in 1966, and his concern over the ethics of newsgathering. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6078

    "Tracking the Story," a discussion with Dan Balz about the detailed account published in the Washington Post of President Clinton's deposition in the Paula Jones case; how the deposition connects to the Lewsinsky investigation; whether anything in the deposition conflicts with what the President has said publicly; Vernon Jordan's second day of testimony and his statements to the press afterwards; and the attempts by Lewinsky's lawyer to stop her subpeonea. "The Money Chase," a Kwame Holman report on the hearings and final report of the senate committee investigating campaign finance abuses. A follow-up discussion with Sen. Arlen Specter and Sen. Robert Torricelli about what they consider the most important aspects of the findings; the charges of China's involvement in contributions; whether Maria Hsia, who organized a fundraiser at an L.A. Buddhist temple, is an agent of the Chinese government; the lack of investigation into the RNC's fundraising; whether there was quid pro quo with foreign investors; and the need for campaign reform for both parties. "Good Call?" a Phil Ponce report on an independent arbitrator's decision to reduce suspension and order the Golden State Warriors to re-instate player Latrell Sprewell's multi-million dollar contract after the team fired him for choking and punching their coach. A follow-up discussion with Ira Berkow and Mike Bruton about whether it was fair for the NBA to suspend Sprewell; what the ruling does to the NBA's image; the concern by the NBA that white audiences will be turned off to black athletes; and whether there was a double-standard for black and white athletes. "Dialogue," a David Gergen discussion with author Martha Nussbaum about the culture wars on campuses; the need for schools to focus on what a citizen should know, not on identity politics; whether studying history from the viewpoint of everyday people denies us of our heroes; the three elements of being a "citizen of the world" - Socratic self-examination, narrative imagination, and considering yourself a world citizen; and whether students should study abroad. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6079

    "Inside Iran / What Next," a Jim Maceda report on the changes which have taken place in Iran; its attempt to improve its international image and relax its severe Islamic laws; and the deep distrust that still runs between Iran and the United States. A Charles Krause report on a non-official meeting of Iranians and Americans at the University of Pennsylvania as a first step towards improving relations and a discussion with Bruce Laingen and Robin Wright about Laingen's participation in the discussion at UPenn ; President Clinton's past remarks about the US looking forward to better relations with Iran. and whether Washington is ready to meet with Iran; why the US needs to move towards better relations and the issues and obstacles that need to be overcome; and how the Iraq crisis has created a better awareness about Iran. "Political Wrap" Mark Shields and Paul Gigot discussed the leak to the Washington Post of President Clinton's deposition in the Paula Jones case; the Republican report on campaign finance; democratic fundraiser Johnny Chung's indictment and guilty plea; Vernon Jordan's testimony before the grand jury; and the House of Representative's vote on Puerto Rico. "Harlem Renaissance," a Spencer Michels report on an exhibit entitled "Rhapsodies in Black: Art of the Harlem Renaissance at the California Palace of the Legion of Honor museum, which examines the art and culture of Harlem during the era between the two World Wars. "Water on the Moon," an interview with Alan Binder about NASA's discovery of water on the North and South poles of the moon; why water is only at the poles and where it came from; why this is an important discovery; whether this indicated any sign of life on the moon; and how it might be possible to extract the water from the soil. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6080

    "Kosovo Clash," a Gaby Rado report on demonstrations by ethnic Albanians in Prisina over the Serbian crackdown and killings in Kosovo, followed by a Margaret Warner report on the history of conflict between Albanians and Serbs in Kosovo, the present clashes between the Kosovo Liberation Army (KLA) and Serb authorities, and the arms embargo and sanctions against Yugoslavia by the contact nations that monitor developments in the region; A discussion with Warren Zimmermann and John Fox about why the situation has erupted into bloodshed; how Kosovo is the "founding myth" for the Serbs and Serbia; why President Milosevic would risk the easing of existing sanctions to crack down on the KLA; the US's interests in the conflict; the prospects for a negotiation; and whether the conflict will spread outside of Kosovo. An Ian Williams report on how the Asian economic crisis has effected thousands of Burmese migrant workers in Thailand who were recently expelled and forced to walk for three hours back to the Burmese border. "The Money Chase," a Kwame Holman report on the indictments of Maria Hsia, Charlie Trie, and Johnny Chung in the aftermath of the Governmental Affairs Committee report on campaigning finance abuses, followed by an interview with Roberto Suro about the importance of Johnny Chang as a witness; how the investigation was conducted from the bottom up; the status of Hsia's and Trie's cases; what the Justice Department's task force's destination might be; and whether the task force was investigating any Republican campaign finances. "Conversation," an Elizabeth Farnsworth interview with author Toni Morrison about her new novel "Paradise"; how she invented Ruby, the town in which the story is based; the exclusivity of the town; the dichotomy between Ruby and the convent outside the town; and whether she will continue to write about the history of African Americans in the United States. "Appreciation," a tribute to the late Fred Friendly and the contributions he made directly and indirectly to The Newshour. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6081

    "Money Trouble / Newsmaker," a Kwame Holman report on the re-election of Indonesia's President Suharto to another term; the background of Indonesia's currency crash and the IMF's proposed bail-out; and Suharto's lack of compliance with the agreement, resulting in the IMF withholding its next payment. A report by Martin Adler on the impact of the economic crisis on Indonesians, including 6000 people living off picking through dumps and a widening gap between rich and poor; the clashes between Chinese and Muslims because of price increases; and the rise of anti-Suharto sentiment at universities. A Newsmaker interview with Robert Rubin about the seriousness of the Indonesian situation; Suharto's desires to deal with the short-term currency problem and not the long-term reforms; the IMF's delay in payment; the ties the Suharto family has to Indonesia's economy; whether social chaos will happen if this problem isn't dealt with quickly; and the possibility that other third world countries would collapse should Indonesia fail. Excerpts from President Clinton's speech at a college in Bridgeport CT, where he explained his $20 million proposal to help working families pay for child care. "Issue of Trust," a discussion with Andrew Kohut, Cynthia Tucker, Patrick McGuigan, Lee Cullum, and Bob Kittle about a recent poll indicating that spiraling distrust towards government has stopped, and that people feel better about the state of the nation but have a temperate but frustrated view of government; the depth and nuances of the poll; the concern about the morality of the culture and the general unease about political ethics; why people have more trust in local government; the generational differences in the level of trust; and whether these numbers are a sign of permanent change or just a "blip." [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6082

    "Overdue," a Kwame Holman report on criticisms by members of Congress about the missions and management of the United Nations and the large debt that the United States owes to the organization. A discussion with Sen. Rod Grams and Rep. Lee Hamilton about a meeting between secretary general Kofi Annan and senators; the conditions that must be met by the UN before the US will pay their dues; whether there should be conditions placed on payment or the US should pay their dues and then lobby for changes; the current status of the "Mexico City" policy, which disallows funds to organizations that perform or lobby for abortions in other countries; and whether the lack of the US monies is holding up the work of the UN. Excerpts of statements made to the Senate Appropriations Committee by top defense officials asking for more funds to pay for US peacekeepers in Bosnia. "Mixed Messages," a Phil Ponce report on dyslexia and the programs for learning disabled children at the Lab School of Washington, followed by a discussion with Dr. Sally Shaywitz and Reid Lyon about a new research discovery that people with dyslexia have different patterns of brain activity than people who are good readers; how the research was conducted; the significance of the findings; the importance of having tangible evidence of dyslexia; and how the study will help to develop better treatment. "Dialogue," a David Gergen discussion with author Alan Wolfe about the people he spoke with for his book "One Nation, After All", and his discoveries about middle-class-morality which is self-critical but less judgmental of others-religious beliefs and how people from different religions accept each other, the country's mature patriotism, and most people's rejection of extremism of any kind. "Justice for All..." a Roger Rosenblatt essay on the even-handed justice in Charlie Chan films and the lack of it in real life. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6083

    "Smoking Issue," a Kwame Holman report on the settlement between tobacco companies and 40 state attorneys general 9 months ago, the criticism from the public health community and the multi-million dollar campaign by the tobacco in support of the settlement. A Margaret Warner report on a bi-partisian tobacco bill introduced into Congress that is in some ways tougher than the original settlement, and a discussion with Sen. Bob Graham, Michael Moore, John Garrison, and David Adleman about the bill; whether the cap of $8 million of damages per year is a flaw; how the industry will view the bill and the issues of liability and marketing restrictions; the need for voluntary agreement by the tobacco companies; the possibility of a court challenge by tobacco companies; and the political prospects of the bill. Excerpts from Senate debate on a 6-year $214 billion transportation bill known as ISTEA. "Cable Car Report," a Kevin Dunn report on the Marine military investigation concluding that the air crew of an A-6 Prowler were solely responsible for an accident in Italy that severed the cable to a ski lift, killing 20 people. A discussion on what the altitude and speed was of the aircraft and what it should have been; the lack of conclusions as to why they were going too low and too fast; the crew's refusal to talk to investigators; what will happen to the crew and their superiors; the possibility of the crew being tried in Italian court; and whether the crew were aware that they had hit a gondola cable. "War On Cancer," a discussion with Dr. Richard Klausner about the decline of cancer incidence and death rate; whether this trend is a fluke; how decreased smoking, changing diet and changing medical care has lowered these rates; the decrease of lung, breast, colon, and prostate cancers and the increase of melanoma, non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma, and brain cancer; minority cancer rates; the drop in mortality rates due to decreased incidents and better diagnosis and treatment; and what individuals should do to avoid cancer. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6084

    "Tracking the Story: Trial by Jury? An update on the President's Legal Problems": A report on the 700 page document released by Paula Jones; and the statement by Mrs. Jones' attorney Donovan Campbell that because of the president's engagement in suppression of evidence, obstruction of justice, and pattern of conduct the case is valid. Robert Bennett, attorney to the president, refuted the statement, claiming that there are legal deficiencies in the Jones case: she has suffered no damages, she was never harassed, and she is using this case to embarrass the president and to interfere with the presidency. The report was followed by a conversation with Dan Balz, Washington Post correspondent, in which he and Margaret Warner discussed the main arguments on both sides and how they connect to the case. These included the issue of a behavioral pattern being presented by the prosecution, the role Kathleen Willey plays in both cases, and the amendment to her testimony. "Political Wrap: Shields and Gigot Discuss the Week in Politics": Mark Shields and Paul Gigot discussed the Kathleen Willey interview with "60 Minutes," its impact on the president's credibility, and the effect this scandal is having on the legislative process. They also discussed the recent allegations that Congress, has a "do nothing" attitude and speculation about how the Republican Congress will react to the California election of a Democrat in an historically Republican area. "Iraq Sanctions": A short background piece on the situation in Iraq and a debate about the effect of the sanctions on the people of Iraq, including the demolition of the infrastructure of Iraq resulting in economic warfare against the people; the sanctions' obstruction of humanitarian aid; and Saddam Hussein's elimination of all government-subsidized food, resulting in hunger and starvation. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6086

    "Turning Point?": The most recent polls indicate that the approval rating of President Clinton has not suffered as a result of Kathleen Willey's testimony in the Paula Jones lawsuit or her interview with 60 minutes. The panel discussed whether Willey's testimony will have any future consequences for the president and how significant this testimony may be in the allegations against him. The accuracy of Ms. Willey's story and the alleged attempts by the White House to diminish her credibility were addressed, as was the support the president will likely continue to have from the American people. "The Search for Peace in Ireland":The second segment began with a report on the peace negotiations in Ireland, including the reinstatement of Gerry Adams, president of Sinn Fein, to the peace talks after a previous ban enforced because of the Belfast murders linked to the IRA and the importance of President Clinton and former Senator George Mitchell to these discussions for peace. The report was followed by an interview with Prime Minister Bertie Ahern, in which the Prime Minister discussed the guarantor role of the United States after an agreement has been reached; the likelihood of U.S. troops being placed in Ireland; and the issues that need to be resolved before a peace agreement can be reached, including a new Parliament in Northern Ireland elected by the population and a formal relationship between Northern and Southern Ireland intended to decrease the isolation of the Northern Nationalists. "Emerald Isle": Robert Pinsky read a Walter Savage Lander poem about Ireland. "Paying for College": The program concluded with a report on the scheduled drop in interest rates of guaranteed government student loans. The new formula to be used by Congress would drop the interest rate by 1.1%, which could result in a decrease in the number of loans lending institutions are willing to give. Marshall Smith, acting deputy secretary of education, and Jon Veenis, of the Consumer Bankers Association, joined Phil Ponce to debate loan servicing costs, fair rates for student loans, and the administration's support for the lower interest rate. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6087

    "Women's Views": Following a brief comparison of the attitudes of women's groups toward Anita Hill and Paula Jones, Patricia Ireland, Anita Blair, Marge Roukema, and Patricia Schroeder met with Margaret Warner to discuss the reactions of women's groups to the recent allegations about President Clinton. Topics covered included the suspicion with which NOW greeted by allegations in the Anita Hill and Bob Packwood situations, as opposed to their reserved demeanor in the Paula Jones/Monica Lewinsky case. The support for Anita Hill was validated by an explanation of the hardships she had encountered making her story known. Ireland claimed that the reverse is true for Paula Jones and Monica Lewinsky. Inconsistencies in the Paula Jones story were discussed as well as the peculiar continued support women still carry for President Clinton. "Magic Bullet?" - Vitamin E: Is it a New Medical Wonder?: Jeffrey Blumberg, nutritional biochemist at Tufts University, discussed a study in Finland in which it was concluded that vitamin E significantly reduced the risk of prostate cancer in male smokers. Other studies indicated that vitamin E may help fight heart disease, slow the progression of Alzheimer's, reduce the risk of cataracts, and aid the immune system of the elderly. Blumberg discussed where vitamin E is found, and how much Americans should be consuming, and addressed the issue of dietary supplements. "Gergen Dialogue: Douglas Wilson Talks About his Book and Lincoln" David Gergen, spoke with Douglas Wilson about his book, "Honor's Voice: The Transformation of Abraham Lincoln". Gergen gave insight as to why his book differs from any other book on the topic, noting that the book gives a glimpse of the struggles behind the success of the virtuous man we know from history. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6088

    "Loose Nukes" A look at the efforts to ensure the weapons of the former Soviet Union don't get into the wrong hands: With the collapse of the Soviet Union, a massive nuclear arsenal was broken into pieces. Countries such as Ukraine, Russia and Kazakhstan were suddenly in possession of over 30,000 nuclear warheads. Unfortunately, many of these warheads cannot be accounted for, making countries such as the United States very nervous. Today the House National Security Committee met and discussed the whereabouts of these nuclear warheads with former Russian National Security Advisor Alexander Lebed. Richard Lugar, Robert Bell, and Jessica Stern joined Jim Lehrer for a discussion on the concerns surrounding these circumstances. Topics discussed included finding work for the former Soviet scientists so they are not tempted to work for countries such as Iraq and Libya; the concern surrounding the lack of security for the warheads; and whether or not the U.S. is at risk in this situation. "Rethinking Reading": A discussion with Catherine Snow about the report released yesterday by the National Research Council. The report was conducted to settle the age old debate between the Phonics and the Whole Language methods of teaching children to read. The report found that children need to understand that reading is about meaning, that they need to understand that those meanings are conveyed through sounds represented by letters, and that they need lots of practice. Ms. Snow discussed issues such as the alphabetic principal, the integration of comprehension, the theory of inventive spelling, and the newly recommended hybrid approach to reading education. "Flying High": A look at the turnaround at Continental Airlines. When Gordon Bethune, CEO of Continental airlines, took over the company in 1994, the future seemed to indicate that a third bankruptcy was inevitable. Correspondent Tom Bearden reported on the events leading to the decline of this company and the steps taken by Bethune and his COO, Greg Brenneman, to merit their two consecutive J.D. Power awards. These steps included the implementation of several incentive plans and the recognition of a team effort in their airline. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6089

    "Easing Up": A report and a debate on the easing of restrictions against Cuba. Correspondent Charles Krause gave background on the situation in Cuba and reported on the Clinton administration's easing of restrictions, including: allowing Cuban exiles to send $300 every three months; permitting humanitarian groups to charter flights to Cuba from the US; easing restrictions on medications; and working with Congress to permit the sale of food in Cuba. Following this report, Phil Ponce revealed two opposing views through his discussion with Congressman Lincoln Diaz-Valart and Alfredo Duran, Vice President of the Cuban Committee for Democracy. The transition to democracy was discussed at great length. The two men agreed on the goal of democracy for Cuba, but failed to see eye to eye on the steps necessary to achieve this goal. Issues included the cause of hunger and starvation in Cuba; whether or not sanctions have ever resulted in a transition to democracy for any country, and the practical implications of removing the sanctions. "Tracking the Story": A report on the situation today in Little Rock, where attorneys for President Clinton urged the court to dismiss Paula Jones' sexual misconduct damage suit. Presidential attorney Robert Bennett claimed that the sexual aversion charge did not exist prior to last week. Paula Jones' attorney John Whitehead refuted Bennett's claim stating that the charge had always been part of the case. The report was followed by a discussion with Washington Post correspondent Dan Balz, who identified the most significant points in Bennett's filing and discussed Bennett's threat to raise sensitive issues if the case does go to trial. Balz also covered the state of the Starr investigation, including the significance of Kathleen Willey to the grand jury. "Political Wrap": Shields and Gigot discussed the week in politics, covering such subjects as, how the Kathleen Willey allegations on 60 Minutes looked five days later; Republican leadership of the House; and the likelihood that Newt Gingrich will run for president. "Spring Verse: Pinsky: A poetic welcome to spring": Poet laureate Robert Pinsky marked the beginning of the season by reading poems from Robert Frost and William Carlos William. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6090

    "Cleaning House": A look at Yeltsin's decision to fire his entire Russian cabinet. Jim Lehrer reported on Boris Yeltsin's decision yesterday to fire his entire cabinet, replacing them with radical new members full of innovative ideas. After the report, Jim was joined by Alexei Arbatov and Leon Aron for an exchange of ideas regarding the legality of dismissing the entire government, the economic situation and lack of growth in Russia, the surprisingly calm attitude of the Russian citizens, whether or not Yeltsin will run again in the year 2000, and their estimations about who will be the members of the replacement government. "Oil Cutback" A look at declining oil prices and increasing oil supplies. Margaret Warner reported on the instability of gas prices in the near future due to yesterday's announcement by Saudi Arabia, Venezuela, and New Mexico that they will cut their crude oil production. Six other oil producing countries announced today that they will follow suit. After the report, Margaret was joined by Daniel Yergin, president of Cambridge Energy Research Associates, for a discussion on the reasons for the cut in production, including the Asian financial crisis and the unseasonably warm winter, which produced a deficit in oil consumption. Yergin also shared his predictions on how this will affect American companies and how much of an increase consumers will see at the gasoline pump. "What's Organic?" A look at efforts to standardize organic food labeling. Lee Hochberg of Oregon Public Broadcasting reported on the USDA-proposed standards that contradict what the National Organic Standards Board had established in 1990. Points on contention include acceptance of irradiated food as organic and the usage of treated sewage as fertilizer. "Titanic Fever" A look at the fascination with this long gone ship. Elizabeth Farnsworth was joined by Maury Yeston, Daniel Allen Butler, and Claudia Pennington to discuss the long-term fascination with the Titanic and the success of movies, museums, books, and theater on the subject. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6091

    "New Africa": A report on the president's business in Africa and the multi-million dollar assistance program offered to African schools. A panel discussed the validity of the statement that a renaissance has begun in Africa, noting that Africa has made great strides in political, economic, and human rights reform, and that economic growth is beginning to take place. Further topics included the diversity problems in Africa; the need for institutions such as an independent media and a central bank; the need for leadership throughout the continent; and the hope that President Clinton's visit to the continent will add to Africa's momentum and its new renaissance. "Special Ed": A look at a unique special education program in a Virginia public school, focusing on a family and their struggle to enroll their autistic child in a public school. The report included a look at the theory behind enrolling a learning disabled child in a public school, opposing views on the theory, and the 1975 Individuals with Disabilities Act, which made it illegal to deny free appropriate public education to handicapped children. "Exercising Privilege" A report on the request for executive privilege for two of President Clinton's White House aids and for the first lady. The report was followed by a panel discussion on the legalities surrounding the executive privilege; what executive privilege is supposed to encourage; what information the president is trying to protect; where the burden of proof lies in this case; and the first lady's request for protection and whether she can receive it since she is not a public employee. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6092

    "Arkansas Shooting": A narration of the events in Arkansas, where two boys, ages 11 and 13, ambushed their classmates with high-powered rifles and handguns, resulting in 5 deaths and many injured. "Search for Stability":" A report detailing the President's trip to Rwanda today, where he apologized for the lack of US support in the 1994 Rwanda genocide, promised $2 million for a survivors fund in Rwanda, and pledged $30 million to strengthen African courts and justice systems. The report was followed by a panel discussion on the dangers in Rwanda and Burundi, including the risk of another genocide; the exploitation of diversity by political leaders and demagogues as a way of gaining power; the impact of the presidential summit on Africa; the issue of arms trade; and the need for African governments to address their people, not international affairs. "Sexual Harassment": This segment included a briefing on the two cases before the Supreme Court, one involving a woman lifeguard in Boca Raton, FL, who is suing the city, the other, a Texas family that is suing the school board for damages related to the statutory rape of their daughter. The briefing was followed by a debate on the interpretation of sexual harassment laws, including subjects such as the notion of a "reasonable person;" the distinction of media cases and legal cases; the need for title VII; and the effect these high profile cases are having on women and their ability to come forward with sexual harassment complaints. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6093

    "Beyond Hatred": A report on the president's visit to South Africa, including footage of his address to the South African parliament. Background information was followed by a panel discussion on the issues surrounding the trip, including: the degree to which South Africa has made the transition from white control to a bi-racially controlled government; the peaceful transition; the fact that the government has embraced a free market philosophy; economic disappointments and the notion that a free market might actually work against the South Africans; the skills gap that still exists as a result of apartheid; the government's challenges in developing public policy; the value of trade to the continent in terms of economic growth; and the need for an African model for economic development. "Race in America": A report on the two-day race commissions meeting in Denver, Colorado. The report covered the meeting that hit a snag because of a lack of Native American representation on the board. "School Violence": Spencer Michaels gave background on the situation in Jonesboro, Arkansas and updated the efforts to help students, parents, and teachers cope with the situation. The report was followed by a panel discussion on the causes and prevention of violence. Topics covered included: drawing a distinction between tragedy and trend; what approach might be most effective in this situation; apparent similarities between this case and other recent cases of adolescent homicide; whether school is safe for students; the warning signs of a child who might have problems; and the issue of weapons prevention in schools. "The Real Thing": The final segment included a tribute to TIME magazine marking the 75th anniversary of America's original news magazine. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6094

    "Historic Encounter": The first segment of this program included a narration on the president's trip to Africa, including footage of President Clinton's address to the South African people. President Clinton praised Mandela for emerging from prison without bitterness and spoke of the need for a UN plan to prevent another genocide from ever happening again. In response, Mandela expressed his concern for this type of force being commanded outside of Africa. "Organ Sharing": Yesterday, the Health and Human Services (HHS) secretary changed the way donor organs are allocated, removing all geographic boundaries with respect to donated organ distribution. The current system is being operated by a private non-profit group called UNOS. The system gives the donated organs to the sickest patient within geographic boundaries set up by UNOS. Following this report, two surgeons debated the issues behind this new system, including whether allowing the government to be involved in transplants is a good idea and the business implications of the new system. "Party Politics": This segment took a look at African-American disillusionment with the Florida Democratic Party. The report focused on state representative Willie Logan (D-FL), who was booted out of his position as the first African-American speaker designate of the house Democratic caucus. He was ousted from this position by a petition signed by 31 white Democrats, and he was replaced by a white woman. This report focused on the events leading to this situation and the reaction of African-American voters. "Political Wrap": Mark Sheilds and Paul Gigot discussed the week in politics, including the transportation bill; the issue of executive privilege in the allegations against President Clinton; and the president's agenda while he is in Africa. "Gergen Dialogue":The final segment included a discussion with Deborah Tannen about her book "The Argument of Culture." The interview focused on the definition of argumentative culture; where the culture is born; the dismissal of the mainstream view in the media; and steps that may be taken to change the culture when newscasts are so provocative. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6095

    ?Supreme Court Watch?: The first segment included a report on two case s that are currently before the Supreme Court. One case being the first major challenge to the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). A woman who is HIV positive claims that she was discriminated against by her dentist when he insisted upon doing her oral surgery in a hospital. The report focused on the specifics of her case and the reasons why she feels she is protected by the ADA. The second case involves Ken Starr?s request for the notes Vince Foster wrote nine days before he died.The report focused on the issue of attorney client privilege after a client has deceased. ?Road Hogs?: A report on the transportation bill before Congress aimed at improving roads and bridges throughout America. Topics addressed included government spending of Highway Trust Fund money on issues concerning other subjects than transportation; the peculiar ballooning of the Inter modal Surface Transportation and Efficiency Act (ISTEA) money from the originally proposed $147 billion to $214 billion; whether education will suffer economically as a result of this extra spending on transportation; and whether appropriate measures have been taken in the allocation of this money. ?Toxic Leaks?: A report on the leaking underground nuclear tanks at the Handford nuclear compound in Washington, in which experts raised points such as the inactivity of the government in funding programs for cleanup; the estimation that 1 million gallons of toxic waste has already leaked; the risk of contaminating drinking and irrigation water; the notion that once ground water has been contaminated, it cannot be filtered; and the reality that there may be funding cuts on the horizon that will result in an even slower clean-up process. ?Hoops Hysteria?: This segment included a report on the year in basketball, and featured an interview with Tennessee women's basketball coach focusing on their undefeated season, how the game has changed, and how her style of coaching has changed over the years. The report also included input from Seth Davis about the stakes of tonight's game, and the comparison of the two men's teams. "The Old Country": This essay on the differences between America and Europe focused on American writers, their subject choices, and the ironic role reversal between America and Europe. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6096

    "Artistic Freedom": The first segment of the program featured a report on the artistic freedom case before the Supreme Court. The report included background on the 1990 legislation that required "consideration of general standards of decency" and the four artists who were turned down for grants as a result. The segment continued with a debate on whether allowing Congress to impose ideological viewpoints based restrictions would be a violation of the first amendment; whether the government has the responsibility to fund all art; whether making these restrictions is preventing anyone from creating art; the issue of the political viewpoints of the artists; whether government officials should have the power to assess what decency is; and criticism of the NEA on artistic grounds. "The Money Chase": This segment included a report on campaign finance reform. The report included an explanation of the manner in which Newt Gingrich brought the issue to the floor, a method known as suspension of the rules; the content of the bill; and an update on other bills being formulated to replace the bill because it did not pass. "Bridging the Gap": This segment began with a report on the shortage of skilled workers in today's high tech job market. The report focused on the reasons for the lack of skilled workers, citing that most workers lack skills in elementary math and fundamental writing and comprehension, indicating that the school system is primarily to blame. This segment also focused on Evanston High School and its efforts to revamp its system to equip students with "smart" labs for focusing on vocational skills, and on the local manufacturing company, Fel-Pro, and its efforts to develop a positive relationship with the school in preparation for the future. "New Ballgame": The last segment included a report on the evolution of the game of baseball in the last decade, focusing on the situation in Minnesota , where the Twins are threatening to leave if the fans will not build them a new, $375 million stadium. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6097

    "Dismissed: Jones v. Clinton": The first segment included a report on federal judge Susan Weber-Wright's decision to dismiss the Paula Jones sexual harassment case along with all other charges against the president. Following the report was an analysis of the decision, including the legal reasons behind the decision, such as the lack of evidence of a hostile work environment, the lack of resolution to the facts, and the contradiction of Paula Jones' claim of emotional distress. The discussion continued with an analysis of the Ken Starr investigation, including the pressure on Ken Starr to finish it, possible impact of the Paula Jones case decision, and speculation as to when we will hear the end of the investigation. "Newsmaker: Defense Secretary Cohen": This segment included an interview with Defense Secretary William Cohen, in which he discussed his proposal before the committee on base closures, the $20 billion the closures will save; other ways in which money can be saved -such as the defense reform initiative- and the reasons why he thinks the proposal will be a success. He also discussed the US forces in the Persian Gulf, how long the troops will stay there, and whether Saddam Hussein will ever comply with the UN restrictions. The last issue addressed was the situation in Kosovo; topics discussed included a comparison of Kosovo with the situation in Bosnia, the call for cooperation from the Serbs, and the likelihood of US involvement. "Loosing Diversity": The final segment included a report on the effects of the end of Affirmative Action at Berkeley University, which resulted in fewer minority students enrolled than in previous years. The report was followed by a discussion on topics such as whether affirmative action represents discrimination; steps that should be taken; whether the public schools of California have shortchanged the students; what can be done to improve K-12 education; and whether proposition 209 will close a door for children. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6098

    "What's Next": Footage of Ken Starr's statement to reporters in which he assured that his investigation will continue, emphasized the need for honesty, and addressed how long he plans to go on with the investigation, followed by a panel discussion on the issues surrounding the investigation, such as the relevant time frame of perjury; the practical and legal ramifications of the decision by Judge Weber-Wright; the need for Americans to stop the intrinsic issues; whether Starr is doing a legal job or a political job; and the outside political pressure on Starr. "African Views": This segment began with a narration of the president's trip to Africa that focused on the shared history between Africa and America. Following the narration was a panel discussion in which members focused on the symbolism behind the president's trip; whether the trip has changed the perceptions of American minds about Africa; the impact of the president's apology for slavery; and the vividness of attitudes about slavery in Africa to those in America. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6099

    "Strength in Numbers?": This segment consisted of an interview with Gail Dudack and Joseph Battipaglia on the Dow Jones Industrial average and reasons for the dramatic bull market, including the cease of inflation and an explosion in corporate profits; how long the booming economy is likely to continue, the effects of the Asian crisis on the US economy; and the danger of deflation. "High Tech Workers": A report on the alleged shortage of information technology graduates from American schools and the legislation being drafted to allow 25,000 more foreign workers to fill information technology jobs in the US. The report focused on the validity of the alleged shortage of workers and the possibility that foreign workers would be willing to work for less money than their American counterparts. "Lasting Impact": An analysis of the week in politics, including whether the dismissal of the Jones case was a political vindication for the administration; how the dismissal will affect the Starr investigation; whether the remainder of President Clinton's term will be soiled because of the Jones case; whether Clinton is damaging the office of the presidency; the lack of moral authority in the White House; and the cause for society's disengagement in politics. "What's Poetry": In recognition of national poetry month, Robert Pinsky read Heather McHugh's poem entitled "What We Thought." [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6100

    "Preventative Pill": A report on Tamoxifen, a drug that was previously used to fight breast cancer but is now being tested as a preventative medication. The report included in-depth information about the study, such as the side effects of the drug, the number of women involved, and the average age of the participants. Dr. Richard Klausner discussed the 40-50% decline in breast cancer and the decrease in bone fractures for women involved in the study. He also explained that the FDA is expediting the approval of this drug and predicted when the drug might be available. "Assault Weapons Ban": A report on today's executive order that permanently banned importation of over 50 types of assault weapons. The report contained a debate on the issues surrounding this ban, including the opinion that less than 1% of these weapons were used in crime; whether the president is representing the people's interests; whether these weapons meet the sporting code; whether the president is stretching the original criteria he set for sporting weapons; and whether banning these weapons will actually cut down on use. The report concluded with a statement from Tanya Metaksa, a representative of the NRA, who claimed that the NRA will go to Congress to try and stop the ban. "Basic Training": The final segment addressed the issue of single sex military training. The segment began with a review of William Cohen's reform order, including a report on basic training in the Marine Corps, where single sex training is implemented and is viewed as successful. Following the report was a discussion with Andrea Hollen and John Hillen on the Marine Corps policy, whether the single-sex policy undermines the corp value of selflessness; at what point gender integration should begin; whether basic training should be used as an opportunity to socialize men and women; and the opinion that gender is not only a social construct. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6101

    "Secure Future?": This segment included a report on President Clinton's trip to Kansas City for a town meeting discussion of the future deficit in the Social Security system. Following the report was an explanation of the changes proposed to save the system; including reducing the automatic cost of living increases (COLA's), raising taxes on benefits, cutting benefits to higher income retirees, raising the retirement age, increasing the payroll deduction, investing the current surplus of Social Security funds in the stock market, and privatization of the system. A panel addressed the growing interest in developing a feasible system; the fact that taxes have already been raised 38 times to compensate for shortfalls; the need to improve the system, not only change it; and the alleged dangers of privatizing the system. "Mega Merger": A report on the $83 billion deal that will merge Citibank and Travelers to form Citygroup.Following the report was a discussion by Marcus Alexis and Rodgin Cohen on the reasons why banking, brokerage, and insurance companies would want to merge: the demands of technology on the industry, competitive domestic pressures, the globalization of financial markets, and the demands of retail and commercial customers; whether the regulations/laws will hamper the merger; whether the barrier between banking and insurance will be a problem; how customers will be affected; and whether this merger will put American banks on a level playing field with banks in Europe and Asia. "Foreign Correspondence": A discussion with foreign correspondent Andrew Nagorski on the capitalization of Berlin. Mr. Nagorski addressed how capitalization might affect Germans, the ongoing unification process, the high unemployment rate in Germany, the state of the currency union in Europe, and whether the European public is in support of unification. "In Memoriam": A tribute to the first lady of country music Tammy Wynette, 55, who had died the night before. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6102

    "Tobacco Companies Declare Deal is Dead": Bruce Reed, domestic policy advisor to the President and his point man on tobacco; US Senator John Chafee (R-RI), a member of the Senate Finance Committee and recently a lead sponsor on tobacco legislation; and, David Adelman, a tobacco industry analyst with the New York brokerage firm of Morgan Stanley DeanWitter, discuss the tobacco companies' assertion that the agreement they reached with states is dead with congressional changes. "Drunk Driving": Correspondent Lee Hochberg of Oregon Public Broadcasting reported on Washington state's tough drunk driving laws. "Jews and the Holocaust": Rabbi James Rudin of the American Jewish Committee; Eugene Fisher of the National Conference for US Catholic Bishops; Deborah Lipstadt of Emory discuss the relationship between Catholics and Jews and a report on the Holocaust issued by the Vatican last month. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6103

    "Talking Peace": This segment began with background on the troubles in Northern Ireland and focused on the deadline for peace talks. Following the background was a discussion on the peace talks. Topics included predictions about the future of the relationship between the North and the South; the importance of David Trimble in the peace efforts; the role of the governments in this effort; the role of former Senator George Mitchell; the importance of the Clinton administration; and possible consequences if no agreement is reached. "Growing Debate": This segment began with background on the tobacco settlement bill that cleared the first hurdle in the Senate committee. Following the report were conversations with tobacco farmers in Kentucky, who spoke of the economic concerns for their future and expressed the conflict they feel because of the medical implication of their crop. Footage of the President's trip to Kentucky followed, in which he assured the farmers that he does not want to stop the sale of tobacco altogether, only to children. "A David Gergen Dialogue": An interview with Alex Kotlowitz, in which he discussed his book "The Other Side of the River," a controversial book dealing with the murder of a young black man in Michigan and the racial situation in the two segregated communities surrounding the murder. Mr. Kotlowitz shared several experiences he had while investigating the book; speculated on the outcome of this murder case had the roles been reversed; and addressed the power of myths and equated how they played a role in this situation. "Freedom Fighter": The final segment was devoted to the life and accomplishments of Paul Robeson, including his law degree from Columbia University, his 11 feature films, his role in Othello, and his leadership in civil rights. Following was a discussion about the legacy of Paul Robeson, including the evolutionary process that "radicalized" him and his threat to the status quo. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6104

    "Giving Peace a Chance": This segment began with a report on the agreement reached by 8 political groups in Ireland only 17 hours after the deadline imposed by George Mitchell, including footage of comments by David Trimble and Gerry Adams. Following the report was an interview with George Mitchell, who addressed the difficulty presented by having 10 individuals in the negotiations; the importance and risk of imposing a deadline for an agreement; the influence of President Clinton in the negotiations; and the difference between negotiating in Northern Ireland and negotiating in the Senate. Mr. Mitchell discussed his role as a moderator between Sinn Fein and the Unionists; what is gained by Protestants and Catholics in the agreement; and the likelihood of this agreement being ratified. "Political Wrap": Mark Sheilds and Paul Gigot discussed the week in politics, including the peace agreement in Ireland; the snag in the national tobacco settlement; and the issue of social security reform. "Hollywood Presidents": This segment consisted of a panel discussion that focused on the evolution of the way the president is portrayed and perceived in popular culture. The panel discussed the increased involvement of American president in celebrity culture; the lack of respect with regard to presidents; the humanization of the president over the last 40 years; whether the change in perception is a reflection of popular culture; and the eerie similarities between the movie "Primary Colors" and the Clinton sex scandal. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6105

    "Is Bigger Better?": This segment began with a report on the merger of NationsBank and Bank of America and of Bank1one and First Chicago. Following the report was a discussion on the historic nature of the first truly national bank; the consequences of the federal government removing restrictions on bank branching; whether these banks will be too big to fail; how this merger might affect Wall Street; the consequences for the average consumer; and ways to prevent failure within the mega corporation. "Starr vs. Bookstores": This report focused on Ken Starr's attempt to subpoena the book buying records of Monica Lewinsky from two bookstores in Washington D.C.. Mr. Starr claimed that he was not interested in discovering the content of the literature but wanted to determine whether she had given any of the books to the president as gifts. The report included a statement by an outraged William Ginsburg, who claimed that the subpoena was an infraction of Monica's first amendment rights, and footage of the civil rights demonstrations that began immediately following the subpoena. Following the report was a discussion between Joe Whitley and Bruce Ennis on whether first amendment rights were indeed violated by the subpoena; whether this was a subpeona for content or purchases; whether the average consumer should be concerned about his/her privacy; and whether this subpoena could be precedent setting. "Trendy and Dangerous": This report focused on the National Cancer Institute study released on Friday, which indicated that daily cigar smoking greatly contributes to all forms of cancer; statistics that most cigar packages do not contain the warning labels found on cigarettes; why cigars have come to symbolize the good life; and why so many women are picking up the habit. "A Conversation with Rafi Zabor": Elizabeth Farnsworth was joined by Rafi Zabor for a conversation about his award winning novel "The Bear Comes Home." Mr. Zabor gave a summary of the novel; addressed his use of the bear metaphor within the book; spoke of the difficulty he encountered writing the book; and discussed the metaphysics, mysticism, and comedia involved in the literature. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6106

    "Microsoft vs. the Justice Department": The segment began with background on Microsoft's aggressive attack on their competitors, resulting in allegations of being a monopoly. The report included examples of how companies violate anti-trust laws; an explanation of why Microsoft is being accused of a monopoly; a debate on whether there is a monopoly on the desktop; and Microsoft's statement that they intend to fight because they feel the Justice Department is impeding innovation. "Fatal Reaction": A report on the American Medical Association study released today indicating that there are 76,000-137,000 deaths due to adverse drug interactions annually. The report included an interview with Dr. Lucian Leape, who explained that by definition an adverse drug reaction is a side effect not related to an error in use. He pointed out different types of drug reactions, such as type A which is related to dose and type B which is idiosyncratic. Dr. Leape discussed what can be done about the problem and expressed the importance of patients knowing and understanding the medications they are receiving. "Disappearing Rainforest": This segment focused on the drought and raging fires in the Amazonian rainforest. Reporter Monica Yant and photographer Peter Tobia investigated the destructive power of the fires that burned 87,000 square miles of Roraima and left many farmers and animals fighting for the same food and water. They explained the long term impact of the fire, stating that it could take as long as 100 years for the forest to heal itself; and addressed the immediate repercussions, namely the 30% increase in cases of malaria due to the high concentration of mosquitoes in the area. "Interview with Katherine Graham": Katherine Graham won a Pulitzer prize today for the only book she has ever written, which focuses on the events and trials of her life. This report focused on her response to winning, how the prize ranks on her list of achievements, and her plans for the future. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6107

    "Breaking the Code": This segment began with a report on the congressional impetus to reform the tax system. The report included information on proposed solutions, including the national sales tax and the flat tax. Following the report was a discussion between Marvin Chirelstein, Jefferey Birnbaum and Denis Calabrese concerning tax reform. Discussion topics included the history of tax reform; the complexity of the current system; an explanation of a national sales tax, which would tax citizens on what they take from the economy, not on what they give to the economy; other programs for which the tax code is used such as subsidizing charities and home ownership; the ideal objectives of the tax code; the distribution of the tax burden; and prospects for a tax overhaul during this millenium. "Talking about Race": The segment included excerpts from the president's town meeting discussion of race in sports. Topics covered in the town meeting included the importance of coming together in order to achieve; the need to be able to talk about the issues without becoming hostile; whether athletes have a social responsibility to give back to the community; and the importance of instilling life-long values through sports. "Pulitzer Winners": This last segment took a second look at the disaster that occurred April 22, 1997 in Grand Forks, Minnesota. This time, however, the focus of the story was not the disaster, but the news coverage of the flood, which earned the Grand Forks Herald a Pulitzer Prize. The report took an intimate look at how the Herald continued to produce throughout the devastation. In addition, the segment focused on poet Charles Wright, who also won a Pulitzer prize for his collection of poems, "Black Zodiac," covering the subject matter of the poems and took a look at Wright's audience. "Private Lives": Anne Taylor Fleming considered the loss of privacy in our lives. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6108

    "Tracking the Story": This segment included a report on two announcements by Ken Starr today covering his letter to Janet Reno asking for mechanisms to ensure a full investigation of the facts designed to promote public confidence in the Justice Department and letter to Pepperdine University declining its invitation to join its staff this fall. The report also included information about Ken Starr's investigation of the alleged contribution to David Hale and Mr. Starr's reiteration that the Paula Jones case is completely separate from his investigation. The report was followed by a discussion between Lanny Davis and George Terwilliger concerning developments in the Starr investigation. Discussion topics included the length of the investigation and the litigation that is prolonging the case; whether Starr can or should investigate the Hale situation, given Hale's alleged ties to Richard Mellon Scaife. "Cambodia's Killer": This report took a look at the life and death of Pol Pot, focusing on his long-term impact on Cambodia. Following the report was a discussion between Sydney Schanberg and Tuck Outhuok concerning the ideology of the genocidal mass murderer. Discussion topics included the Marxist, Maoist, and Leninist views Pol Pot developed while studying in Paris; what pushed Pol Pot over the edge; whether the Vietnam war in Cambodia allowed him to take power; and the devastation he wrought on the Cambodian people. "False Alarms": This segment contained a discussion with Dr. Joann Elmore and Dr. Stephen Feig concerning a study released by the New England Journal of Medicine indicating that mammograms and clinical breast exams produce more false alarms than had been thought. The guests discussed the number of false alarms; the danger of missing cancers by lowering the false positive rate; the cost involved in the increased number of false positives; improvements that can be made; the indication that false positives are higher for younger women; and ways in that women can become more educated and prepared. "A Conversation with Paula Vogel": In an interview with Elizabeth Farnsworth, Paula Vogel discussed her play, "How I Learned to Drive," for which she won a Pulitzer prize. Paula discussed how the play progresses through flashbacks and flashforwards, her inspiration from "Lolita," and her reasons for choosing hard topics. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6109

    "Leading Example": The program began with a report on the President's trip to Chile for the Summit of Western Hemisphere Nations. The report focused on Chile's recent social and political improvements, including her apparent achievement of political stability; her constant 7% growth rate over the past decade; the allocation of 80% of her democratic government budget to social issues; and the unrestricted free enterprise in Chile. The report also included background on NAFTA's invitation to Chile to join the treaty, becoming the first South American member of NAFTA. However, an update on the progress of expanding NAFTA was given indicating that Chile has negotiated separate free trade agreements with Canada and Mexico, in part because of President Clinton' s inability to convince Congress to allow a fast track authority to ratify the invitation. At the summit, the president is expected to announce a time table for a new free trade agreement to include every country in the hemisphere. "Political Wrap": Mark Shields and Paul Gigot discussed the week in politics, focusing on the Ken Starr investigation. Topics discussed included speculation on when Starr will finish his investigation, Mr. Starr's interest in the David Hale story, and whether Paula Jones' decision to appeal will have any implications for the White House. Following this discussion, Mark and Paul were joined by Andy Kohut, director of the Pew Research Center, to debate Americans' opinions about the issues in the media today. "Joint Debate": This segment consisted of a report on the two dozen medicinal marijuana cannabis clubs that have sprung up in California in the last year despite the state's declaration of a "war" on drugs. These cannabis clubs are a result of proposition 215, a bill that deemed the acquisition of marijuana for medicinal purposes with a physician's recommendation legal. The report focused on the increased drug use by teenagers in California; whether cannabis clubs are covered under proposition 215; whether medicinal marijuana is covered under the Constitution; and optional, more medically acceptable forms of marijuana. "Conversation": The final segment included a conversation with Jared Diamond, who won this year's Pulitzer prize for non-fiction for his book "Guns, Germs, and Steel." The conversation covered the origin and the content of his book and explored the environmental and geographical factors behind differences in power and wealth among the world's people. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6110

    "Dissident Released": This segment contained a report about the release of China's largest advocate of democracy, Wang Dan. The dissident was released from a prison in China to come to the United States for medical treatment. The report was followed by a discussion between Kenneth Lieberthal and Sidney Jones on: whether the release is a welcome move by the Chinese; whether he was released because the Chinese want to improve relations with the US; and speculation as to what we can expect from Wang Dan now that he is in the United States. "Turning Point?": This segment began with a report on the summit of the Americas in Chile and focused on the 34-page Declaration of Santiago, which calls for a hemisphere-wide free trade agreement by the year 2005; new efforts against drug trafficking; negotiations on a multilateral process to certify that each government is doing its job; guaranteed free education for every primary grade child by the year 2010; and a commitment to improve the quality of secondary education in the same time frame. The report was followed by a discussion on the second generation of reform now coming to the floor; President Clinton's failure with Fast Track for Chile; the economic, educational and social similarities between Chile and the US; and the fear of a relaxed dialogue on free trade. "Pulitzer Conversation": A conversation with Edward J. Larson, author of "Summer for the Gods" and Pulitzer prize winner for history, in which he discussed the historical, political and legal battle between evolution and creation, the trial of John Scopes, and noted historical figures included in his book. Mr. Larson stated that no one had written a researched academic history on the subject in over 40 years and that there is new information available, so he felt it was a good choice for a topic. "In Memoriam": Richard Rodriquez and Eliot Weinberger discussed the life and writings of the late Octavio Paz; the reccuring imagery and humanism in his poetry; how he was comprised of two cultures, Spanish and Indian; and how Octavio Paz was considered the voice and soul of Mexico. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6111

    "Packaging the Deal": The first segment contained a report on the status of Senator McCain's smoking legislation, including the roadblocks encountered and the advertising and lobbying campaign the industry has launched against it. Following was an interview with Senator McCain in which he addressed the controversy surrounding his legislation; the importance of moving forward in a bi-partisan fashion; the basic parameters of the agreement; whether there will be a response to the tobacco company's assault; and the likelihood of a timely vote. "Teaching Evolution": This segment began with a report about the National Academy of Sciences' campaign to include the subject of evolution in the biology curricula of public schools. The academy is sending a guide book for teaching evolution to every public school across the nation. The report also included background on the concepts of evolution and creationism; a history of the subject in public schools; and a segment on the conviction of John Scopes. Following the report was a panel debate on whether anything in biology can be explained without evolution; whether the democratic thing to do is to allow the students to formulate their own opinions; whether creationism fits a scientific model; the need for a distinction between the large and small aspects of the theory of evolution; and the limitations of scientific explanation. "Turf War": This report focused on a war between the nation's banks and credit unions. The segment opened with a personal story from a single mother who claimed that banks are opposed to her having access to the AT&T credit union. Topics covered in the report included background on the 1934 Federal Credit Union Act; the tax exempt status of credit unions; and the possible danger of excluding low income individuals from banking services by tightening access to credit unions. "Gergen Dialogue": An interview with Barbara Goldsmith, author of "Other Powers," in which she discussed the conditions for women in the 1930's; the popularity of spiritualism during this period; the main character of the book, Victoria Woodhull, whose accomplishments included running for president and being the first woman to address the joint chiefs of staff; and the relevance of Ms. Woodhull's life today. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6112

    "The Money Chase": This segment consisted of a report on today's victory for campaign finance reform in the House. Supporters met with Speaker Newt Gingrich today and convinced him to allow a wide open debate and a vote on the issue within a month. The report gave background on reform attempts up to this point and featured viewpoints from Rep. Tim Roemer (D-IN) and Rep. Asa Hutchinson (R-AR) regarding the leadership process in the House. Other issues addressed included the likelihood of a bipartisan vote and the pressure on members of the Senate. "Newsmaker Interview": This segment contained a political discussion with Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott (R-MS) in which he discussed his views on campaign finance reform; where he stands on Senator McCain's tobacco bill, and the need for some conclusions about the tobacco bill this year. Senator Lott also discussed how the president's legal problems are affecting his ability to govern, noting that important issues such as free trade and NATO expansion are not being addressed appropriately. He concluded the interview by discussing his views about spending the budget surplus and the disconnect between political leaders and the public. "Sexual Harassment": This segment focused on Kimberly Ellerth's sexual harassment suit currently before the Supreme Court. The report profiled the specifics of the case against Burlington Northern that Ms. Ellerth has filed with the US Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and the Illinois Department of Human Rights. Supreme Court reporter Jan Crawford Greenburg gave more perspective on the case and noted that the main issue in the suit is whether an employee can sue if they have rebutted all advances by their employer and their career has not suffered. Ms. Crawford Greenburg also discussed how this case ended up at the Supreme Court, gave a synopsis of the defense's and the prosecution's cases, and discussed the diversity of the justices' opinions. Following this report was a debate between two attorneys in who discussed the split conflict and confusion in the lower courts; whether there need be tangible detriment in a sexual harassment case; whether there is evidence that Burlington Northern had been negligent in elimination of sexual harassment in the workplace; and the limitations on an employer's liability. "Musicians of Note": This segment contained a conversation with composer Aaron Jay Kernis regarding his Pulitzer prize for music; the inspiration he gains from Baroque dance music; how the prize has changed his life; and how this award will help him professionally. The segment concluded with a tribute to George Gershwin, to whom the Pulitzer committee awarded a special citation for his contributions to music. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6113

    "James Earl Ray": This report began with background on James Earl Ray, primary suspect in the Martin Luther King Jr. assassination, who died today of kidney failure. Following the report was perspective on his life and death from Gerlad Posner, Rev. Joseph Lowery, and Haynes Johnson. who discussed whether Ray was capable of such a crime given that he was rumored to be inefficient; whether the government was involved in a conspiracy around Martin Luther King Jr.'s death; whether Ray was a tool in this act of violence; the statistic that only 10% of Americans believe that Ray acted alone; and whether this case will ever be reconciled. "Newsmaker Interview": An interview with Senate Minority Leader Tom Daschle in which he discussed the agenda in the Senate. Other topics included whether the House's decision to take up campaign finance reform will affect the Senate; what the Democrats plan to do if campaign finance reform passes the House; the feasibility of the McCain tobacco legislation; his support of NATO expansion; the disconnect between Washington and the general public; and whether Congress is doing its job. Mr. Daschle also gave his opinion concerning the president's legal problems and criticized Republicans for their stance on tobacco legislation. "Speaking Freely": This segment featured an extensive excerpt from Chinese dissident Wang Dan's first press conference in the United States. Mr. Dan discussed being forced to leave his family and his own country; his dream of democracy in China; and his belief that continuing his education is the best way to help his country. Mr. Dan also spoke of his concern for his parents' spiritual, economic, and physical health and how these factors helped him to decide to leave. Following footage of the press conference, Li Lu and Chai Ling, two of the main student leaders of the pro-democracy movement in China who escaped in the late 1980's, reacted to the release of their fellow dissident. The two compatriots discussed Wang Dan's leadership in the democracy movement; the calm articulate nature that allowed him to stay so focused on human rights in China; his adjustment to life in the US; and his effectiveness in China as an exile in the United States. "Unpredictable Force": Roger Rosenblatt considered the forces of nature by reading his essay that focused on El Nino, Alabama, Wildlife, authors Stephen Crane and Henry David Thoreau, and our own human DNA. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6114

    "Airline Alliances": Last night, American Airlines announced it will form a marketing alliance with U.S. Airways. Meanwhile, United Airlines has been in negotiations with Delta. Experts speculate that these combinations may have been sparked by the alliance between Northwest and Continental earlier this year. This segment of the NewsHour contained an explanation of these alliances by Dr. Julius Maldutis and David Field, who discussed how the new system will benefit customers; differences between these marketing alliances and mergers; speculation that price competition will still exist to benefit consumers; the fact that there is still a portion of the US not covered by these alliances; lack of government legislation about alliances of this sort; and whether deregulation has been sucessful. "Winning Team": This segment began with background on Russian President Boris Yeltsin's dismissal of his cabinet and appointment of acting Prime Minister Sergei Kiriyenko. It was reported that Yeltsin's appointment of Kiriyenko set up a potential standoff with the Duma, who must approve the prime minister. The report was followed by 2 views from Stephen Cohen and Michael McFaul, who discussed the "chicken game" between Yeltsin and the Duma; the political isolation Yeltsin is facing at this point; whether Kiriyenko will bring stability to Russia; why the communists are opposed to Kiriyenko; how the Russians consulted their constitution in this matter, showing that they are capable of exercising peace to solve a problem; the danger that Kiriyenko has no political alliances; the reality of the devastation in Russia outside of Moscow and St. Petersburg; and the opinion that through this move, Yeltsin has extinguished his role as the guarantor of stability in Russia. "Back in Action": It has been eight months since Dan Rostenkowski walked out of prison. He was serving a 15 month sentence for 17 counts of indictment for misusing federal funds. This report focused on the banquet in honor of his reemergence into the public eye. In an interview, Mr. Rostenkowski spoke of how prison has altered his life and his claim that there was a conspiracy against him. "Political Wrap": Mark Shields and Paul Gigot discussed the week in politics covering the political war between the Republicans and the Democrats surrounding the tobacco bill; philosophical differences between the Republican and Democratic stands on the education bill; and potential changes for campaign finance reform. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6115

    "Drawing the Line": Kwame Holman began this segment with a report on the dispute surrounding the line item veto, featuring an in depth explanation of the arguments for and against it. Following the report was a discussion with Kenneth Jost about the arguments made before the Supreme Court today. Mr. Jost explored the technicalities of the line item veto and considered whether the president should be able to pick and choose which taxpayers are subject to certain provisions. He also expressed his opinion that this is a landmark case and that it will be struck down. "Exiled Perspective": This segment focused on the Iraqi political refugees living in the United States in exile. The report featured perspectives from several refugees, who expressed disappointment in the US military; the need for US support of the opposition in Iraq; opposition of the sanctions in Iraq; and pondered who will replace Saddam in the event that he is overthrown. They also shared that, in their view, Saddam should be assassinated and that the US should take the same action that they did against Noriega. "Starting Anew": This segment featured an interview with Chinese dissident Wang Dan in which he discussed his life in prison, the Chinese pro-democracy movement, and his plans for the future. Wang Dan spoke of his desire to eventually return to China and to increase the level of civilization and democracy in his country. He also addressed his involvement in the situation in 1989; the difficulty of living abroad; his desire to one day become the president of Beijing University; and US policy in China. "After the Gold Rush": In recognition of the 150th anniversary of the California Gold Rush, Spencer Michaels narrated a short history of the event. The narration included a discussion of the migration to California; how the discovery of gold changed the face of California; and the photographic documentation of the Gold Rush. In addition, the toll on minorities, the impact on social values and the environmental disasters of the Gold Rush of 1848 were addressed. "Stuff": Essayist Richard Rodriguez of the Pacific News Service considered the subject "stuff" in his composition. The article focused on the revolution in American shopping habits and the dehumanization of the American society. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6116

    "Newsmaker Interview": This segment began with a report about yesterday's statement by the International Atomic Energy Agency which claimed that there is no further evidence of nuclear weapons, factories or equipment in Iraq. The report was followed by a conversation with Richard Butler in which he discussed the legality of Iraq's policy of disarmament by declaration; the lack of physical materials, records of production, and personal interviews to verify destruction; the inconsistencies in Iraq's records; and whether he believes Iraq will keep its promise. "Defining the Mission": This segment featured a report on NATO expansion. The report consisted of detailed arguments for and against NATO expansion and included a debate about possible ratification. Other debate topics were the freedom and security of Europe; whether this action is simply creating another United Nations; the changing needs of NATO; whether the motives behind this expansion are anti-Russian; whether these countries are spending enough money on defense independently; whether there can be an alliance without an adversary; and speculation on the impact if NATO expansion is turned down by the Senate. "Playing Beethoven": A conversation with violinist Anne-Sophie Mutter about her year-long, world-wide tour playing Beethoven's 10 sonatas for violin and piano. In the interview, Ms. Mutter discussed the development of Beethoven within the 10 sonatas; the personal bond she feels with Beethoven; and the relationship between audience and performer. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6117

    "School Vouchers": This segment began with a report on the legislation before the House concerning vouchers for students who currently attend public schools in Washington, D.C. to attend private and parochial schools. The bill has already passed the Senate and the House of Representatives will vote on the issue tomorrow. Following the report was a debate between Richard Armey and Eleanor Holmes Norton on the whether the federal government should feel a special responsibility to D.C.; why the money is going to the District when help is needed in every major city across the US; how the program is expected to work; whether it is possible to give federal money to select religious schools; the differences between vouchers and Pell grants for universities; whether this is about politics or the children; and other options available that will help more D.C. children. "Megan's Law": This segment began with background on Megan's Law, a law named for a girl who was abducted, raped, and murdered that requires communities to be notified if a sex offender is moving into their neighborhood. The report cited situations where Megan's Law has proven effective in a community and where a hoax, using Megan's Law, has seriously damaged a man's reputation and career. The segment concluded with a discussion of the problems with the law. "Pointed Exchange": In this segment, Kwame Holman reported on the debate in the House of Representatives concerning federal funding for needle exchange programs. The report included footage of the press conference in which Secretary Donna Shalala announced that no federal money would be used to fund such programs but that she strongly encouraged private and local funding of needle exchange programs. "Newsmaker Interview": A conversation with the new US surgeon general, Dr. David Satcher, in which he discussed his education and medical experience. Dr. Satcher also gave his reaction to the ban of the needle exchange program and shared his mission as surgeon general, including a commitment to prenatal and pediatric care for every child in the United States and the promotion of healthy lifestyles. He also discussed the controversy behind the position of surgeon general and the necessity of the position, given that it has been vacant for the past 3 years. "Gergen Dialogue": David Gergen spoke with Roberto Suro, author of "Strangers Among Us," about his book and the growth in Latino immigration to the United States. Mr. Suro discussed the immigrant's adaptation to American culture; the diverse population within the Latino, Puerto Rican, Mexican, and Cuban community; and problems faced by the children of immigrants. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6118

    "Q and A": This segment began with extended excerpts from President Clinton's press news conference today, in which most questions concerned Monica Lewinsky and Ken Starr. Following the footage was reaction from the NewsHour's regional commentators. The panel discussed the manner in which the president handled himself during the press conference; the way in which he sidestepped questions concerning Monica Lewinsky and his moral authority; the congeniality of the press conference; whether Clinton is responsible for slowing the Ken Starr investigation; and whether the issue of character matters. "Israel at 50": This segment contained a tribute to Israel in recognition of the 50th anniversary of Israel's independence. The tribute focused on the path to peace and the deep religious, social, and political division still evident today. "Combating Famine": This segment contained an update on the famine plaguing North Korea. The report focused on the progress that has been made in defeating the problem, the increase in digestive problems in North Korea, and the source of the famine. Following the report was a conversation with Catherine Bertini and Andrew Natsios in which they discussed how the famine affects adults as well as children, how the food supply is handled in a socialist country, the amount of food needed to stop the famine, how the food supply can be monitored, and whether there is a military diversion affecting the distribution of food. "Fury of Creation": This segment contained a report on the celebration in Rome commemorating the 400th birthday of John Lorenzo Bernini, famed baroque artist. The report focused on his reputation, his comeback, the development of his artistic ability and style, and his loyalty to Catholicism and the Vatican. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6119

    "Common Currency": This segment featured a report on the meeting of European leaders this past weekend in Brussels to approve the Euro, the common currency for Europe expected to make its debut in January. The report noted the criteria for ratification in the European monetary union and identified countries -such as Britain, Denmark, and Sweden- that have opted to stay out of the union. Following the report was a discussion by Stephan Richter, Lourdes Beneria, and Stephen Overturf on the monetary union. The panel addressed historical attempts to unite European countries; the incentives for unification, including a strong business basis; whether the benefits will be equally distributed; how the unification will affect the average European; whether sacrificing soverignty is a legitimate issue; and whether a United States of Europe is a realistic possibility. "Tracking the Story": Dan Balz discussed the latest developments in the Ken Starr investigation with Elizabeth Farnsworth. Discussion topics included the new set of tax evasion and fraud charges against Webb Hubbell; the indictment of Mr. Hubbell's wife, attorney, and accountant; and whether there is any connection between this indictment and his earlier conviction. Mr. Balz also discussed other developments in the Whitewater investigation, including the first lady's involvement with Madison Guarantee Savings and Loan; her claim of spousal privilege in her refusal to answer two grand jury questions; and the expiration of the Little Rock grand jury next week. The segment wrapped up with a discussion of Susan McDougal's refusal to cooperate with investigators and the court's rejection of Monica Lewinsky's claim of immunity. "Fighting Words": This segment contained a report on the political war of words between Hill Republicans and the Clinton White House. The report included a look at Newt Gingrich's criticism and rhetoric aimed at President Clinton; the debate between Gingrich and Rep. Henry Waxman (D-CA); the president's response to criticism at his press conference yesterday; and the controversy and bi-partisan attitudes in the House. "Political Wrap": In this segment, Mark Shields and Paul Gigot discussed the week in politics. They debated whether the Republicans or Democrats have an advantage after the aforementioned press conference; whether the political situation on the Hill was partisan before Gingrich made his statement; and the importance of immunity in the Lewinsky situation. They also discussed the passing of NATO expansion. "May Day": US Poet Laureate Robert Pinsky read a poem in celebration of May Day. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6120

    "Crime and Punishment": This segment began with a report from Sacramento on the four life terms given to Theodore Kaczynski at his sentencing today. Dan Jackson reported on the points of the sentencing memorandum put out by prosecutors; the impact of the victims' statements at the trial; the emotionless demeanor of Kaczynski at the trial; the role of David Kaczynski in the case; and whether there is any option for an appeal. "Seeking Asylum": In this segment, correspondent Jeffery Kaye told the story of six Iraqis who were brought to the US and are now being deported because they are considered risks to national security. The report included information about the classified evidence in the case against the Iraqis and Amnesty International's claim that this situation violates basic standards of Justice. The report also included information about the men's testimony and the difference between due process for citizens and individuals seeking assylum. "Tumor Killers": This segment contained a report on the study released by Boston Children's Hospital. The study found that when two drugs were used for cancer treatment, they completely eliminated cancerous tumors in mice. Following the report was a discussion about the drugs and how they will be tested. Dr. James Pluda talked about the original purpose of these drugs; the process for clinical trials in humans; the challenge in producing the drug in a pure enough form for use in humans; the potential side effects of the drug; and a time frame for the availability of the drug. "Bailout": This segment began with an update on the political situation in Indonesia. The report included the terms of the International Monetary Fund (IMF) plan, Suharto's initial resistance to the plan, and the demand for political reform in Indonesia. Following the background was a discussion about the economic and political situation in Indonesia. Discussion topics included how the $1 billion from the IMF will be used; the extent of the economic situation in Indonesia; promises made by the Indonesian government that freed up the money from IMF; the significance of the political demonstrations by the students; and the political stability of Indonesia. "Water, Water...": Richard Rodriguez of the Pacific News Service considered water and California in his essay. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6121

    "Talking About Talking": This segment began with footage of Madeline Albright's press conference in London in which she addressed the status of the Israeli Palestinian negotiations and the conditional invitation to continue negotiations here in the US. Following the excerpt was an assessment of the progress of the peace talks, including the main points of the US agreement; the differences between the US agreement and the Oslo accords; and the dynamics of the process. "HMO's and the Law": This segment featured a report that focused on the legalities involved in suing an HMO. The segment began with the story of a man who lost his wife due to the neglect of her health care provider. The man was unable to sue the HMO because of ERISA, a bill passed by Congress in the 1970's that exempts HMO's from being sued for malpractice. The report also included the logic behind the bill and information on reform for these insurance companies. "Newsmaker Interview": This segment contained an interview with European Commission President Jacques Santer, who gave background on the Euro and discussed the history of the pursuit of a unified economy in Europe. Mr. Santer addressed the political compromise over control of the central bank; the challenge of convincing countries to give up sovereign monetary policies; whether the Euro will replace the US dollar as the number one currency in the world; and how World War II has affected the commitment to union in Europe. "Essay": Roger Rosenblatt considered the new novel, "Cloudsplitter," about the radical John Brown. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6122

    "Newsmaker Interview": An interview with Secretary of State Madeleine Albright about the Middle East peace talks. Within the interview, Secretary Albright discussed the conditions of the US agreement; the time frame for the conditional invitation to continue talks in the US; US commitment to peace in the Middle East; the issue of security for Israel; her mediator role in the negotiations; and why these negotiations are so important to the US. "Privilege Denied": This segment focused on the court decision to deny executive privilege to shield senior White House aids from testifying before a grand jury. The report began with background on the privilege dispute and included an explanation of the distinction between unofficial and official matters. Following was a panel discussion about the decision. Discussion topics included whether the privilege has been diminished by the frequency of Clinton's claims; the history of executive privilege; the likelihood of an appeal; and the implication that President Clinton may be hiding something by making the privilege claim. "Children at Risk": This segment focused on the increase in suicide rates for African American kids. The report included results from a study by the Center for Disease Control that found the increase has been 146%. The report also focused on the common denominator in suicide cases; denial and lack of answers for the parents of victims; the increase in the availability of guns; and the lack of affective treatment programs for children at risk. "Dialogue": David Gergen engaged Daniel Callahan in a dialogue about his book "False Hopes." They discussed the content of the book, which criticizes the American medical system; economic problems with the medical system; the need for research on terminal cancer patients; and the need to improve the life within the natural life cycle. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6123

    "Going Global": The segment began with footage of the newsconference in London where the merger of Diamler-Benz and Chrysler was announced. Following the excerpt was information on the history of both companies and a general overview of the merger plan. A discussion followed in which a panel addressed the significance of this event; whether it will signal other mergers; unique elements of this merger; and how the workforce may be affected. Other topics included a comparison of American and German auto unions; whether there will be additional product decision; and the different philosophies of each company. "Cosmic Blast": This segment focused on evidence of a cosmic explosion. Professor David Helfand joined Phil Ponce to discuss this discovery by astronomers. Topics included the location of the explosion; the Italian satellite recording of the flash of gamma rays; the photographs of the aftermath of the flash; and the distance to the explosion. Professor Helfand also explained illustrations of theories for the cause of the explosion. "The Viagra Story": This segment focused on the Pfizer drug Viagra, which reverses many cases of male impotence without side effects. The report included information on other, more painful and intrusive treatments; the level of demand for Viagra; how this discovery has affected the stock market; and the FDA mandate for further testing. Following the report was a discussion in which panelists talked about the demand for the drug; the effectiveness of Viagra; the cognitive and physiological aspects of sexuality; and the need for more research. The panel also discussed the peripheral advantages of the drug, such as raising the ability to have knowledge-based discussions on sexuality; whether insurance companies should cover the cost of this medication; and whether the drug is medically useful. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6124

    "Bubble Economy": A report on the announcement from the US Labor Department today that indicated that employment is at the lowest rate since 1970. The report included information on the status of retail sales; the surge on Wall Street; and Federal Reserve chair Alan Greenspan's concern that higher wages may rekindle inflation. Following the report was a discussion about the US economy. Discussion topics included the low unemployment rate; the risk of inflation; the definition of a "bubble economy"; temporary factors that have influenced productivity; and whether the eventual slowdown will be immediate or gradual. Guests also gave an explanation of the reasons for the quick rise in asset prices and how the technology revolution allows increased productivity. "Hacking Around": This segment focused on the security of the computers at the Pentagon and other government agencies. The report included information on an unclassified military system that was attacked and broken into by "hackers," individuals who try to invade secure computer networks, and a government agency now being created to prevent such attacks from being successful. The agency is called the National Infrastructure Protection Center and it will protect the computers that control the nation's critical infrastructure. The report also featured interviews with members of LOpht, an organized group of hackers, who claim they are only trying to expose the problems so software manufacturers will remedy them. "Hubbell Tapes": This segment focused on the fight on Capitol Hill over the release of the Hubbell tapes by a House committee. The report included extensive footage of Democratic and Republican attacks on one another over the issue. "Political Wrap": Mark Shields and Paul Gigot discussed the week in politics, including issues such as Dan Burton's decision to release the Hubbell tapes; whether Burton should step aside; whether the tapes should have been made public; the loss of the executive privilege claim by President Clinton; and the pressure on Israel to adhere to the US agreement. "Culture of Celebrity": In her essay, Anne Taylor Fleming considered the link between some sports celebrities and violence. "Mother's Day": US Poet Laureate Robert Pinsky read a poem in celebration of Mother's Day. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6125

    "Mega Merger": A report on the proposed SBC-Ameritech merger. The report included background on both companies and a review of the 1996 Telecommunications Reform Act. Following was a discussion about the proposed merger, including topics such as: whether the merger makes sense; whether there is a potential threat to consumers; whether the merger will be counter-competitive; problems associated with consolidation before competition; and whether the government should be involved. "Israel's Next Step": This segment contained a report about past and present negotiations between Israel and the PLO. Following the report was a discussion about the negotiations, including the lack of direct talks between the PLO and Israel; an explanation of the domestic political considerations in the situation; whether the US should be involved in the peace talks; the probability of a compromise; and the tactile differences between the US and Israel although they have the same goal. "Math Wars": This segment contained a report on the battle over the best way to teach mathematics. The report included an investigation of the method developed by NCTM in 1989, which is designed to be used for problem solving strategies and stresses that process is more important than outcome. The report also included criticism of the method; a comparison of students' performance on state exams; the various learning processes for children; and another new method called "Mathland." "Safe to Fly?": A report on the FAA order, released last week, that called for the inspection of all 737's that had over 50K hours of flight time. The segment included an interview with Jane Garvey, in which she discussed the discovery of Teflon erosion in the planes; the results of their investigation; the age of the planes affected; and the safety of the public. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6126

    "Nuclear Fallout": This segment began with background on nuclear testing in India and continued with footage of President Clinton's address, in which he asked India to stop. Following the report, in an interview with Jim Lehrer, Nar-Aysh Chandra discussed whether the Indian government had anticipated this reaction to their testing; why testing is so important to India; whether US sanctions will affect the country; and global criticisms of India's nuclear testing. Next was reaction and analysis from George Perkovich, Pervez Hoodbhoy, and Arjun Makhijani, in which the panel gave an assessment of Pakistan's nuclear capability and discussed the pressures on the Pakistani government to continue testing; whether the testing is aimed at Pakistan; whether sanctions will put off a nuclear arms race; whether sanctions will be affective in India; and the alleged US violation of article 6 of the Non Proliferation Treaty. "House Divided": This segment contained back-to-back interviews about the House committee's investigation of the president. The first interview was with Rep. Henry Waxman (D-CA), who responded to committee chair Dan Burton's statement about the release of the Hubble tapes earlier today; denied any stonewalling on the part of the Democratic members of the committee; and discussed whether any Democrats will change their vote tomorrow and grant immunity for the witnesses. An interview with Rep. John Mica (R-FL) followed in which he gave an analysis of what Burton was trying to do today and discussed the recommendation of the Justice Department to grant immunity to the witnesses; whether the investigation will be turned over to another committee; and whether Republicans are in favor of keeping Burton as chair. Congressman Mica also addressed the stalling tactics of the Democrats on the committee. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6127

    "Nuclear Genie": This segment began with a report on the two underground nuclear explosions in India today. Following the report were three perspectives on the new stage in the nuclear arms race from Ashton Carter, Johathan Schell, and John Mearsheimer. The panelists discussed whether there is any regional or global danger presented by the testing; the stability of the region; the danger involved with wider proliferation; other countries that might follow India in the nuclear arms race; why the US has refused to get rid of their nuclear weapons; and whether nuclear capabilities are a deterrent to war. "House Divided": This report focused on Rep. Dan Burton's (R-IN) attempt to obtain immunity for four potential witnesses in the investigation of campaign finance. "Just Doing It": This segment contained an interview with Nike CEO Phillip Knight about his company and criticism of its labor practices, and his labor reform proposals; the wages earned by his employees in third world countries; Nike's gross profit margin; child labor; and why he believes his company has been the target of these criticisms. "Berlin Airlift:" In this segment, historians discussed the anniversary of the Berlin Airlift. Topics were the significance of the airlift in Cold War history; the debate within Soviet leadership about whether to fight back; whether the airlift helped to heal the wounds of World War II; and how Europe reacted. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6128

    "Testing Pakistan": This segment began with background on the wars and history between India and Pakistan. Following the report was an interview with Zamir Akram in which he elaborated on the situation in India. Discussion topics were whether Pakistan will conduct nuclear testing in the near future; the threat to Pakistan's security; whether Pakistan is the primary target of India's nuclear weapons; and the willingness of Pakistan to work with the United States. Mr. Akram also made a comparison of Pakistan's nuclear capability to that of India and responded to the decision of the United States to impose economic sanctions. "Days of Rage": A report from Jakarta about the chaos and violence in Indonesia. Following the report was a panel discussion in which Abigail Abrash and William Liddle discussed the dramatic political situation in Indonesia; whether Suharto will step down; the widespread resentment of the Suharto regime; the role of the military; and what the US posture should be in this situation. The panel also gave an analysis of the division in the Indonesian military and what this interservice rivalry might mean for Suharto. "Children's Television": The topic for this segment was the uncertain future of children's programming. The report focused on CBS's decision to air the FCC-required 3 hours of educational television per week on Saturday morning and the resulting ratings plummet as a result. Other topics included were the increased competition from other channels; the decrease in the price of children's programming; merchandizing and corporate sponsorship; and whether cutting costs will result in decreased quality. "Tracking the Story": George Lardner of the Washington Post joined Margaret Warner for a discussion about the Ken Starr investigation. Discussion topics included the importance of the testimony by the Secret Service; Ken Starr's arguments at today's hearing; arguments on behalf of the Justice Department; the judge's reaction to arguments; whether the Secret Service is recognizing any limits to the privilege; speculation on when a decision may be expected; and whether there will be an appeal by either side. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6129

    "Days of Rage": This segment began with an update on the political situation in Indonesia. Ian Williams reported from Jakarta that Suharto returned today from Cairo and that there is now an exodus from Indonesia. Following the report were perspectives from Sylvia Tiwon and Rizal Mallargangeng, who discussed whether this is a classic revolt of the people; whether the restoration of order gives strength to Suharto; whether Suharto is on his way out; and whether the US should be involved. They also made predictions about what will happen next and discussed the differences between the initial student movement and the riots of the last few days. "Newsmaker Interview": This segment consisted of an interview with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, who discussed the status of the talks between the US and Israel; redeployment; the importance of Israel's security; whether there is danger of increased violence; the consequences of no agreement; and whether, in his opinion, there will be an agreement reached before his return to Israel. "Political Wrap": Mark Shields and Kate O'Beime joined Margaret Warner to discuss the week in politics. The topics were US foreign affairs; whether Americans are confident of Clinton's foreign policy; and the Justice department case against Microsoft, including the delay of the release of Windows 98, government regulated competition, and whether there is a monopolistic pattern at Microsoft. "In Memoriam": This tribute to the late Frank Sinatra began with a narration of his life including his music, movies, dancing, and Oscars. Following the narrative was a discussion between John Lahr and Frank Rich in which they spoke about the seamless intensity of Mr. Sinatra's voice; the intimacy he delivered to his audience; how he performed as an actor; and why his dark side did not matter. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6130

    "Browsing Battle": This segment began with background on the relationship between Microsoft and the Justice Department in past years. The report continued with information about the anti-trust lawsuit filed against the software company and an interview with Joel Klein, assistant attorney general, who explained the nature of the lawsuit. Mr. Klein also discussed the Microsoft documents obtained by the Justice Department that implicate illegal action by Microsoft; the negotiations preceding the lawsuit; the need for consumer choice; historical comparisons to the Microsoft monopoly; and the anticipated length of the litigation. Following the interview with Klein was a response by Microsoft's group vice president for sales and marketing, Jeff Raikes, who responded to the accusations from the Justice Department and emphasized the importance of innovation. He also discussed the customization capabilities of computer manufacturers; whether Microsoft feels it is treated unfairly; the historical importance of this case; and comparisons to the Justice Department's case against IBM. Next was a panel discussion and analysis of the situation by Paul Gillin, Ron Chernow, and George Gilder. Discussion topics included whether this case could define the economy in the future; the influence of technology in this case; historical parallels to the Microsoft situation; whether consumers want choice or simplicity; and whether the case will have adverse affects on the computer industry. "New Drugs, New Hopes": This segment began with a report on the announcement by the American Society of Clinical Oncology today about the new drugs Raloxifene and Herceptin, two drugs shown to considerably reduce cancerous tumors. Following the report was a discussion with Drs. Craig Jordan and Larry Norton in which they gave a description of the study conducted and explained how the drugs work in the body. They also responded to criticisms of the drugs and discussed who should take them; the types of cancers the drugs were tested on; and when the drugs might be available to the general public. "What's Perfect?": In celebration of the perfect game pitched by David Wells at Yankee Stadium, essayist Roger Rosenblatt shared some of his thoughts on doing things perfectly. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6131

    "Giving Ground": This segment began with an update on the developments in Indonesia from correspondent Ian Williams. The report included Suharto's announcement that he will begin political reforms and elections, and the claim by students that the demonstrations will continue until Suharto steps down. "China Connection": This segment began with a report about the possible connection between China and the Democratic National Committee (DNC) . This news came in light of Johnny Chung's cooperation with the Justice Department. Following the report was an interview with David Sanger of the New York Times, who explained what Mr. Chung has revealed about the source of his contributions to the DNC and the connection to Lui Chao Ying. He also discussed whether contributions from China were illegal; the policy change implemented by President Clinton to allow US satellites to be released to China for launch; how this policy change benefited Liu Chao Ying; and whether the Justice Department has established a link between the contributions to the DNC and the policy change. Following this interview was a panel discussion between Rep. Thomas Barrett (D-WI) and US Sen. Arlen Specter (R-PA). The two men discussed whether an investigation is warranted; the criminal investigation already underway that might be linked to this situation; whether the policy change began under the Bush administration; whether Congress should be involved; and other indictments by the Justice Department surrounding these allegations with connections to China. "Smokin' Debate": In this segment, correspondent Kwame Holman reported on the debate in the US Senate over proposed tobacco legislation. The report included extensive footage of the partisan arguments about the content of the bill proposed by Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott and of Senator John McCain's (R-AZ) response to the arguments. "Conversation": US Special Envoy Richard Holbrooke joined Margaret Warner for a conversation about the Bosnian War. Topics discussed included what the Bush/Clinton administrations could have done to end the war sooner; the failure of the European Union in 1991-92; the "napkin diplomacy" incident that led to the peace agreement; his criticism of the US military in his book; and the violence in Kosovo. "Rosenblatt Essay": Essayist Roger Rosenblatt considered some of New York's landmarks that have been included in the Landmarks Project, which is being implemented for New York's centennial celebration. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6132

    "Nation on Edge": This segment began with an update from Ian Williams of Independent Television News about the situation in Indonesia. He reported that Jakarta has been shut down and that the opposition has retreated. Following the report was an interview with Stanley Roth, assistant secretary of state for East Asian and Pacific Affairs, in which he addressed the situation in Indonesia and President Suharto's promise to step down. He also discussed what Secretary Albright meant by her request for Suharto to commit an act of statesmanship; the US's messages to Indonesia about political reform,the process of dialogue between government and citizen and restraint; the transition to a democratic society; and whether Suharto will reside in Indonesia during the political reform. "Out of Touch": This report was about the consequences of the satellite malfunction that rendered 90% of the country's pagers useless. The report included a description of the problem, a synopsis of what caused it, predictions as to whether the satellite will come back on line, and a discussion of the future of satellite services. "Smokin' Debate": This segment contained an update on day two of the Senate debate over tobacco legislation. The report included extensive footage of the debate on the Senate floor. "High Flier": This segment contained a conversation with American Airlines' Robert Crandall about his influence on the airline industry and American Airlines, where he finished his last day today at the helm. Mr. Crandall discussed his innovations and accomplishments; criticism of the airline industry; his opposition to deregulation during the Carter administration; and the reasons why he is retiring. "Death of an Idol": US Poet Laureate Robert Pinsky gave a poetic tribute to Frank Sinatra, who was buried today in Cathedral City, California. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6133

    "End of an Era": This segment began with a report from Jakarta about the resignation of President Suharto and the demands from the opposition that he be prosecuted. Following the report was a panel discussion and analysis of the situation. Panel members discussed whether Suharto had any choice but to resign; Suharto's successor President Habibi and his relationship with Suharto; and whether the unrest and protest will continue now that a successor has been named. "Pointing the Way": In this segment, correspondent Spencer Michaels reported on navigating with the Global Positioning Satellite (GPS). The report included information about where the GPS is useful, an explanation of how the system works, and when the system will be used extensively by the public. "Smokin' Debate": This segment contained an update on the ongoing debate in the US Senate concerning tobacco legislation. The report included excerpts from Senate debates about whether liability should be limited and information about a proposed amendment that was voted down. "Conversation": This segment contained a conversation with former US postmaster general Marvin Runyon in which he addressed the criticisms of his aggressive management of the Post Office. Mr. Runyon also discussed his reasons for raising the price of stamps during a surplus; the need for more automation; the alleged exploitation of postal employees; privatization of the Postal Service; and the future of the Postal Service. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6134

    "School Violence": This segment began with a report from Spencer Michaels about the outbreak in school violence. The report profiled cases of school violence in Tennessee, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Kentucky, Arkansas, Missouri,and Missippi. Following the report was a discussion between John Stanford, Sissela Bok, and Franklin Zimring in which they talked about the epidemic of school violence; the desensitization of America's children by the media; reasons for the rise in the homicide rate in public schools; whether this copy cat phenomenon will slow during the summer months; the availability of firearms; and to what extent schools are responsible for prevention programs. The panel also addressed what can be done by the schools to minimize such incidents. "End of an Era": This segment began with an update from Ian Williams in Jakarta about the violent situation in Indonesia. The report included footage of the continued student demonstrations against President Habibi. The excerpt was followed by a previously taped conversation between Ian Williams and Charles Krauss. Mr. Williams discussed whether the opposition in Indonesia is unified; whether the students might back organized opposition; the devastation in Jakarta from the fires and looting; and whether the ethnic Chinese will return to Indonesia. Mr. Williams compared this situation to other crises in Indonesia's past. "Fire and Smoke": This segment began with an report from Lee Hochberg about the fires that have been burning in Mexico, Guatemala, and Honduras for more than a month. The report also looked at the impact on the tourist industry in Texas and the health risks associated with smoke inhalation. Hochberg also reported that ozone levels are rising and that the smoke problems are not expected to disappear anytime soon. "Political Wrap": In this segment, Mark Shields and Paul Gigot joined Jim Lehrer to discuss the week in politics. The two men engaged in an extensive analysis of the China satellite story, noting the severity of the allegations and the ties to the Democratic National Committee. Following was a discussion about the tobacco bill that is stuck in the Senate; the lost momentum of the McCain bill; and the setback involving this week's proposed amendment. "Dialogue": David Gergen engaged author David Halberstam in a conversation about his new book, "The Children." Mr. Halberstam discussed the topics addressed in his book about civil rights, such as morality, the teachings of civil rights leader Jim Lawson, faith, and the value of taking a Ghandian approach. He also discussed the importance of television, Dr. Martin Luther King, and the heroes of his book in the success of the civil rights movement. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6135

    "It's Yes": This segment began with a report by Margaret Warner on the results of the referendum on the Northern Ireland Peace Accord, including background on the events leading up to the peace agreement; the points of the accord; and reactions from Prime Ministers Bertie Ahern and Tony Blair. Following the report was a conversation between Joe Carroll and Hugo Gurdon about the results of the election; whether the 17% victory will be enough to ensure peace; the concessions of Unionists and Sinn Fein; whether the Protestant vote will shift in the June election; and whether decommissioning will occur and if so how might it affect the election in June. The segment concluded with a discussion about the prospects for a united Ireland. "A Vote for Democracy": a report about the victory for pro-democracy supporters in the election in Hong Kong; a conversation about the election with Kenneth Pang and Dick Thronburgh, who discussed the record turnout at the voting booth, the success of the pro-democracy candidates, whether the results of the election will expedite the movement towards democracy in Hong Kong, and the amount of power of the legislative counsel. The men also talked about the projected impact of the election throughout Asia and how these elections might affect Hong Kong's relationships in Asia. "Bilingual Education": Spencer Michaels reported on the bilingual education debate in California, where it is an issue in next month's election in the form of proposition 227. The report included information about what is required by proposition 227; the demographics of the state; the results of bilingual education in California's schools; and statements from supporters and opposers of the proposition. "Life Skills 101": This segment contained an essay by Anne Taylor Fleming focusing on the outbreak of violence in the US and an innovative class for seventh graders in Santa Monica California that is designed to help students learn to deal with life. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6136

    "Pressure Point": This segment began with a report from Margaret Warner about the nuclear testing in India and Pakistan. The report covered the events leading up to this nuclear arms race and the sanctions imposed by the US as a result of the testing. Following the report was a conversation between Jamshed Marker and Robert Oakley who discussed the efforts to discourage Pakistan from testing nuclear devices in response to India; the basis for Pakistan's concern; why Pakistan has been so slow to respond to the Indian testing; and whether additional sanctions from the US would be a consideration for Pakistan; what would be required for Pakistan to stop testing; and the increased dispute over Kashmir. "Model Economy": This segment consisted of a Charles Krause report on impact of the free market economy in Chile on the poor. The report began with an extensive background of Chile's movement to a free market economy, including examples of what Chile has done to improve the status of the population, such as paved streets and computers in the classrooms. The report continued with a profile of the Lagos family, who worked their way out of severe poverty. The family detailed the hardships they have encountered and the sacrifices they have made just to stay alive. "Merger Maina": This segment began with background from Phil Ponce about the mega-mergers that have been proposed in the US since January. Following the report was a discussion with Bruce Wasserstein, Jim Grant, Fred Weston, and Walter Adams on the increasing number of large corporate mergers; whether these large mergers stimulate international competition and the US economy; the fundamentals of mega-mergers; the cutbacks and layoffs that sometimes occur in a merger; and the motivation behind them. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6137

    "Fire and Smoke": This segment began with a report from Phil Ponce about the fires and smoke in Mexico that have killed more than 50 people and destroyed more than 1 million acres of grassland and forest. The report covered the cause of the fires and the environmental impact of the smoke in cities as far north as Denver. Following the report was a discussion with Mario Aguliar, Brian Atwood, and Guillermo Castilleja on the impact of the fires; the rate at which Mexico is losing its forest cover; the immediate impact on the United States; the danger to plants and animals as a result of the fires; whether there is a smoke hazard in the US; the quick response of the Mexican government; the cause of the fires and the agricultural practices that need to be changed in order to stop them; whether government subsidy of agriculture contributes to the threat of fires; and to what extent the draught has contributed to the problem. "Hope or Hype?": This segment included an Elizabeth Farnsworth report on the recent surge in cancer research. The report covered several drugs that have been introduced in the past months in the areas of breast, uterine, and prostate cancers. Following the report was a dialogue between three oncologists, Dr. Lynn Schucter, Dr. Derek Raghavan, and Dr. Leonard Zwelling; who discussed the hype surrounding the new drugs; whether the science behind the breast cancer drugs will be applicable to other cancers; and the dangers of smoking. The conversation continued with a discussion about prostate cancer; a the new blood test used to detect prostate cancer; new developments in prostate cancer treatment; and what Americans can do to for prevention. They also talked about the difference between research today and 10 years ago; the number of clinical trials being conducted; and other advances in molecular biology. "Foreign Correspondence": In this segment, Margaret Warner engaged Daniel Williams in a conversation about the status of Russia today. Discussion topics included the expansion of NATO; the status of economic reform in Russia; and the characteristics of the "new Russian". "You Talkin' To Me?": In this segment, essayist Roger Rosenblatt considered the safety, rudeness, and chaos of New York City taxi drivers. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6138

    "Nuclear Defiance": This segment began with a report from Charles Krause about the nuclear testing performed by Pakistan; background on the tests conducted by India; US condemnation of testing in India and Pakistan; and sanctions that would now be imposed on Pakistan as well as India by the United States. Following the report was an interview with Pakistani Ambassador Riaz Khokhar who discussed the declaration of a state of emergency in Pakistan; the criticism of the Pakistani actions by President Clinton and other leaders; whether Pakistan plans to do more testing in the future; why Pakistan felt threatened by India; and whether Pakistan is willing to engage in discussions with India about a halt to the arms race. Following this interview was a conversation with Indian Ambassador Naresh Chandra about the escalating situation in Southeast Asia; whether India is willing to engage in a dialogue with Pakistan; the lack of confidence and trust between India and Pakistan; India's commitment to cooperation with their neighbors; whether Indians feel threatened by Pakistan's actions; and whether the US has the responsibility of intervention. The segment ended with the US perspective on the situation from National Security Advisor, Samuel Berger who discussed the likelihood of Pakistan conducting more tests; the origins of the religious and territorial conflict between Pakistan and India; and whether the US is undergoing efforts to bring the parties together to discuss non-proliferation. "Tracking the Story": In this segment, Margaret Warner gave an update on the Ken Starr investigation, including the ruling on the executive privilege claim by Judge Johnson. Following the report was insight from Ruth Marcus of the Washington Post who discussed Ken Starr's request to the Supreme Court to leap-frog the appeals court; the likelihood of the Supreme Court allowing the leap-frog; the scope of what Ken Starr is asking the court to review; whether the president's lawyers were privy to the evidence Ken Starr presented to the judge; and the likelihood of these two White House aids being forced to testify. "Troubled Ruble": This segment contained a report from Mark Webster in Moscow about falling Russian financial markets and an interview by Phil Ponce with Arnold Horelick and Marshall Goldman about the severe financial crisis in Russia. The two men discussed how Russia got to this point; the affects of low oil prices on the Russian economy; whether the International Monetary Fund will need to come to the aid of the country; and whether other European nations will allow Russia to go under; and the admirable patience of the Russian people [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6139

    "Nuclear Defiance": A report by Andrew Veech about the nuclear developments in Pakistan, followed by four perspectives on the situation from Michael Krepon, John Mearsheimer, Sumit Ganguly, and Askari Rizivi. The panel discussed the increased danger in the Indian subcontinent; the potential for the situation to escalate; whether nuclear weapons might be used as a deterrent; whether India and Pakistan can manage this relationship; the lack of early warning systems in these countries; and the issue of diplomacy in South Asia. "Political Wrap": Mark Shields and Paul Gigot discussed the week in politics, including Judge Johnson's ruling in President Clinton's request for executive privilege and whether Ken Starr's victory will improve his public image. "In Memoriam": A Spencer Michaels tribute to Barry Goldwater, the father of modern day conservatism, who died today at his home in Arizona. The tribute included a synopsis of his accomplishments in the military and politics, focusing on his candidacy for president, and extensive footage from a 1986 interview with Robert MacNeil. Following was a discussion about the political legacy of Barry Goldwater, including how he changed the conservative movement; the transformation of the South and the sunbelt into conservative states; the connection between Lyndon Johnson and Barry Goldwater; and the paradoxes of Barry Goldwater. "Political Dues": A report from Jeffery Kaye of KCET about the California ballot proposition 226, which would put restrictions on campaign spending by labor unions. The report covered the roots of prop 226; the principals of the proposition; the close relationship between Democratic party candidates and unions; whether union members have the power to control what is being done with their money; and whether union members have the ability to redirect their money. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6140

    "Tracking the Story": A report about President Clinton's decision to avoid a Supreme Court showdown over executive privilege in the Monica Lewinsky situation. Ruth Marcus of the Washington Post joined Margaret Warner to give perspective on the issues. Topics included the intentions of the White House to go forward on the issue of attorney-client privilege, the practical implications of today's decision, the parameters of attorney client privilege, and whether the Supreme Court will decide to leap-frog the appeals court. "Valley of Turmoil": This report about the explosive situation in Kashmir began with background from Charles Krause that included the history of the rivalry between Muslims and Hindus, the UN cease fire in 1949, the sentiment against India in Kashmir, and the nuclear testing in India and Pakistan. Next, a panel discussion on issues related to the situation in Kashmir, including the severity of the tension in the vale of Kashmir, the number of troops stationed there, the types of artillery used by either side, from which countries these weapons are imported, and the reasons for the importance of Kashmir to Pakistan. "Does Money Matter": This segment contained a report on the major contest for governor in the California primary election. The report covered the campaigns being run by each candidate, the cost of television campaigns, the lack of political issues in the race, and the negative repercussions of running ads on television. "Dialogue": A David Gergen dialogue with author Jill Ker Conway on her new book, "When Memory Speaks." "Money Ain't Funny": essayist Roger Rosenblatt considered jokes about the wealthy. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6141

    "Nazi Gold": This report on the money stolen from Holocaust survivors by the Nazi's in World War II covered the 1997 11-agency US government group report on the investigation of Swiss banks, which indicated that the Swiss banks knew about the stolen gold, the Swiss helped the Germans convert the gold to hard currency to fund the German war effort, the Swiss reneged on an agreement to return the assets, and the US failure to pressure the Swiss to fulfil the agreement. Following the report was some insight on the report from Stuart Eizenstat including the role of other neutral countries in helping the German war effort; reasons why the Swiss knew they were dealing in looted gold; the unclear concept of neutrality during World War II; and his hopes for other countries to conduct their own investigations. "Reform Struggle": This report on the efforts of Indonesia to conduct a peaceful transition to a democratic society covered both President Habibi's efforts to distance himself from the former President Suharto and the economic catastrophe in Indonesia. Following the report was a discussion about the latest developments in Indonesia including its economic status; the need for US foreign assistance; the implications of the economic problems in a time of transition from an autocratic society to a democratic society; and whether the progress toward democracy will be dependant upon forgiving Suharto. "View from the Hill": This report about the issues and agenda facing Congress included the debate over campaign finance reform legislation, amendments to the legislation, the investigation of the Clinton administration decision that may have allowed sensitive missile technology to reach the Chinese military, and Newt Gingrich's visit to Jerusalem. Next was a discussion about these issues including whether the Starr investigation has affected performance in the House; whether the Speaker has overstepped his boundaries in criticizing the president; whether the president is committed to a domestic agenda; the integrity of the justice system; whether the Speaker's criticism of Secretary Algright about her policy on Middle East issues was appropriate; whether campaign finance reform will be successful; [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6142

    "Intelligence Failure": This report from Kwame Holman covered the CIA classified report about the nuclear testing in India. The report included prevailing assumptions at the CIA; the lack of data-gathering satellites trained on India; the need for better trained analysts; and the lack of US human intelligence in India. Next was a discussion between Senators Richard Shelby and Robert Kerrey about the CIA's failure to detect preparations for nuclear tests in India. Topics included the severity of the intelligence failure; the need for the report to be declassified; and whether the CIA is fighting declassification. "Primary Results": This segment on California's new open primary on Tuesday began with a report from Spencer Michaels that included the results of the Gubernatorial primary; concession statements from the other two candidates; and the results of the vote on propositions 226 and 227. Next, Mark Dicamillo and George Skelton discussed the victory of the low cost campaigns; the results of the poles; the importance of the negative ads in the defeat of Gubernatorial Candidate Al Checchi; public skepticism of self-financed candidates; why proposition 227 passed; the national implications of proposition 226; and whether Jerry Brown is back in the political arena. "Prize Review": a Betty Ann Bowser report on Denver's theatre company, which will be given a special Tony award for outstanding regional theaters during the upcoming awards program. The report also covered the Denver Center for Performing Arts and the unique quality of resident theater. "Public Prayer": This Phil Ponce report covered the issues surrounding prayer in public schools, including the first House vote on prayer in school since 1971, the content of the amendment before the House, and requirements for adding an amendment to the Constitution. Next were two views on the public prayer amendment from Rabbi David Saperstein and Reverend Richard Land. Topics discussed included religious oppression in public schools; whether religious liberty can be protected through government; and whether the First Amendment protects these stipulations for which the latest amendment call. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6143

    "Tracking the Story": Ruth Marcus of the Washington Post joined Jim Lehrer to provide an update on the latest developments in the Starr investigation and the Supreme Court's decision to turn down the independent counsel's request to bypass the appeals court and get a Supreme Court ruling on the Clinton Administration's claim of privilege. Discussion topics included the statement issued by the Supreme Court today denying Ken Starr's request; what this decision means for the court of appeals; the legal process for the appeal; and whether this might slow Ken Starr's investigation. "Expanding Club": Following a report on the meeting in Geneva about nuclear testing, Ashton Carter, Sujit Dutta, Kunihiko Saito, Diego Guelar, and Ehud Sprinzak joined Margaret Warner for a discussion about the increasing number of countries with nuclear technology. Topics included whether the steps taken in Geneva will help to stop the nuclear arms race; the prospects for peace in the Asian subcontinent; the need to address the concrete concerns of India; what else might be done by the superpowers to address the concerns of the non-nuclear countries; and whether the "two tier" system for the prevention of nuclear weapons should be maintained. "Deep Discovery": This segment began with a report from Phil Ponce about the discovery of the wreckage of the aircraft carrier USS Yorktown, which was sunk by a Japanese torpedo during World War II. Following the report was an interview with Robert Ballard, the deep sea explorer who discovered the wreckage, in which he discussed the battle of Midway, during which the ship sank; the state of the preservation of the ship; and why there are no plans to raise the ship. "Man of Faith": A profile of one of the nation's leading teachers of religion, Martin Marty. The report included a synopsis of his accomplishments in entertainment, teaching, speaking, and writing and extensive comments about his spirituality. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6144

    "Refresher Course": This segment began with background on the FAA decision to require more training for controllers. Randy Schwitz and Michael Goldfarb joined Phil Ponce for a discussion about a near-miss at Laguardia airport; the lack on funding for necessary upgrades at airports; the delay in reporting the near-miss; whether the training order was a prudent step on the part of the FAA; and whether the FAA employs enough air traffic controllers. "Troubled Territory": This segment began with background from Charles Krause about the violent situation in Kosovo along the Albanian border. Following the report was a discussion between Jonathan Landay and John Lampe about the latest violence in Kosovo. Topics included whether the recent violence has the potential for an all-out war; whether atrocities are being committed by the Serb forces; the patriarchal structure of Albanian society; whether NATO forces should be dispatched to the Albanian border; and whether NATO might prevent the violence from spreading to Macedonia. "Lion King's Queen": In this segment, Paul Solman of WGBH interviewed Julie Taymor, director of the Broadway production of The Lion King. She discussed her experience in Indonesia; her work in mythic imagery and ethnic drama; her work with Disney on the production; the commercialism that surrounds this event; and the importance of supporting the NEA and other not-for-profit institutions that help artist to develop. "Political Wrap": Mark Shields and Paul Gigot discussed the week in politics including the possible political fallout from yesterday's Supreme Court decision not to expedite the appeal about privilege; whether Ken Starr's investigation is having a debilitating effect on the president's ability to run the country; campaign finance reform; the issue of bilingual education in California; and the legacy of Robert Kennedy. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6145

    "Posthumous Privilege?": This segment began with a report by Jan Crawford Greenburg, who covered today's Supreme Court session on attorney-client privilege and its impact on the Starr investigation for the Chicago Tribune. She discussed the basic facts of the case; arguments made before the Supreme Court today on behalf of Ken Starr and Mr. Hamilton; the reaction of the justices to each of these arguments; the status of the law in terms of this issue; exceptions to the attorney-client privilege; and when the public can expect an opinion. "Newsmaker Interview": In this interview with French president Jacque Chirac, the president discussed the transportation strike in France during World Cup Soccer; whether this strike represents the resistance of the French to the new unified currency in Europe; the danger of the nuclear capabilities of India and Pakistan; why the French did not join the US and Japan in the imposition of sanctions against India and Pakistan; what the international community should do to prevent the escalation of the situation in Southeast Asia; and the heated violent situation in Kosovo. "Filing Suit": Spencer Michaels began this segment with a report about the anti-trust suit against Intel by the Federal Trade Commission(FTC). Following the background were interviews with William Baer and Daniel Wall. Mr. Baer discussed why Intel is a monopolist and what they have done wrong; whether Intel has suppressed innovation and competition; how this suit ties into the Microsoft lawsuit; and whether the FTC will be able to show harm to competition. Next, Mr. Wall spoke about issues related to the government's case against Intel; the intensity of the impact on Intel if the government should prevail; competitive strategies in the marketplace; the perception of Intel in the industry; "Bankrupt Law?": This program concluded with a report on a proposal in Congress to make it more difficult to declare bankruptcy. Topics included were bankruptcy statistics in America; the basic laws involved with bankruptcy; high profile cases; and details of the bills proposed by the Senate and the House. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6146

    "Newsmaker Interview": This segment began with background on the issues surrounding the historic transfer of power in South Korea last February. Following the report was an interview with South Korean president Kim Dae Jung in which he discussed issues involving North and South Korea, including his wish for the US to lift sanctions; whether the lifting of sanctions should be unilateral or conditional; the severity of the famine; prospects for a unified Korea; whether they are still a military threat to South Korea; and the importance of the American intervention; and whether the nuclear capabilities of Pakistan and India might affect the situation between the two countries. He also talked about the economy in South Korea; the importance of the International Monetary Fund (IMF) in solving the economic troubles; and his past experiences with the government that he now runs. "Highway Pork?": This segment contained a report by Kwame Holman about the transportation project in the bill signed today by the president. The report included information about the basic principles that comprise the bill and focused on a stretch of route 10 in West Virginia that is slated to be restored by the project. "New Regime": This segment began with a report by Elizabeth Farnsworth about the issues surrounding the death of Nigeria's leader, General Sani Abacha. Topics included a profile of the new leader, General Abdulsalam Abubakar; the instability in Nigeria; the competition for political control between the diverse groups of Nigeria; and a short history of the leadership in the country. Following the report was a discussion between Walter Carrington and Adonis Hoffman about the qualities of the new leader; the extent of his political strength; and the amount of opposition in Nigeria. "Speaking American": The final segment of this program contained an essay by Richard Rodriguez about the vote for proposition 227, which will end bilingual education in California. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6147

    "Testing Nukes": This segment began with a report by Elizabeth Farnsworth about the comprehensive test ban treaty and also included footage of Secretary of State Madeleine Albright's plea for the US to ratify and hold hearings on the treaty in a speech today in Washington. Following the report was a discussion between US Senators Carl Levin and Jon Kyl, Sidney Drell, and Robert Barker about the efforts to prevent nuclear testing. Topics for discussion included whether there is an urgency for the Senate to act immediately on the treaty; the risks involved in relying upon a treaty for national security; the success and the parameters of the existing non-proliferation treaty; and the prospects of ratification of the new treaty in the Senate. "Smokin' Debate": This segment contained an update from Kwame Holman about developments in Congress concerning the tobacco bill, featuring excerpts from arguments about the tobacco bill from the Senate floor, including the stipulations of Sen. John McCain's bill and spending plans for the money that the bill would require tobacco companies to pay to the federal government. "Shephering the Family": This segment contained a report about the issues surrounding the new statement adopted by Southern Baptists on the roles of husband and wife in the family. Following the report was a discussion with Dr. Anthony Jordan and Carolyn Weatherfor Crumpler about this amendment to the Baptist faith and message. Topics included biblical passages that might be interpreted to support the amendment; an explanation of the statement that calls for women to be submissive to their husbands; the breakdown of family values; and what the practical effects of the statement might be. "Football Frenzy": In this look at the battle for soccer's championship, the World Cup, Phil Ponce reported on the fans; the strike by French airlines; and the history of the competition of the cup. Following the report was a discussion with Rick Davis and Jessi Losada about the games being held in France this year. Topics included the magnitude of this sporting event; the tradition involved in the World Cup; the growing interest of the US in this sport; and the prospects for the US team. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6148

    "China Trip": This segment began with excerpts from President Clinton's address to Chinese scholars about his intentions to proceed with his trip to China. The segment continued with feedback about the public's view of the president's trip from the NewsHour regional commentators: Cynthia Tucker, Patrick McGuigan, Lee Cullum, Bob Kittle, and Jim Boyd. Topics for discussion included whether the president should go to Tiananmen Square; the impact of the president arriving at Tiananmen Square without making comments about the massacre; and the importance of US-Chinese relations. "Newsmaker Interview": In this interview about the recent nuclear testing and Pakistani reaction, Indian defense spokesperson Jaswant Singh discussed whether India will sign the comprehensive test-ban treaty; whether India plans to deploy nuclear weapons; whether there will be further missile testing in India; and the worldwide reaction to the Indian testing. "Millennuim Bug": In this segment, Paul Solman of WGBH reported on the Year 2000 computer bug. The report covered the problem presented by the turn of the century; companies and corporations that might be affected by the problem, including power companies, the federal government, and the banking industry; and the intricacy of the interdependency of our nation's computer systems. "Conversation": This segment contained a conversation with the outgoing secretary of the Navy, John Dalton. In an interview with Margaret Warner, he discussed the ways in which the Navy has changed during his tenure; new challenges within the military due to budget cuts; and gender integration in the military. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6149

    "Military Options": This segment began with a report about the Balkan crisis in Kosovo. The report covered the meeting today in London of the six-nation contact group on the complications involved with Yugoslavia. Following the report was a discussion between Warren Zimmerman and Merrill McPeak about what can be expected from the area in the next few days; the options for Kosovo at this point; whether the US can launch an air operation; and the military difficulty involved with this conflict. "Ocean View": In this segment, Spencer Michaels reported on the Oceans Conference. The report covered ocean pollution; decreased population of certain species of fish; the need for funding for research to protect the environment; and the need for comprehensive international ocean policy. "Newsmaker Interview": This report began with background on the reversion of Hong Kong to China. Following the report was an interview with the second ranking official of Hong Kong, Anson Chan, who discussed the status of Hong Kong since its return to China, including the impact of the Japanese recession; the status of civil liberties; President Clinton's visit to China; the move toward democracy in China; and US-Hong Kong relations. "Political Wrap": Mark Shields and Paul Gigot discussed the week in politics including the issues surrounding the president's trip to China; most favored nation status for China; the issue of the president's arrival at China in Tiananmen Square; and the politics behind McCain's tobacco bill. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6150

    "Falling Markets": This segment began with some perspective on the fall in the stock market today from international economist David Malpass, who discussed the weak value of the Yen; the connection between the Yen, the Japanese stock market, and American investments; which sectors of the US economy are affected to the greatest extent; whether the 600-point drop in the US market is related to this Asian crisis; and whether a weak Japanese economy might allow the US economy to strengthen. "Newsmaker Interview": The Chinese ambassador the US, Li Zhaoxing, joined Jim Lehrer for a discussion about President Clinton's trip upcoming trip to China. The Ambassador also addressed whether China has been affected by the falling value of the Yen; the need for Japan to be more proactive in fixing its economy; whether the president should be received at Tiananmen Square; Chinese dissidents in America; human rights in China; whether China helped Pakistan become a nuclear power; and stories that have been circulating about the Chinese government pertaining to the DNC and satellites. "Airfares": This segment contained a report from Tom Bearden about "fortress hub airlines." The report covered the affects of deregulation; the illegal pricing behavior of Northwest Airlines in Milwaukee; the varied prices that consumers pay for their plane tickets; and the debate about healthy competition for airlines. "King of the Court": The program concluded with a segment about Michael Jordan of the Chicago Bulls. The report covered Jordan's path to professional basketball; his endorsements; his acting debut in the movie "Space Jam"; his line of clothing; and his temporary retirement. Following the report was a conversation with Bill Russell and Jack McCallum about what makes Michael Jordan a great player; his sense of priority; and his ability to seize the moment. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6151

    "China Connection": This segment began with a report from Kwame Holman about the congressional hearings investigating the waiver given by President Clinton to Loral, a top US satellite maker, allowing them to launch a satellite atop a Chinese rocket. The report also covered possible Chinese contributions to the Democratic National Committee which may have influenced this waiver and connections with Mr. Johnny Chung. Following the report was a conversation with US Rep. Christopher Cox (R-CA) and US Rep. Norman Dicks (D-WA) about the investigation they will be heading. Topics included what they are trying to find; whether there is a national security risk for the US; whether the Chinese government was trying to influence US elections; and whether the White House will cooperate in this investigation. "No Parole": The second segment of this program consisted of a report by correspondent Tom Bearden about the proposal to abolish parole. The report covered the details of current sentencing laws in Georgia; profiled gubernatorial candidates who are using the issue in their campaigns; and portrayed parole as an incentive for good behavior. "African View": Following some background on Africa's newest war was an interview with Assistant Secretary of State Susan Rice about the developments in Nigeria and the conflict between Ethiopia and Eritrea. Topics included the historical roots of this conflict; the underlying political and economic tensions between the two countries; US interest in these countries; and Nigeria's commitment to a transition into a democratic government. "Gergen Dialogue": In this segment, David Gergen engaged Edward Lazarus in a conversation about his controversial new book, "Closed Chambers". Topics included his tenure at the Supreme Court; the distrust of the judicial system that pervades the black community; and his obligations as a clerk to Supreme Court Justice Harry Blackmun. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6152

    "Up in Smoke": This segment began with a Kwame Holman report on the latest developments in Congress over tobacco legislation. The report covered the basic terms of the McCain tobacco bill; the amendments added to the bill by Republicans in the Senate; and areas in which the proposed bill violates the Budget Act. Following the update was an interview with Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-CA) and Sen. Phil Gramm (R-TX) about the prospects for a successful tobacco bill;alca00 whether public opinion influenced the outcome of the McCain bill; the marriage tax amendment; whether the failure of the bill is a victory for the tobacco industry; and whether the bill would have reduced teen smoking. "Falling Sun": This segment began with a report from Spencer Michaels about US intervention in the Japanese economic crisis. The report covered the historical significance of this intervention and the extent of the economic crisis in Japan. Following the report, John Letiche, Ayako Doi, and Arthur Alexander engaged in a panel discussion about Japan's economy. Topics included the reasons why the US government decided to intervene; what the US has done to boost the value of the yen; reasons why the Japanese economy has fallen; the political component of the economic crisis; and the implications of this crisis for the rest of the world. "Weighing In": This segment about American obesity began with a report from Lee Hochberg. The report covered the percentage of overweight Americans; the new guidelines for figuring obesity; and health risks associated with obesity. Following the report was a discussion between Dr. Xavier Pi-Sunyer and Barbara Moore about the new federal guidelines on obesity and the obesity problem in the US. Topics included the reasons for lowering the threshold for obesity and the method of calculation for body mass index (BMI). [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6153

    "Newsmaker Interview": This segment consisted of an interview with Secretary of Defense William Cohen about the fighting in Kosovo. Topics included whether the guerrillas in Kosovo are getting help from outside; whether the violence has spread into Albania; whether the NATO air exercises carried out over Northern Albania and Macedonia have made any difference; and further options that are under consideration by NATO. The secretary also discussed US-Chinese relations, including the purchase of US satellites by the Chinese, and whether the technology transfers to China have been a threat to national security. "Smuggling Smokes": This segment about the tobacco bill began with background from Tom Bearden, including an explanation of the black market on cigarettes in Canada as a result of high taxes; the likelihood of a black market in the US if tobacco legislation is passed; and preventative measures already in place in the US. "Political View": This segment contained a mid-year look at the 1998 election cycle including fallout from the tobacco bill debate. A panel consisting of Elizabeth Arnold, Ron Brownstein, David Broder, and Andrew Kohut, discussed the political impact of the tobacco debate; the impact of tobacco as a stand alone issue; the issues of concern for the public; HMO regulation; and the number of Americans who follow government and public affairs. "Foreign Correspondence": The final segment consisted of a conversation with Kenneth Cooper, Washington Post correspondent in South Asia. He discussed Indian support for the nuclear testing; the impact of Pakistan's nuclear capability on India; Indian-Pakistani relations; preconceptions in India about the United States; and the culture of India. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6154

    "GM Strike": This segment began with a Kwame Holman report about the strike at General Motors (GM). The report covered the reasons for the strike and its impact on the GM factories. Following the report was a discussion with Harley Shaiken, David Bradley, and Don Gonyea about the ongoing strike against GM, including the number of jobs lost in Flint, Michigan since the 1970's; the main issues of the strike; the amount of money GM is losing in this strike; and whether changes in the global economy are driving the strike. "Roadblock": This segment consisted of a Tom Bearden report on the latest fight over logging in the national forests in Idaho, covering the proposed moratorium to assess forest management; the issues proposed by the Conservation League; the need for healthful management of the forests; and recreation, wildlife, hunting, fishing, and conservation concerns. "Political Wrap": Mark Shields and Paul Gigot discussed the week in politics including the outcome of the tobacco bill in the Senate and Steven Brill's "Pressgate" articles and his interview with Ken Starr. "Conversation":This segment consisted of an interview with Pritzger Award winning Architect Renzo Piano, who discussed why he chose to become an architect; the style of his architecture; the importance of curiosity within a structure; some of his accomplishments as an architect; and his most recent project in Berlin. "Poem for Dad": US Poet Laureate Robert Pinsky read a poem in honor of Father's Day. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6155

    "Supreme Court Watch": This segment consisted of a discussion with Jan Crawford Greenburg about the Supreme Court's ruling today that killed a sexual harassment lawsuit against a Texas public school system. Topics included the facts of the case; the parameters of Title 9, the law under which the student sued; reasons why the school was not found liable in the case; avenues of legal recourse still available to the student; and whether today's decision might be applicable to other employment cases. "Health Costs": This segment consisted of a report from Betty Ann Bowser about rising health care costs. The report covered health maintenance organization (HMO) Kaiser Permanente's plans to raise rates 11% this year; Kaiser's plan to raise the rates for the California Public Employees' Retirement System(CalPERS); the loss Kaiser has encountered in the past; and whether the members of Kaiser should be forced to pay for the HMO's poor business decisions. "Out of the Ashes": This segment began with background from Elizabeth Farnsworth about the issues surrounding the tobacco settlement, including the defeat of the bill in the Senate, talks between Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich and Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott about a more limited bill, and President Clinton's executive order to survey teen smoking. Following the report was a panel discussion with Richard Blumenthal, John Garrison, Manny Goldman, and Rod Kuegel about the current legal and political state of the tobacco settlement, including whether there will be another attempt at legislation; the problems in the McCain bill; whether a bill is still favored by attorneys general; and today's Supreme Court decision. "Diplomatic Goals": This segment began with a Kwame Holman report about yesterday's World Cup soccer game between the US and Iran and the aftermath of Iran's victory. Following the report was a panel discussion with James Reston Jr., Geoffrey Kemp, and Robin Wright about the reaction in Iran to their victory over the US in World Cup soccer, including whether the reaction in Iran is surprising; the political dimension of the game; the fundamental changes that are occurring in Iran; and the Iranian government's refusal to engage in an official dialogue with the US. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6156

    "China Relations": This segment began with a Kwame Holman report about issues related to the president's trip to China, including the history of US-Chinese relations, President Nixon's 1972 visit to mainland China, and the massacre in Tiananmen Square. Following the report was a panel discussion of the issues surrounding the president's controversial trip, including the importance and influence of the Nixon trip in 1792; the significance of President Clinton's visit; and whether the president will have any opportunity to make change. "Rush to Market": This segment began with a report from Spencer Michaels about the FDA's drug approval process, including the new drug approval guidelines and examples of drugs that have been withdrawn from the market due to safety issues. Following the report was a discussion between Dr. Michael Friedman and Dr. Sidney Wolfe about whether the FDA is moving too quickly to approve drugs; the average review time for drugs; the approval process for drugs; and details of the system for monitoring drugs already approved. "Salmon Rescue": This segment consisted of a Lee Hochberg report about the efforts in Seattle to protect the Shanook Salmon, including the environmental factors threatening the salmon; the costs of habitat restoration; whether the urban area should be forced to protect wild animals; the human costs of trying to protect a wild species; and efforts of Portland to avoid the problems like those of Seattle. "Dialogue": David Gergen engaged Sissela Bok, author of "Mahem," in a discussion about violence on television, including the effects of violence upon children, what one can do to avoid exposure, and the historical significance of violence. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6157

    "Combining Wires": This segment began with a Phil Ponce report about the planned AT&T and TCI merger, covering what the merger might mean for consumers and the past economic problems of AT&T. Following the report was a discussion between Berge Ayvazian and Gene Kimmelman on why AT&T has decided to merge with TCI; AT&T's desire to get into the residential market; whether this merger will benefit consumers; the dangers posed by the deregulation of the cable industry; what is gained by each of the parties; and the likelihood of the success of this merger. "Newsmaker Interview": This segment began with an interview with UNSCOM chief Richard Butler about the latest findings of the weapons inspectors in Iraq, including their discovery of warheads; the types of nerve agents found in the warheads; the methodology used to collect the evidence; and the impact of this finding upon UNSCOM's ability to perform its job. The segment continued with an interview with Iraq's UN ambassador, Nizar Hamdoon, who discussed whether Iraq loaded VX nerve gas into warheads; what happened to the nerve gas possessed by Iraq at the end of the war; the sanctions imposed upon Iraq; whether the tests conducted by the US on the VX nerve gas found in Iraq were falsified; and whether Iraq possesses any nerve gas today. "Dissident View": The program concluded with an interview with three Chinese dissidents, Harry Wu, Xiao Qiang, and Li Lu, who joined Jim Lehrer for a discussion about the issues surrounding the president's trip to China, including whether the president's message to the Chinese was effective; whether the president should have made the trip; whether the president should be received in Tiananmen Square; and the desperate need for President Clinton to address the issue of democracy in China. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6158

    "Supreme Court Watch": This segment contained a report from Kwame Holman and perspective from Jan Crawford Greenburg about today's major rulings in the Supreme Court, including the line item veto, attorney-client privilege, HIV and the Americans with Disabilities Act, and federal funding for the arts. "Conversation": This segment began with a report from Phil Ponce about the history of the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA). Following the report was an interview with NEA Chairman William Ivey, who discussed the Supreme Court decision today in favor of the NEA; the process of grant review; the importance of the involvement of the federal government with the NEA; and the great diversity that is found within the arts. "China's Heartland": This segment began with a report about the president's stop in Xian during his trip to China, including a look at the unemployment problem in Xian. Following the report was a discussion between Michel Oksenberg and Li Cheng, including the economic and political changes in China; the president's agenda in China on human rights and weapons of mass destruction; and the absence of a meaningful rule of law in China. "Magical High": In this segment, essayist Anne Taylor Flemming offered some thoughts on the Getty Museum and its impact upon Los Angeles. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6159

    "Sexual Harassment": This segment contained a conversation with Jan Crawford Greenburg about the Supreme Court's rulings today on employer liability in sexual harassment cases, including a description of the Ellerth case and the Boca Raton Florida lifeguard case; whether the ruling will lead to more litigation; and the amount of institutional pressure upon the courts surrounding these laws. Following was a discussion between Kathy Rogers and Bill Kilberg about the ramifications of the Supreme Court rulings on sexual harassment cases. Topics included whether the rulings make employers more liable; whether the rulings provide any guidance for employees; and employee obligations defined in the rulings. "UAW vs. GM": This segment contained a report from Rod Minott of KCPS Seattle about the strike against General Motors, covering why the workers are striking; the inefficiency of the GM plant in Flint; the need for the community of Flint to expand their economy so they aren't as dependant upon GM; and the amount of money the strike is costing GM. "China Hands": This segment began with a Kwame Holman report about the president's trip to China. Following the report was a discussion with experts John Holdridge, James Lilley, and Winston Lord about US-China relations, including the arrest of several dissidents while the president is visiting China; whether the arrests were a direct insult to the Americans; whether the American response was too harsh; the need for the president to address the issue of human rights at Tiananmen Square; and whether this trip will be successful from an American perspective. "Political Wrap": Paul Gigot and Tom Oliphant discussed the week in politics including the president's agenda during his trip to China; the need to address the Asian financial crisis; whether the president has the ability to be tough enough with China; and the Supreme Court ruling on the line item veto. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6160

    "Speaking Out": This segment began with a Kwame Holman report about the president's trip to China that included extended excerpts from the joint presidential newsconference in Beijing. Following was a panel discussion including Kenneth Lieberthal, Bette Bao Lord, Pei Minxin, and Xiao Qiang about the president's trip. Topics included the historic nature of the presidential newsconference; whether the Chinese government will change its ways; criticisms of Clinton's China policy; and whether Clinton's open dialogue with the students in China will have any consequences. "Tracking HIV": This segment contained a report by Rod Minott of KCTS, Seattle about a Washington state proposal to limit the spread of AIDS. The report covered the state board of health decision to mandate health officials to report cases of HIV to the state; protest of this proposal by AIDS awareness groups; whether this might deter testing for HIV; and whether the fear privacy breeches is a political issue. "Reading the Rulings": This segment began with a Phil Ponce report about the cases before the Supreme Court this term, including the four sexual harassment cases, the line item veto, the NEA funding allocation case, the post mortem attorney-client privilege case, and the AIDS discrimination case. Following the report was an analysis of the Supreme Court session that ended on Friday by Kathleen Sullivan, Paul Campos, Douglas Kmiec, and John Yoo. Topics included the legal implications of this term; whether this term was pragmatic; the most influential justices; and whether the Supreme Court should be deciding cases about sexual harassment. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6161

    "China Trip": This segment began with a Kwame Holman report about the president's visit to Shanghai. Following the report, a panel consisting of Bob Kittle, Lee Cullum, Patrick McGuigan, Cynthia Tucker, and Mike Barnicle discussed the success of the president's trip to China; whether the success will stifle the president's critics; whether this trip to China is historic; and whether the president was a master of diplomacy. "Busing Challenge": This segment consisted of a Betty Ann Bowser report about the struggle over busing in North Carolina, including historic problems over busing minorities into all-white schools; whether the busing should end; racial division on SAT scores; and whether racial quotas should exist within the school system. "Defining Disability": This segment began with a Margaret Warner report about the Supreme Court ruling that people with HIV are covered under the Americans with Disabilities Act. Following the report was a discussion with Chai Feldblum and Steve Bokat about the Supreme Court decision, including an explanation of the general implications; whether there are implications for insurance; and whether there will be more litigation on this issue. "Gergen Dialogue": David Gergen engaged Edward O. Wilson in a discussion about his new book, "Consilience: The Unity of Knowledge." [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6201

    "Fighting the Asian Flu": This segment began with a report from Phil Ponce about the president's trip to China, including his press conference in Shanghai and whether the failing economies of other East Asian countries might effect the Chinese economy. Following the report was some perspective from three economists, K.C. Fung, Barry Naughton, and Greg Mastel, about the China's crucial economic role in East Asia and why the Chinese have been able to avoid devaluation of their currency. "Newsmaker Interview": This segment contained an interview with Lawrence Summers about the crisis in the Asian economy, including whether the Japanese economy might improve in the near future; why the US intervened to improve the value of the Yen; and the importance of the Japanese economy for stability of the US economy. "Making the News": This segment began with a report by Spencer Michels about the ethics and reliability of newsgathering and reporting, including the scandal surrounding The New Republic magazine, Patricia Smith's falsified columns at the Boston Globe, and the Drudge report that broke the Monica Lewinsky scandal. Following the report was a panel discussion with Steve Sidlo, Betty Baye, Tom Rosenstiel, and Marvin Kalb on the lowering of journalistic standards; the new pressures on columnists and reporters; the responsibilities of the editors and publishers of reporters; the age of the majority of news reporters; and what might be done to remedy the ethics problem. "Images of China": US Poet Laureate Robert Pinsky read two Chinese poems. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6202

    "Florida on Fire": This segment consisted of a Betty Ann Bowser report about the wild fires in Florida, including the extent of the damage; ways in which the state of Florida is monitoring and controlling the fires; and agricultural problems that have risen as a result of the fire. "Starr's Mandate": This segment contained a report from Jim Lehrer about the decision by Judge Robertson to dismiss the tax evasion charges against Clinton associate Webb Hubbell. Following the report was perspective from two former federal prosecutors Bruce Yannett and Henry Hudson on whether the judge made the correct decision; whether the tax evasion was an integral part of Ken Starr's mandate; whether these charges were brought by Ken Starr in order to get cooperation from Webster Hubbell; and who might win when the case goes to the appeals court. "Drug Battle": This segment consisted of a Tom Bearden report about generic drugs versus brand name drugs, covering new legislation in the state of Texas designed to require pharmacists to notify doctors if their patients wish to use the generic counterpart; complications that generic drugs might present; and examples of brand name drugs that will soon lose their patents, such as Prozac and Claratin. "Diplomatic Views": This segment contained a report from Spencer Michels about the president's last day in China, focusing on China's pollution problem. Following the report, panelists John Holdridge, Paul Wolfowitz, Winston Lord, and James Lilley, engaged in a discussion about the diplomatic side of the trip, including whether it was a mistake for the president not to go to Japan; whether the trip was a success; whether the US should be getting in the middle of the China-Taiwan conflict; and whether the US-Chinese relationship has benefited from this trip. "Subversive Beauty": This segment consisted of a Roger Rosenblatt essay about the new architectural addition to the Natural History museum in New York. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6203

    "An American Perspective": This segment began with a Spencer Michels report about the president's last day in China, including extensive footage of his final news conference. Following the report was a discussion with Nien Cheng, Maxine Hong Kingston, Eric Liu, and Bright Sheng about the trip, including whether there might someday be democracy in China; whether the president's dialogue about democracy and human rights was effective; and whether the trip was beneficial to the US-China relationship. "Hope and Fear": This segment began with a report from Phil Ponce about the AIDS conference in Geneva, covering strategies formulated at the conference to assist developing countries and setbacks in AIDS research. Following the report was a discussion with Dr. David Ho and Dr. Anthony Fauci about the results of the meeting, including the state of AIDS research; the enormity of the AIDS epidemic; the extent of cases in developing countries; prospects for a cure; the importance of prevention; and new drugs that are available for the treatment of AIDS. "Political Wrap": Mark Shields and Paul Gigot discussed the week in politics including the success of the president's trip to China; domestic US politics in Taiwan; Linda Tripp's testimony to the grand jury; the dismissal of the tax charges against Webster Hubbell; and the state of the Ken Starr investigation. "Song of Ourselves": US poet laureate Robert Pinsky read a Walt Whitman poem to celebrate the fourth of July. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6204

    "Florida on Fire": This segment began with a report from Betty Ann Bowser about the status of the Florida fires. Following the report was a discussion with two firefighters, Col. Jim Watson and John Webster, on the efforts to control and extinguish the fires. Topics included how much rain is needed to end the crisis; what is involved in fighting fires of this magnitude; the danger and unpredictability of fighting wild fires on the ground; and how this situation compares to other natural disasters. "Grow-Your-Own Workers": This segment began with a report from Hedrick Smith about the efforts of Austin, Texas to train its own high tech work force, including Austin's effort in the Eighties to attract high tech companies to the area; the lack of skilled workers to support the growing number of high tech companies; and the efforts to train and recruit adolescents. "Defining Patriotism": In this segment, former Senator Sam Nunn, Doris Kearns Goodwin, Michael Beschloss, and Haynes Johnson joined Margaret Warner for a discussion about patriotism in America. Topics included the evolution of the definition of patriotism; the complication of the Vietnam War; the lack of trust and belief in our leaders; the importance of civic involvement in our country's development; and the intensity of civic involvement compared to that of the past. "In Memoriam": The final segment contained a discussion of the life and movies of the late Roy Rogers, including how he rose to stardom; his optimism and zest for life; and his relationship with his horse Trigger. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6205

    "Newsmaker Interview": This segment contained an interview with Special Envoy Richard Holbrooke, who discussed significant developments in the Kosovo conflict; the engagement of the US in this situation; the lack of legitimate Kosovo Albanian leadership; and the military capabilities of the Albanians and the Serbs. "Working Off Welfare": This segment contained a report by Lee Hochberg about getting off of welfare. The report covered the number of welfare recipients that have mental problems; the problems behind chronic unemployment; the state program in Oregon designed to help persons get off of welfare; and disciplinary measures built into the program. "Tibetan Overtures": This segment began with a report from Spencer Michels about the state of Tibet, covering the Dalai Lama's quest for international support for human rights in Tibet. Following the report was a discussion with Robert Thurman and A. Tom Grunfeld about Tibet and its impact on US-Chinese relations. Topics included the difference between the political Tibet and the area within China containing ethnic Tibetan people; the need for Chinese president Jiang Zimen and the Dalai Lama to meet; and the responsibility of the US in the Chinese-Tibetan conflict. "Gergen Dialogue": In the final segment, David Gergen, editor-at-large of US News & World Report, engaged US Rep. John Lewis (D-GA) in a discussion about his new book, "Walking with the Wind: A Memoir of the Movement." [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6206

    "Dialogue on Race": This segment consisted of excerpts from a PBS special panel discussion with President Clinton on the problem of race in America, including the wealth gap contributing to racial problems; the roots of racism; and the need for diversity in the elementary grades. "Nigeria in Turmoil": This segment began with a report on the death of Moshood Abiola, Nigeria's most prominent opposition leader. Following the report was a discussion with his daughter, Hafsat Abiola, on the controversy surrounding Moshood's death; the lack of medical treatment in the prison; the riots in Nigeria; and the pro-democracy movement in Nigeria. "Grow-Your-Own Workers": This segment contained a continuation of the NewsHour profile of Austin Texas' attempt to develop a high-tech work force. The report covered the shortage of high tech workers; technology programs at Austin Community College; and the working relationship between the company and the community college. "Soothing the Soul": This segment consisted of a Betty Ann Bowser report about an award winning Denver quartet's the use of music to communicate with victims of domestic violence, abuse, and drugs. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6207

    "New Troubles": This segment began with a report from Kwame Holman about the new troubles in Northern Ireland involving the prevention of Protestant Orangemen from completing their parade through a predominantly Catholic town. Following the report was a discussion between Paul Arthur and James Mates on the historic nature of the troubles during this time of year; the significance of the parade; the split within the Protestant community over the peace agreement; and whether Tony Blair might have any influence in this situation. "Managed Care": This segment began with a report from Susan Dentzer about the impact of Health Maintenance Organizations (HMO's) on health care in America. Following the report was a discussion between Ron Pollack and Bill Gradison about what should be done by Congress to improve managed care, including the magnitude of the health care revolution; whether Congress should pass a patient's bill of rights; and the lack of choices for consumers in managed care programs. "Online Publishing": This segment contained a report from Rod Minott of KCTS, Seattle about publishing on the Internet, covering the decision by Slate Online Magazine to charge for its content; the hurdles of online publications; the conversational quality of the Web; and prospects for the success of the magazine. "Ad War on Drugs": The final segment contained a sampling of the $2 billion anti-drug television campaign launched in Atlanta by President Clinton and Speaker Gingrich. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6208

    "Knowing the Unknown": This segment began with a report from Kwame Holman about the history of the unknown soldiers buried at Arlington Cemetery. Following the report was a discussion with Mitch Holland and Kurt Piehler about the use of DNA testing to identify unknowns from the Vietnam war, including the method used for identification; new techniques that allowed the testing after an extended period of time; the historical significance of the unknown soldier; and the accuracy of the new technology. "Unraveling Mysteries": This segment consisted of a Betty Ann Bowser report about the usage of DNA for identification of people outside the military. The report profiled Tony Snyder, who was falsely convicted of a crime and exonerated after his DNA did not match that found on the victim. The report covered new forensics testing; cases that have subsequently been solved because of DNA testing; new laws mandating DNA testing for convicted felons; whether these laws are constitutional; and ways to prevent the abuse of this information. "Political Wrap": Mark Shields and Paul Gigot discussed the week in politics including whether Congress will regulate managed health care and the lack of a congressional agenda. "Kicking Habit": This segment began with a report by Phil Ponce about the popularity of World Cup soccer. Following the report was a discussion with Phillipe Coste and Paulo Sotero about the World Cup games, including the level of emotion associated with the games and the source of the passion about the game of soccer. "The President's Own": This segment contained a tribute to the Marine Corps Band on its two-hundredth birthday. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6209

    "Election Upset": This segment began with a report from Robert Moore about the political turmoil in Japan. Following the report was a discussion with William Clark, Mike Mochizuki, and David Hale about the political and economic problems in Japan, including whether the Senate election results are a referendum on the economy; the importance of the election; whether a new prime minister could help the Japanese economy; the short-term dangers for the yen; and whether the US should continue to encourage reform policies. "Rescuing Russia": This segment began with a report from Margaret Warner about the economic and political turmoil in Russia. Following the report, Anders Aslund and Marshall Goldman discussed how the IMF bail-out is designed to help the Russian economy; whether the Russian crisis is linked to the Asian financial crisis; the need for deregulation and enforcement of tax laws; and the difficulty in collecting taxes. "Setting Limits": This segment consisted of a Spencer Michels report about the campaign for term limits in California. The report covered how term limits would impact the size of government; increased energy in legislature created by limiting terms; whether term limits lower the level of expertise in government; and arguments for and against term limits. "Gergen Dialogue": In this segment, David Gergen engaged Richard Ketchum in a conversation about his new book, "Saratoga: Turning Point of America's Revolutionary War." "Berlin Airlift": This segment contained excerpts from "Berlin Airlift," a documentary that airs tonight on PBS. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6210

    "Hitting the Brakes": This segment contained a report from Phil Ponce about the status of the United Auto Workers strike against General Motors (GM). Following the report was a discussion with Don Gonyea and Diane Swonk covering the amount of profit GM stands to lose in this strike; the significance of the lawsuit filed by GM against the union; the likelihood of GM winning the suit; whether there has been progress in negotiations; the status of the inventories of the auto industry; and how long the union will be able to sustain the strike. "A Dangerous Season": This segment contained a Margaret Warner report about the first significant spate of violence since the Northern Ireland peace accords that were signed three months ago. Following the report, the Irish and British ambassadors to the United States discussed the issues surrounding the recent violence, including what British authorities know about the firebombing; whether anyone has been arrested in connection with the case; the severity of the tension in the area; whether the problem is of a political or law enforcement nature; an assessment of the security situation; how the situation might be resolved; the role of the new Northern Ireland assembly in managing the situation; and whether the British government is still in complete control. "Image of Assassination": In this segment, a panel, consisting of Doris Kearns Goodwin, Michael Beschloss, Haynes Johnson, and Waleed Ali, discussed the digitally enhanced film of the Kennedy assassination that will be available for sale later this week. Discussion topics included the motivation for making the videotape; whether the sale of this footage is offensive; the value of an accurate record of the tragedy; whether the public should be allowed to view the enhanced footage; and the incredible sadness associated with the tragedy. "A Child's Garden": Clarence Page of the Chicago Tribune considered the subject of children's gardens in an essay. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6211

    "No More Secrets?": In this segment, Stuart Knight and Jonathan Turley discussed the issued surrounding Ken Starr's bid to have Secret Service agents testify before a grand jury and Attorney General Janet Reno's argument that such a move could force a president to distance himself from his protectors. Topics included whether the agents should testify against the man they are supposed to protect; whether Secret Service agents should be allowed to determine whether they have relevant, material testimony; whether Mr. Starr wants collaborative evidence; whether the agents are federal law enforcement officials; and the inherent danger presented when law enforcement agents are allowed to withhold relevant criminal evidence. "Surging Insurgency": This segment contained a Charles Krause report about the Kosovo Liberation Army (KLA), including who they are; whether the Drenica massacre was provoked by the KLA; US opposition to an independent Kosovo; and whether the KLA will be able to defeat the Serbs. "Eyes on the Skies": In this segment, Donald Rumsfeld and Richard Garwin discussed issues related to the development of ballistic missiles in third world countries, including whether there is a threat to US national security; why it was determined that third world countries are evolving more rapidly than originally thought; an estimation of how long it will be until North Korea, Iraq, and Iran have the capability to strike mainland US; why these estimations differ from the earlier CIA estimate; and whether the threat will force the US to build a missile defense system. "Say Cheese": This segment contained an essay by Richard Rodriguez about taking pictures. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6212

    "Tracking the Story": This segment contained a conversation with Ruth Marcus, a legal affairs reporter for the Washington Post, who discussed the latest developments in the legal battle over whether Secret Service agents will be forced to testify before the Ken Starr grand jury. Topics included why the appeals court refused to hear the case again; the distinction between plain clothes and uniformed officers; and whether Ken Starr might be wrapping up the investigation. "Dialogue on Race": This segment contained extended excerpts from the Dialogue on Race with President Clinton that was broadcast as a NewsHour special last Thursday. "On the Beach": US Poet Laureate Robert Pinsky read some poetry about summer at the beach. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6213

    "Texas Scorcher": This segment contained a Tom Bearden report about the heat wave in Texas, covering life-threatening situations resulting from the heat; how the problem affects the elderly population; the impact of the heat on Texas farmers; and how the electric company is coping with the high demand for energy. "No Big Deal": This segment began with a report from Phil Ponce about the collapse of the Lockheed Martin-Northrop Grumman merger. Following the report was a discussion with Lawrence Korb and Pierre Chao about the failed merger, including Department of Defense opposition to the merger; whether it would have stifled competition; and why it failed. "Political Wrap": Mark Shields and Paul Gigot discussed the week in politics, including Secret Service testimony to the grand jury; whether this will be damaging to the presidency; whether this Supreme Court decision to not allow an executive privilege for Secret Service agents weakens the office of the presidency; and whether Congress will address the proposed patients bill of rights in this term. "Burying the Past": This segment contained a report from Jennifer Griffin about the burial of the Romanoff family in Russia, covering the reasons for this late burial; the controversy surrounding the funeral; and the circumstances surrounding the deaths of the Romanoff family. Following the report was an interview with W. Bruce Lincoln and James Billington, who discussed the significance of the burial; whether the Romanoffs are still important to Russia; the significance of the refusal of the head of the Orthodox Church to attend the services; doubts about the authenticity of the bones; and the history of the relationship between the church and the Tsar. "Summer in the City": In this segment, essayist Roger Rosenblatt considered summer in New York City. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6214

    "Killer Wave": This segment began with a report from about the tsunami that hit Papua New Guinea, covering how a Tsunami develops, the extent of the damage; and the loss of lives. Following the report was an interview with Eddie Bernard, who discussed how a wave of this magnitude develops, the frequency of these waves, and the warning signs of a tsunami. "Affordable Housing": This segment consisted of a Jeffrey Kaye report about the economic boom in California and its effect on subsidized housing in the area. The report covered the lack of federal subsidies; the lack of affordable rental units; the amount of substandard housing available for rent; the efficiency of the LA inspection system; the increased number of landlords who are opting out of the section 8 subsidy program; and the city's decision to subsidize the rent of those tenants whose landlords had opted out of the program. "Managed Care": This segment began with background from Susan Dentzer about the managed care debate, covering the skirmish over patients rights and the differences between the three proposals. Following the background was a discussion between Senators Edward Kennedy (D-MA) and Don Nichols (R), assistant Majority Leader, about the differences between Democratic and Republican proposals for managed care reform, including provisions to improve the quality of health care; and whether the federal government should be allowed to micro-manage health care. "Seeing Science": This segment contained an interview with Felice Frankel and George Whitesides about their new book/exhibition, "On the Surface of Things," including why they decided to create the book about microscopic science; how some of the subjects of photography were developed; and the science behind the photographs. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6215

    "Starr Witnesses": In this segment, panelists Cynthia Tucker, Patrick McGuigan, Bob Kittle, and Jim Boyd discussed the Secret Service testimony before the Starr grand jury. Topics included whether the American people's best interests are served by requiring these agents to testify; whether there are implications of obstruction of justice and perjury involved in this investigation; whether asking for the testimony might endanger the life of the president; whether Congress should consider this issue; and whether the testimony is damaging to the Secret Service. "Clearing the Air": This segment began with background from Kwame Holman about the debate surrounding the risks involved with second hand smoke. Following the report was an interview with Carol Browner and Charles Blixt about the court ruling against the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), including public health factors surrounding second hand smoke; whether the risk of second hand smoke exists; and whether there will be an appeal of the decision. "Promise of Democracy": This segment consisted of a discussion about the promise of democracy for Nigeria following the death of opposition leader Abiola. Ibrahim Gambari and Dr. Beko Ransome-Kuti discussed whether the recent promise of democracy is different; whether there is an intention on the part of the military to stay in control of the government; the extent of regulation in the country; and the prospects for democracy in Nigeria. "Leisure Time": In this segment, essayist Richard Rodriguez of the Pacific News Service considered Americans at leisure. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6216

    "Changing the Rules": This segment began with background from Phil Ponce about the new IRS reform bill that the president signed today. Following the report was an interview with Fred Goldberg, who discussed the purpose behind the legislation; how the IRS will function under the new rules; how the system of audits will change; and the implementation of the oversight board and their responsibilities. "China Connection": This segment began with a Kwame Holman report about the group of congressional committees who are investigating whether the Clinton administration allowed a US company to do business with China in exchange for campaign contributions to the Democratic party and whether these US companies illegally shared missile technology with the Chinese. Following the report was a discussion with Senators Bob Kerry (D-NE) and Richard Shelby (R-AL), who head the Select Committee on Intelligence. Discussion topics included whether Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott has affected the committee investigation by his comments; the bi-partisan nature of this inquiry; the main concerns of the investigation; and where the investigation stands. "Politics and Gays": This segment began with a Spencer Michels report about the debate in Congress surrounding rights for homosexuals, which was sparked by comments made by Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott in a previous interview. Following the report, Gary Bauer and Elizabeth Birch discussed whether this is a battle of politics or morals; whether this is a partisan debate; the issues at the heart of the moral debate; why the issue of homosexuality is such a difficult issue; and the likelihood of a compromise about this issue. "First in Space": This segment began with a report from Kwame Holman about the life and accomplishments of Alan Shepard, who died yesterday. Following the report was a conversation with essayist Roger Rosenblatt about the historical significance of Alan Shepard in which he read a excerpt from Tom Wolfe's book, "The Right Stuff." [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6217

    "Making Mice": This segment began with a report about the latest study on cloning. Following the report was an interview with Tony Perry, who discussed the significance of his study on cloning; the process of cloning used in the study; the positive implications of this new cloning technology; and whether the research has implications for human cloning. "Abortion Politics": This segment contained a Kwame Holman report about the congressional politics of abortion. The report contained extensive footage from Democratic and Republican arguments for and against the legislation before the Congress. "Courting Diversity": In this segment, a panel consisting of John Yoo, Neal Katyal, Sherryl Cashin, Ted Cruz, and Kathryn Bradley discussed NAACP president Kweisi Mfume's criticism of the lack of racial diversity in Supreme Court law clerks. Topics for discussion included whether the Supreme Court would be better served by more diverse law clerks; the lack of minority applicants from which the court has to choose; the danger of impressing quotas upon the justices; whether there is discrimination in the Supreme Court; and how the problem might be alleviated. "Gergen Dialogue": In this segment, David Gergen engaged Thomas Cahill in a discussion about his new book, "The Gifts of the Jews." [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6218

    "Capitol Shooting": This segment contained a live report from Kwame Holman about the shooting at the Capitol earlier today. The report included an interview with Capitol building worker Patrick Shall and covered the condition of the victims, a detailed description of the incident, and whether the suspect had been taken into custody. "Tough Task": This segment began with a report from Phil Ponce about the election of Japan's new prime minister, Keizo Obuchi. Following the report, Walter Mondale and Yoshihisa Komori joined Ponce for a discussion about the election. Topics included Mr. Obuchi's skills and whether he will be able to pull the country out of recession. "Heat Wave": This segment began with a report from Kwame Holman about the heat wave in Texas that was intensified when a water main broke in Fort Worth, forcing residents to conserve water. Following the report was an interview with Rich Perry and Colin Marquis, in which they discussed the extent of damage to crops and livestock; the cause of the heat wave and draught; ways in which ranchers and farmers are coping; the likelihood of a break in the weather; and how this crisis might effect the rest of the country. "Political Wrap": Mark Shields and Paul Gigot discussed the week in politics, including the failure of the patients bill of rights in the House; whether the Senate will pass the bill; and whether President Clinton will testify before the grand jury. "The President's Man": This segment began with footage from White House Press Secretary Mike McCurry's resignation speech yesterday. The footage was followed by an analysis from Doris Kearns Goodwin, Michael Beschloss, and Haynes Johnson, who discussed whether his resignation is directly related to the Monica Lewinsky scandal; how the position of press secretary has changed in the modern era; the protecting function of a press secretary; the presence of scandal; the expectation of President Clinton to lie; and other great press secretaries of the past. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6219

    "Warning Signals?": This segment began with an Elizabeth Farnsworth report about the shooting at the Capitol by Russell Eugene Weston Jr. including comments from his family and the history of his mental condition. Following the report, Dr. David Pickar and Dr. Nancy Andreason discussed schizophrenia and mental health issues raised by Friday's shooting at the US Capitol, including the causes of paranoid schizophrenia; medications used to keep the disorder under control; why patients stop taking medications; the prevalence of schizophrenia in society; and common misperceptions about the disease. "Newsmaker Interview": This segment contained an interview with Michael Armstrong, who discussed the merger between British Telecom and AT&T; the services that will be offered by the company; the motivation behind the joint venture; and whether industry consolidation will influence prices and competition. "Tracking the Story": This segment began with an interview with Ruth Marcus of the Washington Post, who discussed the latest developments in the Starr investigation and the subpoena serviced on President Clinton last week. Following the interview, Paul Campos, Doug Kmiec and Ken Gormley discussed the legal ramifications of the grand jury subpoena of President Clinton, including whether there is a precedent to the negotiations; the legal definition of a subpoena; whether the president has any special privileges left to use with regards to his testimony to the grand jury; whether the president has an obligation to honor the subpoena; whether forcing the president to comply is a separation of powers violation; and the need for discretion by the president's lawyers and prosecutor Ken Starr. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6220

    "Starr Investigation": This segment began with a discussion with Paul Campos, who commented on the definition of transactional immunity; whether it can be assumed that Ken Starr knows to what Monica Lewinsky is going to testify; and whether information extracted during negotiations could be submitted as evidence. Following the interview was a Margaret Warner conversation with Paul Gigot and Tom Oliphant about what led to the immunity deal after months of stalemate; whether the developments will speed up the investigation; and what Ken Starr's investigation is about. "Reforming Social Security": This segment began with a report from Susan Dentzer about the president's third national forum on Social Security, which took place yesterday in Albuquerque. The report covered why the Social Security needs to be reformed; whether raising the rate of return for Social Security trust funds could be a possible solution; two proposals from the forum: having the government invest Social Security reserves in the stock market or allowing workers to invest a portion of payroll taxes into private accounts; and how the unfunded liability of the Social Security system would be accounted for. Following the report, Susan Dentzer joined Lehrer in the studio for a summarization of topics discussed at the forum. "Strike Ends": This segment began with excerpts from the press conferences following the GM-UAW strike. Following the footage was a report from Don Gonyea of National Public Radio about the reaction from company representatives and workers following the strike; the national implications of this local strike; issues that were resolved in the settlement; how the company is planning to head off strikes at other plants; and whether fundamental issues were resolved or temporarily avoided. "Day of Mourning": This segment contained a Kwame Holman report about the viewing session and memorial service at the Capitol for the officers killed in the line of duty last week. Following the report was footage of the memorial service, including comments made by Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott, Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich, Vice President Gore,President Clinton, and Chief Gary Abrecht. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6221

    "Starr Investigation": In this segment, a panel consisting of Karen Breslau, Susan Page, and Karen Tumulty discussed the Lewinsky immunity deal and how it is being viewed at the White House. Topics included the agreement about videotaped testimony; the limitations on questioning the president; the fact that the president's lawyers will be allowed to be present; whether this will set a precedent for future investigations; the conflict between political and legal issues for the president; and the importance of Linda Tripp in the investigation. "Contested Justice": This segment began with footage from Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas' speech to the National Barr Association. Following the footage was a discussion with Leon Higgenbotham and Stephen Smith about issues surrounding Clarence Thomas and the African American legal community, including the significance of what Mr. Thomas did not say; whether the justice should have accepted the invitation; and why there is a large amount of controversy surrounding Justice Thomas, especially in the African American community. "Farming for Fish": This segment contained a Spencer Michels report about fish farming. The report covered the scarcity of Abalone; the amount of fish consumed in the US that comes from fish farms; and environmental dangers associated with aquaculture. "In Memoriam": This segment contained a discussion about the work and life of Jerome Robbins. Following extensive footage from one of the musicals he choreographed, "West Side Story," a panel consisting of Eliot Feld and Hedy Weiss discussed what is done by a choreographer; skills and talents that make a great choreographer; the style of Jerome Robbins; and the brainy, yet visceral quality of his work. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6222

    "Going Public": This segment began with a report from Margaret Warner about the latest developments in the investigation of the president and excerpts from press secretary Mike McCurry's press conference yesterday. Following the footage, a panel consisting of Mark Mellman, Frank Luntz, Michael Beschloss, and Haynes Johnson discussed the Starr investigation and Monica Lewinsky's testimony and what it means for the president. Topics included whether the president should speak out publicly about the subpoena; the need for the president to restore the confidence of the American people; the way in which this scandal has paralyzed his presidency; and whether the president is sending a bad message about morality to the children of the country. "Nursing Home Care": In this segment, NewsHour health correspondent Susan Dentzer reported on congressional hearings about improving nursing homes. The report covered the indignities associated with the country's nursing homes; the extent of substandard care in California nursing homes; the predictability of nursing home inspections; the failure to act upon violations; and HCFA's new oversight and enforcement plan, including more frequent inspections of homes with repeat violations, increased focus on chains with record of non-compliance, state imposition of monetary penalties for each serious violation, referrals for civil and criminal prosecution, and HCFA posting of ratings on the Internet. "War and Famine": This segment consisted of a Tim Ewart report about the famine and death in Sudan, covering the way in which the rebels and the government are using food as a weapon; the extent of famine in Sudan, and how starvation in Sudan is forcing parents to abandon their children. Following the report, a panel consisting of Kate Almquist, Francis Deng, and Elfatih Erwa discussed the extent of the desperation in Sudan; interventions underway by relief centers; whether the government is cooperating; why response has been so slow; whether the government views the Christian south as part of the country; and whether the government is doing anything to end the crisis. "Powerball Power": This segment began with a Kwame Holman report about the latest Powerball lottery and continued with a discussion with Roger Rosenblatt about the power of Powerball. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6223

    "Slowing Down": This segment began with a report from Paul Solman about whether the economy is slowing down, focusing on the semiconductor industry. Following the report was a discussion with David Wyss and Jim Wilcox about the latest economic numbers and what they mean for the US economy. Discussion topics included why the economy has slowed in the second quarter; ways in which the economic crisis in Asia has effected the US economy; the rise in the number of bankruptcies in this country; whether the US economy is headed for a recession; and whether the stock market is over-valued. "50 Years of Integration": This segment began with a Kwame Holman report about the history of integration in the armed forces. Following the report, a panel, consisting of Doris Kearns Goodwin, Michael Beschloss, Haynes Johnson, and Julius Becton discussed the fiftieth anniversary of integration in the armed forces and how it has impacted society. Topics included the life of a black soldier during the forties; the history of the movement of integration in the armed forces; Truman's motivation to integrate; whether Truman's order was courageous; the leadership and courage of the black soldiers; and ways in which integration changed the military as a whole. "Political Wrap": Paul Gigot and Tom Oliphant discussed the week in politics, including President Clinton's announcement that he will not address the Monica Lewinsky scandal until after he has testified to the grand jury; the way in which the public has blamed the media and Ken Starr; and whether Ken Starr will indict anyone. "Camp Memories": In this segment, essayist Jim Fisher of The Kansas City Star remembered summer camp. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6224

    "War on Film": This segment began with a Phil Ponce report about the new war film, "Saving Private Ryan." The report covered the realistic portrayal of war in the film and the short bootcamp that actors attended in preparation for the filming. Following the report, a panel consisting of Judge John Harrison, Paul Fussell, and Stephen Ambrose discussed the emotional nature of the film; whether the narration of war in the film was accurate; the depiction of suffering in the Speilberg film; ways in which the terrifying randomness of death is portrayed in the film; the reluctance of veterans to talk about the war; the difficulty of portraying the experience of war; and whether this film will change the way in which war is portrayed in the future. "Foreign Correspondence": This segment consisted of an interview with foreign correspondent Marcus Mabry about the state of affairs in South Africa. Discussion topics included the extent of racial segregation in the country; why whites are emigrating from South Africa; the introduction of affirmative action to South Africa; Africa's commitment to democracy and capitalism; and whether there is a threat of civil war in Congo. "Checks and Balances": This segment began with a Lee Hochberg report about initiative campaigns in Oregon. The report covered new laws that restrict the initiative process; whether big corporations and legislators are trying to control the initiative process; and new employment and voter registration requirements for signature gatherers. "The Money Chase": This segment began with a report from Kwame Holman about the Shays-Meehan bill for campaign finance reform. Following the report, Rep. Zach Wamp (R-TN) and Rep. Anne Northup (R-KY) discussed whether the bill will pass; whether it allows for more corruption; whether by denying soft money, political parties will be limited in how they can voice their opinions in campaigns; and whether the bill will survive amendments later in the week if indeed it passes today. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6225

    "Big Drop": This segment contained a discussion with Robert Brusca and Bob Froehlich about today's action in the stock market. Topics included why the market dropped; whether the political uncertainty in Japan and the US has effected the market; whether the stock market is over-valued; ways in which economic releases are tainted as a result of the General Motors strike; and whether the market will continue to fall. "Under Fire": This segment began with a Kwame Holman report about the confrontation between the attorney general and congressional Republicans, covering her long-standing refusal to appoint an independent counsel on campaign finance; Rep. Dan Burton's threat of contempt of Congress if Janet Reno does not call for an independent counsel; and Reno's plan to take three more weeks to consider the evidence given her by former head of Justice Department's campaign finance investigation Charles LaBella. The segment continued with perspective on the situation from Michael Carvin and Walter Dellinger, who discussed the issues surrounding the attorney general and campaign finance, including whether Ms. Reno deserves the criticisms she is receiving; whether the Justice Department can objectively investigate this campaign corruption; and whether Congress should be involved in prosecutorial affairs. "Return of Thalidomide": This segment began with background about the birth defects and other problems caused by Thalidomide and the recent FDA approval of the drug in the US to treat leprosy and AIDS related illnesses. Following the report was an interview with Dr. Michael Friedman about the issues surrounding the FDA approval of Thalidomide, including why the FDA would approve such a dangerous drug; requirements for doctors, pharmacists and patients for the distribution of the drug; and birth control requirements for patients taking the drug. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6226

    "Ups & Downs": This segment contained a discussion with Ric Edelman and Terry Savage about the volatility in the stock market. Topics addressed included the need for investors to focus on long-term goals; the importance of diversity in a portfolio; whether the majority of the public understands the proper ways to invest; and what might happen in the next few weeks. "Crisis in Kosovo": This segment began with a Charles Krause report about the latest developments in Kosovo. Following the report, a panel consisting of Lionel Rosenblatt, Alex Dragnich, Gary Dempsey, and John Fox discussed the issues surrounding the violence and crisis in Kosovo, including ways in which this situation mirrors Bosnia; the goal of the offensive in Kosovo; the repercussions for the neighboring countries of the fleeing refugees; whether NATO should give the impression that it will side with ethnic Albanians; whether it is possible to restrain the KLA; and whether military intervention is an option. "The Power of Color": This segment contained a Paul Solman report about artist Mark Rothko, covering his childhood; his ability to express feeling in his work; his use of color; his exclusive use of the color black at the end of his career; and his contribution to the world of modern art. "Gergen Dialogue": In this segment, David Gergen engaged Stephen Carter, professor of law at Yale University and author of "Civility: Manners, Morals, and the Etiquette of Democracy," in a discussion about the etiquette of democracy, including the role of religion in the restoration of civility; the danger of learning morals from movies and politics; and the need for religious voices in national debates. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6227

    "Inspections Standoff": This segment began with background from Tom Bearden about the UN inspection program in Iraq, covering the discovery of VX nerve gas in Iraq and the demand for the end of sanctions. Following the report was an interview with Ambassador Richard Butler, who discussed what prevented the inspectors from performing their job; whether there have been threats to throw out the inspectors; whether the US will continue to try and investigate Iraq; and the critical nature of the current impasse with Iraq. "Starr Investigation": This segment began with a Margaret Warner update on the Starr investigation and an interview with Andrew Kohut of the Pew Research Center, who discussed public interest in the investigation-including the decrease in interest in the story-whether the public believes the president had sex with Monica Lewinsky, and whether the public believes the president should be impeached if, in fact, he did lie. Following the interview, a panel, consisting of Jim Boyd, Lee Cullum, Cynthia Tucker, Partick McGuigan, Andrew Kohut, and Robert Kittle, discussed the issues surrounding public interest in the investigation of the president, including why the public is willing to overlook the president's lies; whether the American people are being pragmatic about the situation; whether the public believes the offenses are impeachable; whether the president has squandered his moral authority; whether the poll results might change if the president lied; Monica Lewinsky's public image; and whether Ms. Lewinsky is perceived as a victim. "Contempt?": This segment contained a Kwame Holman report about Dan Burton's contempt of Congress action against Attorney General Janet Reno and the opposition to the action by committee Democrats. "All Our Children": This segment consisted of an Anne Taylor Flemming essay about abused and neglected children in America and what is being done to care for and heal these children. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6228

    "Africa Bombings": This segment began with an interview with Clive Mutiso of Time Magazine about the bombings in Africa. Topics included the extent of the devastation caused by the bomb in Nairobi; the number of people who may have been killed; the events of the night in Nairobi; and the sophisticated nature of the bomb used. Following this interview was a discussion with Susan Rice, who commented on the number of victims; whether the type of explosive has been determined; whether there were any warnings; and the level of security at these embassies. The segment concluded with a panel discussion about these events. Larry Johnson, Salih Booker, and Jack McGeorge discussed possible suspects in the bombings; the amount of explosives used; whether there are domestic political reasons for this violence; whether these countries are easily accessible and why they were chosen; the sophistication of the operation/coordination of the two bombings; and what the immediate focus of the investigation will be. "Texas Scorcher": This segment began with excerpts from WFAA, Dallas, Fort Worth, about the heat wave in Texas, including the death toll; the loss of livestock; the declaration of Texas as an agricultural disaster area; water main ruptures in the area; and restrictions on water use. "Political Wrap": Paul Gigot and Tom Oliphant discussed the week in politics, including the ramifications of Monica Lewinsky's testimony to the grand jury; whether the allegations against Ken Starr about leaking information to the media will effect his investigation; the charge of contempt of Congress against Attorney General Janet Reno; ways in which this charge divides Republicans on the hill; how campaign finance reform passed the House; and whether the bill will pass in the Senate. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6229

    "Africa Bombings": This segment began with a Kwame Holman update about the embassy bombings in Africa. Following the report, Admiral Bobby Ray Inman, J. Christopher Ronay, and Brian Jenkins joined Elizabeth Farnsworth for a discussion about the investigation of last week's bombings at the embassies in Tanzania and Nairobi. Topics included whether there was advance warning of the attack; whether the tragedy could have been prevented; who might be responsible for two simultaneous bombings of this magnitude; what is being done to try and determine who was responsible for the bombings; and the likelihood of solving the case. "Growing Problems": This segment began with a report from Fred de Sam Lazaro about the farm crisis in the northern plains, covering the escalating costs of farming and the declining price of food, uncooperative weather, and effects of the Freedom to Farm Act. Following the report, Bruce Gardner and Neil Harl discussed the state of farmers in the nation, including other farming areas that are suffering from disease, draught, and the market; what has caused prices to be lower; the importance of exports in the economics of farming; and whether the Freedom to Farm Act provides a sufficient safety net. "Exotic Expressions": This segment contained a report about the many faces of artist Chaim Soutine, covering his personality; his sense of suffering; and the transformation of his style. "Good Losers": In this essay, Richard Rodriguez of the Pacific News Service considered some "good losers," focusing on America's fascination with tragedy and the unspoken silence in life. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6230

    "Kids Who Kill": This segment began with an update from Spencer Michels about the March 1998 shooting in Jonesboro Arkansas, covering the youth justice system in Arkansas; other cases where juveniles have committed capital crimes; and the increased number of juveniles accused of murder in the last decade. Following the report, Steven Drizin, Lawrence Steinbert, Linda Collier, and James Backstrom discussed the criminal justice system and juveniles who kill. Topics included the variation among the states in the way in which juvenile criminals are prosecuted; practical differences between adult and juvenile courts; whether children should be tried as adults; and the need to focus on rehabilitation for very small children. "Globaphobia": In this segment, Paul Solman of WGBH/Boston reported on American's fears of the new global marketplace, including whether globalization represents an economic danger for the American economy; the differences between service, manufacturing, and agricultural industries; and ways in which trade might effect American jobs. "Transforming TV": This segment began with a report from Kwame Holman about the retail debut of High Definition Television (HDTV), covering the increased resolution, the increased aspect ratio, and CD-quality sound. Following the report was an interview with Joel Brinkley, who discussed the differences between digital television and standard television; the complex micro-processors contained in the digital televisions; and whether standard television will be obsolete by the year 2006. "Missing Persons": In this segment, Roger Rosenblatt considered some people who have disappeared and the public's fascination with missing people. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6231

    "Africa Bombings": This segment began with an interview with Under Secretary of State Thomas R. Pickering, who discussed the details of the Nairobi bombing, including the types of bombs used in the attack; the arrest of many suspects who may have some connection with the bombing; why the security recommendations made by Admiral Inman in 1985 were not carried out; and how the bombings will effect future decisions about embassy security. He also discussed the escalating situation in Iraq, including what the UN plans to do next; whether there are US forces in Iraq; and whether this conflict is different than those of January, February, or March. "Yangtze Flooding": This segment contained a Phil Ponce report about the flooding in Central China, including the lives, homes, and crops lost in the floods and whether there is any relief in sight for the Chinese. Following the report was a discussion with David Lampton, Lester Brown, and Yu Shuning about what is being done for the victims; why the area of the Yangtze is so important to the Chinese; what has contributed to the flooding; and whether the density of the population in China and construction have contributed to the flooding. "E-mail Junk": This segment consisted of a Spencer Michels report about unsolicited junk e-mail(Spam), including what is being done by Internet Service Providers(ISP) to filter unwanted e-mails; the costs and impact of junk mail on customers and ISP's; the dangers associated with increased amounts of Spam; and new legislation being drafted to reduce the amount of Spam. "Dialogue": In this segment, David Gergen, editor-at-large of US News & World Report, engaged Patricia O'Toole in a conversation about her book, "Money and Morals in America," including what inspired her to write this book; the legacy of the Puritans; the need to build community; and the importance of philanthropic activity. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6232

    "Settling the Past": This segment began with a Phil Ponce report about the Swiss Bank settlement, in which the banks agreed to pay $1.2 billion to Holocaust survivors and their heirs in reparations. Following the report, Abraham Foxman and Robert O'Brien discussed the out-of-court settlement, including the historical significance of the settlement; why the Swiss Banks decided to settle; the need to educate the Swiss public about the truths pertaining to the settlement; whether the sanctions created some resentment in Switzerland; and what lessons can be learned from the experience. "Curry's Kansas": This segment began with a look at the art of John Steuart Curry, including his experience as an illustrator, studying art in Kansas City, and the renaissance of interest in Curry in recent years. Following the report, Patricia Junker of the H.M. de Young Memorial Museum discussed Curry, covering the vulnerability of the subjects of his paintings; the forces that shaped his life; his interest in the subject of race and tales of American heroism; and the controversy surrounding his subject matter. "Impact on the Presidency": In this segment, Doris Kearns Goodwin, Michael Beschloss, Haynes Johnson, and Joan Hoff discussed the impact of President Clinton's grand jury testimony on the institution of the presidency. Topics addressed included whether Clinton's successor will inherit a weakened presidency; whether Clinton has downgraded the dignity of the office; and the relationship between the media and the presidency. "In Memoriam": This segment contained extended excerpts from the memorial service for American victims of the embassy bombings in Kenya and Tanzania. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6233

    "Dealing with Iraq": This segment began with background from Spencer Michels about UN inspections of Iraqi weapons. Following the report, a panel consisting of Charles William Maynes, John Bolton, Geoffrey Kemp and Raymond Zilinskas discussed the issues surrounding Iraq's defiance of the UN arms inspectors, including whether the administration is dealing with the crisis in the appropriate way; whether there has been a change in US policy regarding Iraq; whether there are any weapons of mass destruction hidden in Iraq; why the US will not allow the UN to lead the arms inspection in Iraq; the need to overthrow Saddam Hussein; the amount of control the US has over the inspections; and what can be done to contain Iraq. "Crisis Management": This segment began with excerpts from Mike McCurry's press conference about the president's testimony before a grand jury and continued with a discussion with Howard Baker and Leon Panetta about the ability of the president to govern under the pressure of a scandal. Topics covered included the impact of the scandal on the morale of the White House staff; the ability of President Clinton to compartmentalize and focus on the issue of the day; whether President Reagan found it difficult to focus on issues during the Iran-Contra Affair; whether the scandal effects the quality of the decisions the president makes; and at what point the president should bring his case to the public. "Political Wrap": Mark Shields and Paul Gigot discussed the week in politics, including whether the scandal is affecting the ability of the president to lead the country; whether the New York Times story about the president's testimony before the grand jury was a trial balloon; the public and political advantages of leaking information; and whether the president should address the nation after his testimony. "Stars at Poolside": In this segment, Anne Taylor Fleming presented her essay about a special photo exhibit in Los Angeles about celebrities at the poolside. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6234

    "The President Testifies": This segment began with background from Margaret Warner about the issues surrounding the investigation of the president, including instances in which the president denied a relationship with Monica Lewinsky and his deposition in the Paula Jones lawsuit. Following the background report, Dan Balz of the Washington Post discussed the specifics of President Clinton's testimony; why Paula Jones' lawyers asked the president to answer questions about Ms. Lewinsky; the way in which the president answered questions about his relationship with Monica Lewinsky in his testimony in the Paula Jones case; and whether the president encouraged Monica Lewinsky to lie. "Grand Jury Workings": This segment contained a discussion with Scott Turow and Joe Whitley about the grand jury process and how it has been used by Ken Starr, including whether it is proper to use the grand jury to gather evidence for the House of Representatives; whether it is customary to call the subject of an investigation to be a witness; whether Ken Starr has abused the grand jury process; and the force behind a grand jury subpoena. "Maximum Coverage": This segment consisted of a Terence Smith report about media coverage of the investigation of the president. The report covered the extent of the media coverage of the scandal; the sensitive subject matter of the testimony; the barrage of Internet pages that focus on Monica Lewinsky; and whether the credibility of the news media has become questionable. "Ireland Bombings": This segment began with a report from John Ervan about the bombing on Saturday in Omagh Ireland, covering what is being done to find those responsible for the bombing and statements from some of the victims. "Africa Bombings": This segment contained an interview with David Bresett about the developments in the embassy bombings case. Mr. Bresett discussed his reaction to the arrest made in connection with the case; the terrorist group with whom the subject is associated; why Osama Bin Laden, the leader of the terrorist group, hates the US; the method of operation; and where the investigation might go from this point. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6235

    "Tracking the Story": This segment contained a discussion with Dan Balz of The Washington Post about the aftermath of President Clinton's speech following his grand jury testimony. Topics included the latest developments in the Starr investigation; whether Ken Starr might call Monica Lewinsky back for more testimony; what was included in the president's testimony; questions that President Clinton refused to answer; whether there were discrepancies between Monica Lewinsky's testimony and that of the president; what the timetable of Ken Starr's report to Congress might be; the reaction of Congress to the president's address; and whether the White House has agreed on a common public strategy. "Denver Reacts": In this segment, a panel of Denver voters discussed the investigation of the president and the possible implications of his speech last night. Topics included whether the president needed to address the nation; whether a change in society has affected the leaders of the country; whether the president needed to say more in his speech; whether the independent counsel has gotten out of hand; whether the president should be forgiven for his actions; whether a resignation would affect the economy; and how the situation might be different if the truth had come out seven months earlier. "Public Opinion": This segment consisted of a conversation with Andrew Kohut of the Pew Research Center, who discussed public opinion of the investigation of the president, including the number of Americans who watched the presidential address; public opinion of Clinton; whether Americans believe that President Clinton told the whole truth to the grand jury; whether the public approves of the president personally; whether there is approval of the president's job performance; how the public feels about impeachment; and whether the public feels the matter should be dropped. "Political Wrap": In this segment Mark Shields and Paul Gigot discussed the week in politics, including whether the president's speech following his grand jury testimony was effective; whether the president should have attacked Ken Starr in his address to the nation; public opinion of the president; how politicians are reacting to the president's testimony; and whether Ken Starr is likely to end his investigation soon. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6236

    "Should He Resign?": This segment consisted of a debate between US Sen. John Ashcroft (R-MO) and US Rep. Barney Frank (D-MA) about whether the president should resign. Debate topics included whether the president has hurt the national interest by suborning it to his personal interest; whether a resignation would be disruptive; whether the situation impairs the ability of the president to deal with foreign policy; and whether the president will have any effect on public policy in the future. "Communications Gap": This segment contained a report from Terence Smith about the gap between the Washington media and the American public's view of the importance of the Monica Lewinsky issue. Following the report, Frank Sesno, Doyle McManus, and Tom Rosenstiel discussed the gap in perception. Topics included whether the public opinion has settled; the great public fatigue with the Monica Lewinsky scandal story; whether the coverage of the subject should be moderated; whether public resentment of the media coverage will increase in weeks to come; what the public resents about the media; whether public opinion inside the Beltway differs from the rest of the country; ways in which the credibility of the president's defenders has been diminished; and whether the press has a self-promoting interest in this story. "Pledge Segment": This segment contained a Gaby Rado report about the latest developments in Kosovo, covering the continuing terrorist attacks; Kosovo Albanians who have been driven out of their homes and are living in the forest; and whether there is any prospect for peace. "New Troubles": This segment began with a report from John Irvine about the impact of the violence in Northern Ireland. The report included the response from politicians and security chiefs about the violent bombing in Omagh and funerals for the victims of the bombing. Following the report, Joe Carroll and Michael McDowell joined Margaret Warner for a discussion about the ramifications of the latest violence in Northern Ireland. Topics included whether the violence puts pressure on the new leadership in the north; ways in which radical elements on either side of the conflict (Protestant and Catholic) support one another; the public sentiment for peace; whether ordinary citizens could have an impact on peace; and whether the peace process can continue amidst this violence. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6237

    "Striking Back": In this segment, President Clinton's address to the nation regarding the military strikes against terrorist bases in Afghanistan and Sudan was rebroadcast in its entirety. Following the report, Phil Ponce reported on the specific terrorist network that was the target of the American attack. Next was a discussion with Robin Wright and Larry Johnson about what led to the strikes and what is likely to be the impact on America, including why the US intelligence was confident that Osama Bin Laden was behind the embassy bombings; whether Afghanistan and Sudan are key figures in terrorism against the US; whether there was evidence that the terrorist group was planning other attacks against other American embassies; how this message might be received by Osama Bin Laden and his terrorist group; and the impact of the strike on Sudan. "Pledge Break": This segment consisted of excerpts from Secretary of Defense William Cohen and Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff General Henry Shelton's briefing at the Pentagon regarding the military strike against Afghanistan and Sudan. "Congressional Views": In this segment, a panel consisting of Sen. Charles Rob (D-VA), Sen. John Kyl (R-AZ), Rep. Lee Hamilton (D-IN), and Sen. Rod Grams (R-MN)discussed the military strike against Afghanistan and Sudan. Topics included whether there is congressional support for the action against the terrorism; whether this action might trigger more terrorist actions against the US; and whether the president was trying to distract from his own problems by ordering the strike. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6238

    "Newsmaker Interview": This segment consisted of an interview with National Security Advisor Samuel Berger, who discussed the issues related to the US attack on terrorist sites and related matters, including whether the air strikes on Afghanistan and Sudan accomplished their purpose; whether there is physical evidence that the pharmaceutical plant that was targeted by the US was in fact manufacturing VX nerve gas; the extent of the damage done to the facilities that were attacked; the purpose for striking the camps; and whether the US considers itself at war with Bin Laden and his organization. "Taking the Hit": The first half of this segment contained an interview with the Sudanese ambassador to the United Nations Mr. Elfatih Erwa, who discussed the US strikes against a terrorist target in Sudan. Topics included the amount of damage and number of casualties caused by the strike; whether the factory that was the target was responsible for manufacturing chemical weapons; Sudan's demand for an investigation; whether his country has a relationship with Bin Laden; and Sudan's plans to withdraw their diplomats from Washington DC. The segment continued with an interview with Taliban representative Noorullah Zadran, who discussed the damage and casualties in Afghanistan; whether the Afghanistani government knows where Bin Laden is and whether he survived the attacks; the Taliban's relationship with Bin Laden; and whether the Taliban movement is open to observers coming in and investigating. "Pledge Break": This segment consisted of excerpts from today's White House briefing by presidential spokesman Mike McCurry, who was asked about the anti-terrorist attacks and the Monica Lewinsky situation. "Political Wrap": Mark Shields and Paul Gigot discussed the week in politics, including the overwhelming support of the American public for the military strike against Afghanistan and Sudan; whether this action might develop into a war; whether Democrats and Republicans on the Hill might continue to support the president's military action; whether the president was trying to divert attention from the Monica Lewinksy case by ordering the military strike; the growing number of editorials and columnists calling for the resignation of the president; and whether the president will make another address before Ken Starr's report is released to Congress. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6239

    "Upheaval": This segment about Russian President Premiere Boris Yeltsin's cabinet shake-up began with a report from Gaby Rado of Independent Television News. Following the report, Leon Aron, Padma Desai, and Robert Legvold joined Lehrer for a discussion about the issues surrounding the unrest in the Russian cabinet, including why Boris Yeltsin is making changes; whether the reinstatement of acting Prime Minister Chernomyrdin was a step backward; whether the tax code would have been passed by the Duma if Chernomyrdin hadn't returned; whether the Russian public approves of this move; and whether this has been an act of desperation. "Primary Test": This segment consisted of a Kwame Holman report about the impact of the Clinton-Lewinsky scandal on politics, focusing on a Democratic primary race in Oklahoma and covering whether the Democratic party has been tarnished by the scandal and whether the media is to blame for the scandal. "Nothing But the Truth": This segment began with a report about facts and fiction in newspaper columns. The report covered the allegations of plagiarism against Mike Barnicle and Patricia Smith, both of the Boston Globe. Following the report, Jimmy Breslin, Juan Williams, and Ann Marie Lipinski joined Terence Smith for a discussion about newspaper columns and the separation between opinion and fact. Topics included what readers can expect from columnists; whether the author should be allowed to embellish; whether there was a difference between the Barnicle and Smith cases; and ways in which this situation has effected the journalism profession. "Gergen Dialogue": In this segment, David Gergen engaged Lena Lencek and Gideon Bosker in a discussion about their new book, "The Beach," a book about America's fascination with the ocean. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6240

    "Stormy Weather": This segment began with a Phil Ponce report about Hurricane Bonnie and the flooding in Texas. Following the report, Jerry Jarrell joined Ponce for a discussion about the disastrous weather, including how a region transforms from complete draught to flooding in a short period of time; whether it is unusual for a tropical storm to have an impact as far inland as Del Rio; the status of Hurricane Bonnie; the size of the hurricane; the predictability of the storm; and whether there is a connection between tropical storm Charlie and hurricane Bonnie. "War of the Future": This segment began with a report from Kwame Holman covering the bombing at Planet Hollywood in Capetown Africa, which is alleged to be in retaliation for US military strikes in Afghanistan and Sudan last week. Following the report, a panel consisting of Robert Oakley, Paul Bremer, William Maynes, and William Perry discussed the issues surrounding the Clinton Administration's action against sites in Afghanistan and Sudan last week in the battle against terrorism, including whether the attack on Planet Hollywood is an action that Americans should expect to see in the future; ways in which the war on terrorism has changed; the increased threat of nerve gas and biological warfare; the need to give other governments incentive to work with the US in the fight against terrorism; how the US might prevent this war from appearing as a war on Muslims; whether military steps are a last resort; and whether the executive order against assassination applies to Osama Bin Laden. "Counting Heads": This segment consisted of a Betty Ann Bowser report about the federal court ruling on how to conduct the census, covering the problem of uncounted Americans; steps being taken to ensure an accurate count for census 2000; and the controversial nature of President Clinton's proposal to use "sampling" to get an accurate count. "In Memoriam": This segment began with excerpts from a January 1989 Lehrer interview with Justice Lewis Powell, who died this morning at his home. Following the footage, Kathleen Sullivan and Douglas Kmiec joined Lehrer for an assessment of the career of the late justice, including how he will be remembered, his desire to preserve local government institutions, whether he was viewed as a pragmatic conservative, and his humble and modest nature. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6241

    "Stormy Weather": This segment began with a Phil Ponce report about the status of Hurricane Bonnie, including statements from several residents who have decided to ride out the storm. Following the report, Jerry Jarrell joined Ponce for a discussion about the hurricane, including where it is currently located; where it is expected to go next; unusual aspects of this hurricane; the enormous size of the storm; whether there might be lingering effects of the storm after it has cleared out; and whether Hurricane Danielle might follow the same path that Bonnie has taken. "Global Connection": This segment began with a report from Spencer Michels about foreign markets and their impact on the US. Following the report, a panel consisting of Richard Medley, John Campbell, and Moises Naim discussed the impact of emerging foreign stock markets on the US stock market and the world. Topics included why the market in Russia is falling; whether Latin America is contributing to the economic problems; why foreign markets effect each other so dramatically; ways in which the US economy is being affected by the foreign financial crisis; and how these foreign financial crises might be solved. "Paying Back Medicaid": This segment consisted of a Lee Hochberg report on the issues surrounding reimbursement of the Medicaid program, including government involvement in recovering costs; ways in which this reimbursement affects the families of recipients; ways in which some recipients try and cheat the system by sheltering their assets before they apply for Medicaid; and whether there has been any effort to regulate the estate recovery process. "Editor's Choice": In this segment, NewsHour regional commentators Susan Albright, Robert Kittle, Pat McGuigen, and Cynthia Tucker discussed the growing number of editorials calling for President Clinton's resignation. Topics included what has led to liberal newspapers to call for the resignation of the president; the way in which newspaper editorial decisions are made; whether there is enough evidence available to call for a resignation; the difference between resignation and impeachment; and whether an editorial reflects the views of the reporting staff at a newspaper. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6242

    "Taking the Plunge": This segment began with a report from Spencer Michels about today's 357 point drop in the US stock market and the subsequent drops in other world markets. Following the report, Kathleen Stephanson and Jeff Shafer joined Lehrer for a discussion about the drop in the markets, including how the drop might affect investment portfolios; whether this indicates a crisis in the US economy; factors that have contributed to the drop, including the Asian financial crisis and the possible devaluation of the Yen; whether the market might continue to fall before a recovery; whether there are any signs of a recession ahead. "Stormy Weather": This segment contained a update from Phil Ponce about the damage and destruction caused by Hurricane Bonnie. Following the report, Governor Jim Hunt joined Ponce for a discussion about the amount of damage sustained by North Carolina, when the hurricane is expected to leave the area, the threat of floods following the storm, when residents of the North Carolina shore can expect to return to their homes, and practical impacts of receiving federal assistance. "Sensitive Lesson": This segment contained a report from Jeffrey Kaye about how the presidential scandals are being handled in classrooms across America. The report included ways in which teachers avoid the subject of sex in the classroom; children's news programs that are covering the subject matter; and how students view the scandal. "Seeking an Alternative": This segment consisted of a Paul Solman report on alternative approach to medicine, including the new area of touch therapy; other alternative techniques in the area of hypnotherapy and relaxation; the extent of the research at Columbia; skepticism among patients and other health care providers; and whether the placebo effect is contributing to the success of this alternative care. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6243

    "Global Plunge": This segment began with a Spencer Michels report about the panic in Russia over the crisis in its economy and the effects of this plunge on other world markets. Following the report, Daniel Yergin, Adam Posen, Walter Russell Mead, and Richard Jacobs joined Margaret Warner for a discussion about the issues surrounding the volatility in the world stock markets, including whether Russia is the driving force behind global instability; why the International Monetary Fund (IMF) bailout of Russia was not successful; whether political reactions are likely in world governments; whether the decline in world markets is threatening US economic interests; whether there are international solutions for the economic crisis; and the political crisis that is affecting world economies. "Political Wrap": Mark Shields and Paul Gigot discussed the week in politics, including whether the president should travel to Russia; what might be done to improve the economic situation in Russia; whether the president's second statement concerning the Monica Lewinsky situation was more effective; whether the president should resign; the investigation of vice president Al Gore over fundraising phone calls; and the pressure on Janet Reno to name an independent counsel for campaign finance. "Dianamania": This segment began with a Terence Smith report about the new wave of media coverage of Princess Diana. Following the report, Alex Jones and Jane Robelot joined Smith for a discussion of the media coverage of Princess Diana on the anniversary of her death, including whether there is a justification for the extent of media coverage; whether there is an element of exploitation in media coverage a year later; and whether there is anything new to report at this time. "Cultural Legacy": In this segment, Richard Rodriguez considered the life and accomplishments of literary critic Alfred Kazan, who died this past June. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6244

    "Taking the Plunge": In this segment, Joe Battapaglia, Michael Metz, and James Glassman discussed the issues surrounding today's 500 point drop in the stock market, including whether the drop was a correction to the bull market or the beginning of a bear market; the need to assess the companies in which one owns stock; opportunities for investing in the future; whether the US might be headed for a recession; and whether the strength of the US economy might help stabilize other world economies. "Time of Turmoil": This segment began with a report from special correspondent Simon Marks on the current economic situation in Russia, covering whether Boris Yeltsin is likely to resign, the decline in the ruble, and whether the Russian public believes President Clinton's visit will have any effect on the situation. "World Leader": In this segment, Jim Hoagland, Fareed Zakaria, and Trudy Rubin joined Lehrer for a discussion about President Clinton's trip to Russia for a summit with Boris Yeltsin. Topics included what Americans can expect from the summit; whether Russians are concerned about the summit; the need for the president to emphasize to the Russian people the importance of the reforms they are conducting; whether the president's domestic problems and the drop in the US stock market might affect his leadership abilities in Russia; and the need to integrate Russia into the Western world. "Newsmaker Interview": This segment began with background from Margaret Warner about the involvement of the UN Security Council in the disarmament of Iraq. Following the report, former UN Weapons Inspector Scott Ritter joined Elizabeth Farnsworth for a discussion about the weapons inspection process in Iraq, why he resigned as an inspector; his view of the situation between the UN and Iraq; why the inspectors were not allowed to carry out certain inspections; the number of inspections that were blocked; the lack, in his opinion, of US leadership in the disarmament of Iraq; the ongoing FBI investigation against him; and what he hopes to accomplish through his resignation. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6245

    "Wall ST MainST": In this segment, Lawrence Lindsey, Anirvan Banirji, Ron Blackwell, and Michael Boskin joined Lehrer for a panel discussion about the impact of the stock market on the overall economy, including whether today's rebound was expected after the market fall in the days before; fundamentals of the US economy; whether there are signs of increasing volatility in the future of the market; whether the US economy might be headed for a recession; whether the Federal Reserve should lower interest rates; and whether there might be a global recession on the horizon. "24-Hour Business": This segment began with a report about the effects of the market on news network ratings, covering the increased number of avenues of information about the stock market. Following the report, Muriel Siebert, Gary Schatsky, and Teresa Tritch joined Smith for a discussion about the impact of cable television coverage of the market and Internet trading on yesterday's drop in the stock market, including the increased number of people who are affected by the stock market; whether there are illusions about guaranteed returns in the stock market; whether the 24-hour flow of information has an impact on the market; the way in which the public has latched on to the availability of information; the importance of distinguishing information from hype; and whether it is appropriate for specialists on the broadcasts to recommend specific stocks. "Grounded": This segment began with a report from Tom Bearden about the Northwest Airlines strike, covering the number of daily flights that have been cancelled and why the pilots are striking. Following the report, Aaron Gellman and Julius Maldutis joined Phil Ponce for a discussion about the issues surrounding the Northwest Airlines strike, including the history of the conflict between management and labor at the airline; whether the pilots are requesting an industry leading contract; whether there should be any government intervention; and whether the strike will impact communities and the US economy. "Chasing Records": In this segment, Jim Fisher of The Kansas City Star considered the race to break baseball's record for home runs. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6246

    "Staying the Course": This segment began with an excerpt from the American-Russian press conference today about the summit in Russia. Following the footage, Michael McFaul, Stephen Cohen, Melor Sturua, and Leon Aron discussed the issues surrounding the president's summit with Boris Yeltsin, including whether anything positive came of the conference; whether the president's advice to Russia was in fact good advice; the extent of the crisis in Russia and whether this is the greatest crisis it has ever faced; whether Boris Yeltsin is physically capable of dealing with the economic problems; the difference between the International Monetary Fund bailout of Mexico and that of Russia; and the need to resurrect the idea of the market. "Divided Attention": This segment began with background from Kwame Holman about the investigation of the president. Following the report, a panel consisting of Doris Kearns Goodwin, Michael Beschloss, Robert Dallek, and Ronald Steel discussed President Clinton's efforts to conduct foreign policy in the midst of a domestic scandal, including whether there are precedents for Clinton's attempt; the way in which foreign leaders view the Lewinsky scandal; whether President Clinton has been handicapped by his domestic problems; whether there is hope for Clinton's situation; whether foreign policy issues may give the president an opportunity to rise above his domestic affairs; and historical parallels to Clinton's situation. "Morning After Pills": This segment consisted of a Rod Minott report about FDA approval of a "morning after" pill for birth control, covering the way in which the pill prevents pregnancy; whether an established pregnancy would be affected by ingestion of the pill; whether the general public is aware of this method of contraception; and differences between RU-486 ("the abortion pill") and the new "morning after" pill. "Provide, Provide": In this segment, NewsHour contributor and Poet Laureate of the United States Robert Pinsky considered the dips and slides of the US stock market through some poetry. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6247

    "Swissair Crash": This segment began with a report from David Smith of Independent Television News about the crash of a Swissair jet over Nova Scotia. The report covered what is being done to investigate the crash and whether terrorism might have been involved. Following the report, Michael Goldfarb joined Elizabeth Farnsworth for a discussion about issues surrounding the crash, including the danger of speculation; how the investigation will be tackled; whether there have been advances in investigatory techniques since the TWA crash; and the safety record of Swissair. "Cancer War": This segment consisted of a report from Susan Dentzer about the recommendations of an advisory board to the FDA for approval of a new treatment for breast cancer. The report covered the way in which the new drug works; whether the drug cures breast cancer; and whether the drug can be used for prevention. "The President and the Press": This segment began with excerpts from media coverage of the president's summit with Boris Yeltsin in Russia. Following the footage, Helen Thomas and Jody Powell joined Terence Smith for a discussion about media coverage of President Clinton's trip and questions about Monica Lewinsky. Topics included whether questions pertaining to Monica Lewinsky were appropriate at the summit in Russia; whether the president's ability to have a dialogue with the American people has been damaged; and whether the president should say more about the investigation before Ken Starr submits his report to Congress. "Should He Resign?": In this segment, former US Senators Sam Nunn(D-GA), Dale Bumpers(D-AK), John Danforth(R-MO), and Warren Rudman(R-NH) discussed whether President Clinton should resign over the Monica Lewinsky matter. Topics included whether the president has put the interest of the country before the scandal in the past seven months; whether President Clinton has an obligation to consider resignation from office; whether the president should wait for Ken Starr's report before he makes a decision about resignation; the need to let the system of government work through the constitution; and whether the president's ability to govern has been weakened by the scandal. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6248

    "Swissair Crash": This segment consisted of a Kwame Holman report about the latest developments in the investigation of the cause for the crash of Swissair flight 111. The report covered what is known about the crash at this point; what was discovered through air traffic control tapes; and where the investigation will go from here. "Political Wrap": Mark Shields and Paul Gigot discussed the week in politics, including Senator Leiberman's criticism of the president; whether the president is losing the support of many Democrats in Congress; the general disappointment in the president's apology; and whether Janet Reno will appoint an independent counsel to investigate campaign finance before the November election. "Security Risks?": In this segment, Jeffrey Kaye of KCET Los Angeles provided an update about the Iraqi refugees who are considered security risks by the US government and who are being held in prison in the United States. The report covered why attorneys for the Iraqis were not able to view some evidence of allegations against their clients; the way in which the US government collected evidence to support the allegations against the Iraqis; instances where the FBI has found the Iraqis lied; whether the FBI understands Middle Eastern culture; and why suddenly the previously classified evidence has been determined unclassified. "Foreign Correspondence": This segment consisted of an interview with Kevin Sullivan, Northeast Asia co-bureau chief for The Washington Post, who discussed the economic and political conditions in Japan. Topics included whether the Asian crisis has affected the morale of the Japanese people; whether there is any resentment toward Japan; how the drop in the value of the yen has affected the Japanese way of life; and how the Japanese view the Monica Lewinsky scandal. "Chasing the Record": In this segment, Jack Buck and Frank Deford joined Elizabeth Farnsworth for a discussion about the race for the homerun record. Topics included the increased interest in baseball; the magnitude of breaking the record; why there was not as much attention when Roger Maris broke Babe Ruth's record in 1961; and what will be done with the record breaking ball. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6249

    "Swissair Crash": This segment consisted of an update from Phil Ponce about the Swissair crash, covering the retrieval of the black box containing technical data, the possibility that the voice recorder has been located, memorial services being held at local churches in Nova Scotia, and ways in which the US Navy is assisting in the retrieval of large pieces of the aircraft. "Net Growth": This segment consisted of two segments that focused on the way in which the Internet is changing the face of work in America. The first report, from Paul Solman of WGBH Boston, focused on two entrepreneurs who have developed an Internet company. The report covered the way in which the Web company plans to make revenue, the way in which the new company is funded, how this company plans to function, and how venture capitalists assist new entrepreneurs in developing new companies. The segment continued with a panel discussion with Paul Saffo, Claudia Goldin, Charley Richardson, and David about the impact of the Internet on the workplace. Topics included how technology has impacted the 40-hour work week and the locations that employees work from, the types of jobs that have been most effected, whether some individuals might be displaced by the wave of technology, ways in which technology is allowing people to become sedentary, whether technology promotes productivity, and how technology has affected communication. "The Littlest Victims": In this segment, Ian Williams reported on the South Korean government imposed economic austerity measures last year as a condition of the International Monetary Fund's financial bailout and some of the unexpected victims. The report covered children that have been placed in foster care by their parents because they can no longer afford to feed them and whether some cases are a result of the erosion of traditional family values in South Korea. "Gergen Dialogue": In this segment, David Gergen engaged Robert Woodson in a conversation about what he discovered while researching his new book, "Triumphs of Joseph." Mr. Woodson discussed several examples of individuals who have been transformed from social misfits into model citizens. "Labor Day": In this segment, Robert Pinsky US Poet Laureate, read some poetry in celebration of Labor Day. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6250

    "Lower Rates?": This segment began with excerpts from Federal Reserve Chairman Alan Greenspan's speech on Monday that caused a commotion on Wall street. Following the footage, Allan Meltzer and James Galbraith joined Lehrer for a discussion about interest rates and the impact of Greenspan's comments on the stock market. Topics included why the market reacted to Mr. Greenspan's comments; whether the Federal Reserve will cut interest rates; whether lowering interest rates would be a mistake; and whether the US economy might help to stabilize the Japanese economy. "Schizophrenia": This segment consisted of a Susan Dentzer report on dealing with schizophrenia, an illness that affects Russell Weston, the man who was responsible for the July 24 Capitol shooting. The report covered how the disease affects its victims; the importance of treatment programs; what is involved in controlling the disease; whether schizophrenia is a collection of diseases; what may be the causes of schizophrenia; physical symptoms of the disease; and the difference between its different forms. "Fair Game?": This segment began with a Terence Smith report about media coverage of the story of Senator Dan Burton's affair several years ago that resulted in an illegitimate child. Following the report, Robert Lichter and Vic Caleca joined Smith for a discussion about whether the story about Rep. Burton's extramarital affair from the 1980's was justified. Topics included why the newspaper decided to run the story; whether Rep. Burton's strong criticism of President Clinton's behavior justified the story; whether the White House was involved in the story; whether there was a good reason to cross the line of privacy; whether the affair affects Rep. Burton's ability to do his job; and the need to require clear justifications to cross the line of privacy. "Foreign Correspondence": This segment consisted of a conversation with Mary Jordan, Northeast Asia co-bureau chief for The Washington Post. Topics included how the economy has changed in Asia over the past few years; whether the Korean people feel resentment toward Japan or North Korea; whether the full scale of the famine is known; and what it is like to be a journalist in Korea. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6251

    "The Starr Report": This segment began with excerpts from Charles Bakaly's statement today following the submission of the Starr report to Congress. Following the footage, Ruth Marcus of the Washington Post discussed the day's events, including the process of the delivery of the report; the nature of the communication between Starr's office and the speaker's office; the size of the report; whether there has been a characterization of the nature of the report; and whether the House might release the contents of the report to the public. "View from the Hill": Following a Phil Ponce report about the nature of business in the House of Representatives today, a panel consisting of US Reps. Bill McCollum(R-FL), Asa Hutchinson(R-AK), Zoe Lofgren(D-CA), and Marty Meehan(D-MA) discussed the process of dealing with the Starr report that was delivered to Congress today. Topics included whether Congress has agreed on a process for dealing with the report; the need to protect the privacy and constitutional rights of the individuals who testified to the grand jury; whether it will be possible to proceed in a bipartisan fashion; whether the president's legal team should be allowed to view the report before it is released to the public; whether the independent counsel should have submitted the report to the president before the House; and whether leaks to the media about the report might be avoided altogether. "Magic Moment": This segment began with footage of Mark McGwire's record breaking home run last night. Following the excerpt, Doris Kearns Goodwin and Frank DeFord joined Elizabeth Farnsworth for a discussion about the 62nd home run. Topics included the increased loyalty in the sport of baseball; the history that permeates the game; and whether this event might boost the popularity of the sport. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6252

    "The Day After": This segment consisted of a Kwame Holman report about the events of the day after the Starr report was delivered to Congress. Holman's report covered what Congress is planning to do with the report; and whether an advanced copy of the report might be given to the president. "High Crimes and Misdemeanors?": In this segment, a panel consisting of three constitutional law professors, Paul Campos, Ken Gormley, and Michael Gerhardt, discussed the legal guidelines Congress follows under the impeachment process, including constitutional grounds for impeachment; whether the president could be impeached for an offense that is not indictable; whether there are historical examples of impeachment for personal/private behavior; how the president's matters will be handled in the event that impeachment occurs; whether Ken Starr's report is accepted as the undisputed truth; and whether there is a role for the public in the deliberations of the House. "Delivering the News": This segment began with a report from Terence Smith about the use of the Internet to make Ken Starr's report public. The report covered other instances where major documents have been posted and public concerns about the information being available to the world. Following the report, Christopher Feola and Rich Oppel discussed the use of the Internet in the release of the independent counsel's report, including whether the Internet will be able to survive the surge of requests; the way in which the report will be posted; other historically significant situations in which the Internet has played a significant role; whether the information will be censored on Web sites; the journalistic significance of the Internet; and whether the Internet is rendering the newspaper obsolete. "Historical Views": In this segment, a panel consisting of Doris Kearns Goodwin, Michael Beschloss, Haynes Johnson, and Seymour Martin Lipset joined Lehrer for a discussion about the historical significance of impeachment. Topics included the impeachment process against Richard Nixon; whether the impeachment of Richard Nixon was bi-partisan; whether the current House Judiciary Committee is divided on partisan lines; whether the unstable stock market will affect public opinion of the president; and public in apprehension about an impeachment. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6253

    "The Starr Report": In this segment, Terence Smith discussed the contents of the Starr report, which was released by Congress after a more than 300-vote majority in favor of the public release. The segment covered the eleven impeachable offenses alleged by the Starr report, including lying under oath in the Paula Jones sexual harassment lawsuit about his relationship with Monica Lewinsky; lying under oath about being alone with Lewinsky and about the gifts they exchanged; lying under oath to the grand jury about his sexual relationship with Lewinsky; lying under oath about conversation with Lewinsky about the Jones case; obstructing justice by concealing evidence about his relationship with Lewinsky; reaching an understanding with Lewinsky on a plan to lie about their relationship; obstructing justice by assisting in Lewinsky's job search in New York; lying under oath about conversations with Vernon Jordan about Lewinsky; trying to obstruct justice by attempting to influence the testimony of his secretary, Betty Currie; obstructing justice by refusing to testify for seven months while simultaneously lying to potential grand jury witnesses who then lied in their testimony; and committing acts that Starr called "inconsistent with the President's constitutional duty to faithfully execute the laws". "The President's Reply": In this segment, Kwame Holman discussed the contents of the president's formal rebuttal to the Starr report, claiming that the president did not commit perjury, obstruct justice, tamper with witnesses, abuse the power of his office, or commit any crime that would justify his removal from office. Following the report, Henry Hudson and Bruce Yannett joined Margaret Warner for a discussion about the legal implications of the Starr report. Topics included whether the case against the president is a strong one; whether this would be an indictable example of perjury in a court; whether the Starr report makes a strong case for obstruction of justice; and whether Congress might seek impeachment of the president. "Seeking Forgiveness": This segment began with extended excerpts from the president's apology at a White House prayer breakfast this morning. Following the footage, Ministers C. Welton Gaddy and Paige Patterson gave their reaction to the president's apology. Discussion topics included the mood of religious leaders during the prayer breakfast; the difference between forgiveness and competency to lead the country; whether the president should resign; whether there is a connection between repentance and resignation; and differences between impeachable offenses and offenses against God. "Political Wrap": Mark Shields and Paul Gigot discussed the week in politics, including whether Starr's case against the president is strong; whether the president is truly sorry for the scandal; whether the House is cooperating in a non-partisan fashion; whether the Democrats will be hurt in the upcoming election; and what might happen if the issue remains a debatable point. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6254

    "Defining Perjury": This segment began with a Margaret Warner report on whether the allegations against the president contained in Ken Starr's report to Congress are valid legal accusations. Following the report, Bruce Yannett and Joseph diGenova joined Warner for a conversation about the legal definition of perjury and the accusations about the president in the Starr report. Discussion topics included whether a witness can give a technically correct answer, intentionally misleading the jury, and not be guilty of perjury; whether a witness is in the clear if the questions asked are ambiguous; and whether perjury prosecution can be brought on the basis of the testimony of one witness. "Delivering the News": This segment began with a Terence Smith report on the media coverage of the explicit portions of Ken Starr's report to Congress. Following the report, Geneva Overholser and Bill Powers joined Smith for a discussion about the issues surrounding media coverage of the Starr report, including the magnitude of the report; whether the media covered the subject appropriately; whether the report in its entirety is more powerful than fragmented excerpts; whether the use of the Internet to publish the report threatens the printed versions of news media; and whether there is a sense of vindication in the press. "Crisis Manager": This segment began with a report from Elizabeth Farnsworth on the new Russian Prime Minister Yevgeny Primakov, covering Primakov's background in Russian government, his determination not to return to Soviet-style economics, and the job that lies ahead for him. Following the report, Stephen Cohen and Robert Legvold joined Farnsworth for a discussion about the confirmation of the new prime minister of Russia, including what Americans should know about this man; whether Primokov will implement an economic policy similar to that of the communists; and what the US should be doing to help the economic situation. "In Memoriam": This segment began with a Kwame Holman report on the life and politics of George Wallace, who died on Sunday. Following the report, Haynes Johnson joined Lehrer for a conversation about the life of the former governor of Alabama, covering his personality and his conversion from a segregationist. "Chasing the Record": This segment contained footage of Sammy Sosa's 62nd home run in Chicago last night, which tied him with Mark McGwire. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6255

    "What Next?": In this segment, Charles Canady and Zoe Lofgren discussed how much of the back-up material provided to Congress by Ken Starr should be made public. Topics included arguments that are being made for the release of the taped testimony; the process by which this determination is being made; whether the general public is entitled to full disclosure; what will happen next; and the need to resolve this issue as quickly as possible. "Public Opinion": This segment began with a conversation with Andrew Kohut about the apparent disconnect between the American public's lack of concern over the Starr report and the growing number of newspapers calling for the president's resignation. Discussion topics included the way in which the graphic sexual details of the Starr report impacted public opinion; whether the president's credibility problems increased with the Starr report; whether the president's job approval ratings were affected; whether the poles indicate that the American people would like the president to resign; and whether the public would like to see full-blown congressional hearings. Following the interview, the NewsHour's regular cast of regional commentators: Cynthia Tucker, Patrick McGuigan, Lee Cullum, Bob Kittle, and Jim Boyd, joined Lehrer for a discussion on public opinion of President Clinton's behavior. Topics included whether the American people are critical of the president; whether the public is growing tired of the subject and the details; and whether the president should resign or be impeached. "Testing Teachers": This segment consisted of a Betty Ann Bowser report on the issues surrounding the performance of American public school teachers, including what is needed in order to improve the quality of education; basic skills and proficiency tests that are being required of teachers across the US; the unprecedented failure of 59% of the prospective teachers in Massachusetts; whether the tests were fair; and whether the standards of schools of education are up to par. Following the report, US poet laureate Robert Pinsky read a poem about school. "Language or Silence": In this segment, Richard Rodriguez considered the oppression of homosexuals. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6256

    "Fielding Questions": This segment consisted of extensive excerpts from a news conference with President Clinton and President Havel of the Czech Republic. Questions included whether the president has lost moral authority and the ability to lead this country in foreign affairs; whether the president lied under oath in his testimony; and whether the resignation or impeachment of President Clinton would affect US-Czech relations. "Newsmaker Interview": This segment contained an interview with Treasury Secretary Robert Rubin, who discussed whether the president still has a moral authority in the US; whether the US will be able to provide leadership in the global economic crisis; whether the scandal is rendering the president unfocused; whether the US economy is in jeopardy; criticisms of the International Monetary Fund (IMF); and whether the IMF is the answer to the financial crises in Europe and Asia. "Newsmaker Interview": In this segment, Senate Majority Leader Tom Daschle (D-SD) joined Margaret Warner for a discussion on the issues surrounding the possibility of impeachment proceedings, including whether the president still possesses the ability to lead the country; the way in which the president has handled the Monica Lewinsky situation; his call for the president to quit the hairsplitting over legal technicalities; whether the taped testimony of the president should be released to the public; the need to proceed with the investigation of the president in a careful and non-partisan fashion; whether an impeachment inquiry was warranted by the Starr report; whether he believes the president should consider resignation; and whether the scandal is affecting the ability of the Democratic party to promote their agenda on the Senate floor. "Teacher Shortage": This segment consisted of a Betty Ann Bowser report on the shortage of teachers in the public education system. The report covered a program in Oakland, California that allows individuals to teach without a teaching degree, whether this program might lower the standard of teaching in America, reasons why the shortage of teachers exists, and the way in which successful schools are recruiting teachers. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6257

    "Video Release": This segment began with a Kwame Holman report about the House Judicial Committee's vote on the release of the president's testimony to the grand jury. Following the report, Christopher Cox and Vic Fazio joined Margaret Warner for a debate over the public release of the Clinton grand jury testimony tapes. Discussion topics included whether a decision has been made to release the tapes; the need to proceed in a fair and objective manner; whether the videotape could be used in political campaigns; and whether there has been a White House attempt to intimidate members of the Judiciary Committee. "Global Views": This segment began with a Terence Smith report about how the Lewinsky scandal is being received in Italy, France, London, China, and other countries around the world. Following the report, Sebastian Mallaby, Mohammed Wahby, Jose Carreno, and Sylvie Kauffman discussed international reaction to the Monica Lewinsky scandal, covering the magnitude of the scandal overseas; what type of reaction the story is provoking; whether the economic impact or the sexual content of the report is more interesting to foreign countries; whether a scandal of this nature would produce this sort of public scrutiny and reaction in other countries; whether the controversy diminishes the standing of President Clinton or the US in the eyes of the world; and whether foreign countries are calling for the resignation of the president. "Regional Reflections": In this segment, Elizabeth Farnsworth was joined by Mary Beckman, Morton Marcus, Gary Shoesmith, and Tom Fullerton for a discussion about the health of the US economy. Topics included reasons for volatility in the stock market; ways in which the volatility is affecting different regions in the US; ways in which foreign economies are affecting the US economy; the decline in the value of agricultural exports; whether there are pre-conditions for an economic recession; and whether consumer confidence has diminished. "63": This segment consisted of footage of Sammy Sosa's homerun last night against the San Diego Padres. It was his 63rd in the homerun race against Mark McGwire. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6258

    "Going Public": In this segment, George Gekas and Bobby Scott joined Elizabeth Farnsworth for a discussion about the decision by the House Judiciary Committee to release the videotape of the president's grand jury testimony. Topics included what will be released with the president's testimony on Monday; the process of the decision to release this information; whether there was bipartisan agreement in the committee on what information to release; whether the public has the right to know the context of the impeachment investigation; and whether the Republican party is worried about a public backlash. "Political Wrap": Mark Shields and Paul Gigot discussed the week in politics, including whether the House Judiciary Committee should have voted to release the videotape of the president's grand jury testimony; whether the timing of the release matters; whether there could be a backlash against the Republicans; and whether the White House had a role in the publication of a story about Judiciary Committee member Henry Hyde's affair that ended 30 years ago. "Reporting on Race": This segment began with a report from President Clinton's National Dialogue on Race, including the goals of the initiative and the four recommendations of the board to the president, including the appointment of a permanent president's council on race, the creation of a public education and media program on race, the need to urge business and government leaders to address racial concerns together, and the need to encourage young people to get involved in bridging racial divides. Following the report, Anglea Oh, Christopher Edley, Roger Wilkins, and Linda Chavez joined Margaret Warner for a discussion on the report issues. Topics included whether the report will be helpful; whether the report was too gentle and diverse; and the need for a sense of urgency and bold policy recommendations in the report. "Gergen Dialogue": In this segment, David Gergen engaged James Chace in a discussion on his new book, "Acheson: The Secretary of State Who Created the American World." [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6259

    "Testimony": This segment began with extensive excerpts from the broadcast of the president's grand jury testimony, including the statement he read at the beginning of his testimony about his relationship with Monica Lewinsky; questions about the legal definition of sexual relationship; conversations with White House aides in which he denied a sexual relationship with Ms. Lewinsky; and alleged conversations with Ms. Lewinsky after she had been subpoenaed in the Paula Corbin Jones civil case. Following the footage, Bruce Yannett and George Terwiliger joined Margaret Warner for a discussion on the legal issues involved in the president's grand jury testimony. Topics included the advantages that the president had in his grand jury testimony, such as having his attorney present and the time constraints; whether the fact that the testimony was videotaped affected the prosecutor's questions; whether the video shows that the president committed perjury; the president's lack of complete and candid answers; and what the president really meant by his testimony about the gifts he gave to Monica. "Making the Case?": This segment began with excerpts from the president's grand jury testimony in which the president became harsh and angry in response to questions about the Paula Jones case. Following the footage, Paul Gigot, Haynes Johnson, Michael Beschloss, Tom Oliphant, and Joan Hoff joined Lehrer for a discussion about the political and historical ramifications of the president's testimony. Topics included whether the president helped himself by insisting that he did not lie to the grand jury; whether the tape was a good tool for the American public and Congress to make a judgment about the behavior of Bill Clinton; the demeanor of the president during his testimony; and whether the broadcast of this tape could ensure impeachment proceedings. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6260

    "Congressional Views": In this segment, US Representatives James Sensenbrenner(R-WI), Charles Canady(R-FL), Marty Meegan(D-MA), and Maxine Walters(D-CA) joined Lehrer for a panel discussion on the impact of the president's televised testimony and other documents released from the Starr report. Topics included whether the release of this testimony will damage the president's credibility; the direct contradiction between the testimony of the president and that of Monica Lewinsky; whether it is likely that there will be a formal impeachment inquiry; and whether the Judiciary Committee is the most polar of all committees in Congress. "Views From Omaha": This segment consisted of a Betty Ann Bowser report on how the saga of President Clinton's troubles is playing in Omaha Nebraska, covering the demographics of the city; whether the tape of the testimony has changed the opinions of Nebraskans; and the way in which the scandal is being portrayed in Omaha classrooms. "Delivering the News": This segment began with a Terence Smith report about media coverage of the president's grand jury testimony, covering ways in which the media has been challenged by the coverage of the Monica Lewinsky scandal. Following the report, Roger Rosenblatt, Kathleen Hall Jamieson, and Ed Fouhy joined Smith to evaluate the impact of the president on videotape. Topics included the different styles of news networks; whether the tape of the testimony was newsworthy; whether there was a justification for broadcasting the testimony before it had been screened; and whether the broadcast of raw footage has set a new standard for reporting the news. "In Memoriam": This segment began with an Elizabeth Farnsworth report on the life an accomplishments of Florence Griffith Joyner, who died on Monday. Following the report, Marilyn King joined Farnsworth for a discussion on "Flo Jo," including why she was such a good runner; the way in which she gave back to the community; the rumors about her use of performance enhancing drugs; and the effect of her style on track and field. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6261

    "Public Opinion": In this segment, Andy Kohut, Celinda Lake, and Ed Goeas joined Margaret Warner for a discussion on polls and public opinion of the president. Topics included the delayed toll of the Starr report on the public's opinion; the rebound in approval ratings after the release of Clinton's grand jury testimony; whether all polls are consistent following the release of the videotape; and whether the American public is concerned that the president lied under oath. "Views From Omaha": In this segment, Betty Ann Bowser reported from Omaha, Nebraska, in the second of a four-part series on how the American city is dealing with the Clinton-Lewinsky matter. Tonight's report focused on how Omaha's religious leaders are handling the scandal, covering how the scandal has affected the Jewish community during the holiest week of the year; the need to forgive the president; whether the president should resign; the renewed need for leadership from the religious community; and the concern about what the impact of the scandal will mean for the future of morals in the country. "Yugoslavian Strongman": This segment consisted of a profile of Yugoslavian President Slobadan Milosevic, whose forces are currently battling with ethnic Albanian guerillas in Kosovo. The report covered the way in which Milosevic has risen to power; whether he is an effective leader; the controversy surrounding his power; the number of Yugoslavians who support their president; and US involvement with Milosevic and the Balkan peace process. "Gergen Dialogue": In this segment, David Gergen engaged co-authors Sylvia Hewlitt and Cornel West in a discussion about their new book, "The War Against Parents: What We Can Do for America's Beleaguered Moms and Dads." Topics included the need for more child care programs, the need for an increase in the minimum wage, the need for an extended maternal leave program, and the difficulty of being a good parent in 1998. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6262

    "Stormy Weather": This segment began with a report from Spencer Michels on Hurricane Georges, which is currently threatening South Florida. The report covered the path the hurricane has taken so far, the death toll, and the estimated damage in the Dominican Republic so far. Following the report, Jerry Jarrell of the National Hurricane Center in Miami joined Lehrer for a discussion about the latest forecast for the storm, covering where the hurricane is currently located, the width of the storm, whether the storm will continue to strengthen, when it is expected to hit the Florida Keys, and where the hurricane warnings are in effect. "Impeachment Inquiry": This segment began with excerpts from Chairman of the Judiciary Committee Henry Hyde's newsconference about the status of the decision about an impeachment inquiry. Topics included whether the release of the evidence was an attempt by Republicans to smear the president; whether other Justice Department investigations will be finished soon; why the committee has not agreed on a definition of an impeachable offense; and whether Ken Starr will be subject to subpoena in the event that there are impeachment hearings. Following were excerpts from Barney Frank's (D-MA) statements after the newsconference on behalf of the Democrats on the Judiciary Committee. "Views from Omaha": In this segment, Betty Ann Bowser reported from Omaha, Nebraska in the third of a four-part series on how people in Omaha view the Clinton-Lewinsky matter. Today's report focused on how women view Monica Lewinsky. Topics included the way in which the Lewinsky matter might make women more aware of their rights in employment; whether women are bothered by Lewinsky's lack of remorse; whether the scandal has given interns a bad name; whether women can identify with Monica Lewinsky; and sympathy for Chelsea Clinton. "Foreign Correspondence": In this segment, Southeast Asia Bureau Chief Keith Richburg joined Terence Smith for a discussion about Indonesia and Hong Kong. Topics included the threat of famine in Indonesia; the massive unemployment problem that is consuming the country; when the situation might reach a point of civil unrest; whether the military faces a problem of credibility; whether there is a resentment of the US and the International Monetary Fund(IMF) in Indonesia; and what life is like at his home in Hong Kong after the Chinese take-over. "American Accents": This segment began with a profile of San Francisco Symphony's Michael Tilson Thomas. Mr. Thomas discussed his love for the music of Gershwin, his style of conducting, and the way in which he captures the spirit of American music. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6263

    "Stormy Weather": This segment consisted of an update from Max Mayfield, Deputy Director of the National Hurricane Center in Miami, about the latest forecast for Hurricane Georges, covering the current location of the hurricane; what is causing the most damage; where the strongest winds have occurred; whether the storm will strengthen over the Gulf of Mexico; and when it is expected to hit land. "Bosnia Votes": This segment began with a Margaret Warner report on the results of the election in Bosnia, in which the leader of the ultra-nationalist Serbian radical party, Nikola Poplasen, defeated the more moderate Biljana Plavsic. Following the report, Robert Gelbard and Christopher Bennett joined Warner for a discussion about the impact of the election in Bosnia, including whether this was a step forward in the implementation of the Dayton agreement; whether extreme nationalism continues to have staying power in Bosnia; and what the US might be able to do in order to strengthen the moderate forces in Bosnia. "Views from Omaha": In this segment, correspondent Tom Bearden reported from Omaha, Nebraska, in the last of a four-part series on how people in Omaha view the Clinton-Lewinsky matter. Today's report focused on how schools are dealing with the scandal. Topics included how teachers are using the scandal to teach their students about the Constitution; whether parents want their children exposed to the Clinton-Lewinsky story; the way in which Catholic schools are handling the situation; and how the subject has brought an enthusiasm to some classrooms. "Political Wrap": Mark Shields and Paul Gigot discussed the week in politics, including whether the Judiciary Committee will go ahead with impeachment hearings; what happened to the idea of censure; whether the release of the videotape was a mistake from a Republican point of view; and whether the American people have already come to a decision about this issue. "March for Dollars": This segment consisted of a Susan Dentzer report on the latest effort to raise money for the fight against breast cancer, covering preparations for the march in Washington DC; the amount of federal spending on research for cancer; and the development of several new therapies for cancer patients. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6264

    "Stormy Weather": The segment began with an update from Phil Ponce about the damage on the Gulf Coast from Hurricane Georges. Following the report was some perspective from hurricane expert Miles Lawrence, who discussed where the storm is currently located; the strength of the winds associated with the storm; the extent of the damage thus far; whether the storm surge is expected to recede soon; whether the threat of heavy rainfall is expected to continue; when people will be allowed to return to their homes; and where the storm might be headed next. "Time for Change": This segment began with a report from Bill Neely of Independent Television News about Gerhard Schroeder's defeat of Helmut Kohl for the Chancellor of Germany, covering the historic nature of this vote and the difficult job ahead of Mr. Schroeder. Following the report, Martin Winter, Stephan-Gotz Richter, Robert Kimmitt, and Angela Stent joined Margaret Warner for a discussion about the elections in Germany. Topics included why Helmut Kohl was defeated; whether Schroeder is a pragmatist; what the election will mean for economic policy; and whether greater tensions between Germany and the US are on the horizon. "Changing the Date": In this segment, Jeffery Kaye of KCET, Los Angeles reported on the steps taken in California to make that state an even bigger player in the next presidential election by holding an earlier primary. The report covered practical reasons for consolidating primary elections; whether the consolidation would affect the amount of money spent on campaigns; and the proposal to rotate the early primary elections by region. "Gergen Dialogue": In this segment, David Gergen engaged professors Victor Davis Hanson of California State University and John Heath of Santa Clara University, authors of "Who Killed Homer?: The Demise of Classical Education and the Recovery of Greek Wisdom." Topics included reasons for the decline in the study of the great Greek philosophies; what is lacking from society as a result of the decline of this kind of education; and how one can go about learning ancient Greek. "Chasing the Records": This segment began with footage of Mark McGwire's record breaking 69th and 70th home runs from yesterday's baseball game. Following the excerpts, Roger Rosenblatt joined Lehrer for a discussion about McGwire's achievement, including the good behavior demonstrated by McGwire and Sammy Sosa and what the attention will mean for the sport. "In Memoriam": In memory of jazz singer Betty Carter who died of cancer this weekend, this segment consisted of excerpts from her GREAT PERFORMANCES appearance at Carnegie Hall in May of 1994. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6265

    "Cutting Rates": In this segment, a panel consisting of Laura Tyson, Joel Prakken, Lyle Gramley, and Michelle Laughlin joined Jim Lehrer for a discussion of the implications of today's cut in the interest rate. Topics included whether the Federal Reserve made the right decision; whether the interest rate cut will have an impact in the global market; whether today's decision was a confidence signal; how this will affect Wall Street investors; whether volatility in the market will be reduced; and whether European central banks will follow the lead of the Federal Reserve and lower their interest rates. "Worth the Money?": This segment consisted of a Kwame Holman report on the controversy over the decision by Congress to purchase eight C-130J cargo planes for the military without a request for the planes by the Pentagon. The report covered the high cost of the planes; the state-of-the-art navigational equipment in the new planes; and controversy surrounding members of Congress about the purchase of these aircraft. "Voice for Health": In this segment, Dr. Gro Harlem Brundtland, the new director-general of the World Health Organization(WHO), joined Susan Dentzer for a discussion about her accomplishments, including why she took on this challenge after stepping down as the Prime Minister of Norway; what the WHO has achieved in the past fifty years; the need to stamp out the use of tobacco; and how she plans to work with organizations outside of the WHO to stop the spread of disease, obesity, and AIDS. "Perspectives": This segment consisted of a conversation with Stephen Carter, a professor at Yale University Law School, and is the first in a series of conversations about the issues raised by the conduct and the investigation of President Clinton in the Monica Lewinsky matter. Discussion topics included the opportunity presented by the scandal for moral rejuvenation in society; the increased number of adults signaling to children by their actions that there is no right and wrong; the problem with using virtues to win political arguments; the alarming display of cynicism by the American people with regard to the scandal; and why African American support remains so strong for President Clinton. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6266

    "Africa Bombings": This segment began with an update about the investigation of the bombings of the US embassies in Africa, covering the indictment of several men in connection to the bombing, their relationship with Osama Bin Laden, and arrests that have been made in Germany, Uganda, and London. Following the report, Robin Wright and Elaine Shannon joined Warner for a discussion about the ongoing investigation. Topics included whether investigators are close to convicting those most responsible for the terrorism; the size of Osama Bin Laden's network; and whether authorities are close to connecting the terrorist act to Bin Laden. "Anonymous Sources": This segment began with a report from Terence Smith on the media's use of anonymous sources. Following the report, Bob Woodward, Lanny David, and Jack Nelson joined Smith for a discussion about the use and abuse of anonymous sources by the media in their coverage of the Clinton-Lewinsky matter. Topics included whether the use of sources has gotten out of hand in the Lewinsky scandal and reasons why an informant might wish to remain anonymous. "Perspectives": In this segment, Orlando Patterson joined Phil Ponce for a discussion about issues raised by the conduct and the investigation of President Clinton in the Monica Lewinsky matter. Topics included whether the issue of privacy has been eroded by the independent counsel; reasons why African Americans have stood steadfast by the president throughout the scandal; whether one can perjure one's self if the testimony in question is of a private nature; and whether Americans should expect their leaders to lead moral private lives. "Fit for a King": In this segment, Essayist Anne Taylor Flemming considered an historic tennis match, the match between Billy Jean King and Bobby Riggs. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6267

    "Stopping the Fighting": The segment began with a report from Charles Krause on the fighting in Kosovo, covering reasons for the conflict between the Albanians and the Serbs, public opinion in the West of the situation, and whether NATO will become involved in the conflict. Following the report, US Senators John Warner (R-VA) and Joseph Lieberman (D-CT) joined Lehrer for a discussion about the latest developments in Kosovo. Topics included whether the threat of military action is legitimate and when it might occur; whether there is a possibility that the fighting will spread throughout the Balkans, including Greece and Turkey; and why this conflict is important to the US. "Hedge Funds": This segment began with a Kwame Holman report on hedge funds, covering what they are, the lack of regulations on the funds, and the bailout designed to rescue the financial institutions that have been impacted by them. Following the report, Richard Medley and Frank Partnoy joined Phil Ponce for a discussion about the bailout package, including who can invest in a hedge fund; the type of investments that hedge funds take place in; the way in which they make money; and whether the Federal Reserve should rescued the hedge funds. "Starr's Tactics": In this segment, Anthony Lewis and Stuart Taylor joined Margaret Warner for a discussion about the upcoming release of additional documents from the Starr investigation and the possible impeachment hearings that Congress will consider next week. Topics included whether the investigation has been legitimate; the failure of the investigators to allow Ms. Lewinsky to call her lawyer before questioning her; whether the president was entrapped in perjury; whether the president has committed an impeachable offense; and the president's use of the White House to propagate his lie about a sexual relationship with Monica Lewinsky for seven months. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6268

    "Newsmaker Interview": This segment consisted of an interview with National Security Adviser Samuel Berger, who discussed developments in Kosovo and possible NATO military action, including whether the only use of force would be air strikes; whether the US is actively trying to overt air strikes; whether all NATO countries are in agreement about military action; whether there would be a need for further authorization from the United Nations for the use of force; where the target for force would be; and whether, in the event of a peace keeping agreement, the area would need to be policed. "More Evidence": This segment began with extended excerpts from the transcripts of the taped conversations between Linda Tripp and Monica Lewinsky about their testimony in the Paula Jones case. Following these excerpts, Kwame Holman reviewed the grand jury testimony of President Clinton's friend Vernon Jordon and White House Secretary Betty Currie, covering Ms. Currie's testimony about the gifts given to Monica Lewinsky by the president and Mr. Jordan's attempts to help Ms. Lewinsky in her job search. "Political Wrap": Paul Gigot and Tom Oliphant discussed the week in politics, including whether anything was learned by the release of the grand jury testimony of Vernon Jordan and phone conversations between Linda Tripp and Monica Lewinsky; whether the Judiciary Committee will vote for an impeachment hearing; what might happen to the budget surplus; and whether another government shut-down might be on the horizon. "Supreme Court Watch": In this segment, Jan Crawford Greenburg joined Phil Ponce to discuss cases before the Supreme Court in its new term, including cases involving student on student sexual harassment in Davis v. the Monroe Country Board of Education; a challenge to the 1996 Telecommunications Act in FCC v. Iowa Utilities Board; a gang loitering statute in Chicago v. Morales; and guests and their rights to privacy in Minnesota v. Carter. "Made In America": This segment consisted of an essay by Roger Rosenblatt about the movie "Saving Private Ryan" and the way in which it reflects what has happened to American culture. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6269

    "Impeachment Inquiry?": This segment consisted of a Kwame Holman report on the Judiciary Committee's hearing today in Washington to determine whether an impeachment inquiry should begin. The report covered comments made by committee Chairman Rep. Henry Hyde; statements read by Republican and Democratic members of the Judiciary Committee; and Democratic criticism of the Republican request to have an open-ended impeachment investigation. Following the report were extended excerpts from Republican lead counsel David Schippers, who discussed in detail the seventeen allegations against the president. Following the excerpts, Democratic lead counsel Abbe Lowell refuted all allegations laid out by David Schippers. Next, Paul Gigot, Tom Oliphant, Elizabeth Drew, and Norman Ornstein joined Margaret Warner for a panel discussion on the House Judiciary Committee's meeting on whether to recommend an impeachment hearing to the full House. Topics included whether the outcome of today's proceedings were expected; whether the Clinton-Starr confrontation has now been transferred to the Congress; ways in which this committee compares to the Nixon Judiciary Committee; and whether this will pass to the full House on a party line vote. "Newmaker Interview": In this segment, former President George Bush and his former National Security Advisor, Brent Scowcroft, joined Lehrer for a conversation about the investigation of President Clinton, including whether foreign policy is more difficult when a domestic scandal is underway; whether President Bush considered himself the moral leader of the US during his presidency; the intrusiveness of the office of the presidency; whether a career in politics is worth the scrutiny; human rights in China; what should be done about Saddam Hussein; whether the fall of Communism was a battle between good and evil; and whether President Bush had planned for his diaries to be printed and whether he is comfortable about what history will write about him. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6270

    "Global Crisis": This segment began with a report from Phil Ponce on the issues surrounding the global economic turmoil, including the meeting today in Washington between the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund (IMF); the IMF prediction that the global economy will only grow 2% in the next year; Japan's realization that its banking system is in more trouble than originally thought; and an excerpt from President Clinton's address at the meeting. Following the report, Lawrence Summers, Donald Tsang, and Eduardo Aninat joined Ponce for a discussion about the global economic crisis. Topics included the severity of the crisis; what must be done to stimulate the Japanese economy and relieve the crisis; an assessment of the crisis in Brazil; and what is being done there to pursue economic reform. "Impeachment Inquiry": This segment began with a Kwame Holman report on the House Judiciary proceedings. Following the report, Bob Kittle, Lee Cullum, Patrick McGuigan, Cynthia Tucker, and Susan Albright joined Elizabeth Farnsworth for a panel discussion on the House proceedings. Topics included whether the Judiciary Committee made the right decision; whether an inquiry is the best way to restore the faith of the American people in its government; whether the inquiry should have been limited; whether the process through which the committee came to its decision was a fair one; and the partisan nature of the vote. "Newsmaker Interview": After background on politics in Columbia, new President Andres Pastrana joined Charles Krause for a conversation about the issues facing him in his administration, including whether he is concerned that Columbia might be overtaken by guerillas and drug traffickers; how he plans to deal with the manufacturing and exportation of drugs; whether he believes the United States needs to do more to stop the importation of drugs; and why he believes he will be able to accomplish what his five predecessors could not. "Listening to Baseball": In this segment, US Poet Laureate Robert Pinsky read a poem about America's fascination with the game of baseball. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6271

    "Impeachment Inquiry": This segment began with a report from Kwame Holman about the House vote tomorrow on impeachment. Following the report, US Representatives George Nethercutt (R-WA), Zach Wamp (R-TN), Chaka Fattah (D-PN), and Gene Taylor (D-MS) joined Jim Lehrer for a discussion about tomorrow's vote in the full House on whether to proceed with an impeachment inquiry. Topics included how the members will vote tomorrow; whether the members believe that the president perjured himself; whether two-thirds of the Senate would vote to impeach the president; whether Republicans and Democrats are polarized on the issue; whether an impeachment investigation would impact the US economy; whether an economical impact should be considered in deciding whether to impeach the president; and whether the president has committed an impeachable offense. "Showdown": This segment began with a report from Robert Moore of Independent Television News on the possibility of NATO air strikes on Serb forces in Kosovo, covering the retreat of some Serbs in the region. Following the report, Yugoslavian Ambassador to the United Nations Vladislav Jovanovic joined Margaret Warner for a discussion about his government's side in the Kosovo conflict. Topics included the withdrawal of Yugoslavian forces from the area; what they have done to resume peace negotiations; the contradiction between the statements of his government and the United Nations; and why the civilian population has come under attack by the Yugoslavian forces. Next was an interview with Bujar Bukoshi, Prime Minister of the self declared government of the Republic of Kosovo, who discussed what should be done in absence of an agreement between the UN and Milosevic; whether he would like to see NATO air strikes; the way in which the air strikes would prevent the genocide; and whether his organization is ready to negotiate. "Perspectives": In this segment, William F. Buckley joined Elizabeth Farnsworth for a discussion about the issues raised by the conduct and the investigation of President Clinton in the Monica Lewinsky matter. Topics included the need for consequences for disgracing the office of the presidency; ways in which this situation differs from affairs of President Kennedy and President Lyndon B. Johnson; and the need to investigate the situation further. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6272

    "Impeachment Inquiry": This segment began with extended excerpts from the meeting on the House floor to decide whether to go forward with an impeachment inquiry, covering the heated debate over time limits and the president's reaction to the vote. Following the report, Gregory Craig joined Margaret Warner to discuss today's vote in the House to launch an impeachment inquiry. Topics included the significance of the vote in the House; whether he believes the process will be fair; why 31 Democrats voted for the Republican alternative; the president's reflections on the situation; whether the president understands the enormity of the inquiry; the way in which the American people might affect this process; how the White House plans to deal with this inquiry; and whether the White House plans to cooperate and expedite the process. Next, US Representative Christopher Cox joined Warner to offer his perspective on today's vote. Discussion topics included the bipartisan nature of the House vote; why the time limit was not imposed; whether the president will testify before the House of Representatives; and whether the Republican Congress wants the inquiry to continue into next year. "Historical Views": In this segment, a panel consisting of Doris Kearns Goodwin, Michael Beschloss, Haynes Johnson, and William Van Alstyne joined Phil Ponce to offer historical perspective on today's vote. Discussion topics included whether today's vote mirrors the gravity of Watergate; the lack of historically similar cases with which to compare these proceedings; the level of partisanship in the Watergate hearings of 1974; and whether the process could have an impact on the people of the US. "Global Crisis": This segment began with background about the meeting in Washington between the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and the World Bank. Following the report, James Wolfensohn joined Lehrer for a conversation about the outcome of the meeting and other world economic issues. Discussion topics included what was accomplished at the meeting; the recognition of a world economic crisis; the gravity of the crisis; whether there is a potential for a world-wide depression; whether a solution was developed at the conference; the way in which the World Bank fits into the newly developed solution; the need to put emphasis on fixing the social systems as well as the financial systems; and why the world markets reacted negatively to today's meeting. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6273

    "Unfinished Business": This segment consisted of a Kwame Holman report on Conrgess' last minute push to pass spending bills, covering the appropriations bills that were missing from the House floor; those that were passed, including Defense, Military Construction, Energy and Water, Legislative Brand, and Virginia HUD; and bills vetoed by the president. "Political Wrap": Mark Shields and Paul Gigot discussed the week in politics, including whether the House vote on the impeachment inquiry qualifies as a partisan vote; whether the Democrats might lose some seats in Congress because of the impeachment inquiry vote; and what might happen in Congress before the year's end. "Global Crisis": This segment began with a report from Phil Ponce on the spread of "Asian flu" to Russia and Latin American countries, covering the International Monetary Fund(IMF) meeting in which the group decided to temporarily stop foreign payments and to focus on promoting growth and not fighting inflation. Following the report, Fred Bergsten, Susan Aaronson, and David Henderson joined Ponce for a discussion about the global economic crisis. Topics included the mood at the IMF meetings; whether the IMF bailout of Mexico contributed to the problem that confronts the global economy; the need to continue to encourage democracy and capitalism around the world; and how the crisis can be explained. "Nobel Winner": In this segment, Jose Ornelas joined Elizabeth Farnsworth for a conversation about Nobel Prize Winner Jose Saramago. Discussion topics included the struggles he encountered in his life; what he is like personally; his dislike for strict moralists; and why the award is so important for Portuguese speakers everywhere. "Perspectives": This segment consisted of a conversation with Deborah Tannen, who discussed the investigation of the President Clinton in the Monica Lewinsky matter. Topics included the way in which the president is caught between legal statements and layman's statements; public opinion of the situation; the need for faith in the institutions of our democracy; increased cynicism about the American political and legal systems; how we got to a point where the president was asked about his sex life under oath; whether the scandal has changed polite conversation; and whether there is a disconnect between the public and the government. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6274

    "Showdown": This segment began with background from Kwame Holman about the crisis in Kosovo, covering the ultimatum given to Yugoslavian President Slobodan Milosevic by US Envoy Richard Holbrooke to end the fighting or there would be NATO air strikes. Following the report, Robert Hunter and John Scanlan joined Lehrer for a discussion about the crisis in Kosovo and the prospect of NATO air strikes. Topics included Milosevic's desire to keep Kosovo from becoming independent; the ethnic Albanian opposition within Kosovo; whether the United Nations will be able to deal with the refugee situation; and whether sanctions should be lifted. "California Senate Race": This segment began with a report from Jeffrey Kaye of KCET about the Senate race in California between Republican Matt Fong and Democrat Barbara Boxer, covering the liberal vs. conservative match-up in the state; how the polls are reading; and the way in which Boxer has polarized voters. Following the report, David Broder, Ron Brownstein, and Elizabeth Arnold joined Margaret Warner for a discussion about the upcoming election and issues that are influencing it. Topics included whether the impeachment issue is causing problems for Democratic candidates; whether there is a national agenda for either party; the importance of education in the election; and what has happened to women candidates. "Nobel Winners": In this segment, Dr. John Cook joined Elizabeth Farnsworth for a discussion about the three American scientists -- Robert Furchgott of the State University of New York in Brooklyn, Ferid Murad of the University of Texas Medical School in Houston, and Louis Ignarro of the University of California Los Angeles School of Medicine--who won the Nobel Prize for medicine this year for their discoveries about the role of nitric oxide in regulating blood vessels. Topics included how the discovery was made; why this discovery is so important; some implications of the research; the way in which this research led to the discovery of the drug Viagra; whether there may be implications for cancer treatment; and whether there are dangers associated with Nitric Oxide. "New World": In this segment, Robert Pinsky read some Columbus Day poetry. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6275

    "Public Opinion": In this segment, Andrew Kohut Director of the Pew Research Center joined Margaret Warner for a discussion about the latest polls on the president and the Congress and what this means for the upcoming election. Topics included how the public feels about Congress' decision to launch an impeachment inquiry; whether opinion about impeachment activity has affected congressional approval; whether these polls can predict how incumbents will fare in the upcoming elections; and whether the public believes Clinton should be impeached and removed from office; "Historical Views": In this segment, a panel consisting of Doris Kearns Goodwin, Michael Beschloss, Haynes Johnson, and Ben Wattenberg joined Lehrer for a discussion and some historical perspective on polling. Topics included when and how the use of political polls began; problems with early polling tactics; the way in which the use of the poll has become obtrusive; when politicians began to rely on polls to float ideas; and the accuracy of polls today. "Strands of Justice": This segment consisted of a Betty Ann Bowser report about the latest developments in the use of DNA sampling to solve crimes, focusing on the story of an innocent man who served time for rape only to be exonerated and released after it was determined that his DNA did not match that of the subject; a new procedure that allows small pieces of DNA to be cloned for testing; databases being developed by states that require all convicted felons to register their DNA; and whether these databases might be abused. "Supreme Court Watch": In this segment, Jan Crawford Greenburg joined Phil Ponce for a discussion about an important telecommunications case argued before the Supreme Court today. Topics included why Iowa Utilities Board v. the Federal Communications Commission is of profound national importance; the complexity of the case; and what is at stake for either side in the case. "Perspectives": In this segment, Shelby Steele joined Elizabeth Farnsworth for the fifth in a series of occasional conversations about issues raised by the conduct and the investigation of President Clinton in the Monica Lewinsky matter. Discussion topics included the danger in separating virtuousness and personal responsibility; whether the Baby Boom Generation redefined virtue; the way in which the scandal has corrupted society; whether it is possible to be a failed human being and yet a good president; and what it will signify if President Clinton is allowed to stay in office. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6276

    "Newsmaker Interview": In this segment, US Special envoy Richard Holbrooke joined Lehrer for a discussion about the agreement made this week to end the fighting in Kosovo. Topics included whether he is optimistic about the agreement with Yugoslavian President Slobodan Milosevic; the crisis that remains in Kosovo; whether the threat of NATO force still remains; the difficulty of the negotiations; at what point Milosevic realized that the threat of air strikes was real; and what will happen to the ethnic Albanians who were displaced from their homes. "Newsmaker Interview": This segment consisted of an interview with Attorney General Janet Reno, who discussed the murder of Matthew Shepard, a gay student from the University of Wyoming. Topics included her request for Congress to pass a hate crimes bill; how a new law would help prevent other crimes; and how it is determined that case qualifies as a hate crime. The attorney general also discussed the Starr investigation; whether there have been any second thoughts about giving Ken Starr expanded authority; the informal inquiries about campaign finance; when these inquiries will be done; whether an independent prosecutor will be named for campaign finance; and why this matter has been contentious between herself and Republicans on the Hill. "Tribal Colleges": This segment consisted of a Tom Bearden report about the impact that tribal colleges on Indian reservations are having on their students and the communities that they serve. The report covered the rituals included in the celebration; the increased enrollment in these schools; the core of the curriculum; whether the teachers at the schools are sufficiently trained; and the lack of resources and funding. "Perspectives": In the fourth segment, Calvin Trillin joined Terence Smith for the last in a series of occasional conversations about issues raised by the conduct and investigation of the president in the Monica Lewinsky matter. Topics included what the American people are thinking about the scandal; the gap between the press and the American people; and whether the president should be impeached; [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6277

    "Lower Rates": This segment consisted of a conversation with Neil Soss and Dean Foust about the impact of the Federal Reserve's cut in interest rates. Discussion topics included whether the decision was unexpected; whether this move demonstrates a sense of urgency; what prompted this decision; to what extent the failure of hedge funds has contributed to the problems; whether this is part of a global interest rate strategy; and how this will affect the global markets. "Budget Politics": This segment began with a report from Kwame Holman on the latest developments in the budget negotiations between Congress and the White House, covering what has been included in the budget deal; the lack of a tax cut; and bipartisan approval of the budget plan. Following the report, House Majority Leader Dick Armey (R-TX) and National Economic Advisor Gene Sperling joined Elizabeth Farnsworth for a discussion about the budget and spending agreement reached today between congressional leaders and the White House. Topics included the key Republican and Democratic achievements of the bill; what was accomplished in the area of education; what was gained for the International Monetary Fund (IMF);whether the administration will be able to deliver the reforms for the IMF; the funding designated to rebuilding the military. "School Violence": This segment consisted of a Betty Ann Bowser report about how New Haven, Connecticut is dealing with the problem of school violence, covering the policing model used in the schools of New Haven to reduce violence; the link between children who have an early exposure to violence and those who commit violent acts; the child development training program for police officers in the city; the way in which the Yale Child Study Center has developed a violence intervention program; and the need for family involvement and parental guidance. "Conversation": This segment consisted of a conversation with Amartya Sen, who was awarded this year's Nobel prize for his work in welfare economics. Discussion topics included why he is interested in this area of economics; what winning the prize means to him personally; his study of famines; and to what extent economists can explain the state of the global economy. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6278

    "Nobel Peace Prize": This segment began with background on the two Northern Ireland politicians who were awarded the 1998 Nobel Peace prize for their efforts in bringing peace to Northern Ireland and a report from Terry Lloyd of Independent Television News on the history leading up to the peace agreement. Following the report was an interview with Nobel laureate John Hume, who discussed his reaction to winning the prize; whether the prize is preliminary; whether the impact of the award will help to move the peace process forward; short term objectives of the peace process; whether disarmament will occur soon; and the role of George Mitchell, chairman of the Irish peace talks, in the process. Next was a conversation with George Mitchell about the work of John Hume and David Trimble in the peace accord. Discussion topics included the cautious reaction of David Trimble to receiving the award; John Hume's role in the process; whether the award could potentially damage the peace accord; the accomplishments of the past few months; and whether the question of disarmament is the main obstacle. "Common Cause": This segment consisted of a report by Elizabeth Brackett of WTTW, Chicago on the strong support of African American voters for President Clinton, covering the perceived unfair investigation of the president; the historical support of African Americans for the Democratic party; examples of some African Americans who do not support the president; and whether the African American community will have a high voter turn-out in the mid-term elections. "Political Wrap": Mark Shields and Paul Gigot discussed the week in politics, including the importance of African American support for the president and whether it will make a difference in the elections; whether there is deep malaise among Republicans about the new budget; the status of the impeachment inquiry; and whether the inquiry will be done by the end of the year. "No Access": In this segment, essayist Roger Rosenblatt contemplated the tragedies of Sudan, focusing on the lack of media coverage of the starvation and crisis in the country. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6279

    "Antitrust Battle": This segment began with background about the antitrust charge against Microsoft, which revolves around Microsoft's operating system. Following the report, Susan Garland, a reporter for Business Week who is covering the trial, discussed the first day in the government's antitrust trial against Microsoft. Topics included how the outcome of the case will affect consumers; the Justice Department's allegations against Microsoft; and what the government wants Microsoft to do. "Pursuing the Past": This segment began with background from Charles Krause on the arrest of Chile's former president, General Augusto Pinochet, who led the bloody coup of 1973 in which the democratically elected government of Chile was overthrown . Following the report, Arturo Valenzuela and Ruth Wedgewood joined Elizabeth Farnsworth for a discussion about the controversy over the arrest of Pinochet in London. Topics included whether Pinochet can be prosecuted in Chile; how the Chilean people feel about the military government; why England was able to arrest Pinochet; whether there have been any prosecutions in Chile; the role of the US government in the situation; options that are available to the British; and the need for international autocrats to be able to travel internationally in order to restore peace. "Talking Law": In this segment, media correspondent Terence Smith reported on the proliferation of lawyers as analysts and commentators on television news programs, covering the way in which the appearance of lawyers on television has been magnified by the twenty four-hour news network. Following the report, Roger Cossack, Barry Scheck, Ann Coulter, and Paul Campos joined Smith for a discussion about the growing number of lawyers on television. Topics included whether the attorneys are providing legal analysis or a political agenda; the need for lawyers to be experts in the field about which they are asked to comment; the argumentative nature of the programs on which the lawyers appear; and the lack of a sense of proportion and education from these programs. "Time Lines": In this segment, essayist Ann Taylor Flemming considered the aging of the baby boomers, covering marketing schemes by health food companies, the cosmetic surgery industry, and the development of the drug Viagra. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6280

    "Pacific Rim Blues": This segment consisted of a Tom Bearden report on the impact of Asia's economic turmoil on the Pacific Northwest, which relies on Asia as a major market for its products. The report covered how the wheat farmers have been affected; the decline in the amount of exports for the whole state of Washington; and the need to lift food sanctions so farmers have more markets to which to sell their crops. "Politics of Education": This segment began with a report from Phil Ponce on the politics of education, covering the debate in the House and the Senate over a $500 spending bill that includes money for the International Monetary Fund, the Peacekeepers in Bosnia, Home Health Care, Community Policing, the Defense Department, farmers, and anti-drug programs. Following the report, Stephen Goldsmith, Tom Menino, Lisa Graham Keegan, and Rod Paige joined Ponce to discuss whether small class sizes improve education; whether more buildings and renovated classrooms are needed; whether the partisanship at the national level is impacting the schools at the state level; the role of the federal government in education; and whether vouchers could be a solution. "Parents and Peers": This segment consisted of a Susan Dentzer report about the debate over the way in which children develop. The report covered the exaggerated popularity of parental importance; whether the majority of similarity between children and parents is genetic; the group socialization theory; and the importance of peers in the development of children. "Gergen Dialogue": In this segment, David Gergen engaged Simon Winchester in a conversation about his book, "The Professor and the Madman: The Making of the Oxford English Dictionary." [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6281

    "Peace Talks": In this segment, David Ficher, David Makovsky, and Hisham Melham joined Elizabeth Farnsworth for a discussion about the Middle East peace talks taking place in Maryland. Topics included whether anything was accomplished today; the development of written proposals; the key Palestinian goals of the peace agreement, namely to control more territory; the role of the CIA in the verification of the security arrangement; and whether these negotiations will be successful. "Texas Floods": This segment consisted of a Phil Ponce report on the continued flooding in Texas. The report covered the number of families who have been evacuated from their homes; the amount of livestock that has been swept away; and federal aid that has been designated to supplement state and local recovery efforts. "Finishing Touches": This segment began with a Margaret Warner report on the spending plan that was approved by Congress. Following the report, Robert Reischauer and Rudolph Penner joined Warner for a discussion about the $500 billion plan. Topics included the way in which the budget surplus affected the development of the spending plan; whether the Congress should spend the surplus; and why the Republicans did not get a tax cut. "Whaling Again": In this segment, Jim Compton of KCTS, Seattle, reported from Neah Bay in the Pacific Northwest on preparations by the Makah tribe to resume its ancient whaling tradition. The report covered the Makah's preparations for the whaling expedition; criticism of the hunt by anti-whaling groups; and what the Coast Guard is planning to do to protect the whalers. "Promise of Democracy": This segment consisted of a Charles Krause report on Nigeria's new leader General Abdulsalami Abubakar and his pledge of a transition to democracy, covering the history of military rulers in Nigeria. Following the report, Gen. Abubakar joined Krause for a discussion about the transition, including whether he would invite international observers to Nigeria; what the role of the military will be after the implementation of democracy; whether the oil companies are supportive of the return to civilian rule; and whether the country is ready for the transition. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6282

    "Tracking the Trial": In this segment, John McChesney joined Phil Ponce to provide an update on the proceedings in the Microsoft trial. Topics included the government's allegations against Microsoft; successful arguments made by Microsoft; whether the packaging of Windows 95 and Internet Explorer is a true integration; and whether Bill Gates has been demonized. "Airing the Issue": This segment began with a Terence Smith report on the use of the Clinton-Lewinsky matter in campaigns around the country. Following the report, Kathleen Hall Jamieson, David Axelrod, and Greg Stevens joined Smith for a discussion about the impact of the Lewinksy matter on campaign advertising around the country. Topics included why Republicans and Democrats are not using the impeachment matter more in their campaigns; the nation-wide impact of the scandal; and whether the scandal has had an effect on fund raising. "Beetle Menace": This segment consisted of a report from Elizabeth Brackett of WTTW, Chicago, on concerns over an invasion of tree-devouring Chinese beetles, covering the way in which the beetle made its way to the US; how the problem might be rectified; restrictions that will be placed on Chinese imports; and whether the restrictions will affect US trade with China. "Views on the Congo": This segment began with a report from Charles Krause on the ongoing civil war in the Congo, covering the possibility of Zimbabwe, Angola, Namibia, Uganda, Rwanda, and Burundi becoming involved in the war. Following the report, Philip Gourevitch and Eyamba Bokamba joined Krause for a discussion about the deterioration of the situation in the Congo. Topics included the root cause of the rebellion that began last August; whether a regional war can be avoided; and the danger associated with the conflict. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6283

    "Peace Process": This segment began with a Kwame Holman report on the agreement signed by Israeli Prime Minister Netanyahu and Palestinian leader Arafat this afternoon. The report covered where the peace talks occurred; the involvement of President Clinton in the negotiations; and reaction to the agreement in Israel, Palestine and Jordan. Following the report, Hisham Melhem, Robert Satloff, and Dean Fischer joined Margaret Warner for a discussion about the Middle East peace agreement. Topics included the key elements of the deal; difficult choices made by either side in the negotiations; the involvement of the US; whether Arafat was ready for the concessions; whether the constituencies will approve the deal; and whether the security will be the most difficult issue to implement. "Newsmaker Interview": In this segment, the president's National Security Advisor Samuel Berger joined Elizabeth Farnsworth for a conversation about the success of the Middle East peace talks. Discussion topics included why an agreement was possible this time; how the issues of land and security were resolved; the role of the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) in the agreement; whether the clauses in the Palestinian charter that called for the destruction of Israel were removed; and whether the safety of the leaders is a concern. "Political Wrap": In this segment, Mark Shields and Paul Gigot discussed the week in politics, including whether the Middle East peace agreement will affect the president's approval rating; whether, other than this achievement, the president has had a good foreign policy year; whether the agreement might influence the congressional elections; what the outcome of the mid-term election might be; and whether Democrats or Republicans are benefiting most from the budget approval. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6284

    "Expanded Role": Following a report about the role of the CIA in the latest accord between the Israelis and the Palestinians, U.S. Senators Richard Shelby (R-AL) and Robert Kerrey (D-NE), James Woolsey, and Melvin Goodman joined Elizabeth Farnsworth for a discussion about the Middle East peace agreement. Topics included what the specific role of the CIA might be in the implementation of the peace process; whether the CIA would be required to enforce policy; whether the recent agreement could have been accomplished without the involvement of the CIA; and whether there are any alternatives. "To the Rescue": This segment contained a Margaret Warner report about the efforts of First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton to campaign and raise funds for Democratic candidates. The report covered her meetings with members of Congress to persuade them not to abandon her husband; her television commercials for Democratic candidates; why her approval ratings have improved as a result of the scandal; whether she has lost her image as a strong independent woman; and her defense of her husband during the scandal in the 1992 election. "David Gergen Dialogue": In this segment, David Gergen engaged author Daniel Boorstin in a conversation about his new book, "The Seekers: The Story of Man's Continuing Quest to Understand His World." Discussion topics included why the subject intrigues him; whether Aristotle had the greatest influence of the "seekers"; and where America fits into world civilization. "West Meets East": In this segment, Fred De Sam Lazaro of KTCA reported on the Ming Dynasty art that is on exhibit in Minneapolis. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6285

    "Making the Deadline": This segment began with a report from Charles Krause on the last minute developments as today's deadline came for withdrawal of Yugoslavian army and police forces from Kosovo, including what was contained in the Kosovo agreement. Following the report, Robert Hunter, James Hooper, and Gary Dempsey joined Margaret Warner for a discussion about the peace process in Kosovo. Topics included whether NATO's credibility has been weakened by the agreement; what the future might hold for Milosevic; and whether the Yugoslavian government understands the threat. "Newsmaker Interview": In this segment, Richard Holbrooke, who negotiated the troop withdrawal with President Slobadan Milosevic, joined Elizabeth Farnsworth to discuss the status of the Yugoslavian withdrawal from Kosovo. Topics included whether the withdrawal represents a major development in the peace process in Kosovo; whether all of the required forces are being withdrawn; and whether the threats are credible. "Barter Economy": In this segment, special correspondent Jennifer Griffin reported from southern Siberia on how ordinary Russians are coping in a collapsing economy. The report covered the way in which Russia is paying teachers by allowing them to take what they need from local stores; whether the barter system is working; and the number of Russians who are selling their blood. "High Hopes": In this segment, Betty Ann Bowser reported on Texas Governor George W. Bush, who is in the political spotlight for more than just his re-election campaign. The report covered the bipartisan nature of the governor; Democratic support for Bush in Texas; his attempt to gain the support of the Hispanic voters in the state; and whether he is planning to run for the presidency in the year 2000. "Required Reading": In this segment, Roger Rosenblatt considered two books: "Into Thin Air" by Jon Krakauer and "The Perfect Storm" by Sebastian Junger. He discussed the success of the books and why these tales of misfortune have become popular. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6286

    "Back in Space": This segment began with a Kwame Holman report on John Glenn's return trip to space. Following the report, NASA Administrator Daniel Goldin joined Elizabeth Farnsworth for a conversation about the importance of John Glenn's return to space. Discussion topics included whether there is tightened security at Cape Canaveral; the tenacity of John Glenn; the increased interest in the space program; criticism of the science surrounding the trip; whether there are increased risks because of his age; and ways in which the space program has changed since Senator Glenn's first trip in 1962. "Historical Views": In this segment, a panel consisting of Doris Kearns Goodwin, Michael Bechloss, Haynes Johnson, and Alex Roland joined Phil Ponce for a discussion about the historical significance of Glenn's return flight. Topics included the level of interest in the flight; the historical impact of Glenn's first flight; the danger involved in the orbit; ways in which the America of today differs from that of 1962; whether the trip should be represented as science; and whether there are added risks involved with this flight. "Running Hard": In this segment, Terence Smith reported on the advertising in the US Senate race in New York. The report covered the negative ads being run by Democratic candidate Chuck Shumer and Republican incumbent Al D'Amato; whether negative campaigning is effective; ethics panel criticism of D'Amato for letting his brother use his office; and Ed Koch's support for D'Amato. "Money Talks": In this segment, a panel consisting of Ron Brownstein, Ceci Connlolly, and Jim Drinkard joined Margaret Warner for a discussion about the ads and the money involved in this year's political campaigns. Topics included whether the New York Senate race is similar to other races around the country; whether Republicans are using the Clinton scandal in their ad campaigns; whether the candidates have much control over what ads are aired in their district; and whether there is a difference between candidate advertising and party advertising. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6287

    "Space Science": This segment consisted of a Tom Bearden report on the science experiments John Glenn is expected to conduct during his return trip to space. The report covered ways in which aging and weightlessness are connected; how microgravity affects sensory perception; and whether one person might supply sufficient data for the experiments. "Truth & Consequences": This segment began with a Kwame Holman report on the report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission that was released in South Africa today, covering the report's criticism of Christian churches, the media, businesses, courts, and the African National Congress. Following the report, Franklin Sonn, Rich Mkhondo, and Cliff Matheson joined Phil Ponce for a discussion about the Apartheid era atrocities, including why the report is important to the African people; what the report is designed to accomplish; whether the committee is perceived as being fair; the importance of government leadership in the process; and whether the truth is now known. "Undoing Affirmative Action": In this segment, Jim Compton of KCTS Seattle reported on Washington state's ballot initiative to end affirmative action. The report covered whether the action should be considered a civil rights initiative; arguments for and against the initiative; and the complexity of the situation in education. "The Art of War": In this segment, Robert Pinsky read a poem about war and the hope for peace. The reading was followed by essayist Clarence Page of The Chicago Tribune, who considered the art of war in an essay focusing on the National Vietnam Veterans Art Museum in Chicago. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6288

    "Election 98": This segment consisted of a Kwame Holman report on several highly competitive races in the state of Wisconsin. "Political Wrap": In this segment, Mark Shields and Paul Gigot joined Margaret Warner for a discussion of the week in politics. Topics included the competitive races in Wisconsin; whether the election will be a referendum on campaign finance reform; Republican and Democratic party ads; and whether the Republicans will be able to pick up seats in the House and Senate. "Growing Brain Cells": In this segment, Phil Ponce was joined by Fred Gage for a conversation about a new study that shows that brain cells can reproduce throughout the human life. Topics included what types of cells can reproduce; the way in which the study was conducted; and the medical implications of the research. "AIDS": In this segment, Susan Dentzer joined Elizabeth Farnsworth to report about information released by the United Nations this week that states that in Africa AIDS cases are rising at such a rate that there will be catastrophic consequences for the population. Discussion topics included how the increased infection will affect countries like Botswana, where life expectancy is now as low as it was the 1950's; whether any African countries are having success in the fight against AIDS; the number of AIDS-related deaths expected over the next two decades; new information about the "cocktail" of drugs used to fight AIDS; and President Clinton's initiative on the disease. "Seeing Ghosts": This segment began with a poetry reading by Robert Pinsky about the history of ghosts and Halloween. Following the poetry, Roger Rosenblatt considered the horrifying news of the past year. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6289

    "Killer Storm": This segment began with a report from Phil Ponce on the floods and devastation caused by Hurricane Mitch in Central America, covering the number of deaths and homeless in Nicaragua and Honduras. Following the report, Juan Marcos Garcia and Gerald Jones joined Ponce for a discussion about the tragic consequences of the hurricane. Discussion topics included whether the flooding or the mudslides have been more devastating; whether there was any way to anticipate the extent of the damage; whether there was a national warning; how long it might take to rebuild the infrastructure; the lack of resources; and what the Red Cross is doing to help the flood victims. "The Home Stretch": In this segment, David Broder, Ron Brownstein, and Elizabeth Arnold joined Lehrer to offer some perspective on tomorrow's election. Topics included whether there has been a national theme for this election; whether the incumbents are in danger of losing their seats; why the impeachment issue is not affecting the election; and examples of some close races. "Pig Pollution": This segment consisted of a Tom Bearden report from Colorado on a battle at the ballot box over regulating large-scale hog farms. The report covered reasons for the consolidation of hog farms; environmental problems that result from the large farms; the fear of ground water pollution; and the number of elections in which hog farming is an issue. "Jefferson's Legacy": This segment began with a report from Margaret Warner on new evidence that suggests Thomas Jefferson fathered a child with Sally Hemings, who was one of his slaves. Following the report, Joseph Ellis, Annette Gordon-Reed and Daniel Jordan joined Warner for a discussion about this new evidence. Topics included whether the evidence is convincing; whether the discovery should change our assessment of Thomas Jefferson; whether the new information complicates our understanding of Jefferson's opinions on slavery and race; whether the public needed to know about the affair; and why it was so hard for mainstream historians to accept this notion. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6290

    "Election 98": Mark Shields and Paul Gigot joined Lehrer for an analysis of the mid-term election. Discussion topics included the projected victory of Evan Bayh in Indiana; whether the Republicans will gain as many seats as expected; whether there is a national issue in the election; why there were so many negative campaigns; the difficulty of defeating incumbents during a secure economic period; and what might happen in the Shumer-D'Amato race in New York. "Cyber Campaign": This segment consisted of a Terence Smith report on how politicians and political organizations are using the Internet to spread their campaign message. The report included whether close races could be decided by the Internet; the use of Web sites to raise campaign funds; the way in which candidates use the site to attract volunteers; and whether candidates understand the capability of the Internet. "Managing Health Care": In this segment, Susan Dentzer reported on Medicare and HMO's. The report covered the recent decision by HMO's to drop several recipients who are covered by Medicare, including why the decision was made; how it is related to the balanced budget; whether there were any other options available to the HMO's; whether the health plans precipitated the crisis; whether the health care financing administration was too rigid; and what choices are available to beneficiaries. "Time Out": In this segment, David Aldridge and Roger Noll joined Elizabeth Farnsworth for a discussion about the delay of the NBA season and the lock out against players. Topics included whether money is the main issue in the lockout; whether this is the first owner lockout in professional sports; how much of the season has been lost thus far; the losses for the players and for the owners; whether a resolution is in the near future; and the likelihood that the entire season will be cancelled. "Gergen Dialogue": In this segment, David Gergen engaged Juan Williams in a conversation about his new book, "Thurgood Marshall: American Revolutionary," including Marshall's contributions to the fight against discrimination; what gave him his vision and drive; his tenure at the NAACP; and his landmark victory in Brown v. the Board of Education. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6291

    "Winners and Losers": In this segment, correspondent Kwame Holman provided a rundown of the winners and losers in Tuesday's election. Topics included whether this was a typical mid-term election; states in which the Democrats made gains; and gubernatorial races in which the Republicans defeated Democrats. "Reading the Returns"In this segment, US Senators Mitch McConnell (R-KY) and Robert Torricelli(D-NJ) joined Margaret Warner for an analysis of the outcome of Tuesday's election. Discussion topics included why the Republicans did not make more gains in the Senate; whether the Republicans in Congress presented an important set of issues in this election; the tremendous African American turnout; whether there was high turnout among Republicans; whether Republicans emphasized the impeachment issue too much; and whether Speaker Gingrich's job is secure. "Voter Profiles": In this segment, Michael Dabadie, Peter Hart, Andrew Kohut, and Yvonne Scruggs-Leftwich joined Phil Ponce for a discussion about what influenced the voters behind yesterday's election results. Topics included the number of moderates in this electorate; the increased African American turnout at the poles; whether this election was typical of an off-year election; and whether the election was a referendum on the impeachment proceedings against President Clinton. "Election 98": In this segment, Mark Shields and Paul Gigot joined Lehrer for analysis and perspective on yesterday's election. Discussion topics included the lack of Republican issues in the election; whether nationalizing the race was a mistake on the part of the Republicans; whether the results will make impeachment less likely; the state of the Republican leadership in the House and the Senate; and the victory of former professional wrestler Jesse Ventura in Minnesota. "Ballot Issues": The final segment consisted of a Kwame Holman report on the state-wide ballot initiatives that were decided yesterday. Initiatives included abortion, affirmative action, same-sex marriage, medicinal marijuana, tax limits, gambling, and stadiums. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6292

    "Impeachment Inquiry": This segment began with extended excerpts from today's newsconference by House Judiciary Committee Chairman Henry Hyde, in which he discussed his plans for conducting the impeachment investigation of President Clinton. Following the footage, House Judiciary Committee members Asa Hutchinson (R-AK), Thomas Barrett (D-WI), Bill McCollum (R-FL), and Marty Meehan (D-MA) joined Lehrer to discuss whether Henry Hyde's plan will be effective; whether more witnesses should be called before the committee; whether there is a lack of material witnesses; whether the House should consider a lesser sanction on the president; whether Kenneth Starr will be on trial at this hearing; whether this inquiry has been approached as a bipartisan process; and the likely intent of the interrogatories sent to the president by the committee chair. "Regional Views": In this segment, regional commentators Lee Cullum, Cynthia Tucker, Patrick McGuigan, Bob Kittle, and Susan Albright joined Margaret Warner for a discussion about the impeachment inquiry. Topics included whether the House Judiciary Committee should limit testimony to that of Ken Starr; whether Republicans are trying to resolve the issue too quickly; whether the House committee has the authority to recommend a lesser punishment such as censure; whether the process outlined by Henry Hyde is in favor of the Democrats; and whether there is hope for a bipartisan consensus. "Newsmaker Interview": Following background about Hurricane Mitch, Honduran President Carlos Flores joined Phil Ponce for a conversation about the tragedy caused in Honduras by the storm. Discussion topics included the number of people affected by the hurricane; the number of persons who are unaccounted for to date; the way in which the environment has made rescue efforts difficult; the priorities for the rescue; whether there are enough supplies; how much foreign aid has arrived in Honduras; and the amount of agriculture destroyed by the storm. "Ulysses in Space": This segment began with a brief excerpt from today's newsconference with the crew of Discovery in space. Following the footage, Robert Pinsky shared some poetry which seemed to reflect the joyous attitude of Senator John Glenn. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6293

    "Cultivating Cells": This segment began with a conversation with Dr. Thomas Okarma about the importance of the recent discovery about the cultivation of specialized human cells in the lab. Discussion topics included where the donated stem cells for the research are obtained; why these cells continue to grow indefinitely; whether these cells could be made to differentiate into heart cells, blood cells, etc.; what this research might be used for; and how his company plans to deal with the ethical issues surrounding the discovery. Following this discussion, Dr. Kevin Fitzgerald and Dr. Norman Fost joined Elizabeth Farnsworth to discuss the ethical issues raised by the cell research. Topics included whether the research should be done on human embryos; and whether there are sociological implications. "Political Wrap": This segment began with a report about Rep. Bob Livingston's (R-LA) announcement to challenge Newt Gingrich (R-GA) for his speakership and Rep. Steve Largen's (R-OK) announcement that he plans to challenge Dick Armey for his leadership. Following the report, Mark Shields and Paul Gigot discussed the announcements. Topics included why Republicans in the House have gone after Newt Gingrich; whether Gingrich was too combative; the lack of issues on which Republicans can stand together; whether the speaker might resign; and the difficulty of governing with a thin majority. "New News": In this segment, Richard Reeves, Marvin Kalb, Ann McDaniel, and David Talbot joined Terence Smith for a panel discussion about the technological revolution in the news business. Topics included whether Americans have faith in the news media; the way in which the president has lost control of the flow of information by way of instantaneous transmission; whether the Internet has robbed reporters of the time to check sources; whether the competition between news magazines is healthy; and whether there is a lowering of standards for the Internet medium. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6294

    "Impeachable Offenses?": This segment consisted of a Kwame Holman report on today's House Judiciary subcommittee hearings to determine what constitutes an impeachable offense. The report included excerpts from the hearings in which members of the committee made arguments for and against the termination of the investigation. "GOP Shakeup": In this segment, Congressmen Matt Salmon (R-AZ), Lindsey Graham (R-SC), Michael Castle (R-DE), and former Representative Vin Weber (R-MN) joined Margaret Warner for a panel discussion about the upcoming overhaul of the House Republican leadership. Topics included why so many Republican members are rallying for Mr. Livingston to run for the speakership; whether any Republicans are planning to vote for Democrat Dick Gephardt; similarities between Livingston and Gingrich; differences in the style of the two men; the importance of unity in a Congress with a thin majority; and whether the leadership changes will affect the way in which the impeachment inquiry is handled. "Supreme Court Watch": In this segment, Jan Crawford Greenburg joined Phil Ponce for a discussion about the decisions made by the Supreme Court today against the White House appeals in the attorney-client and Secret Service privilege cases. Topics included how these decisions will affect future government officials; whether the decision will have ramifications for the Clinton investigation; reaction from the White House and Ken Starr's office; and the case decision not to take the school voucher case on appeal. "Voice of a Diva": In this segment, Cecillia Bartoli joined Elizabeth Farnsworth for a conversation about her career in opera. Topics included the difficulty of singing; how much she enjoys her work; working with her mother; development and protection of the voice; why she enjoys singing operas by eighteenth century composers; and how she deals with the pressures of success. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6295

    "Facing Off...Again": This segment began with background from Spencer Michels on the face-off between the United Nations and Iraq. Following the report were back to back interviews, the first of which was with Nizar Hamdoon, Iraq's ambassador to the UN, who discussed why Iraq curtailed cooperation with the UN weapons inspectors on October 31st; the Iraqi request that the sanctions be stopped; whether Iraq ever plans to cooperate; whether there are any signs of a diplomatic end to the situation; and whether Iraq is preparing for air attacks. Next was an interview with Richard Butler, United Nations chief weapons inspector, who discussed whether the sanctions will be lifted from Iraq; how many UN inspectors remain in Iraq; and whether the end of the inspections is near. "Natural Disaster": In this segment, James Mates of Independent Television News reported on the effort to rebuild Honduras inthe aftermath of Hurricane Mitch. The report covered the destruction of the Chiquita Banana factory, the destruction to the tourism industry, and the number of people who remain homeless and jobless. "Mr. Speaker": This segment began with background from Kwame Holman on the resignation of House Speaker Newt Gingrich. Following the report, Michael Beschloss, Haynes Johnson, Tony Coehlo, and Bob Walker joined Margaret Warner for a discussion about the role of the Speaker of the House of Representatives. Topics included when the role has been the most powerful; the way in which the Reform system affected congressional power; and why the speaker decided to resign. "Music for the Brain": This segment consisted of a Tom Bearden report on the effects of music on the brain. Topics included the use of the Suzuki method for teaching music; whether music fundamentally affects the brain; and the lack of music classes in non-magnet schools around the country because of low budgets. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6296

    "Facing Off...Again": This segment began with excerpts from the president's remarks about Saddam Hussein today. Following the footage, Rolf Ekeus, Charles William Maynes, Paul Wolfowitz, and Edmund Ghareeb joined Elizabeth Farnsworth for a discussion about the latest developments in the weapons inspections in Iraq. Topics included whether there are any alternatives to the weapons inspections; whether there is a war on the horizon; whether there has been a failure of American policy; whether the sanctions will be lifted if the Iraqis comply with UNSCOM; the main objectives of the weapons inspectors; the goal of military action; the need to rally support from allies; whether there has been an exaggeration of the amount of weapons of mass destruction in Iraq; and whether the US has a double standard in Middle East foreign policy. "Matters of the Heart": In this segment, Susan Dentzer reported on new research on heart disease, covering the benefits of drinking wine and grape juice and new genetic treatments for cardiovascular disease. Following the report, Dr. Ronald Crystal and Dr. Valentin Fuster joined Phil Ponce for a discussion about the new research, including why injecting the heart with protein causes it to grow new blood vessels; ways in which the research might affect the health care industry; whether this genetic therapy is safe; whether the effects will be long lasting; the benefits of rigorous exercise for heart patients; and new research utilizing magnetic resonance imaging to predict whether patients will be prone to strokes and heart attacks. "Trading Dollars": In this segment, Lee Hochberg of Oregon Public Television reported on the exchange rate between US and Canadian currency. The report covered several film crews who have moved to Canada to film in order to take advantage of the exchange rate; the way in which the economic problems in Asia have had an effect on the Canadian currency; increased American tourism in Canada; and how the situation is affecting small cities on the US side of the border. "David Gergen Dialogue": In this segment, David Gergen engaged Chief Justice William Rehnquist in a discussion about his new book, "All the Laws But One: Civil Liberties in Wartime." Topics included his interest in the history of the Supreme Court and his career in the legal system. "Veterans Day": In this segment, Robert Pinsky read a poem in honor of Veterans day. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6297

    "Newsmaker Interview":This segment began with excerpts from Iraqi Deputy Prime Minister Tariq Aziz's newsconference in which he responded to President Clinton's call for Iraq to comply with UN inspections. Following the footage, US Secretary of State Madeleine Albright joined Margaret Warner for a conversation about the latest showdown with Iraq. Discussion topics included whether the president has decided to attack Iraq; whether there is any turning back at this point; why the Iraqi government will not accept responsibility for their own actions; whether the US has agreed to the principle of lifting sanctions; whether there are any diplomatic efforts to avoid the need for a military strike; and the concern for civilian deaths in Iraq. "US vs. Microsoft": This segment began with a report by Jim Compton of KCTS Seattle on the developments in the Justice Department's antitrust case against Microsoft. Following the report, John McChesney, Andrew Shapiro, and Paul Gillin joined Phil Ponce for a discussion about the impact of the case on the company's image. Topics included which companies are involved in the trial; whether Microsoft is suffering as a result of the trial; whether the government has proved the allegations effectively; whether there will be an impact on consumers; and what the industry might gain from limiting Microsoft's power. "Artistic Judgments": In this segment, correspondent Betty Ann Bowser tracked Cathy Kimball, curator of the San Jose Museum, and Beth Venn of the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York City as they designed an art exhibit. "Spectacular Sport": In this segment, Richard Rodriguez offered some thoughts on the sport of professional wrestling. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6298

    "Collision Course?": This segment began with a report on US preparations for a military strike against Iraq, covering the forces currently in place and forces enroute. Following the report, General Merrill McPeak, James Woolsey, Rear Admiral Eugene Carroll, and John Pike joined Elizabeth Farnsworth for a panel discussion about the military preparations. Topics included whether it appears that the US will inevitably be bombing soon; when the military strike might occur; the importance of air power being used to affect the order of power in Iraq; the urgency of degrading Saddam Hussein's ability to regenerate his weapons of mass destruction; how long the situation might continue; whether bombing might increase support for Hussein; the potential risk of civilian deaths; and the accuracy of the stealth bomber. "Political Wrap": Mark Shields and Paul Gigot joined Margaret Warner for a discussion of the week in politics, including whether there is congressional support for the military strike on Iraq; why so few members of Congress have spoken out on the issue; whether the settlement in the Paula Corbin Jones case will affect the impeachment process; whether Republicans have a strategy to conclude the investigation of the president; and whether Bob Livingston will be an effective Speaker of the House. "Back from the Brink": In this segment, correspondent Charles Krause reported on the International Monetary Fund's (IMF) decision to provide a 42 billion dollar rescue package to Brazil to restore investor confidence in Latin America's largest economy. "Helping Out": This segment consisted of an update from James Mates on the struggle to bring relief to the victims of Hurricane Mitch in Honduras and Nicaragua, covering the way in which air drops are being used to get supplies to areas where roads have been destroyed and the danger of disease caused by filth and dirty water. "New News": In this segment, Bernard Kalb and Bill O'Reilly joined Terence Smith for a discussion about the impact of technological advances on broadcast and cable television news. Topics included the lack of reliable sources in the "new news"; the editorializing on news programs; whether the American public is better served by the media of today; the increased amount of opinion represented in the news; the ferocious competition in the news industry; and the obsessive quality of the coverage of the Monica Lewinsky scandal. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6299

    "Newsmaker Interview": This segment consisted of an interview with National Security Advisor Samuel Berger, who discussed why President Clinton decided not to bomb Iraq this weekend; how many inspectors are going back; whether the agreement gives the inspectors access to everything they wish to see; whether there is any mechanism to prevent the Iraqis from moving the weapons before the inspectors arrive; whether Saddam Hussein is willing to comply with UNSCOM; whether deadlines should be imposed; the president's call for a new government in Iraq; what is being done to help the people of Iraq; and whether the events of the past weekend should be viewed as the beginning of the end. "Good Call?": In this segment, US Senators Arlen Specter (R-PN), Kay Bailey Hutchinson (R-TX), Joseph Biden (D-DE), and Lee Hamilton (D-IN) joined Margaret Warner to discuss the situation in Iraq and the president's decision not to attack. Topics included the need to stop the "back-and-forth" with Saddam Hussein; how the administration will judge whether Hussein is going to comply; whether the US should support surprise inspections; whether there should be a long-term strategy for cutting the regime in Iraq; whether ground forces should be used to force Saddam to comply; and the importance of not underestimating Hussein. "Hot Money": This segment consisted of a report by Jeffery Kaye on the impact of "hot money" --short-term investments-- on the Asian economy. The report covered Alan Greenspan's call for better banking practices in Asia rather than capital controls; the way in which private capital markets are similar to casinos; and the challenge facing the Asian leaders. "New Deal": After a short report from Elizabeth Farnsworth covering the details of the tobacco settlement, Christine Gergoire and John Garrison joined her for a discussion about the agreement. Topics included the public health gains accomplished in the settlement; ways in which this settlement compares to that of last year; whether the American Lung Association is pleased with the settlement; how the settlement deals with local lawsuits; and ways in which the public health provisions will be enforced. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6300

    "Storm Center": Following a background report, Datuk Hasmy Bin Agam and Robert Andrews joined Margaret Warner for a discussion about Vice President Gore's open criticism of Malaysia, at the Asian-Pacific Economic Council (APEC) annual meeting, for its treatment of political opponents. Topics included whether it was ill-advised for the vice president to make the remarks in public; regional criticism of the arrest of Mr. Anwar; whether Mr. Anwar was arrested because of his beliefs; whether the situation in Malaysia might be compared to apartheid; why Mr. Anwar is being held without bail; whether it is possible to have economic prosperity in a global economy without political freedom; and whether Prime Minister Mahthir will stay in power. "Waiting for Starr": In this segment, Kwame Holman examined the members of the House Judiciary Committee who will decide the impeachment issue slated to begin Thursday. The report covered the release of the taped testimony of Monica Lewinsky; the Committee's continued arguments over procedure and witnesses; and their plans to hear from Independent Counsel Kenneth Starr. "Cutting Rates": In this segment, Morton Marcus, Don Ratacjzak, Mary Bechman, and Keith Phillips joined Elizabeth Farnsworth for a discussion about the impact of the quarter point cut in short-term interest rates. Topics included whether the cut was the right thing for regional economies; why the Federal Reserve decided to cut interest rates; whether the cut will help improve the situation in Asia; how the Initial Public Offering (IPO) market has been affected; whether weaknesses in the global economy influenced the Fed's decision to lower the rates; and whether the global economy is now on a rebound from the Asian economic crisis. "Tipton High": In this segment, Jim Fisher of the Kansas City Star considered a small town in Western Kansas where kids and education are important. The report covered ways in which the small school is supported; the values taught in the school; and what makes this school different from those around the country. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6301

    "New Leadership": This segment consisted of a Kwame Holman report on the new Republican leadership in the House of Representatives, covering Newt Gingrich's support for Speaker-elect Bob Livingston and whether the Republican message was communicated to voters in the last election. "Fresh Views": In this segment, Ernie Fletcher (R-KY), Robin Hayes (R-NC), David Wu (D-OR), and Jay Inslee (D-WA) joined Jim Lehrer for a discussion about the new Congress and today's GOP leadership elections. Topics included how Republicans feel about the leadership ability of Bob Livingston; whether there will be much difference in the House under the new speaker; whether the chance for bipartisanship has increased; and whether charges of impeachment should be brought against the president. "News Leaks": This segment began with background from Terence Smith on the alleged leaks to the press by the office of independent counsel. Following the report, Jeffery Toobin, Evan Thomas, and Steven Brill joined Smith for a discussion about the relationship between leakers and the press. Topics included the lack of media coverage of the investigation of the independent counsel; the lack of a definition for grand jury material; whether it is reasonable to assign a reporter to cover leaks; whether Ken Starr will release reporters from any responsibility; and whether reporters have functioned as informants to the office of independent counsel. "Prison Gangs": In this segment, Betty Ann Bowser reported on hatred in prison gangs, covering the number of white supremacist gangs; the isolation of white prisoners in jail; and ways in which isolation in prison feeds the white supremacist hatred. "Art of the Story": In this segment, John Barth joined Elizabeth Farnsworth for a discussion about the art of the short story. Topics included whether he prefers writing short stories or novels; the topic of his latest book; and his use of contemporary physics in his books. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6302

    "Going Public": This segment consisted of a Kwame Holman report on today's impeachment hearing. The report included extensive excerpts and highlights from Independent Counsel Kenneth Starr's testimony today before the House Judiciary Committee. "The Impeachment Hearings": This segment consisted of congressional reaction to the impeachment hearings from US Reps Bill McCollum (R-FL) and Zoe Lofgren (D-CA). Discussion topics included whether Ken Starr's case was credible; whether the evidence supported the allegations; whether the allegations warrant impeachment; whether the process has been fair thus far; and whether the hearings today were productive. "Focus": In this segment, Stuart Taylor and Elizabeth Drew joined Lehrer to analyze the House Judiciary Committee's impeachment hearings. Discussion topics included whether there will be articles of impeachment voted out of this committee; whether the prosecutor should be called as a witness; whether the hearing will change the polls; whether Ken Starr answered the questions appropriately; and the fact that the Democrats never tried to disprove any of the allegations against the president. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6303

    "What Next?": This segment consisted of a report from Kwame Holman on the latest developments related to the Starr investigation and the impeachment proceedings, covering the resignation of Ken Starr's ethics advisor, Sam Dash. "Political Wrap": Mark Shields and Paul Gigot discussed the week in politics, including how the resignation of Sam Dash will affect the reputation of Ken Starr; whether the House will vote to impeach Bill Clinton; and the way in which the election of new Speaker of the House Bob Livingston will affect the impeachment inquiry. "Dream Launch": This segment consisted of a Tom Bearden report on the international space station. The report covered the complexity of the assembly of the space station; the involvement of Russia in the project; the launch of the first module; the way in which the station will be built; and the number of space walks required for full assembly. "National Book Award Winner": This segment consisted of an interview with Alice McDermott, who joined Elizabeth Farnsworth to discuss her National Book Award for "Charming Billy." Topics included the main character of the book; why she wrote the book in the first person; and the large number of detailed characters in the book. "Steady Excellence": In this segment, Roger Rosenblatt discussed the steady excellence of cartoonist Herbert Block. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6304

    "Tobacco Deal": In this segment, Saundra Torry joined Lehrer to provide an update on the tobacco settlement that was signed today. Discussion topics included the monetary settlement of tobacco companies; how the division of the money is to be decided; when the states and the District of Columbia will receive the money; the limits for advertising; why this settlement does not have to face federal legislation; and whether local governments are prevented from suing. "Back on Track?": This segment began with an update from Margaret Warner on the status of the Asian economic crisis. Following the report, Winston Lord, Mike Mochizuki, Robert Brusca, and Adam Posen joined Warner for a discussion about Asia's economy. Topics included whether there is a connection between what is happening in Asia and the US stock market; the way in which Japan is coming to grips with the situation; the status of the political trend in Asia; Asia's dependency on exports to the US; and what the future might hold. "Divided Parish": This segment consisted of a Phil Ponce report on a controversial Catholic priest who was dismissed from his church in Rochester in September. The report focused on the priest's actions that resulted in his dismissal, including his decision to appoint a woman to a high ranking parish position, the blessing of three homosexual unions, and inviting non-Catholics to participate in communion; outreach programs of the parish; and concerns about the Bishop of the Diocese of Rochester being too liberal. "National Book Award Winner": In this segment, Gerald Stern joined Elizabeth Farnsworth for a conversation about his book, "This Time," a collection of poetry for which he recently won a National Book Award. Mr. Stern discussed whether he was encouraged to become a poet and read several of the poems from his book. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6305

    "Joining Forces": In this segment, John McChesney, David Ya-Fee, and Andrew Shapiro joined Lehrer for a discussion about the proposed merger of America Online and Netscape. Topics included the specific qualities of each company; what America Online will acquire from the merger; whether the merger will be good for consumerism; and what the procedure will be in order to determine whether a merger will happen. "Death Watch": Following background on the "60 Minutes" episode that aired an assisted suicide by Dr. Jack Kevorkian, Mike Wallace and Ned McGrath joined Terence Smith for a discussion about CBS's decision to air portions of a tape showing the doctor participating in the suicide. Topics included whether the story was aired simply for ratings; the shameless promotion of the program; whether the segment added valuable, unknown information about the debate over the right to die; whether "60 Minutes" was advocating Jack Kevorkian; whether the program crossed the line of decency; and why CBS decided to air the program. "Assisted Suicide": In this segment, Lee Hochberg provided an update on Oregon's new assisted suicide law, covering what is used in the procedure; the lack of details about the deaths; the paranoid secrecy surrounding the assisted suicides; how candidates for the procedure are determined; and whether some patients might be victims of depression. "National Book Award": In this segment, Edward Bell joined Elizabeth Farnsworth for a discussion about his new book, "Slaves in the Family," for which he recently won a National Book Award. Topics included why he decided to write the book; why he felt it was important to write about the shared history between blacks and whites; how he researched the book; and how his family felt about the book. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6306

    "No Immunity": This segment began with a report from Lindsey Hilsum of Independent Television News on the ruling by the highest court in Britain, in which it was determined that former Chilean President General Augusto Pinochet would not be granted immunity from murder, persecution, and genocide charges. The report covered Lady Thatcher's reaction to the decision and international reaction to the surprise ruling. Coverage continued with a report from John Snow, focusing on the angry reaction of Pinochet supporters in Chile. "Toppling Saddam": This segment began with a report on the latest conflict between Iraq and UN weapons inspectors. Following the report, Zalmay Khalilzad, Frank Anderson, Khalil Jahshan, and Adeed Dawisha joined Margaret Warner for a discussion about the desirability and appropriateness of overthrowing the government of Saddam Hussein. Topics included whether the United States should attempt to change the Iraqi government; whether it is possible to overthrow Saddam; whether the form of government in Iraq could be changed without conquering the country; the diversity of opposition groups in Iraq; whether working with Iraqi dissident groups is feasible; whether the neighboring countries are threatened; and what level of US military involvement might be needed. "Risky Business": Following background on his career as a journalist, Gustavo Gorriti joined Terence Smith for a discussion about his work in Latin America and the challenges that reporters face there. Topics included winning the International Press Freedom Award; why he decided to leave Peru; the danger of being a journalist in Latin America; high regard for journalists in his country; his thoughts on media coverage of the Clinton-Lewinsky scandal; and whether the transition of the Panama Canal from the US to Panama will be smooth. Following the interview, Robert Pinsky read a poem written by International Press Freedom Award winner Goenawan Mohamad. "National Book Award Winner": In this segment, Louis Sachar joined Elizabeth Farnsworth for a conversation about his work and the National Book Award. Discussion topics included why he decided to write children's literature; what makes a good children's book; his source of inspiration for his award winning book, "Holes"; what he is trying to accomplish by writing children's books; whether he incorporates morals in his books; and how the award will affect his writing. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6307

    "Playing Fair?": This segment began with a report from Phil Ponce on the Justice Department's antitrust lawsuit against Visa and Mastercard, covering what the Justice Department is alleging and exclusionary rules in the bi-laws of both companies. Following the report, Kevin Arquit and Lloyd Constantine joined Ponce for a discussion about the lawsuit. Topics included whether the card companies have a unique relationship with banks; whether there is competition between the companies; whether consumers have choices; and what the Justice Department would like to accomplish. "Alternative Medicine": This segment began with a report from Paul Solman on the use of "touch therapy" in surgical procedures, covering the study being done by Columbia Presbyterian on the cost effectiveness of alternative medicine. Following the report, Susan Dentzer joined Margaret Warner for a discussion about the issue of the "Journal of the American Medical Association" that was entirely devoted to the subject of alternative medicine. Topics included what is meant by the term "alternative medicine"; different types of therapy, including relaxation techniques, herbal medicine, massage, chiropractic, spiritual healing by others, megavitamins, self-help groups, and imagery; and whether the American Medical Association has determined if the therapies work. "Gergen Dialogue": In this segment, David Gergen engaged Sen. Daniel Patrick Moynihan in a discussion about his new book, "Secrecy." Topics included the culture of secrecy in the cold war period and whether a culture of openness can exist. "Giving Thanks": In this segment, essayist Anne Taylor Fleming considered what Americans have to be thankful for. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6308

    "81 Questions": This segment began with a report from Margaret Warner in which she gave details about the president's answers to several of the questions posed to him by the House Judiciary Committee. Following the report, Representatives Asa Hutchinson(R-AK) and Jerrold Nadler (D-NY) joined Margaret for a discussion about issues surrounding the impeachment inquiry, including whether anything new was discovered in the answers to the questions; whether the president's answers are forthcoming; whether the president's attorneys should be given the opportunity to cross examine any witness; and whether Chairman Hyde plans to call any other witnesses. "Political Wrap": In this segment, Mark Shields and Paul Gigot discussed the week in politics, including the relevance of the president's answers to the 81 questions posed by the House Judiciary Committee; whether the American public believes that Bill Clinton lied under oath; whether there might be a censure compromise before an impeachment vote in the committee; and the attorney general's decision not to appoint an independent counsel to investigate Vice President Gore for campaign finance violations. "School Vouchers": This segment began with a report from Betty Ann Bowser on the school voucher program in San Antonio, Texas that allows children in poorly performing public schools to attend private schools at no cost. The report covered the number of cities who have similar programs; Secretary of Education Richard Riley's opposition to the program; and arguments for and against public funds being used for voucher programs. Following the report, Paul Peterson and Bruce Fuller joined Phil Ponce for a discussion on issues surrounding the voucher programs, including whether students in private schools perform better; whether the vouchers are similar to the GI bill; whether the vouchers inject a free market aspect that could be catastrophic for education; whether there is a concern that the best students will leave the public school system; and the need for accountability. "Giving Thanks": In this segment, US Poet Laureate read some poetry in recognition of the Thanksgiving holiday. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6309

    "Census 2000": This segment began with a conversation with Jan Crawford Greenburg, who joined Phil Ponce to provide an update on the arguments before the Supreme Court today about the use of sampling in conducting the 2000 census. Topics included the definition of sampling; who is opposed to the use of sampling; whether the procedure might be susceptible to political influence; and when a decision is expected. Following the update, Matthew Glavin and Dennis Lopez joined Margaret Warner to discuss what is at stake in the method used for conducting the 2000 census. Topics included why the US should change its method of census; whether the integrity of the Constitution is at stake; how many seats might shift in Congress as a result of sampling; whether the debate is political; and why minorities tend to be undercounted. "Starting Over": This segment consisted of a Charles Krause report on the huge task of rebuilding the Central American nation of Honduras after Hurricane Mitch. The report covered the lack of drinking water; economic loss in the country; the present living conditions for the people; what is being done in the international community to help the homeless; the destruction of the banana plantations; the need for an immediate reconstruction effort; and opportunities presented by the destruction. "Gergen Dialogue": In this segment, David Gergen engaged Shelby Steele in a conversation about his new book, "A Dream Deferred: The Second Betrayal of Black Freedom in America." Topics included the way in which whites are always trying to prove a negative, that they are not racist; how this phenomenon has affected the progression of the black race in America; whether Affirmative Action is effective; and whether Affirmative Action forces minority students to become competitive. "In Memoriam": This segment consisted of an excerpt of a 1996 NewsHour profile of Seattle's unusual Superintendent of Schools John Stanford, who died this weekend. The profile was originally prepared by Rod Minott of KCTS Seattle. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6310

    "Rich Mix": This segment began with a report from Phil Ponce on the planned merger of Exxon and Mobil, which would result in the creation of the largest privately owned oil company in the world. Following the report, Daniel Yergin, Ron Chernow, and Christopher Flavin joined Lehrer for a discussion about the merger. Topics included why the merger is a good move for both companies; the history between Exxon and Mobil; whether it was inevitable that the two companies would reunite; whether the oil industry remains a growth industry; whether there will be a difficulty in blending the corporate cultures of the two companies; and whether the merger will be successful. "The Impeachment Hearings": Following a report from Kwame Holman on the developments in today's House Judiciary Committee hearings on impeachment, Reps. Bill McCollum (R-FL) and Thomas Barrett (D-WI) joined Margaret Warner to discuss the hearings and other issues related to the impeachment process. Topics included whether today's hearing clarified perjury in the way that it relates to impeachment; whether the issue remains a political debate; whether censure remains an option; whether Congress has a constitutional authority to censure the president; and whether impeachment can serve as a form of censure. "Past and Present": In this segment, Kunihiko Saito and Iris Chang joined Elizabeth Farnsworth for a discussion about the impact of history and World War II on the relationship between China and Japan. Topics included why there was an apology from Japan to China and why it did not take the form of a letter; why China is expecting an apology now; whether the Chinese believe that Japan has recognized its wartime aggression; and whether the Japanese have tried to conceal the past from the children of their country. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6311

    "The Pinochet Precedent": This segment began with background on the case against former Chilean President Augusto Pinochet. Following the report, Diane Orentlicher, Anne-Marie Slaughter, Jeremy Rabkin, and Alfred Rubin joined Ponce for a discussion about the possible fallout from allegations against Pinochet, in which it was determined that he did not fall under immunity. Topics included whether the ruling was right; whether the ruling could have implications for other countries; whether it is the equivalent of assassination; and the fact that the ruling was a narrow decision based on British law. "AIDS Epidemic": This segment consisted of a Fred de Sam Lazaro report on the AIDS situation in South Africa. The report covered the rate at which the number of cases are rising in the country; the lack of trust between the white doctors and black citizens of South Africa; how the oppression of women has added to the epidemic; and whether the government is doing anything to stop the spread of the disease. "Breast Implants": This segment contained an update from Susan Dentzer on developments in the long-running story about breast implants. The report covered the discovery that there is no scientific evidence to support the connection between breast implants and connective tissue disease; the number of lawsuits involving silicone breast implants; whether the discovery will affect cases already in the courts; and how many lawsuits have been brought to date. "Swingin'": In this segment, Spencer Michels reported on the return of swing dancing. "For My People": In this segment, Robert Pinsky remembered poet and novelist Margaret Walker, who died earlier this week. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6312

    "Continuing the Counsel?": This segment began with a report from Kwame Holman about the acquittal of former Secretary of Agriculture Mike Espy on all charges of corruption brought against him by Independent Counsel Donald Smaltz. Following the report, Lawrence Walsh, James Brosnahan, and James McKay joined Lehrer to discuss how the Espy acquittal will impact the debate over independent counsels. Topics included whether independent counsels are worth the money spent because of the message sent; whether there are too many investigations underway; whether the independent counsel statute should be abolished; whether the statute should be limited; whether the attorney general is responsible for the independent counsel; whether there is pressure for independent counsels to bring charges irregardless of fact; and whether the statute will be renewed in 1999. "Harvest Blues": This segment consisted of a Spencer Michels report on the practice of importing farm workers for harvesting crops. The report covered a farmer's proposal before Congress requesting permission to import workers and promising to give preferential hiring to American citizens, vouchers for housing, and transportation assistance; the possibility that the program would reduce illegal immigrants; and the way in which mechanizing diminishes the need for workers. "War Crimes": This segment began with an update from Paul Davies about the charges of war crimes against Bosnia for their behavior in Sebrenica. Following the report, Roy Gutman and Ivo Daalder joined Margaret Warner for a discussion about the issues surrounding the Bosnian war crimes, including the number of people who were slaughtered in the massacre; whether NATO troops and Americans will be more active in bringing charges against the guilty; and whether Yugoslavian President Slobodan Milosevic underlies the problem. "Still Playing": In this segment, Elizabeth Farnsworth reported on the 25th anniversary of the Kronos Quartet. David Harrington joined Elizabeth for a discussion about how he became involved in this type of music and his love for string quartets. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6313

    "Mixed Messages": This segment began with an Elizabeth Farnsworth report on increasing occurances of layoffs and the decreasing unemployment rate. Following the report, John Challenger and Lisa Lynch joined Farnsworth for a discussion about the increase in corporate layoffs. Topics included where the new jobs in November occurred; the boom in the construction and services industries; whether the Holiday season contributed to the increase; how unemployment can be going down when layoffs are going up; the areas where most of the layoffs are occurring; how mergers are affecting employment; and whether workers are becoming insecure. "Political Wrap": Following a Kwame Holman report on the actions of the House Judiciary Committee this week in the impeachment inquiry, Mark Shields and Paul Gigot discussed the week in politics. Topics included whether an impeachment vote would pass on the floor of the House; why the campaign finance violations were not included in the impeachment inquiry; the acquittal of former Secretary of Agriculture Mike Espy; and Bill Bradley's announcement that he might run for the presidency in the year 2000. "Violent Distractions": In this segment, Brad Bushman, Gene Jankowski, Peter Gardiner, and Madeline Levine joined media correspondent Terence Smith for a discussion about the implications of the study on the effectiveness of television commercials shown during violent programming that was recently published in the Journal of Experimental Psychology Applied. Topics included what was learned by the studies; whether the study, if proven to be true, will affect television programming or advertising; the implications of viewing violent imagery; how much influence advertisers have over programming; and whether the connection between memory and violence is strong. "The Art of Justice": In this segment, Roger Rosenblatt remembered the quality of the work of Alan Pakula, who recently died in an automobile accident. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6314

    "Mounting A Defense": In this segment, Douglas Kmiec and Bruce Yannett joined Lehrer for a discussion about the potential legal and political pitfalls ahead for the White House in the impeachment hearings. Topics included whether the allegations against President Clinton are as serious as those against President Nixon in the Watergate crisis of 1974; whether the president has any defense for his actions; whether the Senate would vote to convict; whether the allegations against the president constitute abuse of power and obstruction of justice; and the American public's perception of this situation. "Newsmaker Interview": In this segment, James Hoffa, the new president of the Teamsters Union and son of the late Jimmy Hoff--who headed the Teamsters from 1957 to 1971--joined Margaret Warner to discuss his election as president and his plans for the Teamsters. Topics included his plans to unify the union; whether he will continue to be militant toward employers; whether government control has been good for the union; and the need to slow globalization. "Pledge Break": This segment consisted of a Peter Morgan report on the efforts of Jewish Holocaust survivors to be compensated for their losses. "Toys Are Us?": This segment began with a Phil Ponce report on the most popular toys for the holiday season. Following the report, Gary Cross and Chris Byrne joined Ponce for a discussion about toy trends. Topics included the increase in the number of interactive toys; what these high tech toys are teaching children; how the industry determines which toys will be successful; whether toys are indicators of the culture; and whether American children get too many toys. "Day of Infamy": In this segment, Robert Pinsky read a poem to mark the anniversary of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941. [52 minutes]

  • Episode #6315

    "Mounting a Defense": This segment began with a report from Kwame Holman on the case set before the House Judiciary Committee today by the president's legal defense group. The report included extensive excerpts of the testimony and the proceedings in the committee's impeachment hearings. "The Impeachment Hearings": In this segment, Congressmen Asa Hutchinson (R-AK) and William Delahunt (D-MA) joined Lehrer for a discussion about today's proceedings. Topics included what was accomplished by the hearings today; whether the comparison between the cases against President Clinton and President Nixon was helpful in answering questions; whether perjury can constitute an impeachable offense; and whether censure is a legitimate alternative. "The Impeachment Hearings": In this segment, Stuart Taylor and Tom Oliphant joined Lehrer to provide analysis and commentary about today's hearings. Discussion topics included whether the president's attorneys made a viable case; whether there will be a party line vote; whether a censure would be constitutionally valid; whether there were convincing facts presented today that might have swayed moderate Republicans to vote against articles of impeachment; and how long a Senate trial would take and whether it would paralyze the country. [52 minutes]

  • Episode #6316

    "Mounting A Defense": This segment began with a report from Jim Lehrer on the articles of impeachment drafted by House Republicans today, accusing the president of two counts of perjury, obstruction of justice, and abuse of power. Following the report were extended excerpts of the testimony and the proceedings in the House Judiciary Committee's impeachment hearings today. Kwame Holman narrated the segment. "The Impeachment Hearings": In this segment, two House Republican moderates, Rep. Marge Roukema (R-NJ) and Rep. Christopher Shays (R-CT), joined Margaret Warner for a discussion about the impeachment hearings and proceedings. Topics included whether the president's legal defense team did an effective job in pleading his case before the House Judiciary Committee; whether the lawyers are damaging the credibility of the president; whether the impeachable offenses are provable; the constitutional responsibility of the House; and whether censure should come to the House floor as an alternative. "The Impeachment Hearings": In this segment Stuart Taylor and Tom Oliphant joined Lehrer to provide analysis and commentary about today's hearings. Discussion topics included whether the president's lawyers did an effective job today; whether the charge of perjury in front of the grand jury is strong; whether this case compares to Watergate; and what might happen next. [52 minutes]

  • Episode #6317

    "The Impeachment Hearings": This segment began with a report from Congressional Correspondent Kwame Holman on the summations by the Republican and Democratic counsels of the House Judiciary Committee in the impeachment proceedings. Following the report, John Labovitz and Douglas Kmiec joined Margaret Warner for a discussion about the summations by the committee's counsels today. Topics included whether the defense or the prosecution made a better case today; whether the case against the president will be credible if the impeachment goes to the Senate; whether the answer will be censure or impeachment; and whether the articles of impeachment can be proven. "Saving Social Security": This segment began with a report from Susan Dentzer on efforts to fix the Social Security system. The report covered investment options to save the system, including government investment of some Social Security reserves in the stock market and allowing individuals to invest a portion of Social Security taxes into personal accounts. Following the report, Susan joined Lehrer to discuss the situation. Topics included progress that was made toward saving the system; the need to raise the rate of return; whether there is a sense of urgency to find a solution; and what might be the most likely solution. "Old Bones": In this segment, Richard Potts joined Phil Ponce for a discussion about the discovery of 3 million-year-old bones by a team of scientists near Johannesburg, South Africa, including what may be discovered through these remains. [52 minutes]

  • Episode #6318

    "The Impeachment Debate": This segment began with excerpts of President Clinton's statement of apology on the Lewinsky matter today and a Kwame Holman report on the debate in the House Judiciary Committee, covering the articles of impeachment drafted and approved by the committee and the heated debate that ensued in the committee surrounding procedure. "A View from the Hill": In this segment, House Judiciary Committee members Lindsey Graham (R-SC) and Tom Barrett (D-WI) joined Margaret Warner for a discussion about today's vote to impeach President Clinton. Topics included why the president's apology was not enough to sway moderate Republicans on the committee; whether the president failed to address what was needed; and whether there might be a vote for censure on the House floor. "Political Wrap": In this segment, Mark Shields and Paul Gigot discussed the week in politics including whether there will be a vote to impeach on the House floor; whether the president's apology earlier today was effective; whether an impeachment would constitute an abuse of party-line power by the Republicans; whether censure is likely; and why impeachment has become more likely in the past weeks. "Conversation": In this segment, novelist Tom Wolfe joined Elizabeth Farnsworth for a discussion about his book, "A Man in Full"; why reporting is so essential to a novel; why he believes the book has been successful; and how he responds to criticism. [52 minutes]

  • Episode #6319

    "Covering History": In this segment, media correspondent Terence Smith reported on how the news media has covered the impeachment process, including the continued headlines about the inquiry in newspapers and on television. "Public Opinion": In this segment, Andrew Kohut joined Margaret Warner to discuss what polls show about public reaction to the impeachment process. Topics included whether the public is ignoring the hearings; whether the public would like the president removed from office; whether there is a trend developing in the polls; whether Americans favor censure over impeachment; whether the public wants the president to resign; and how citizens feel about Congress as an institution. "Regional Views": In this segment, Cynthia Tucker, Patrick McGuigan, Lee Cullum, Bob Kittle, and Susan Albright joined Terence Smith for a panel discussion about the impeachment debate and public opinion. Topics included whether censure is supported by the American public; whether there is support for impeachment in Oklahoma; whether the public has been slow to understand the gravity of the situation; whether the president's latest public apology was effective or different from previous statements; whether there is anything the president could do or say to alter his fate; and whether the House will likely vote for impeachment. "Debating Points": In this segment, Calvin Trillin and William F. Buckley joined Lehrer to debate the issues surrounding the impeachment of the president. Discussion topics included whether the House should vote in favor of the articles of impeachment against the president; whether the president's poor judgement in the Monica Lewinsky situation indicates that he might have poor judgement about other issues; whether public opinion should influence members of the House; whether partisanship in the House will be a problem; and whether censure is a likely solution. "Being There": This segment consisted of a Clarence Page essay about a successful Boston program to fight juvenile crime and drug usage, focusing on the specifics of the programs involving the church, how successful the programs have been, and whether the church can work closely with the state to continue to improve the situation. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6320

    "The Impeachment Debate": In this segment, Norman Ornstein, Thomas Mann, and Tom Oliphant joined Lehrer for a discussion about the upcoming debates in the House and the possible alternatives to impeachment. Topics included whether it is likely that the president will be impeached by the full House; whether there are any moderate Republicans who will not vote for impeachment; whether the president can say anything at this point to avoid impeachment; Bob Dole's suggestion for a resolution; and whether a joint resolution before a Senate trial is likely. "Covering History": This segment began with a report from Terence Smith on the role of weekly newsmagazines and their coverage of the daily news. Following the report, Mark Whitaker, Walter Issacson, and Stephen Smith joined Smith for a discussion about the role of these magazines. Topics included how a newsmagazine attempts to cover a story with the magnitude of the impeachment inquiry; the role of the Internet in the media; and whether there is a sense of competition between the magazines. "Debating Points": In this segment, Deborah Tannen and Shelby Steele joined Margaret Warner to debate the issues surrounding the possible impeachment of the president. Discussion topics included whether a president accused of what Bill Clinton has been deserves to be impeached; whether the president's behavior led the media to report extensively about private issues; and whether Bill Clinton corrupted the legal process. "Where is Wye?": In this segment, Robert Satloff and Rashid Khalidi joined Phil Ponce for a discussion about the outcome of the president's trip to Israel. Topics included whether the peace process in the Middle East is back on track as a result of the president's trip; what the Palestinians were expecting as a result of the Wye Agreement; and whether the Israelis and Palestinians are meeting their respective obligations of the agreement. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6321

    "Showdown": This segment consisted of full coverage of today's air strikes on Iraq, beginning with President Clinton's address to the nation in which he explained why he took the action against Iraq and excerpts from Tony Blair's address to Great Britain, explaining why his country had an extensive involvement in the air strike. Following the footage, Senators Joseph Leiberman(D-CT) and John Warner (R-VA) joined Lehrer for a discussion about the military action. Topics included whether there was support for this strike; whether there is suspicion about the timing; Senator Trent Lott's (R-TN) statement in which he indicated he did not support the mission; whether the House should proceed with debate and a vote about impeachment; whether the public will accept the president's explanation for the timing of the event; and how long the strikes are expected to continue. "Impeachment Debate": This segment began with a Kwame Holman report on the latest developments in the impeachment proceedings. Following the report, Mark Shields and Paul Gigot joined Margaret Warner to offer political analysis of the impeachment proceedings and Iraq. Discussion topics included whether the president made an effective case for the timing of the military strikes on Iraq; the deep mistrust that exists in the Congress toward the president; whether the delay in the impeachment proceedings will help the president; and whether the House will postpone the vote until the bombing stops. "Historical Views": In this segment, Doris Kearns Goodwin, Michael Beschloss, Haynes Johnson, and John Dean joined Phil Ponce to discuss the outlook of the impeachment proceedings. Topics included whether the controversy surrounding the timing of the US military strike on Iraq can be compared to the mistrust of Nixon during Watergate and whether there is a precedent for Senator Lott's (R-TN) statement against the president today. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6322

    "Iraq/Impeachment": This segment began with excerpts from the president's and Pentagon officials' statements about the military strike against Iraq. Pentagon officials included Secretary of Defense William Cohen and Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff General Henry Shelton. Following the footage was a report from Lindsay Hillsam on the global reaction to the American and British military action against Iraq. Next was a report from Kwame Holman on the latest developments in the impeachment proceedings and Iraqi air strikes. The report included excerpts from the discussion on the House floor about whether to continue the proceedings. "Newsmaker Interview": This segment consisted of an interview with Secretary of State Madeleine Albright, who discussed whether the impeachment proceedings against the president should continue; whether the timing of the military strike against Iraq was appropriate; whether it is difficult to conduct foreign policy when the motives of the president are under suspicion; whether the mission has been successful thus far; the objective of the strikes; how the targets have been chosen; and whether the US has been in contact with the Iraqi government since the bombing started. "The Water's Edge": This segment consisted of congressional reaction to the Iraqi air strikes and presidential impeachment hearings from Lee Hamilton (D-IN), Jim Leach (R-IA), Bill McCollum (R-FL), and Marty Meehan (D-MA). Discussion topics included whether the impeachment debate should be deferred; whether the impeachment debate will weaken the president's ability to conduct foreign policy; and whether there is anything that the Democrats can do to avoid the vote in the House tomorrow. "Shields and Gigot": In this segment, Mark Shields and Paul Gigot provided analysis of the military strikes against Iraq and the impeachment process. Discussion topics included the risks and benefits of proceeding with or delaying the impeachment process; whether the timing of the military strike was appropriate; whether the president has managed to change any of the votes for impeachment in the House; and whether Clinton will be impeached when the House finally votes. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6323

    "Attack on Iraq": This segment consisted of a Phil Ponce report on the continuing military attack on Iraq. The report covered the reaction of the Iraqi people; the amount of destruction caused by the military strikes; Iraqi Deputy Prime Minister Tariq Aziz's accusation that Clinton is a pawn at the hands of the United States; and the accuracy of the US military force. "Impeachment Debate": Following analysis by Mark Shields and Paul Gigot, the Newshour joined the ongoing live coverage of the impeachment debate in progress in the House. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6324

    "What Next?": In this segment, two members of the Senate Judiciary Committee, Orrin Hatch (R-UT) and Patrick Leahy (D-VT), and Senators Mitch McConnell (R-KY) and Joseph Lieberman (D-CT) joined Lehrer for perspective on the presidential impeachment proceedings. Discussion topics included whether censure is a likely solution; whether there are 67 votes to convict the president in the Senate; the leadership of Senator Robert Byrd; whether there should be a trial in the Senate; whether the Senate will handle the matter in a bipartisan nature; how long a Senate trial might last; and whether a trial would be traumatic for the nation. "Historical Views": In this segment, Doris Kearns Goodwin, Michael Beschloss, Haynes Johnson, and Howard Baker discussed whether censure is a likely solution to the impeachment situation; the need for bipartisanship in the Senate; whether there is a historical precedent for these impeachment proceedings; and how these political events will shape history. "Citizens React": In this segment, Lee Hochberg of Oregon Public Broadcasting reported on the public's reaction to the impeachment vote. The report covered public opinion on how the impeachment process has been handled in the House; whether the president should resign; mistrust of Bill Clinton; and the uneasy feeling from the partisan nature in the House. "Did It Work?": In this segment, Henry Kissinger and Zbigniew Brzezinski joined Margaret Warner to provide an analysis of the Iraqi bombings. Discussion topics included whether the three-day campaign diminished Saddam Hussein's ability to develop weapons of mass destruction; whether the military strikes should have continued for a longer period; whether the strikes reinforced American credibility; whether there is an alternative to the current containment policy; and the reaction of allies in the region. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6325

    "Newsmaker Interview": In this segment, Under-Secretary of State Thomas Pickering joined Elizabeth Farnsworth to discuss the latest developments in economic sanctions and arms inspections for Iraq. Topics included why he went to United Nations to consult with Russian delegations yesterday; whether sanctions will be removed without verification of disarmament; what the US policy is toward Iraq; whether the UN is moving toward a policy of containment; whether US goals in Iraq are realistic and attainable; whether Iraq poses a major world threat; and whether the bombing advanced the situation. "Politics and Peace": In this segment, Robert Satloff and Rashid Khalidi joined Phil Ponce to analyze the impact of Israel's elections on the peace process. Discussion topics included whether the Wye accord led to the downfall of the Israeli government; whether the elections will interfere with the peace process; and whether the Palestinians would prefer to deal with a prime minister besides Benjamin Netanyahu. "Mr. Speaker?": This segment began with a report from Elizabeth Bracket of WTTW, Chicago on US Representative Dennis Hastert (R-IL), who remains the likely candidate for Speaker-of-the-House. Following the report, Mark Shields, Paul Gigot, and Bob Walker joined Margaret Warner for analysis of the new Speaker-to-be. Topics included the credentials that Dennis Hastert possesses; why he wants to be speaker; how he is regarded by the hard-line conservatives; and whether he needs to demonstrate his independence from Tom Delay. "Haunting Presence": In this segment, Richard Rodriguez of Pacific News Service offered some thoughts on the homeless. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6326

    "Octuplets": This segment began with an Elizabeth Farnsworth report on the octuplets born at St. Luke's Episcopal Hospital in Texas. Following the report, Dr. Joe Massey and Nancy Dubler joined Elizabeth to discuss the science and ethics behind multiple births. Topics included why fertility drugs increase the number of children; whether the health of the babies is always considered; risks involved with multiple births in humans; and whether there are ways to control the number of children conceived when fertility drugs are used. "Suing for Safety": This segment consisted of a report from Elizabeth Brackett on the recent lawsuits against gunmakers to reduce the use of handguns. The report covered Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley's lawsuit against gunmakers for accountability for handgun deaths; the logic behind the lawsuit; and whether the city is likely to win the case. "View From Abroad": In this segment, Martin Kettle, Mohammed Wahby, Rich Mkhondo, and Ayako Doi joined Terence Smith for a discussion about the overseas reaction to the recent vote for impeachment. Topics included whether there is support for the president in foreign countries; the small pleasure of Europeans in seeing the number one country in a problematic situation; whether the international community trusts the president; and whether the president's ability to conduct foreign policy has been diminished. "Portrait of the Artist": In this segment, Senior producer Jeffrey Brown offered a look at the Vincent Van Gogh art display at the National Gallery in Washington DC. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6327

    "Ripple Effect": This segment consisted of a report from Jeffery Kaye of KCET on the Asian economic crisis and its effects on the United States. The report covered industries such as steel and technology that are feeling the effects of a wide trade deficit; how the Asian crisis has affected the prices of agriculture; and ways in which consumers have benefited. "The Uninsured": In this segment, Susan Dentzer reported on the growing problems with health insurance in America. The report covered why there are so many families who are not covered by insurance; the American Medical Association's possible solution for the problem which proposes the creation of health insurance purchasing cooperatives and providing tax credits to help pay for coverage; and incremental changes that have been made to the system and why this approach is not working. "Unsteady Democracy": In this segment, Special correspondent Jennifer Griffin reported on the current crisis in Russia, the murder of Galina Staravoitova, a female member parliament and a pro-democracy legislator. The report covered the fear of fascism in Russia; whether the democratic gains of the past decades in Russia are in jeopardy; the corruption in the government; and whether the Russian people still support Democracy. "Gergen Dialogue": In this segment, David Gergen engaged Collin Murphy in a discussion about his book, "The Word According To Eve: Women and the Bible in Ancient Times and Our Own." Topics included the underepresentation of women in the bible; and criticism of the bible by feminist scholars. "Where Marble Eats Marble": In this segment, Robert Pinsky read a poem in reaction to the recent impeachment vote. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6328

    Deflated Mission": This segment began with a Phil Ponce report on the latest attempt by Richard Branson, Per Lindstrand, and Steve Fossett to circle the earth in a hot-air balloon, focusing on problems encountered along the way in Libya and China. Following the report, Tom Hamilton joined Ponce to discuss why the attempt failed. Topics included weather patterns that contributed to the demise of the trip; the mechanics of a hot air balloon; why it is so difficult to travel around the world; and why foreign countries are so sensitive to encroachment on their air space. "Shopping Online": This segment began with a report from Lee Hochberg of Oregon Public Broadcasting on the growth in the online shopping industry. The report covered the use of secure servers; the decline in the profits of traditional stores because of virtual stores; and companies that have resisted selling on the Web. Following the report, Darryl Peck, Maryfran Johnson, and Andrew Whinston joined Margaret Warner for a discussion about online shopping during this holiday season. Topics included what percentage of holiday sales have been consumed by online shopping; whether this is a rapidly growing area; the potential of this phenomenon; advantages to shopping online; and whether consumers should be concerned about their private financial information. "Harvest Blues": This segment consisted of a report from Rod Minott of KCTS on the problem of housing migrant workers in the US, covering the public health problems caused by the lack of housing; farmers who are supplying housing for their workers; and state funded projects that might help to solve the problem. "Foreign Correspondence": In this segment, Indira Lakshmanan joined Elizabeth Farnsworth to discuss what has changed in Hong Kong as a result of returning to Chinese sovereignty; the downsizing in Hong Kong; bitterness and anger towards the government; and whether there is a consensus about what has caused the Asian economic crisis. "Winter's Edge": In this segment, Robert Pinsky read a poem for Christmas. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6329

    "What Next?": In this segment, Rolf Ekeus, Denis Halliday, and Zalmay Khalilzad joined Elizabeth Farnsworth to discuss today's air strikes against Iraq and the outlook for future weapons inspections. Topics included what Iraq would like the Security Counsel to do; how the conflict between Iraqi and US aircraft in the no-fly-zone today might be interpreted; whether the inspections-sanctions regime has come to an end; the need for a new government in Iraq; whether inspections will ever be effective under the rule of Saddam Hussein; the status of the UN oil for food program; and whether Iraq needs to be contained. "2000 Millennium Bug": This segment began with an update from Paul Solman on the battle against the millennium bug. Following the report, Kenneth Apfel joined Lehrer for a conversation about the potential crisis. Discussion topics included the recent victory for the Social Security Administration in bringing their systems into Y2K compliance; how the problems were solved; and why they were so far ahead of major corporations. "Collecting Child Support": This segment consisted of a report from Jeffrey Kaye of KCET, Los Angeles on today's problems with child support. The report covered the inability of the office of the attorney general in Ventura County, California to track delinquent payments; the need for a nationwide automated tracking system; and the complexity of interstate cases. "Cheap Oil": This segment began with a report from Elizabeth Brackett of WTTW, Chicago on the drop in oil prices. Following the report, Larry Goldstein and Chubba Chehta joined Phil Ponce to discuss the factors involved in the recent drop in oil prices, including the historic lows of gasoline prices; whether Americans are driving more; the reduction in demand for gasoline; and how the lower gas prices might impact oil companies. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6330

    "Olympic Investigation": This segment began with a report from Tom Bearden on the Salt Lake City Olympic investigations, covering the charges that Salt Lake City officials bribed International Olympic Committee (IOC) officials. Following the report. Howard Berkes and Christine Brennan joined Lehrer to discuss the latest developments of the Olympic investigations in Salt Lake City. Topics included the allegations that college scholarships were given to relatives of IOC members; whether what was done in Utah was unique; whether Salt Lake City should be viewed as a victim or a perpetrator; how the problem might be solved; and what the IOC is saying about the situation. "Year of Disasters": This segment began with a review of the year's weather by Phil Ponce. Following the review, Anet Abramovitz, Bob Watson, and John Clizbe joined Ponce to discuss the year's devastating storms and natural disasters. Topics included the magnitude of the destruction caused by weather in 1998; the cost of the devastation to organizations such as the Red Cross; whether the earth's climate is changing, resulting in floods, draughts, fires, and storms; how these changes might affect agriculture and weather patterns; and which populations are most vulnerable to the disasters. "Slowing Down": In this segment, Rod Minott reported on the massive job cuts at Boeing Aerospace. The report covered the morale of the workers at the plant; whether the Asian economic crisis is to blame for production cuts at the company; and what the company plans to do to stay afloat. "Conversation": This segment consisted of a conversation with Henry Kamm, who discussed his new book, "Cambodia: Report from a Stricken Land"; how the country has changed over the past ten years; the devastation caused by war; the low employment; the re-admittance of two former Khmer Rough leaders into Cambodia; and the effort by the United Nations in the early nineties to impose a cease-fire and hold elections. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6331

    "Bombing Trial": In this segment, Tim Sullivan joined Lehrer to report on the latest developments on the grand jury in the Oklahoma City bombing. Discussion topics included the mandate of the grand jury in Oklahoma; who started the petition drive that led to the formation of the grand jury; what was included in the grand jury's report; and whether there is any evidence of a broader conspiracy in the case. "New Crackdown": This segment began with background from Elizabeth Farnsworth on the arrest and imprisonment of Chinese dissidents Xu Wenli, Qin Yongmin, and Wang Youcai. Following the report, Michel Oksenberg, Harry Wu, Minxin Pei, and Xiao Qiang joined Elizabeth for a panel discussion about the latest crackdown on dissidents in China. Topics included whether human rights in China have been improved; whether the Western world has become too soft on the issue of human rights in China; why the government seems to be threatened; the involvement of the China Democracy Party in the situation; whether economic problems in China and the rest of Asia have contributed to the problem; and what the US government should do to help improve the situation. "Neglected News": In this segment, the NewsHour's regular cast of regional commentators, Cynthia Tucker, Patrick McGuigan, Lee Cullum, Bob Kittle, and Susan Algright, joined Terence Smith to discuss the underreported news stories of 1998. Topics included the scientific discovery of cloning; the economic new of 1998 such as the failure of fast track in the Congress and capital controls; the demise of the Social Security system; economic and political chaos in Russia; the expansion of NATO; and whether the undercoverage of the aforementioned stories is directly linked to the overcoverage of the Clinton-Lewinsky affair. "Year of Common Sense": In this segment, Roger Rosenblatt joined Phil Ponce to offer some end-of-the-year thoughts on the American people. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6332

    "No Fly Zone": This segment began with background from Phil Ponce on the battles over the Iraqi no fly zones. Following the report, General Merrill McPeak and Richard Haass joined Ponce to discuss why the no fly zones were created; whether the rules of engagement can change; whether Iraqis can penetrate the zones; whether Iraqi missiles are a serious threat to US forces trying to enforce the limits; and whether there is international support for the US. "AFtershock": This segment consisted of a Betty Ann Bowser report about the murder of a doctor who performed abortions in Buffalo, New York. The report covered the way in which med students are taught about the abortion procedure; the decreasing number of doctors willing to or trained to perform abortions; the increase of blackmail and threats against doctors who perform abortions; whether anti-abortion activists are effective in decreasing the number of abortions in the US; and Supreme Court cases that may have increased the tension between the two groups this year. "David Gergen Dialogue": In this segment, Frank R. Wilson joined David Gergen for a discussion about his fascination with the human hand, including how the hand influences the way in whichthe brain works; the importance of hands in child development; and the emotinal satisfaction of people who work with their hands. "Remembering 1998": In this segment, a panel consistign of Doris Kearns Goodwin, Michael Beschloss, Andrew Kohut, Haynes Johnson, and Joan Hoff joined Lehrer to discuss the big events of 1998, including what the general public believed to be the most important story of 1998; the amount of violence reported in the media; the general characterization of the year; whether the impeachment process reflects more serious problems in the nation; the lack of loyalty to institutions; and the great cynicism of the American people. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6333

    "Common Currency," a Tom Beardon report on the new Euro currency, the timetable for the conversion, and the job of re-denominating existing bonds and cash balances; followed by a discussion with Philippe Schmitter, Horst Ungerer, Jurek Martin, and Stephen Overturf on the Euro's historical and political implications and significance, Britain's decision not to participate at this time, the sovereignty concerns of countries, and the risks of the new currency. "40 Years of Castro": Phil Ponce spoke with photographer Roberto Salas about his book, "Fidel's Cuba", discussing the background of several of the photographs of Castro, which of the photographs were Salas' personal favorites, and his thoughts about Castro; followed by a discussion with Raul deValasco and Rafael Penalver, who talked about the call by former Republican officials and politicians for a bi-partisan commission to re-think American policy towards Cuba, the motives for this call, the interests of the Cuban people, and the present changes in Cuba and limited benefits for Cubans from foreign investments. "Political Wrap," Mark Shields and David Brooks discussed the week's political events, including the possibility of a trial balloon for a short Senate impeachment trial and the dissension among Republicans, whether a full scale trial would benefit Republicans, Senator John McCain's and Al Gore's announcements for the Presidency, and the new House Speaker Dennis Hastert. "Happy New Year": in honor of the new year, Robert Pinksy read a passage from the chorus at the end of "Secular Masque" by 17th century poet John Dryden. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6334

    "Impeachment Trial Preview", Senators Joseph Lieberman, Arlen Specter, Robert Bennett, and John Breaux discussed the proposal by Lieberman and Slade Gordon for an abbreviated procedure to a avoid a full-scale impeachment trial, the difference between this proposal and a straight motion to dismiss, why some senators feel it's important to have witnesses, how the possibility of censure fits into the Lieberman/Gordon proposal, and whether the Senate will be able to come up with a consensus on how to proceed. "Ready for War?" a Tom Beardon report on the decrease in proficiency of U.S. military units due to downsizing, increased use of military in foreign non-combat missions, the decrease of military training funds, and whether Congress? commitment of $1.1 billion to address these issues will really solve the problems. "Long Term Care", excerpts from President Clinton?s announcement of $6 .2 billion to help families with long-term medical care expenses, followed by a discussion with Susan Dentzer, who explained the problems and expenses of long-term care and how President Clinton?s proposals will help. "Unborn Child Abuse," a report by Elizabeth Brackett on the Wisconsin legislature, which says that pregnant women must be ordered into treatment if they are abusing drugs and alcohol, and whether the law is effective in getting women into treatment or sending them into hiding. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6335

    "Newsmaker," an interview with Secretary of State Madeleine Albright about two issues: the purpose of new initiatives towards Cuba allowing Americans to send money to needy Cubans, along with more air flights, food sales, and direct mail service; and whether the exchange of fire in the air over Iraq's southern no-fly zone should be viewed as a new major escalation. "Making History," a discussion with former senators John Danforth, Warren Rudman, Dale Bumpers and Bennett Johnston about the upcoming impeachment trial, why it is so hard to reach a consensus on how the trial should proceed, the pressures faced by the Senate on the issue, and if it is possible to have a non-partisan trial. "Hustling Scandal?" after a background report on the media's increase in reporting on the sexual affairs of politicians, Tom Barrett, Tom Fiedler, Doyle McManus and Larry Sabato debated whether such reporting is attack journalism, the media's claim that the main journalistic interests are not about sex but about lying and hypocrisy, and the issues of checkbook journalism and the position that mainstream media is in due to "fringe media" such a Larry Flint setting the agenda. "Bowl Blitz," Elizabeth Farnsworth and John Feinstein discussed the recent victory of University of Tennessee over Florida State in the Fiesta Bowl, the current ranking system that can lead to undefeated teams not getting a chance to compete in the championships, the low television ratings for Bowl games, the pros and cons of corporate sponsorship for college sports, and Keith Jackson's retirement from sports casting. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6336

    "The 106th Congress," a Kwame Holman report on the beginning of the 106th Congress, including a look at the make up of the congressional seats, the choice of Dennis Hastert as the new House Speaker and his address to the House, and the swearing in of the new Senate members. "Making History," a discussion with Representatives Bill McCollum and Charles Canady on where the negotiations stand in the Senate over the format of the impeachment trial, why they feel it is important for the Senate to hear witnesses, and whether evidence can be presented without graphic testimony. "Making History," a discussion with columnists Bob Oliphant and David Brooks on the lack of progress by the Senate in reaching a bipartisan arrangement on how to proceed with the impeachment trial, the opposition by Democrats to calling witnesses, why the Republicans feel compelled proceed with the trial even if there are not enough votes to impeach, and the role of the House managers in the process. "NASDAQ High Climber," after a background report on how NASDAQ works and its current high rise in stock prices and composite index, Reena Aggarwal and John Coffee discussed with Phil Ponce the similarities and differences between NASDAQ and the NY Stock Exchange, what the composite index means, the large volume of high-tech stocks in the NASDAQ market which is leading to the current rise, and what the public should expect of the market in the future. "Freud's Legacy," a report by Susan Dentzer on Sigmund Freud's work, the debate over whether he was one of the leading lights of the 20th century or close to a fraud, and how the controversy over these competing views has dogged a current exhibition about Freud at the Library of Congress. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6337

    "Impeachment Trial," coverage of the opening of the impeachment trial against President Clinton, including extended excerpts of the opening formalities, the reading of the articles of impeachment, the swearing in of Chief Justice William Rehnquist and his subsequent swearing in of all 100 Senators to serve as jurors, followed by excerpts of Trent Lott and Tom Daschle announcing that they will hold a meeting of all senators to decide how to conduct the Senate trial and Joe Lockhart's statements that the White House has offered to the Senate to forgo some of their rights in order to expedite the proceedings. "Making History," a discussion with Senators Kay Bailey Hutchinson, Thad Cochran, Harry Reid, and Byron Dorgan on where matters stand in regards to how and when the impeachment proceedings will go on, their personal positions in calling witnesses, the dramatic impact of their being sworn in as jurors, and the hopes and confidence that a bipartisan agreement will be reached on how to proceed with the trial. "Making History," Doris Kearns Goodwin, Michael Beschloss, Haynes Johnson, and Buckner Melton gave their reactions to the opening of the impeachment trial and speculated on whether the Senate is having trouble deciding how to proceed because history and the Constitution do not offer much guidance, how the oath of impartiality has thrust the senators into a new role, and what the chief justice's role will be. "Making History," Mark Shields and Paul Gigot gave their perspective on the day's proceedings and discussed why the Senate has been unable to reach a consensus on how to proceed with the trial, the pressure brought by the House and White House on the Senate on the issue of calling witnesses, and the institutional loyalty of the senators. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6338

    "Impeachment Trail," after a background report by Kwame Holman on the unanimous agreement reached by the Senate on how to proceed with the impeachment trial, the exact details of the trial agreement and the White House's response, Jim Lehrer spoke with Senator Tom Daschle on the specifics of the agreement, what procedures would happen if witnesses were called, what Senate activities would still go on during the trial, how the agreement will impact the president's State of the Union address, and the importance of bipartisanship in the agreement. Senators Olympia Snowe and Mike DeWine then gave their perspectives on the agreement, the issue of witnesses, the agreement's time frame, and the importance of a fair trial and fair process. "Political Wrap," Paul Gigot and Mark Shields discussed the bipartisan trial agreement reached by the Senate, the implications of all 100 Senators confirming the agreement, the importance of witnesses to the trial, and whether President Clinton should give his State of the Union address during this time. "Embassy Bombings," a Phil Ponce report on the American embassy bombings on August 7, 1998, the resulting investigation, and subsequent report by Admiral William Crowe that criticized both Congress and the Executive branch for failing to protect American embassies and the people who work in them, followed by an interview with Admiral Crowe, who addressed specific details of his report, the lack of "stand off" distance for most embassies, and the new threat of transnational terrorists and large bombs. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6339

    "Standing By Their Man," Leon Panetta, Yvonne Scruggs-Leftwich, Linda DiVall, and Ralph Reed discussed the staunch loyalty to President Clinton by both the public and his staff, despite the past years' events. Possible reasons for this loyalty included his continued intense focus on popular governmental issues despite his own problems, the quality of his opposition and their credibility as critics, the public's perception that his personal issues were an invasion of privacy, the good economy, and Clinton's personal charm. "Intelligence Gathering," a background report on the United Nations' inspection program in Iraq (UNSCOM), Iraq's past assertions that the UNSCOM program was being used as an espionage tool for the United States, and recent newspaper stories in the U.S. that appear to confirm these charges; followed by an interview with Thomas Pickering, who denied the allegations put forth by Iraq and former UNSCOM inspector Scott Ritter and went on to explain the U.S.' position and involvement with UNSCOM. "Jack the Dripper," a report on the life, work, and influence of Jackson Pollack, focusing on the retrospective of his works currently on exhibit at New York's Museum of Modern Art. "Force of Nature," an essay by Richard Rodriguez on the impact of natural disasters such as hurricanes and earthquakes on poor Latin American communities and how those forces of nature drive an international migration of the poor to other counties such as the United States to find work and shelter. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6340

    "Dean of the Senate," after an overview of the Senate impeachment trial calendar, Senator Robert Byrd spoke with Margaret Warner about his satisfaction with the impeachment trial's ground rules and the importance of the trial being bipartisan, his opinion on the necessity of witnesses, whether the trial debate should be private or public, and the inappropriateness of the House or White House lobbying senators during the trial. "Freshman Views," an interview with Senators George Voinovich and Evan Bayh, in which they agreed with Senator Byrd's remarks as to the importance and stakes involved in the impeachment trial, then voiced their opinions on the issues of calling witnesses and whether the trial should be made public or kept private. "Crime Wave," a Charles Krause report on the extraordinary increase in crime in Mexico City since the democratic election of Mayor Cuauhtemoc Cardenas; the effects this problem is having on his political career; the demand by residents for increased security and the rise of personal bodyguards, armored cars, and security services; and the factors in the breakdown in law and order, including the powerful Mexican drug Mafia, the juxtaposition of great wealth and great poverty, and the skyrocketing police corruption. "Supreme Court Watch," Phil Ponce and Jan Crawford Greenburg discussed the case heard today by the Supreme Court concerning whether a school should be responsible for student on student sexual harassment, examining the importance of the case and its potential impact on schools across the country, the facts of the case, the arguments of the attorney and Justice Department on behalf of the student, what questions the justices asked the attorneys, and the justices' concerns about the arguments. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6341

    "Presiding Officer," a Kwame Holman report on Chief Justice William Rehnquist, including his education and professional background, his no-nonsense reputation, and his substantial knowledge of impeachment trials; followed by a discussion with Stuart Taylor and Jeffrey Rosen who speculated on how Justice Rehnquist's judicial style will affect the trial, whether his views on impeachment will be a factor, whether he will be an active judge or defer decisions to the Senate, what to expect from the opening day of the trial, and why the White House hasn't made motions on the charges yet. "Prime Time News," a report by Terence Smith on the rise and popularity of television news magazines, the success of "60 Minutes", "Dateline" and "20/20", the high profit and low cost of new magazines as opposed to entertainment shows, the issue of public interest journalism versus entertainment journalism and the temptation to "dumb down" content to gather better ratings, the minute-by-minute audience research gathered about these programs and how producers utilize it, and the ways news magazines attract celebrity interviews. "Ending An Era," after a background report on Chicago Bull's star Michael Jordan including the history of his career and an extended excerpt of his retirement announcement, Jerry West and Fred Mitchell discussed Jordan's great physical skill and demeanor, his long domination of the basketball profession, whether he seemed relieved to be leaving the sport and his loss of motivation, the reaction of the fans, what his retirement means to the league, and what makes an athlete evolve from being a sports figure into a major personality. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6342

    "The Managers' Case," A Kwame Holman report on the first day of the impeachment trail of President Clinton, including extended excerpts of: the opening statements made by Representative Henry Hyde, the cases presented by impeachment managers Rep. James Sensenbrenner and Rep. Ed Bryant, the case for the second article of impeachment, presented by Rep. Asa Hutchinson, and the case for the charge of perjury contained in the first article, presented by Rep. James Rogan. "Legal Views," Phil Ponce, Douglas Kmiec, and Bruce Yannett discussed how effective the House managers were in presenting their impeachment case today before the Senate, whether one article of impeachment is stronger than the other, if the managers had made compelling arguments for the need to call witnesses, how much of their arguments were geared towards the American public, and the weaknesses of their presentation, including the risk of redundancy. "Overview," an overview perspective by Doris Kearns Goodwin, Michael Beschloss, Haynes Johnson, and David Brooks about the first day of testimony in the impeachment trial, in which they noted that the day's events didn't feel historic but boring, repetitive and subdued, and speculated on the likelihood that the presentation has not swayed public opinion; how the championing of this cause will impact upon the Republican convention in 2000; whether the managers had moved any closer to getting witnesses called, and the weariness of the American public due to dealing with these issues since 1994. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6343

    "The Managers' Case," a Kwame Holman report on the second day of the impeachment hearings, with extended excerpts of Rep. Bill McCollum summarizing the evidence, Representatives George Gekas, Steve Chabot, Christopher Cannon, and Bob Barr giving arguments on how criminal laws would apply to the charges, and an objection by senator Tom Harkin to the senators being addressed as "jurors" by the House managers. "Overview," a Kwame Holman report on the reaction of Senators to the case presented by the House Managers and their thoughts about calling witnesses, followed by a discussion with Phil Ponce, David Gergen, Yvonne Scruggs-Leftwich and George Terwilliger, who speculated about how well the managers presented the charges and whether they were presenting the case to the Senate or to the public; if the Managers made a successful case for calling witnesses and the necessity of witnesses; and why Senator Tom Harkin made his objection. "Political Wrap," Mark Shields and Paul Gigot discussed their thoughts on the day's impeachment proceedings, including whether there was any sign that there were enough votes to remove the president and the lack of evidence that would change the dynamics of the vote, the chances of witnesses being called, why Bob Barr got to give the summation and his political impact, the chances of President Clinton being called to testify and if he would be offered immunity, and if it is a good idea for Clinton to go ahead with the State of the Union address. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6344

    "Killing the Truce," a Louise Bates report on renewed fighting in Racak Kosovo between Serbs and ethnic Albanians and the Serbs defiance of the international community and NATO, followed by a discussion with Robert Hunter, James Hooper, and Jonathan Landay who addressed events leading to the current situation in Kosovo, the details of the recent massacre of 45 ethnic Albanians; the expulsion of the head of the international verification mission, William Walker, over his assertion that Serbian security forces carried out the massacre; the options NATO has in handling the situation; and the strength of the Kosovo Liberation Army. "Witnessing History," a report by Terence Smith on how the impeachment trial is viewed outside the Washington area, including the major networks', local news' and newspapers' lack of coverage. A discussion with Margaret Warner and Andrew Kohut on recent polls that reflect the public's lack of interest in the trial; the public's view of how the Senate is handling the trial; the issue of having live witnesses; the President's popularity; and the satisfaction of the public's standard of living. A discussion with college newspaper editors Jin Whang, Gregory Thomas, Dan Alter, Sharif Durhams, and Christine Whelan on whether the polls reflect student views, why the issues are failing to engage students, whether the trial strikes them as fair or partisan, and what they believe the actual issues of the trial are. "Building Diversity," a Spencer Michels report on the latest efforts to achieve diversity in California's state law schools, such as University of California's Boalt Hall and Hastings Law School, in light of Proposition 209, which requires the state schools to drop Affirmative Action in admissions, while private schools such as Stanford University do not fall under the act and can continue with the practice. "Freedom," a reading by poet laureate Robert Pinsky of Robert Hayden's "Frederick Douglass" in honor of Martin Luther King Day. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6345

    "The President's Defense," a Kwame Holman report on the first day of testimony for the defense in the Senate impeachment trial by White House counsel Charles Ruff, with extended excerpts of his outlining the events leading to the impeachment charges and his overview of how the defense team will argue against each of the two articles of impeachment. "Legal Views," a discussion with Bruce Yannett and John McGinnis on how effective White House counsel Charles Ruff was in attacking the House managers' case in the Senate impeachment trial, the implicit threat made by Ruff that Linda Tripp would be subpoenaed if witnesses were called, the importance of offering an alternate explanation of events, and the persuasiveness of Ruff in arguing that the charges do not rise to the level of a removable offense. "Overview," Mark Shields and Paul Gigot discussed whether White House counsel Charles Ruff changed any of the dynamics of the Senate impeachment trial; Ruff's "threat" of calling Linda Tripp as a witness and whether witnesses would be called; the unreality of President Clinton making the State of the Union address during the impeachment trial; predictions on what he will talk about; and how the Democrats and Republicans might conduct themselves during the speech. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6346

    "The President's Defense," a Kwame Holman report on the second day of the president's defense in the Senate impeachment trial, including extended excerpts of White House Counsel Gregory Craig's defense of the first impeachment article of perjury and House Deputy Counsel Cheryl Mills' defense of the second impeachment article, obstruction of justice. "State of the Union," a Kwame Holman report on various reactions to President Clinton's State of the Union address, including the welcome response by 20,000 citizens in Buffalo, NY, to which the president traveled after the speech, Alan Greenspan's skepticism to the president's Social Security proposal, the House of Representatives' positive reaction, and senators' reactions and how the impeachment trial affected their perception of the speech. "Denver Views," Elizabeth Farnsworth discussed with a panel of Denver voters their reaction to the speech, the issue of the country having a surplus projected for so many years, the president's demeanor and whether he spoke about issues which concerned them, their reaction to two of their representatives not attending the speech, and their thoughts on the impeachment trial, how it affects them and the President's continued popularity despite the trial. "Overview," Doris Kearns Goodwin, Michael Beschloss, Joan Hoff and Haynes Johnson gave their reaction to the State of the Union speech and discussed how President Clinton historically uses this speech as a springboard away from his personal issues and the lack of focus this time on any major programs, the "ghost" of what great achievements might have been made had there been no investigation and impeachment trial, whether the White House defense has raised reasonable doubts about the impeachment case, the lack of interest by the public to the trial, and the degree of artificiality to the State of the Union speech. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6347

    "The President's Defense," a Kwame Holman report on the third and final day of Clinton's defense in the Senate impeachment trial with extended excerpts of President Clinton's lawyer David Kendall addressing the charges of obstructing justice, coercing Monica Lewinsky to lie, making misleading statements to White House aides, and improper involvement in getting Ms. Lewinsky a job; and excerpts of former Senator Dale Bumpers' closing remarks, in which he spoke of the president's character, the impact of Clinton's indiscretions on his family, the lack of compassion by the House managers, and the chaos which might ensue should the President be convicted. "Views from the Senate," Senators Charles Grassley, Robert Bennett, Barbara Boxer, Joseph Biden, John Chafee, and Patrick Leahy discussed whether each has enough information to make a judgement in the impeachment trail and the need for witnesses, if each plans to submit questions to the counsels, whether it is conceivable that a final vote could happen after the questioning, the impact of former Senator Dale Bumper's closing speech, and if the bipartisanship that brought the Senate together was about to fall apart. "Call for Civility," excerpts from former President George Bush's speech given at a Senate lecture series at which he commented on how things work, or should work, in the US Senate, including the 1991 decision on sending troops into Iraq, and his worries about the decreasing civility in the Congress and the tabloid journalism of mainstream newspapers. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6348

    "Questions and Answers / Legal Views," first a Kwame Holman report on the questioning phase of the impeachment trial, including extended excerpts of specific questions and answers regarding the job search for Monica Lewinsky and each side's position on calling witnesses; followed by a discussion with Bruce Yannett and Doug Kmiec about how well the House managers were able to rehabilitate their factual case, the observation that the factual disputes have mostly been about the obstruction charge, and the judgement that neither side has made a better argument about whether to call witnesses or not. The segment then continued with excerpts of both legal sides addressing the issue of the House managers including in Article One charges of perjury that were already rejected by the House and the broader constitutional questions of whether the president's actions amount to impeachable offenses, followed by an analysis by Yannett and Kmiec over how well each side did on arguing the legal standards and constitutional argument defining "high crimes and misdemeanors." "Views from the Senate," a Kwame Holman report on reaction by Senate members to the day's events, including Senator Robert Byrd's news release stating he will introduce a motion to dismiss the charges, Republican Orrin Hatch's agreement that there are not enough votes to convict and his suggestion of an adjournment motion, Phil Graham's prediction that a motion to dismiss would fail, Christopher Dodd and Edward Kennedy's endorsement of the motion to dismiss, and House Manager Henry Hyde's reaction and comments about the motion. "Political Wrap," Mark Shields and Paul Gigot discussed how close the impeachment trial is to conclusion, the significance of Robert Byrd's intention to have the charges dismissed and Orrin Hatch's suggestion of adjournment, whether the momentum has changed regarding witnesses, how the length of the trial could affect the political parties, how the State of the Union address played out in the Senate and whether any of the issues raised in the speech could be addressed before the conclusion of the impeachment trail. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6349

    "The Impeachment Trial," a Kwame Holman report on the day's impeachment proceedings, including senators' speculations on the path the trial will take, the delay in opening the proceedings as the parties tried to agree on what to do next, excerpts of arguments by House managers and the White House counsel on the motion to dismiss, and the defeat of a motion to open the ensuing Senate debate on the motion to dismiss. "Regional Views," Terrence Smith spoke with columnists Cynthia Tucker, Robert Kittle, Patrick McGuigan, Lee Cullum, and Susan Albright about whether the Senate should dismiss the impeachment charges, whether witnesses should be called and what would be accomplished by their appearance, the virtues of a straight up or down vote on the articles of impeachment, the political repercussions of the trial, whether the Senate is making a legal, moral, or political judgement, and the personal toll the trial has taken on Monica Lewinsky, the president, and his family. "Going for the Gold," a Betty Ann Bowser report on the International Olympic Committee's announcement of recommendations to curtail further scandal in light of the accusation that the 2002 winter games were awarded to Salt Lake City because of bribes and gifts received by IOC members, details of other accusations of improper activities in the Nagano, Sydney, and Atlanta games, the impact of the IOC's announcement on Salt Lake City and the ensuing investigations by US Olympic Committee, the Salt Lake Olympic Ethics Committee, the Utah Attorney General's Office, and the US Justice Department, and Salt Lake City's fears that the games will lose money and sponsorship in the wake of the scandal. "Supreme Court Watch," Phil Ponce and Jan Crawford Greenberg discussed two recent Supreme Court decisions, the first being a rejection by the court of the census bureau's proposal to do a statistical sampling rather than a full census, ruling that statistical sampling cannot be used for the purposes of determining House of Representative seats, and the second an interpretation of the 1996 Telecommunications Act in which the court ruled the FCC does have jurisdiction to set pricing formulas for what the large long distance telephone companies would have to pay to get into the local telephone markets. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6350

    "The Witness Issue / Overview," a Kwame Holman report on the debate in the Senate over calling witnesses in the impeachment trial, including excerpts of the House managers and White House counsel's arguments on the motion to call witnesses, followed by a discussion with Tom Oliphant and Stuart Taylor about why the witness dispute has become such a big issue and if it is a metaphor for how long the trial will last, whether the House managers really think witnesses will sway any votes, the political calculations of the senators in how they will vote for or against witnesses, and their prediction that witnesses will be called. "Newsmaker," an interview with General Wesley Clark about the present fighting in Kosovo and NATO's threat of air strikes, whether NATO air strikes and ground forces will be necessary to stop the fighting, Clark's meeting with President Milosevic, which had little results, NATO's goal in applying force and plan to take action against both Serbian security forces and the Kosovo Liberation Army, the plans to extract the 700 verification members already in Kosovo, why Americans should be concerned about Kosovo, and his confidence that he will have unity among the nations to permit air strikes. "In Memoriam," a Phil Ponce profile on the life of Sarah "Sadie" Delaney, the first African American woman to teach home economics in white New York City public schools, who passed away at age 109, followed by a profile of the achievements of preeminent choral conductor Robert Shaw, who passed away at age 82. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6351

    "The Impeachment Trial / Views from the Senate," a Kwame Holman report on the Senate votes on a motion to end the impeachment trial and a motion to subpoena witnesses, which were split along party lines with the exception of Democrat Senator Russ Fiengold; Senate minority leader Tom Daschle's call for a conclusion to the trial; and reaction by House managers and White House counsel to the vote for subpoenas. A discussion with Senators Robert Bennett, Tom Harkin, Sam Brownback, and Harry Reid on the importance of the two votes and of continuing with the trial when it is evident there are not enough votes to convict, whether this trial is still a bipartisan effort, the need for a specific end date to the trial, how the witnesses will be deposed, the question of sanctions, and if their party affiliation is a factor in their decision on how they will vote in the impeachment. "Parkinson's Disease," a Betty Ann Bowser report on Parkinson's Disease, the famous people such as Michael J. Fox, Janet Reno, Johnny Cash, the Pope, and Billy Graham who have been diagnosed with the disease, an explanation of the affliction, the recent announcement that unknown chemicals in the environment might cause the disease, and a look at treatments, both surgical and medicinal, which can lesson the symptoms with varying degrees. "Papal Appeal," a Phil Ponce report on Pope John Paul II's visit to St. Louis, the thousands who greeted his arrival, and the youth rally that was attended by more than 20,000; a discussion with George Weigel, Reverend Richard McBrien and Helen Rose Ebaugh on the Pope's efforts to energize the church in the US with this visit, the extent to which Americans agree with the Pope on issues such as birth control, women priests, divorce, and homosexuality, whether the Pope has been a non-authoritarian teacher, whether American Catholics are "cafeteria Catholics" who pick and choose what issues they approve of, and the relevance of the Pope in the lives of American Catholics. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6352

    "Missile Defense," a report by Elizabeth Farnsworth on Secretary of Defense William Cohen's announcement of $6.6 billion to build a national missile defense system to defend attacks from places such as North Korea, the growing concern over the threat of missile attacks, and how this new plan potentially violates the Anti-Ballistic Missile (ABM) Treaty; a follow up discussion with Robert Bell, Donald Rumsfeld, Richard Garwin, and John Rhinelander about details of the proposed plan, the necessity of such a system, the evolving threat of North Korea, Iran, and Iraq and continued threat from Russia and China, the inability of the proposed missiles to destroy bomblets, and the affect this plan will have on the ABM Treaty and the amendments that would have to be made. "What Next? / Overview," a Kwame Holman report on the negotiations in the Senate to reach an agreement on the rules to conduct the depositions of three witnesses in the impeachment trial, the major disagreement over the issue of videotaping, the delays caused by the negotiations, and the introduction of two plans on how to proceed that were voted on in a straight party line; followed by a discussion with Tom Oliphant and David Brooks about the difference between the two plans and the failure of the two parties to get together on the issues, why videotaped testimony is such a huge issue, and the possibility of a split verdict-a vote on "finding fact" and a separate vote of removal--and how it differs from censure. "Trash Talk," a Betty Ann Bowser report on the 3 million tons of solid waste coming into Virginia every year, much of it from New York City, which has triggered angry exchanges between Mayor Rudolph Giuliani and Virginia officials, the reasons why Virginia has attracted mega-landfills, the concerns of residents over destruction of ground water and traffic congestion, the plans for a port to be built on the Charles River to move garbage in by barge, and the Virginia legislature's proposals to ban garbage barges and limit the amount of trash trucked in. "Through the Looking Glass," in honor of the impeachment trial and Charles Dodgson's (Lewis Carroll) birthday, poet laureate Robert Pinsky recited the poem that is read to the jury as evidence during Alice's trial from "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland." [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6353

    "Party Lines/Political Wrap/Historical Views," a Kwame Holman report on the House and Senate's initial pledges to have a bipartisan impeachment investigation and trial and the subsequent strong partisanship that ensued; followed by a discussion with Mark Shields and Paul Gigot on the high levels of congressional partisanship, why the bipartisanship didn't hold, the polarization of Americans over President Clinton, and how the Republicans and Democrats justify their votes; followed by a discussion with Robert Dallek, Joan Hoff, Buck Melton, and Michael Beschloss about the country's history of partisanship, the fact that an impeachment is a political fight and would be naturally more partisan than most congressional decisions, and whether Congress is more partisan than it used to be. "Gender Gap," a Betty Ann Bowser report on a study by the American Association of University Women that concluded that girls were less comfortable than boys with technology and computers, resulting in fewer girls taking advanced computer courses, possible reasons for this gap, such as society's message about technology to boys and girls, and the actual gains girls have made over the years in becoming more comfortable with computers. "Playing for Dollars," a Phil Ponce report on the costs to cities that want to attract or keep major league sports, such as expensive stadiums being built in Hartford CT to attract the New England Patriots and in Denver CO to keep the Broncos from moving; followed by a discussion with John Rowland, Andrew Zimbalist and John Feinstein about whether the new stadiums are more about urban revitalization then football, whether it's a good investment of public monies, the high costs of seats which prohibit average fans from attending games, and the instability of NFL teams' locations. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6354

    "Weighing in the Numbers," a Kwame Holman report on the details of President Clinton's year 2000 budget, including how the surplus will be spent, increases for defense, education, and expanding Medicare eligibility, tax cuts for long term care and stay-at home parents, new taxes on cigarettes, and limits on tax breaks for corporations and wealthy investors; followed by a debate between Jack Lew and Senator Pete Domenici on whether 38% of the surplus should be spent or given back to the public, the possibility of the surplus actually being used to preserve Medicare, if the budget reflects a return to "big government," and their agreement that more funds need to go to public education. "Indicting the President?" Margaret Warner report on a New York Times article reporting that Kenneth Starr is weighing the possibility of asking a federal grand jury to indict President Clinton while he's still in office, the negative reaction by senators, and the White House's call for a federal judge to hold Starr and his staff in contempt for leaking grand jury information; followed by a discussion with Eric Freedman and Ken Gormley on reasons why or why not Starr has the constitutional authority to seek an indictment, how the 25th Amendment factors into the issue, and what would prevent an unscrupulous prosecutor from usurping the impeachment process. "Bilingual Education," an update by Spencer Michels on the progress of California's Prop. 227, which was designed to eliminate bilingual education, the varying degrees of compliance throughout the state with some cities using waivers to keep most children in bilingual programs, and the arguments for and against bilingual education. "Dialogue," a conversation with Virginia Postrel, who discussed her book, "The Future and Its Enemies", her position that the future should evolve away from a contest between traditional left and right into a method of discovery through trial and error, the trend of today's youth to be more entrepreneurial in the shaping of their lives, what "open-ended progress" means, the worries of decaying moral values, and her assertion that we will have a much richer future if we allow more experimentation and feedback. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6355

    "Overview," Tom Oliphant and Bill Kristol discussed whether anything new was learned in the impeachment trial deposition of Vernon Jordan, whether the House managers a still pushing for live witnesses, what will happen to the video depositions, what the "finding of fact" vote is and the possibility of it being put to a vote, and the fact that there is still no chance that the President will be impeached. "Money for the Military," a Kwame Holman report on the approval by Congress to increase military spending, William Cohen and Henry Shelton's explanation of the Clinton military budget to members of the House Armed Services Committee, and their concerns that the increased spending would not be enough. A discussion with William Lynn, Duncan Hunter, and Barney Frank in which Mr. Lynn reasoned why the US needs to spend more on defense after the Cold War, Rep. Hunter faulted the president for coming up with a 5-year plan when he will only be in office for 2 more years: and Rep. Frank felt there was a mismatch between the type of post-Cold War threats and the military's spending. "Surplus Politics," a Susan Dentzer report on President Clinton's proposal of using the budget surplus to save Social Security; the details of his plan, including investing Social Security reserves in the stock market and creating Universal Savings Accounts; Alan Greenspan's endorsement of reducing the federal debt through surpluses but his concern that investing Social Security monies in the stock market is not politically feasible; and the confusion by members of Congress over details of the plan. "Tracking AIDS," Dr. Anthony Fauci and Laurie Garrett discussed findings being released this week from a Chicago AIDS conference, including the recent discovery that it is highly likelyt that the AIDS HIV-1 virus originated in the chimpanzee and how this information might help researches develop a vaccine, the results of a study which investigated the way AIDS is transmitted from mother to unborn child, and new research on the increasing lack of effectiveness of AIDS drugs. "WW II Encore," an essay by Anne Taylor Fleming on the renewed interest in World War II through such films as "Saving Private Ryan" and "The Thin Red Line" and recently published books by Tom Brokaw and Stephen Ambrose and the possible reasons for this nostalgia, including the need for heroes and the guilt of the baby boomers who did not go to war or who possibly side-stepped the draft. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6356

    Trial Excerpts [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6357

    "Trial Excerpts", a Kwame Holman background report featuring extensive excerpts from the day's events in the impeachment trial following the videotape deposition from the prosecution's three witnesses. This was followed by a discussion with Tom Oliphant of the Boston Globe and David Frum of the Weekly Standard on the impeachment trial, discussing what impact Sidney Blumenthal, Verdon Jordan, and Monica Lewinsky's testimony had on the Senate trial, whether or not this marked the end of the trial, and if the testimony affected the House manager's case. "Newsmaker: Secretary Albright", a Phil Ponce interview with Secretary of State Madeleine Albright on the conflict in Kosovo as peace talks resume between NATO and the Serb and Kosovo Albanian rebels. Albright discussed what the talks will entail; the peace agreement that will be extended to the disputing parties during the talks; how NATO will act if the groups fail to comply with the accord; and whether or not the administration is likely to consider sending American troops to the region as a NATO peace-keeping force. "Stocking Up Online", a Paul Solman feature on the Internet phenomenon known as day trading, in which individuals and brokers can buy and trade stocks in an effort to capitalize on the momentous shifts of volatile Internet stocks. This was followed by a conversation in which Paul Kedrosky and Mike Mandel exchanged views on the issue and on how daytrading affects the stock market. select pdb_seg_info_subcat.episode_nola, pdb_seg_info_subcat.pif_nola, pdb_seg_info_subcat.ep_seg_segment_number,pdb_seg_info_subcat.ep_seg_subject_category,pdb_seg_info_subcat_val.ep_seg_subject_desc from pdb_seg_info_subcat, pdb_seg_info_subcat_val where pdb_seg_info_subcat.episode_nola = ? and pdb_seg_info_subcat.ep_seg_segment_number=? and pdb_seg_info_subcat.ep_seg_subject_category=pdb_seg_info_subcat_val.ep_seg_subject_category order by pdb_seg_info_subcat.ep_seg_subject_category [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6358

    "Man of Peace", a background report by Phil Ponce on the legacy of King Hussein as his health is in steady decline. This was followed by a Margaret Warner discussion with Edward Djerejian, the director of the James Baker Institute for Public Policy at Rice University, Nora Boustany, the diplomatic columnist for the Washington Post, Naseer Aruri, the chancellor professor at the University of Massachusetts at Dartmouth, and Robert Satloff, the executive director of the Washington Institute for Near East Policy, on the king's life, focusing on Hussein as a reformer; how he will be remembered; and how his reign has and will continue to impact the Middle East. "Other People's Business", a Terrence Smith background report on the recent issue of People Magazine on Chelsea Clinton, which has provoked mass debate among the public on whether or not certain people should be kept out of the spotlight. This was followed by a conversation with Gene Gibbons, managing editor of the Internet site stateline.org, and author Elizabeth Drew on the controversy and on the state of journalism in the face of the impeachment scandal. "Political Wrap", a conversation with Wall Street journalist Paul Gigot and syndicated columnist Mark Shields on the week's events of the impeachment scandal as it comes to an end, focusing on what is in store for the next week; and the Republican desire to end the trial. "Finally: Tip Off", a Jim Compton report from Seattle on the end of the NBA lockout and the return of professional basketball. The report focused on how season tickets will be affected for the Seattle team, The Supersonics; how the economics of the game were affected by the lockout; and the impact of the terms of the NBA settlement on players' salaries. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6359

    "Closing Arguments", a Kwame Holman report on the closing arguments of the impeachment trial in which extensive excerpts from the testimony was featured, including remarks from impeachment manager James Sensenbrenner, Christopher Cox, George Gekas, Steve Buyer, Charles Canady and Bill McCullom. This was followed by a conversation with Tom Oliphant of the Boston Globe and David Brooks of The Weekly Standard on whether or not the manager's arguments were effective; how the vote is likely to unfold; and the significance of the vote. "His Father's Son", a Phil Ponce background report on the funeral of King Hussein, who died after a long battle with cancer. The report showed the diverse crowd who gathered to mourn the death of Jordan's long-time king, including Yassir Arafat, Benjamin Netanyahu, George Bush, and Prince Charles. This was followed by a conversation in which former US ambassador to Jordan Rosco Suddarth, Johns Hopkins University professor Fouad Ajami, and Laurie Brand, associate professor of the University of Southern California, exchanged views on the challenges now presented to Jordan following his death, including its struggling economy; the danger that its neighboring countries pose for the country's stability; and how difficult it will be for Hussein's eldest son to reign with the same level of support as his father. "Working With Emotional Intelligence", a David Gergen dialogue with author Daniel Goleman on his book, "Working with Emotional Intelligence". He discussed the premise of his book, which states that people's success is not determined by their IQ but by their emotional intelligence; the factors determining one's emotional intelligence; and how he conducted research for this study. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6360

    "The Impeachment Trial", a Kwame Holman report on the impeachment trial, as the Senate addressed how it would proceed with the final deliberations and whether the testimony would be open or closed; followed by Margaret Warner discussion with US Senators Kay Bailey Hutchison (R-TX), John Chafee (R-RI), Christopher Dodd (D-CT) and Paul Wellstone (D-MN) on the decision for the final deliberations to be closed; the mood of the Senate; and predictions for the outcome of the trial. "A Question of Speech", a Lee Hochberg report on an Oregon court ruling against an anti-abortion group that posted "Wanted" signs for abortion practitioners on its internet site. The group was found guilty and was asked to pay $104 million in compensation. "Remembering Iris Murdock", a background report on the death of novelist Dame Iris Murdoch, who died at age 79 as a result of a long battle with Alzheimer's disease. Elizabeth Farnworth joined with british novelist Martin Amis and James Atlas of the New Yorker magazine to discuss the legacy of the acclaimed writer and the impact her work on people throughout her lifetime. "Snuffing the Sniffles", a Susan Dentzer report on the rise of the common cold, exploring the best remedies for a cold; its cause; and potential cures. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6361

    "Investigating the Investigator", a background report by Margaret Warner on a pending Justice Department inquiry into the practices of special counsel Kenneth Starr, including a charge that his office violated precudures when it investigated Monica Lewinsky last year. This was followed by a conversation in which Anthony Lewis of The New York Times and Stuart Taylor of National Journal and Newsweek exchange views on whether these claims against the independent counsel are warranted and what this means for Ken Starr. "Enduring Playwright", a Paul Solman report on the 50th anniversary of "Death of a Salesman," now being revived on Broadway, in which he discussed the play with its author, Arthur Miller. "Politics of Education", a Phil Ponce background report on the debate in Congress over the federal government's role in providing funding for education. This was followed by a discussion with secretary of education Richard Riley and chairman of the House Education and the Workforce Committee William Goodling (R-PA) on how the federal government should be accountable for education spending, focusing on Clinton's call for more federal government funding standards for states; what impact federal regulation would have on state school systems; and whether the government should take this kind of role in education. "Poisoned Water", a Fred De Sam Lazaro report on recent concerns that waters in Bangladesh contain poisonous arsenic and are contaminating the drinking water, putting the population at risk for a dangerous epidemic. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6362

    "The Impeachment Trial", a Kwame Holman background report on the impeachment trial following the closing arguments, featuring remarks from various senators on how they voted on the two articles of impeachment. This was followed by a Margaret Warner conversation in which Tom Oliphant of the Boston Globe and David Brooks gave reactions to the senators' announcements, including views on why specific Republicans defected from the party line and voted to acquit the president. "Politics of Education", a Spencer Michaels report on an education initiative launched by California's newly elected governor, Gray Davis, which is intended to raise the standards and accountability of the California school system. The report looked at the proposed bills to see if the system will see real reforms and talked to students and teachers on their opinions of the new standards outlined in the bill. "Going for the Gold", a Phil Ponce conversation with Anita Defranz of the US and International Olympic Committee (IOC) and Utah's Governor Mike Leavitt on a report released on the impropriety that occurred behind the bidding for the 2002 Salt Lake City Olympic Games, in which various IOC members received gifts from officials from bidding cities that amounted to millions of dollars. "Inside North Korea", an Elizabeth Farnsworth conversation with Peter Hayes, the director of the Nautilus Institute at Berkeley, on the project he started in North Korea in which he worked with North Koreans in a non-governmental manner to install a wind-power system. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6363

    "Not Guilty", a Kwame Holman report on the impeachment verdict reached by the Senate, voting President Clinton not guilty on the two articles of impeachment of perjury before a federal grand jury and obstruction of justice. The report included extensive excerpts from the proceedings of the final deliberations; an outline of the votes by party; a statement by President Clinton in the Rose Garden in which he apologized for the past events and looked to reconciliation and rebuilding the nation. This was followed by reactions from house managers Henry Hyde, James Rogan, Charles Canady, Steve Buyer, and Asa Hutchinson. "Senate Views", Jim Lehrer spoke with four Republican senators, Robert Bennett (R-Utah), Orrin Hatch (R-Utah), John Warner (R-Virginia) and John Chafee (R-Rhode Island) on their views of the trial, discussing whether or not the verdict was reached in a fair manner; the diffuculty felt among senators on reaching a verdict; the lack of partisan pressure felt by Republicans; rebuilding the nation and the challenge it presents to Congress; how the presidency has been affected and whether or not it has been weakened; and how Republicans must work with the President or forgo accomplishment. Margaret Warner followed with a discussion with four Democratic senators, Byron Dorgan (D-North Dakota), Richard Durbin (D-Illinois), John Edwards (D-North Carolina), and Carl Levin (D-Michigan), in which they exchanged views on the verdict and its implications for Congress; how the prosecution carried out its case without proving the president guilty beyond resonable doubt; the role of the independent counsel; where the prosecution went wrong; and opinions on whether Clinton's statement of contrition was adequate. "Political Wrap", a discussion with Mark Shields and Paul Gigot on the historical aspect behind the acquittal of President Clinton, in which they exchanged views on the Senate's performance as an institution; why both Democrats and Republicans voted as they did; and the real objectives for both parties once the trial concludes. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6364

    "Airline Acrimony", a Phil Ponce background report on a court ruling charging American Airline pilots with contempt of court over their ongoing strike in attempt to gain higher wages following American's recent acquisition of Reno Air. This was followed by a discussion in which Aaron Gellman and Michael Boyed discussed whether or not the pilot's were justified in their strike; how the strike will affect the airline industry; and how the pilots should be reprimanded for their actions. "Ailing Presidency", a Simon Marks update report on the declining health of Russian president Boris Yeltsin. The report looked at a Russian move to remove the president from office in light of the steadily declining economy and his weakening leadership. "Views from Denver", a Elizabeth Farnsworth discussion with a group of Denver's citizens on the conclusion of the impeachment trial. Topics discussed the outcome of the trial voting Clinton not guilty on the two counts of impeachment; how the trial affects the nation as a whole; whether or not the process worked; and if the president should be accountable for his actions. "Historical Views", a Margaret Warner discussion on the historical perspective of the impeachment trial with historians Michael Beschloss, Doris Kearns-Goodwins, Haynes Johnson and Joan Hoff. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6365

    "Debating Tax", a Kwame Holman report on the Republican tax agenda as they kick off a 150-stop tour of selling their across-the-board 10% tax cut proposal, followed by a discussion with Charles Rangel (D-NY) and John Engler (R-MI) in which they debated the issue of tax. Topics discussed included prioritizing national issues such as medicare, Social Security and education; tax policy in relation to these issues; paying for taxes through the surplus; the Democratic agenda; and the best strategy to redistribute wealth: by loosening Washington's grip on the people or through a stronger, more powerful federal government. "Trying to Heal", a Betty Ann Bowser update on Jasper, Texas and how it is coming to terms with the horrific murder of James Byrd Jr, the black man who was dragged to death by three white men last June. As the first day of the trial began, Bowser spent time in the town talking to various residents on where they see race relations, gaining insight into how the community has coped with the tragedy, such as in setting up task forces and race dialogues. "Confrontation with Iraq", a Spencer Michaels update report on a renewed threat issued by Iraq that if US and Britain warplanes continue to patrol the no fly zone, they would not hesitate to bomb both countries' air bases in Kuwait, Turkey and Saudia Arabia. This was followed by a Margaret Warner discussion with four guests in which they discussed the severity of the threats; the domestic pressure on Saddam Hussein from Iraq nationalists; how the US should see the threats; the previous missile attacks carried out by the US on Iraq and what they meant to the country; the state of the Iraqi military; how to lift the sanctions on Iraq; and the difference between the Iraqi leadership and the current humanitarian crisis now taking place in the country. "What We Have Learned", in a post-impeachment poem, US poet laureate, Robert Pinsky called to attention the transitory nature of the office of the presidency and how presidents end up being remembered foremost as people. He did this by referring to two epitaphs: one of Thomas Jefferson and the other of a freed slave. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6366

    "Protesting Kurds", an Elizabeth Farnsworth background report on the recent arrest by Turkish intelligence of Abdullah Ocalan, the leader of the Kurdish workers party known as the PKK. This was followed by a discussion with Michael Grunter, Graham Fuller, and Al McCofskey, in which they exchanged views on the situation, focusing on Ocalan as person and leader; his support within Turkey; the history of the PKK; the Kurd riots that took place in Canada and Western Europe in protest of their leader's detainment; the US role in the arrest; and the short -term and long-term prospects for the Kurdish movement. "In Contempt", Phil Ponce spoke with Peter Baker of the Washington Post on the announcement by Susan Webber Wright that she may charge President Clinton with contempt of court in the Paula Jones lawsuit. The DC district court judge who oversaw the Paula Jones case said Clinton gave misleading testimony in that trial. Baker explained the charge of contempt; possible reasons for her decision; the potential outcome which could result from the charge such as jail time or heavy fines; the White House response; and what this may mean for Ken Starr. "Town Meeting", reporting from Oregon, Lee Hochberg followed Oregon's two senators, Gordon Smith(R) and Rod Wyden(D), on their bipartisan odyssey around the state in which they talked to constituents about state issues so as to steer Oregon on a post-impeachment course. Topics they addressed included education, agriculture, environment, tourism, transportation and fishing. "Sex on TV", a report by Terrence Smith on the explosion of sex on television. According to two recent studies, more than 50% of television programs include sexual content, yet less than 10% acknowledge sexual safety issues. Following a background report on the studies, Terrence Smith engaged Robert Thompson, Vickie Rideout, Steve Allen, and JJ Abrams in a discussion on what these reports mean for television, including television's role as an educator; the purpose of the two studies; how Felicity, which is produced by Abrams, has intertwined sexual stories with the safety aspect; views from one of the report's sponsors, The Kaiser Foundation; whether television should be censored; and the overall responsibility of the entertainment industry to the public. "Battle Ships", the program concluded with a Roger Rosenblatt essay in which he explored a ship graveyard off of Statton Island and found it rich with American history, revealing life left in all the decayed remains. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6367

    "Words Worth", an Elizabeth Farnsworth report on the use of rhetoric throughout the impeachment trial and its effects on common language. This was followed by a discussion with Mark Russell, Judith Martin, Robert Pinsky, Philip Royster and Rochelle Gurstein, in which they exchanged views on how they perceive language to have changed as a result of the trial from their professional standpoints. They talked about the negative impact the trial has had on language for young people; the right to privacy and invasive journalism; the distinction between public and private language; how private matters are now being made political; and predictions for the trial's impact on language in the 21st century. "Newsmaker", Richard Vaughn began this segment with an APTV report on Boris Yeltin's recent statement denouncing any NATO attack on Yugoslavia, followed by a Margaret Warner newsmaker interview with Secretary of State Madeleine Albright on the current battle being fought in Kosovo. Albright detailed her conversation with Yugoslavia president Milosevic in which she reiterated the Saturday noon deadline for a peace agreement in the region or NATO would strike. Other topics discussed included an analysis of the peace talks now taking place in Paris; the difficulties in carrying out the process for all parties; whether or not sanctions should be lifted on Serbia; Yeltsin's opposition to a NATO air strike; the political and military importance of the negotiations; the US role in the recent arrest of Abdullah Ocalan, leader of the PKK; and with the impeachment trial finished, how foreign policy is being affected. "Breast Cancer", a Susan Dentzer feature on a ground-breaking report released on breast cancer. The MAYO Clinic carried out a study which concluded that preventative mastectomies greatly reduce the probability that high-risk women will develop the disease. Dentzer spoke with the author of the study, Dr. Lynn Hartmann, as well as with two sisters born with the predisposed genes for the disease-one of whom developed breast cancer and the other who went through a preventative mastectomy-discussing their personal stories with cancer; preventative mastectomies; and other preventative measures now available for high-risk women. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6368

    "News Conference", a Margaret Warner report highlighting the day's press conference held between President Clinton and French president Jacques Chirac as the two leaders prepared to meet to discuss the looming Saturday-noon deadline of reaching a peace accord in Yugoslavia. The report included extensive excerpts from Chirac and Clinton, followed by a Margaret Warner discussion in which Wall Street Journal columnist Paul Gigot and syndicated columnist Mark Shields reviewed the president's first post-impeachment press conference and the other political events of the week. Issues discussed included the content of the conference; Clinton's disposition throughout it; an analysis of Clinton's goals for Congress and for the Democratic party; the Republican agenda; the struggle likely to result between the parties in cooperating on legislation; and the possiblity that Hillary Clinton may decide to run for the New York Senate. "Workplace Rules", a Phil Ponce report on recent efforts by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) to help reduce workplace injury. OSHA proposed a set of guidelines that would call for certain employers to introduce ergonomics programs into their companies as a way to reduce on-the-job injuries after their study found repetitive stress syndrome and overexertion to cause one-third of workplace injuries. Phil Ponce then discussed this with three guests: OSHA Administrator Charles Jeffers, Patrick Cleary, a representative for US manufacturing companies and Eric Frumin, a labor union representative. The group debated the issues at hand, including the validity of the research conducted on ergonomics; the guidelines themselves as an effective means to end workplace injury; those who would be excluded from coverage of the proposal; the cost that the guidelines would induce for manafacturing companies; and how the guidelines could be improved to be more comprehensive. "Going For The Gold", the second of a two-part look by Betty Ann Bowser at the scandal that erupted over the bidding of the 2002 Olympic Games to be held in Salt Lake City, in which various competing cities have reported to have given gifts and money to some International Olympic Committee members. The report looked at the business behind the games; why cities fight for this title; and how impropriety plays in the process of attaining it. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6369

    "Kosovo Talks", this segment featured a discussion with Susan Woodward of the Brookings Institution and Balkan Action Council executive James Hooper on the current crisis in Kosovo. The guests exchanged views on the failure of Serb and Albanian officials to reach an agreement with NATO by the Saturday-noon deadline over the disputed territory of Kosovo; the Albanian's reluctance to accept the accords; the terms of the agreement, in which Serb police would remain in Kosovo and would require the KLA (Kosovo Liberation Army) to disband; what it would mean for the KLA to disarm; why the Serbs have failed to reach a negotiation; the affect of air strikes on Serb policy-making; and other strategies NATO may have to look to in order to reach an agreement, including incentives and inducements. "Bus Diplomacy", a Spencer Michaels background report on a historical meeting that took place between the prime ministers of India and Pakistan and resulted in the two countries reaching a bilateral agreement on nuclear testing. To many, this symbolized the countries' efforts to try to end fifty years of hostility. The report detailed the bus trip taken by Indian prime minister Atal Behari Vajpayee from New Delhi to Lahore, Pakistan; the Lehore Accords, which were signed as a result of the meeting; and the history of antagonism between India and Pakistan. Elizabeth Farnsworth then spoke with Michael Krepon and Paula Newberg about the significance of the meeting, including the objectives of India and Pakistan; the content of the declarations, the ongoing dispute over the Kashmir territory; and whether or not it is likely that India and Pakistan will sign the comprehensive test ban treaty. "Competing Agendas", a Margaret Warner discussion with governors John Rowland (R-Conneticut) and James Hodges (D-South Carolina), and senators Mitch McConnell (R-Kentucky) and Richard Durbin (D-Illinois) on the competing agendas between the states and federal government. Issues discussed included Clinton's education initiative and whether or not states should be accountable to the federal government for education; the possibility that Congress will be able to cooperate on legislation; the factions within the Republican Party and how that will play into its policy-making ability; and their overall state agendas for the year. "Thumbs Up", a Phil Ponce report on the life of acclaimed film critic Gene Siskel, after complications from surgury resulted in his death at age fifty three. This was followed by a conversation with Time magazine film critic Richard Scheckel. He traced the life of the movie mastermind, who is remembered for his long-lasting TV partnership with Roger Ebert, for which they became best known for their trademark "Thumbs up, Thumbs down." Scheckel discussed what the duo brought to film criticism; the affection behind the banter; their chemistry; and the impact their reviews had on films throughout their career. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6370

    "Newsmaker Interview", a Jim Lehrer newsmaker interview with national security advisor Sandy Berger, in which he addressed the surrounding issues behind the conflict in Kosovo. He focused on the provisions of the NATO peace accord agreed to today by the Kosovar/Albanian delegation, which would provide Kosovo self-governance and would call for a NATO peace-keeping force in the region; NATO's authorization to use force if the Serbs fail to accord; and why the United States has an invested interest in the matter. "Rogan's Run", a Kwame Holman report on the political future of House impeachment manager and California congressman, James Rogan (R), who may suffer negative consequences in his next election as a result of the impeachment scandal. In the report, both Republican and Democrat constituents discussed how they felt Rogan had represented them this term while his focus was in Washington. "Levi's Leaving", a Tom Bearden report on the recent announcement by Levi Strauss & Co. that it will lay off nearly 6,000 of its employees and will shut down half of its twenty two factories after sales in the US have decreased dramatically, followed by an Elizabeth Farnsworth discussion with Harry Bernard, Elizabeth Dipilli, and Carol Emert on the company's problems and its strategy to overcome them. The guests focused on Levi's plans to restructure, including a shift from marketing to operational strategy; a comparison between the success of Gap products and Levi's recent slide; Levi's cost-cutting strategy; Internet marketing; going international; and how the company plans to reinvent itself in the fashion world. "Guilty", a Phil Ponce report on the verdict reached by a Jasper, Texas jury, which found twenty-four year-old John William King guilty in the dragging death of James Byrd Jr. after just two hours of testimony. A conversation followed with Clara Tuma of Court TV, in which she discussed the short nature of the trial; the verdict; the defendant's reaction as the verdict was announced; other reactions in the courtroom, including a mass applause following the verdict; the prosecution's summary and description of the murder; the evidence linking King to the crime and eventually proving his guilt; the murder as a ploy for white supremacy groups; and the factors that will be taken into account in deciding his sentence of life imprisonment or death. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6371

    "Worth Renewing", a Kwame Holman report on a Senate committee meeting held to discuss the future of the Independent Counsel Law of 1974, as its expiration approaches. The committee questioned whether it should be renewed, amended or retracted, and the report included testimony from senators and a statement made later by President Clinton. This was followed by a Margaret Warner discussion with former independent counsels Joe deGenova and Curtis von Kann, and professors Ken Gormley and Kathleen Sullivan, in which they debated whether or not the statute should be renewed; previous cases carried out by independent counsels; the need for the statute; the investigative process the law elicits; limiting the powers of the independent counsel; the unaccountablility of the counsel and suggestions for improving its structure. "Jane Doe #5", a Terrence Smith background report on the most recent story being hounded by media involving allegations made by Juanita Broaddrick, a former campaign worker, that Clinton sexually assaulted her twenty years ago. The report traced the life of the story, which was covered by nearly every media organization after first being told by NBC. This was followed by a conversation with NewsHour media correspondent Terrence Smith on this new-style journalism; media organizations' decision to cover the story; legal outcomes that are possible from the accusations; and an overall assessment of the state of journalism. "Going Mainstream", a Jeffrey Kaye report on the new status rap/r&b is taking in the music world, as its profits have been eclipsing those of all other styles and people are following it more and more. Kaye followed the hip-hop scene in Los Angeles and spoke with various people in the industry finding out the essence of the latest music phenomenon. "Dialogue", a David Gergen dialogue with John Maddox on his recent book, "What Remains to be Discovered", in which he discussed science advancements he predicts for the 21st century, including using gene therapy to eradicate disease and increase human life span. He concluded with how he thinks people should regard and approach the progression of science and technology. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6372

    "Newsmaker Interview"; as the 106th Congress reconvened this week for session, Jim Lehrer spoke with Senate minority leader Sen. Tom Daschle (D-South Dakota) on the current agenda being addressed by Congress, including how to deal with the surplus; the Republican tax proposal; the idea of investing government dollars in the stock market; sending American troops to Kosovo as part of the NATO peace-keeping force; how the impeachment trial will play in accomplishing a legislative agenda; his relationship with Senate majority leader Trent Lott; the standing relationship between the president and the Republicans; and his opinion of holding an office in the US Senate. "Mending Medicare", a Susan Dentzer update report looking at the current state of Medicare. In the report, Dentzer compared the federal health insurance program that covers the elderly and disabled to other health insurance policies, such as the federal employee package and other HMOs, noting their cost, coverage and pitfalls. A Medicare Commission was appointed by the government to introduce legislation to improve the current system and has a deadline of March 1, 1999. "Killer Snow", a Spencer Michaels report on the two deadly avalanches that devastated Austrian ski resorts and killed at least 33 people this month. The report focused on the search efforts by Austrian medics; other resorts that have been hit by avalanches; and ongoing fears of further avalanches in the future, followed by an Elizabeth Farnsworth discussion in which Eugen Freund, the Washington correspondent for Austrian TV, and an avalanche expert, Dale Atkins, exchanged views on the disaster, including the rescue mission still being carried out; the weather forecasts predicting more avalanches to come; the causes for the avalanches; the path of an avalanche and chance for human survival; the relationship between avalanche severity and slope size; the ongoing debate on whether buildings on mountains cause avalanches; and the Austrian government's intervention in the matter. "Turkey & The Kurds", a Margaret Warner discussion with journalist and author Nicole Pope on the battle being fought between the Kurds and the Turkish people. Pope discussed the repression taking place in Turkey of the Kurds; the effect that the detainment of Abdullah Ocalan, the leader of the PKK, may have on the Kurdish people and their movement; the misconceptions held by westerners on the situation; and the strategic relationship between Turkey and the US. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6373

    "China's Challenge", a Kwame Holman report on building tensions between the US and China, after China has continued to defy its agreement with the international community that it would improve human rights. According to the report, China has increased crackdowns on political dissidents and has in turn been condemned by US officials. Margaret Warner talked with four guests on the tough stance taken by China, in which they discussed the current Sino-American relations; the future instability that may occur in the region as a result of Chinese violations; China's inbred tendency to put its domestic concerns above international concerns; China's mounting hositility towards Taiwan, including an increased military posture against Taiwan according to a classified Pentagon report; the Clinton Administration's decision to block the sales of satellites to China; what may result from China obtaining more advanced communication technology, such as more advanced military capabilities; and if there is any leverage that the US can use in mending relations with China. "Shields & Gigot", a discussion in which Mark Shields and Paul Gigot focused on the week's political events, including the politics behind the hearings on whether or not to renew the independent counsel law; why George W. Bush has been hailed the frontrunner for the Republican 2000 presidency nomination; and the purpose behind Senate majority leader Trent Lott's letter to the American people in which he outlined his intention to rebuild the nation. "Microsoft Trial", a Phil Ponce update on the Microsoft trial in which Ann Marie Squeo, Rick Rule, and Christine Varney discussed the current standing of the antitrust trial as it breaks for a six week recess. Topics debated included the Microsoft's presentation of witnesses; whether or not the government has proved Microsoft has harmed consumers; possible repercussions that could result if Microsoft loses the case, including the break-up of Microsoft or removing the Internet browser from Microsoft's Windows; what this would mean for consumers; and the schedule for the rest of the trial following its hiatus. "Stepmom's Makeover," an Anne Taylor Flemming essay in which she embraced the notion, brought forth in the recent film, "Stepmom," that it's possible for children in broken homes to develop meaningful relationships with step-parents. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6374

    "Newsmaker: Salt Lake 2002", a Jim Lehrer newsmaker interview with chairman of the Olympic Oversight Commission George Mitchell on the findings of a report he headed investigating the scandal behind the bidding for the 2002 Salt Lake City Olympic Games. Topics discussed included the nature of the scandal in which cities bribed IOC members with large sums of money; the history of gift-giving as part of the bidding process; the billions of dollars at stake from the games; recommendations made by the Olympic Oversight Commission to establish an independent body to oversee the process by which host cities are determined; accounts of specific bribery acts that played a part in the Salt Lake City scandal; and the standard of integrity inherent in the games that could be lost if regulations are not imposed. "GOP 2000", a Jeffrey Kaye report on the GOP California state convention held over the weekend, in which Republicans gathered to debate issues that have been divisive to the party and have caused losses in recent elections. In the report, moderate and conservative Republicans united and said they must agree on common principles if they are to reform their party's now factious image and regain voter support. "Vote For Democracy", a Spencer Michaels background report on the first democratic elections held in Nigeria in over a decade, in which Olusegun Obasanjo was voted in as president of the country, ending fifteen years of military rule, followed by an Elizabeth Farnsworth discussion on the meaning of the vote with playwright and chairman of the Democratic United Front of Nigeria Wole Soyinka and former US ambassador to Nigeria Walter Carrington, in which they exchanged views on the role that money played in the election so as to subvert it; Nigeria's potential as leader in Africa; how to restore faith in the Nigerian officials that democracy is possible; whether or not the president will have the power to restructure the nation and the need for civilian cooperation to make the new government work. "Dialogue", a David Gergen dialogue with author Danielle Crittenden on her book,"What Our Mother Didn't Tell Us," which looks at the struggle that women born into the "post-feminist" generation are having with finding happiness. She spoke about how these have-it-all women must revert to basic principles in order to get the most from life. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6375

    "2000, Behind the Bug", a Spencer Michaels update on the Y2K crisis following the release of a report carried out by the US Special Committee on Year 2000; followed by an Elizabeth Farnsworth discussion with two senators who headed the study, Sen. Robert Bennet and Sen. Chris Dodd, in which they noted that the industry as a whole was in good shape, especially in the telecommunications, financial services and utility industries, but health care, small businesses, and offshore industries were not well-prepared.This was followed by more discussion with information technology consultant Bruce Webster and Lou Marcoccio of the The Gartner Group on the possible long-term aspects of the problem, including a downturn in the global economy and in international trade. "Bitter Harvest", a Betty Ann Bowser report on a class action lawsuit settled between the United States Department of Agriculture and black farmers over discrimination claims filed by the farmers over two years ago. The report outlined the compensation agreed to by the government; included views from farmers who filed the suit; and investigated whether or not the settlement was adequate compensation. "Working Art", a background report on the history of the making of the Washington Monument as it sets off on a period of reconstruction for over a year, followed by a Margaret Warner discussion with the architect in charge of the project, Michael Graves. Topics discussed included why he became interested in the reconstruction; why he designed the scaffolding surrounding the Monument the way that he did; the difficulty in designing the scaffolding in compliance with Park Service regulations; how he classifies his style and responses to criticisms of his work. The segment concluded with a clip from the lighting ceremony marking the beginning of the project. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6376

    "Investigating Social Security", a Kwame Holman background report on efforts by the Administration to reform the current Social Security system, followed by a Margaret Warner discussion with economists Henry Aaron and Martin Feldstein, in which they commented on the president's proposal to invest Social Security dollars in the private sector. They exchanged views on the framework of the proposal; whether or not the body investing the money would function independently; other proposals for Social Security reform in which beneficiaries would be able to chose their own fund managers; and to what extent safeguards would be implemented that would ensure no political meddling. "From the Redwood Forests", a Spencer Michaels background report on a historical deal made between the federal government and Pacific Lumber Company, in which the the goverment bought over ten thousand acres of Redwoods for 480 million dollars from the company in efforts to preserve the environment. An Elizabeth Farnsworth interview with San Jose reporter Paul Rogers, in which he discussed the significance of the agreement; the bipartisan backing of the acquisition; the scope of the deal; the preservation of endangered species as a result of the deal; the reaction of Pacific Lumber's employees to the deal and the precedent that the deal sets for other regions trying to preserve their forests. "The Get Game", a Terrence Smith background report on what is known in journalism as "the get game", or broadcast journalists getting high profile interviews. Terrence Smith then engaged television producers Carol Ross Joynt, Jeff Zucker and Ken Auletta in a conversation on the art of getting these guests; how these interviews impact the country; the skills in obtaining the interviews, including persistence and gift giving; the significance in being the first to get the interview; whether or not the public is better off from having heard the personal stories; comments on the ratings-driven society that breeds the interviews and to what extent journalist go to in order to seize an interview. "Fair Return", in this essay, Jim Fisher visited a Kansas cooperative for schoolchildren and spoke with the children and teachers of the school to see how they measured their experience being part of this new age education system. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6377

    "Acquitted", this segment began with a statement made by Richard Ashby's chief defense lawyer after the Marine captain was acquitted for killing twenty people after flying a jet into a ski gondola in Italy. Jim Lehrer discussed the trial with two reporters who covered it: New York Times correspondent Harry Wald and Italian journalist Cesare De Carlo. Topics discussed included the reactions in the courtroom following the announcement of the verdict; further charges pending on the four crewmen involved and the Italian government's reaction to the verdict. Former Air Force lawyer Col Scott Silliman (Ret.) was brought into the conversation and explained the nature of the trial and the way the military justice system operates. "Rebuilding the Nation", as President Clinton prepares for a visit to Honduras to discuss US aid in the wake of Hurricane Mitch, this Charles Krause feature updated the state of devastation in the country. The report outlined to what extent the country's infrastructure was damaged, which one official commented set the country back twenty-five years. Krause talked to Honduran officials about the impact Mitch had on the economy; how the country is avoiding political refugee escape; and the aid donated by international bodies to help rebuild the nation. "Dialogue", a David Gergen conversation with Lawrence Otis Graham on his new book, "Our Kind of People", which looks at the rise of the black upper class in society and its divide with mainstream black culture. "In Memoriam", a Kwame Holman report on the death of former Supreme Court Justice Harry Blackmun, who is best remembered for the historical Supreme Court decision on Roe vs. Wade that granted women the right to an abortion. The report concluded with a clip of a previous interview with Blackmun, in which he reflected on his career as Supreme Court justice, followed by an Elizabeth Farnsworth discussion with two constitutional law professors, Kathleen Sullivan and Douglas Kmiec, in which they discussed his legacy, including his deep humility and compassion as a person; the controversies his decisions evoked; the evolution of his case decisions; and his impact on the Supreme Court. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6378

    "Questions and Answers", this segment featured excerpts from a joint press conference held between President Clinton and the Italian prime minister D'Alema on the verdict in the trial regarding the ski gondola accident in Italy. Topics discussed included how the US has compensated for the deaths of the twenty Italians killed in the gondola; a "closure" statement on the Lewinsky scandal and Clinton's objective of opening trade barriers between the US and the EU. "Global Connections", a Paul Solman background report on the state of the US economy in relation to the global market, looking at the continuing strength of the US economy despite international economic decline in Europe, Asia and South America. Following the report economists Paul Krugman of MIT and Stephen Roach of Morgan Stanley Dean Witter discussed this phenomenon, focusing on whether or not the US should be concerned for the future economy; the economic boost provided by foreign interest in US investment and the expanded purchasing power from low inflation in the US. The guests expressed the factors accounting for US economic success, including overall company diversification, sound policy management and financial structural improvement. "Update: Uganda", a Lindsey Hilsum background report on the recent outbreak of violence in Uganda in which Rwandan rebels attacked a tourist camp and killed eight people. A Phil Ponce interview with professors George Ayittey of American University and Chester Crocker of Georgetown University on the ongoing violence in central Africa, including a background on the Hutus, the rebel group responsible for the attacks in Uganda; the Hutus' motive for the attack as a plot for revenge against their longstanding Rwandan rivals, the Tutsus; the reasons for anti-US sentiment among Hutus; the positive US relationship with Uganda and prospects for peace in central Africa. "Political Wrap", a Jim Lehrer discussion on the week's political events with Wall Street columnist Paul Gigot and syndicated columnists Mark Shields, in which they exchanged views on the release of the Monica story and her interview with Barbara Walters; the US interest in the matter; the Democratic race for the 2000 presidential election between Al Gore and Bill Bradley; an analysis of Gore's position in the race; the likelihood of Elizabeth Dole obtaining the Republican presidential nomination and analysis of other Republican candidates, including Dan Quayle and John McCain. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6379

    "Joltin' Joe," a Betty Ann Bowser report on the life of legendary baseball hero Joe DiMaggio, who had died at age 83, followed by a Phil Ponce conversation in which Hall of Fame player Phil Rizzuto, New Yorker columnist Roger Angell and essayist Roger Rosenblatt reflected on his life as man and athlete, including his mass appeal to the public; his elegance; the distinction between being a hero and a celebrity; his impeccable record; the attraction of his mysterious character and how the combination of his quiet persona and his athletic ability made for a public hero. "Global Warming in Antarctica", this special pledge break report by Lawrence McGinty of ITN focused on the threat of global warming in Antarctica and how it may impact the world. The report outlined what effects the climate warming could have on the world, including a rise in global sea levels and the outlook for the future if it continues. "Social Promotion", an Elizabeth Brackett report on the movement against social promotion in public schools. The report discussed the ongoing debate on whether reform programs to end social promotion are beneficial to students, or if they actually impair educational performance. The Clinton Administration hailed the idea a success after reports showed a drastic increase in student performance following the implementation of the first retention program into the Chicago school system. The report looked at the issue by talking to students with opposing views on the programs, Chicago school officials, and both advocates and opponents of the programs. "Conversation", a Jim Lehrer conversation with Gregory Craig following his last day as White House special counsel for impeachment issues. He discussed his performance in the role; his sentiments during the impeachment trial; the Republican's role in acting partisan throughout the trial; the Republican failure to establish a move for censure; his reasons for taking the post as Clinton's counsel; his view on whether or not the president should address the issue publicly and how he prioritizes the experience as special counsel. "Dark Vision", the program concluded with a tribute report to filmmaker Stanley Kubrick, who had died at age 70, followed by a clip from one of his famous scenes in the film, "Dr. Strangelove." [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6380

    "Nuclear Espionage," a Jim Lehrer conversation with Secretary of Agriculture Bill Richardson and chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee Sen. Richard Shelby on recent allegations that a Chinese scientist at a US nuclear lab was guilty of espionage. Richardson discussed the allegations that the scientist violated security procedures at the lab, handled classified materials and failed to inform the lab of security breeches he committed; the time at which the violations occurred; and his origin as a Taiwanese-American. Shelby then joined the conversation and discussed the state of lab security; the need to tighten the security; whether or not it is speculated that the Chinese government was behind his actions and the loss in technology that may result for the US from the scientist's violations. "Update: Fighting the Flu", a Susan Dentzer background report on flu shots and their effectiveness, as flu strains are becoming more rampant and deadly in recent years. A Phil Ponce conversation with Susan Dentzer, in which she discussed the influenza virus type A, B and C; the flu's symptoms, including dry cough, fever, and sore throat; how well the flu shots work in preventing the flu; the difference between the flu and other viral infections; the percent of the population who get vaccines; who is at high-risk for the flu; the vaccine's side effects and prospects for a flu vaccine available on the market. "Special Pledge Report," this Paula Buonadonna ITN special pledge break report focused on the Mafia in Sicily and its threat to Sicily's citizens. The report looked at the people's efforts to fight back against the Mafia. "Brave New World", a Kwame Holman background report on the history of the deficit, as this year produced the first surplus in over twenty five years. Margaret Warner followed with an interview with presidential historians Doris Kearns-Goodwin and Michael Beschloss, journalist Haynes Johnson and senior fellow at the American Enterprise Institute Herbert Stein, on the historical impact of the transition from deficit to surplus spending; how Medicare and Social Security play into deficit spending; the Congressional debate that is likely to ensue on spending the surplus; Reagan's reasons for deficit spending; the priority of balancing the budget in past decades and the differences between deficit spending politics and surplus spending politics. "The Snow Man," US poet laureate Robert Pinksy read "The Snow Man" in the wake of a late winter snow storm. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6381

    "Truth and Democracy," a Phil Ponce background report on an International Truth Commission report alleging that the US had a role in the deaths of the thousands of Guatemalans who were killed over the course of Guatemala's civil war. This was followed by a discussion in which Marc Falcoff of the American Enterprise Institute and George Vickers of the Washington Office on Latin America discussed the extent to which the US was involved in aiding the Guatemalan military oppression; the complex political structure in Guatemala; whether or not the Truth Commission is a positive body to help democratize the nation; recommendations made by the Truth Commission to reconcile the divided people; the state of democracy across Latin American; the significance of President Clinton's visit to Central America and the need for US aid in the wake of Hurricane Mitch. "Customizing Computers," a Tom Bearden feature report on the way the computer industry is evolving to better meet the needs of customers. The report outlined the recent trend in which manufacturers customize computers to meet individual requests, rather than to be sold as a package deal by retailers. Following the trail of DELL Computers, Compaq and other manufacturers are resorting to this cost-cutting system which threatens the business of computer retailers. "Special Pledge Break Report", a Betty Ann Bowser special pledge break report on the partisan wrangling in Congress over current education legislation, in which Democrats have held up the passage of the Ed Flex Bill which would allow states flexibility to allocate federal education money, by adding an amendment to the bill containing parts of Clinton's agenda. "In the Limelight,"a Spencer Michaels background report on playwright Tom Stoppard, the co-writer of "Shakespeare In Love" and writer of "India Ink," a play making its debut in San Francisco. Topics discussed included what age has done for his nerves; how he originates his themes for his plays; whether or not he ever has writer's block; thoughts on the success of "Shakespeare in Love"; responses to criticisms that his plays lack emotional depth and how he believes his works will be remembered. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6382

    "Kosovo Debate," a Spencer Michaels background report on the current crisis in Kosovo, in which renewed fighting between the ethnic Albanians and the Serbs has provoked a mass debate in Congress on whether or not the US should send troops to the region. This was followed by an Elizabeth Farnsworth discussion with two members of the House International Relations Committee, Rep. Dana Rohrabacher (R-California) and Rep. Tom Lantos (D-California), in which they exchanged views on the situation, focusing on the role of Europe in the matter; NATO's role in world politics; Clinton's mandate for Congress to stay out of the issue; concerns that the matter is turning partisan and the threat that the situation could pose on world peace if left unresolved. "Special Pledge Break Report," a Betty Ann Bowser update report on legislation being introduced by Congress to improve US embassy security. The report contained excerpts from the Foreign Relations Committee hearings on the matter. "What Price Loyalty?", Terence Smith began this segment with a report on George Stephanopoulous's decision to write a book on his experiences working as President Clinton's top aide, criticized by many for being released while the president was still in term. A conversation with Arthur Schlesinger, the former special assistant to John F. Kennedy, Rahm Emanual, a former Clinton advisor, and Peter Carlson, a Washington Post staff writer, on whether or not aides should feel obligated to be loyal to the president; if the public benefits from the memoirs; whether or not personal memoirs have any impact on a sitting president; the role that money plays in releasing a book; whether or not Clinton has loyal former aides and the historical value in the memoirs. "Dialogue", a David Gergen dialogue with Allen Weinstein, co-author of "The Haunted Wood," in which he dicussed his book, which traces the operations of the KGB in the Stalin era. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6383

    "Filling the Ranks," this Tom Bearden background report looked at the state of the US Army, which has undergone enlistment losses in recent years. The report outlined the efforts that Congress is making to increase recruitment and induce Americans to enlist in the military. This was followed by an Elizabeth Farnsworth discussion in which Louis Caldera, Lawrence Korb and Charles Moskos exchanged views on how the enlistment shortage affects army performance; the need to reach out to younger generations to boost enlistment; whether or not the problem can be managed; the need for a strong statement of mission to college youth; if army standards need to be modified to be fit for today's job market; the notion of reinstating the draft and the need to maintain the military as a voluntary post. "Shields & Gigot," a Margaret Warner conversation with syndicated columnist Mark Shields and Wall Street Journal columnist Paul Gigot on the week's political events. Topics discussed included the vote held by the Republican Congress on sending troops to Kosovo; Dennis Hastert's role in the first foreign policy initiative by Congress; the Democrat and Republican divide on China policy; whether or not the Congress has any impact on sending troops to Kosovo and how partisan bickering on international policy will impact domestic policy. "Special Pledge Break Report," this report featured remarks by the foreign minister of the Czech Republic Jan Kavan and Secretary of State Madeleine Albright on the historical signing of a treaty allowing Poland, the Czech Republic, and Hungary into NATO. "Who Plays," a Phil Ponce report on a federal judge's decision to override the NCAA mandate for athletes to meet certain educational requirements. This was followed by a Phil Ponce interview with NCAA president Cedric Dempsey and professor Jeffrey Sammons on the need to adhere to a standardized test in accepting student athletes into colleges; the relevance of standardized test outcomes on academic success; the claim that African-American students are adversely affected by the standard and what other efforts are being discussed for reform of the proposition. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6384

    "Newsmaker," a newsmaker interview with Senate majority leader Trent Lott on whether or not he supports sending troops to Kosovo as a peace-keeping force; the need to look at the fundamental questions such as cost and an exit strategy before making a decision; the assertion that the Senate will debate the issue; the measures taking place by the Senate to investigate the Chinese espionage claims; assessments to whether these charges should interfere with Sino-American relations; and the bipartisan concern over national security issues. "Welfare to Work," an Elizabeth Brackett feature looking at a welfare reform program set up in Illinois known as Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), to wean recipients off welfare by imposing a five year time limit until they are cut off from the state. The report outlined whether or not the 25% drop in Welfare was a result of recipients finding work or from other factors; various success and failure stories from recipients who were affected by the legislation; and if welfare to work programs provide the necessary training to keep recipients in stable jobs. "Special Pledge Break Report": this report included extensive excerpts from a press conference in which the president talked to the International Association of Firefighters on initiatives to handle chemical and biological terrorist attacks. "The Cousins' Wars," a Gergen dialogue with Kevin Phillips on his book, "The Cousins' Wars". Topics included why he expanded his focus from the Revolutionary War to include the British Civil War and the American Civil War; the political, religious and personal similarities of the three wars; and the influence that each war had in the evolution of the cultural and political framework of the English-speaking world. "Loyal to the Bone," a Roger Rosenblatt essay on loyalty taking a backseat in today's self-seeking society as portrayed by public figures, sports teams and average people. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6385

    Conduct Unbecoming, [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6386

    "Conduct Unbecoming," a Phil Ponce conversation with Mark Thompson of Time Magazine on a court case charging a former high-ranking army official with sexual misconduct. Thompson discussed the details of the case, in which Army General David Hale was charged for having had improper relations with four of his subordinate officer's wives; the army's role in the case; and the way in which the case is being monitored. "Opposing Counsel," a Kwame Holman report on attorney Janet Reno's call not to renew the Independent Counsel Law of 1974 that expires in June. The report included testimony from the day's hearings on the issue, in which Reno answered questions on how the Justice Department would assume the role of investigating political officials. "Special Pledge Break Report," this report included extensive excerpts from the Rose Garden press conference held between Republic of Ireland Prime Minister Bertie Ahern and President Clinton on their efforts to salvage the Good Friday peace accord signed a year ago. "Starting Over," a Margaret Warner background report on the status of Medicare, following the failure of a bipartisan Medicare panel to pass Medicare reform legislation known as the Breaux-Thompson plan, followed by a conversation in which Rep. Bill Thomas (R-CA) ,co-chairman of the Medicare Commission, and President Clinton's national economics advisor, Gene Sperling, discussed the future of Medicare. Topics discussed included why the legislation failed to pass; a reform proposal being drafted by President Clinton that would include the Commission's proposals but would add prescription drug benefits; an assessment of the Breaux-Thompson plan; responses to claims that the Breaux-Thompson plan would increase premiums for beneficiaries; and whether or not the budget surplus should be allocated to Medicare. The two also debated whether the president's proposal will involve substantial reform. "Frank McCourt," a Terrence Smith special St. Patrick Day report in which he spoke with Frank McCourt on his new book to be released entitled "Tis," which is a sequel to his best seller, "Angela's Ashes". He discussed his life as an Irish immigrant; his reflections on arriving in the United States; his life as a teacher; and thoughts on St Patrick's Day as an Irish person. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6387

    "Bracing For Combat," a Margaret Warner background report on the peace accord signed by the Kosovar/Albanian delegation, which would grant them self-governance in Kosovo and would require NATO troops to police the region; the Serb failure to sign the accord; and the resulting dispute in Congress on whether NATO should bomb Serbia for its behavior. A conversation followed in which senators John Warner (R-VA), Joseph Lieberman (D-CT), Kay Bailey Hutchison (R-TX), and Max Cleland (D-GA) exchanged views on the severity of the crisis in Kosovo; the need to support US involvement in Kosovo; the need for Clinton to address the nation on the issue; the need to have an exit strategy before sending American troops to Kosovo; assessments to the purpose of the air strikes and what message should be sent to Milosevic; whether or not the US should become involved in a civil war of a sovereign nation; the need for a clear mission; and the Senate's commitment to fully debate the issue before coming to a resolution. "Special Pledge Break Report," this report featured excerpts from the day's congressional hearings on a Republican-proposed resolution to set up a ballistic missile defense spending program. Following the hearings, the resolution passed easily and is expected to become legislation soon. "Making a Comeback," a Spencer Michaels background report on reforms adopted by the International Olympic Committee to change the process by which Olympic cities are determined following the scandal over the Salt Lake City 2002 Olympics. This was followed by an Elizabeth Farnsworth discussion with former Olympians Donna de Varona and John Naber, and historians Jeffrey Segrave and John MacAloon, on whether the reforms adequately insulate the process from possible impropriety; criticisms of the higher-ranking members of the IOC implicated for bribery who were not expelled; the need for the Olympic Games to keep its integrity and standards; whether the reforms will be successful in resurrecting people's esteem for the Olympic Games; the athletes as the "unintended benefactors" from the scandal; the assertion that other issues equally in need of reform are being overlooked and may bring down the Olympic movement; and how later generations of IOC members will ultimately determine how the Olympics are regarded. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6388

    "Taking Questions," this segment featured extensive excerpts from President Clinton's first press conference in over eleven months. Topics discussed included the crisis in Kosovo and the need for US intervention; claims that China engaged in espionage of US nuclear technology and how it will impact Sino-American relations; his relationship with first lady Hillary Rodham Clinton and the prospect of her running for the New York Senate; denials of the Juanita Broaddrick sexual assault claim; his thoughts on George Stephanapoulous' memoir that includes disparaging remarks about the Clinton Administration and what his legacy will be on lying. "Political Wrap," a discussion on the week's political events with syndicated columnist Mark Shields and Wall Street Journal columnist Paul Gigot, in which they gave an analysis of the president's remarks in his press conference. They commented on Clinton's call for a bombing campaign on Serbia; his bitter disposition regarding the China espionage claims; whether the first lady is seriously considering running for NY Senate; whether it should be believed that the president has not read Stephanopolous' memoir, and an overall rating of his media performance. "Pressing the Press," a Terence Smith report on the annual Radio & Television Correspondents' Dinner, including excerpts from a speech given by President Clinton in which he mocked his own tactics in dealing with the press. A conversation with Terence Smith on Clinton's relationship with the press corps; the significance of a presidential press conferences in providing access to the media; and the procedure by which a presidential press conference operates, followed by comments on the press-Clinton relationship by Shields and Gigot. "Retreat to Civility," a Kwame Holman feature report on a three-day bipartisan retreat in Pennsylvania intended to enhance relationships between congressional members and mend the partisan divide that resulted from the impeachment trial. The report included reactions from Democrats and Republicans following the retreat. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6389

    "Bracing For Combat," this segment began with a statement made by President Clinton calling for NATO officials to discuss military action against Serbia in reaction to Serbia's defiance of its ceasefire agreement with Kosovar/Albanians. Jim Lehrer then discussed the conflict with Yugoslavia's ambassador to the United Nations, Vladislav Jovanovic,in which he denied claims that the Serbian military is carrying out the genocide of ethnic Albanians; explained the Serb position on Kosovo and their understanding of NATO as the unwarranted aggressor in the situation; and declared that in no way would Serbia support independence for Kosovo. "Update: Bracing For Combat," Terence Smith spoke to regional commentators on President Clinton's call for a NATO assault on Serbia. Lee Cullum of the Dallas Morning News, Cynthia Tucker of the Atlanta Constitution, Bob Kittle of the San Diego Union Tribune, Beth Barber of the Cleveland Plain Dealer and Tom Bray of the Detroit News exchanged views on whether an air strike on Serbia is justified; the limits of military campaigns in obtaining political aims; and the need for congressional support in sending troops to Kosovo. "Open Secrets," this Lee Hochberg feature looked at the controversy behind Ballot Measure 58, the Oregon state law that was approved by voters this year allowing adopted children the right to see their birth certificates. The report looked at birth mothers' efforts to halt the implementation of the law, saying when they gave up their children they did so with the promise by the state of anonymity. "Budgeting for the Future," a Kwame Holman background report on the Republican fiscal budget proposal for 2000, including locking away the Social Security surplus, increasing defense and education spending, setting aside billions for Medicare for over 10 years and an $800 billion tax cut. Margaret Warner followed with a discussion on the proposal with White House budget director Jack Lew and chairman of the budget committee Sen. Pete Domenici, in which they debated the issues of Medicare, Social Security and tax cuts. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6390

    "Bracing for Combat," this segment began with excerpts made by President Clinton to the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees defending his Kosovo policy and insisting that the US must intervene before the crisis escalates, followed by a Kwame Holman report including excerpts from a Senate meeting in which legislation authored by Rep. Bob Smith (R-New Hamshire) that would require congressional approval in authorizing NATO air strikes was debated and turned down; statements made in Congress by Democratic and Republican senators supporting Clinton's call for air strikes and ending in the drafting of new legislation that supports the strikes. "Military Views," a Terence Smith background report on the state of NATO, Kosovar Albanians, and Yugoslav military operations as they prepare for action in the Balkans, followed by a conversation in which former NATO commander Gen. George Joulwan, former Air Force chief of staff Gen. Merrill McPeak, Daniel Serwer of the United States Institute of Peace, and Adm. Eugene Carroll of the Center for Defense Information discussed the NATO bombing assault, including the NATO objective of targeting Serb missile launch sites and radars; the challenge of destroying the Yugoslav air defense system; whether a military strike can solve the political problem; how military action has strengthened Milosevic's regime; the need for a more comprehensive approach in foreign policy; the expected time frame of the bombing campaign and an overall assessment of the uncertainty of air strikes. "Conversation: Years of Renewal," a Margaret Warner conversation with Henry Kissinger on the third volume of his book of memoirs as secretary of state in the Nixon and Ford Administrations. Topics discussed included Kissinger's skepticism of current military action in Kosovo; criticism of using military force as a standard foreign policy mechanism; thoughts on American idealism and its effect on the way foreign policy is carried out; the transition from Nixon to Ford foreign policy; and Watergate and Vietnam's influence in dividing foreign policy. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6391

    "Bombing Begins," a Jim Lehrer feature containing footage from the first wave of NATO air strikes, followed by a statement made by NATO Secretary-General Javier Solana; a statement by President Clinton on NATO's stance on the issue; a statement by President Slobodan Milosevic to his nation in which he advised his people to remain calm through the NATO attack and to continue with their work; and a Bill Neely ITN report on the current situation inside of Kosovo. This was followed by a statement from Russia's President Yeltsin appealing to NATO to stop their assault and a statement later made by UN Secretary-General Koffi Annan in which he gave his support to using force in Kosovo. Jim Lehrer followed with an interview with Madaleine Albright, in which she discussed whether any contact had been made with Milosevic; the assertion that Milosevic would have to withdraw his forces before NATO will halt the air campaign; the Russian denouncement of NATO air strikes and the resulting impact on US-Russian relations; whether or not the UN should have a role in the diplomacy efforts; the prospect of using ground troops in Kosovo; her confidence that the military tactics will function successfully in getting Milosevic to react; and how mandatory the NATO operation is to world peace. "Plan of Attack," the segment began with excerpts from a briefing at the Pentagon in which Secretary of Defense William Cohen outlined the NATO plan of attack, including the admission that US military personnel will be at risk; a statement by Joint Chief of Staff chairman General Henry Shelton on the NATO assault. Margaret Warner followed with a conversation with Lt. Gen. Thomas McInerney of the US Air Force and John Pike of the Federation of American Scientists on the Kosovo situation, discussing the military tactics being used for the operation; an assessment of the risk involved for the pilots; whether the Serb forces have a formidable defense system from the NATO air strikes; and the risk of civilian casualties in Serbia. "Supreme Court," a Terence Smith report on two recent Supreme Court cases, Wilson vs. Layne and Hanlon v. Berger, which questioned whether the law that allows reporters to "ride-along" with police officers on raids should be revoked. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6392

    "Second Wave," following the second set of NATO air strikes on Kosovo, this segment contained a statement from Gen. Wesley Clark, the supreme allied commander of Europe, on the military strategy; two ITN reports from Yugoslavia with footage of the bombings and the bombing's damage, injured civilians; and a statement by President Clinton following the attacks, in which he emphasized NATO's dedication to continuing a bombing campaign and commented on whether NATO ground troops are likely to be deployed in Yugoslavia. "Newsmaker," a Jim Lehrer interview with Secretary of Defense William Cohen, in which he discussed NATO's military strategy in Kosovo; NATO's ability to assess the damage from the bombings; the restricted access to Serb television; his inability to confirm casualty numbers; why the US will not relay this information to the public; an assessment of the status of the Serb air defense system; the confirmation that no allied aircraft had been shot down; the need for Milosovic to agree to a peaceful resolution before the campaign ends; an assessment of the internal fighting in Kosovo; and an outlook on how long the attacks will continue. "Driving Force," this segment began with a Charles Krause report on the break-up of Yugoslavia, discussing Slobodan Milosevic's rise to power in Serbia in which he inflamed Serb nationalism and resorted to ethnic cleansing to gain public support. This was followed by a Phil Ponce conversation on President Milosevic with former US Ambassador to Yugoslavia John Scanlan, Yugoslav ambassador to the EU Mihailo Crnobrnja, and Milosevic's former minister of information, Radmila Milentijevic. First, Mihailo Crnobrnja discussed the character of Milosevic and explained his political tactics, in which he skews and misinterprets facts in efforts to rally support from Serb people. Radmila Milentijvic discussed the Serb mentality and the reasons behind their anti-American sentiment and the way Milosevic has galvanized his power. Scanlan then explained the way Milosevic has used the NATO bombings to his advantage and how he will be able to withstand bombing in order to further nationalize his country. The three exchanged views on whether Milosevice will ever agree to peace and grant Kosovo autonomy. "Silencing the Night," a Terence Smith report on the way the Kosovo crisis is being covered by the media, after Serb officials ordered the expulsion of all NATO journalists from the country. Terence Smith followed with a conversation with journalists Phil Bennett of the Washington Post and Joshua Cooper Ramo of Time on how they will cover the story, commenting on the expulsion of their reporters from the region; the danger of being in Belgrade at the moment; the concern that the limitations on reporting will deter the US in understanding the full details of the situation; and how they will cover the story by posting reporters in bordering nations. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6393

    "Third Wave," this Kosovo update contained a Julian Manyon report from Belgrade on the third wave of NATO air strikes on Serbia; a Colin Baker report from Macedonia in which he detailed the continuing aggression by Serb forces against ethnic Albanians in Kosovo; an excerpt from a televised statement by President Clinton and Secretary of State Albright to the Yugoslav people asking for peace; and an excerpt from remarks made by Air Commodore David Wilby of the Royal Air Force in which he updated the press on the status of the bombing campaign and discussed to what extent it had been successful in weakening the Serb air defense system. "Newsmaker," a Jim Lehrer interview with National Security Advisor Samuel Berger on the NATO bombing campaign, including details of the NATO targets on the Serb air defense system, command control system and Serb security and police forces; assessments on the two Serb MIGs war planes shot down by NATO in Yugoslavia; comments on the Serb counterattack; whether the Serb air defense system had been degraded; the validity of Yugoslav reports on current atrocities taking place by the Serb military on Kosovar Albanians; the assertion that consequences from NATO action will prove less harm to Kosovar Albanians than no NATO action; the affirmation that NATO has had no casualties as of yet; and whether Milosevic may change his posture on the issue. "Rough Neighborhood," a Margaret Warner background report on the history of Kosovo and its relation to the Balkans, followed by a conversation in which Johns Hopkins University fellow Charles Gati and New York Times correspondent Chuck Sudetic talked about the Kosovo conflict in a historical context, discussing the long standing instability of the Balkans beginning with the Ottoman Empire; how religion plays into the nationalistic fervor of the different peoples of the regions; the importance that the past plays in the Albanian's and Serb's motives to gain independence; the cultural clash between Western and Eastern mentality; whether it is possible to change the Balkan way of thinking in a way to meet Western views and solve the conflict peacefully. "Far From Home," an Elizabeth Brackett report from Chicago on Serbian-American reactions to the military assaults against Serbs, who strongly protest the NATO action and condemn the US for killing Serb civilians. "Political Wrap," a Phil Ponce conversation with Mark Shields and Paul Gigot on Clinton's position on Kosovo and how he has made the case to the American people; whether or not the public support will continue; the congressional distrust of the president; and how the impeachment scandal has caused people to be more skeptical of how Clinton handles foreign policy. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6394

    "Operation Allied Force," the segment began with a Tom Bearden opening report on the second phase of NATO air strikes in Serbia targeting Serbian troops and vehicles, followed by two ITN reports on the refugee crisis in Kosovo, in which masses of ethnic Albanians were forced to flee to neighboring countries or face death in Kosovo. "Newsmaker," a Jim Lehrer newsmaker interview with Supreme Allied Commander of Europe General Wesley Clark, who discussed phase two of the NATO bombing assault, in which NATO has expanded targets to include Serb ground troops and vehicles; accounts of executions taking place in Kosovo by Serb forces; whether the atrocities are in reaction to NATO bombing; the assertion that an air campaign will not deter Milosevic from ethnic cleansing; what it will take for Milosevic to retreat; an assessment of the damage inflicted on Milosevic's forces and his military infrastructure; the need for a sustained military assault; whether phase two will put NATO forces at a greater risk than in the first set of strikes; and whether the assault has been successful to this point. "Operation Allied Force," a Margaret Warner conversation in which Jim Hoagland of The Washington Post, Fareed Zakaria of Foreign Affairs Magazine and Trudy Rubin of The Philadelphia Inquirer assessed General Wesley Clark's comments, discussing the political success of the military campaign and whether it is generating more instability in the region; the need for NATO to shift into more ground action in order to halt the massacres committed by Milosevic's troops; the need to revert to diplomacy in dealing with Milosevic; the significance of Russian Prime Minister Primakov's meeting with Milosevic; the Russian dependence on the US to obtain IMF funding; and prospects that Milosevic will ever be likely to embrace the Rambouillet Accords. "Media War," a Terence Smith background report on Yugoslavia's independent media and its dependence on the Internet to report news during its time of conflict following Milosevic's initiative to ban and censor many internal news sources. This was followed by a conversation in which independent Serbian journalist Vesna Radivojevic, American journalists Paul McCarthy and Marilyn Greene discussed the current media conditions in Belgrade, focusing on the importance of email to communicate information; the extent to which Serb news sources have been censored by Milosevic; whether Serb's Radio B-92 still functions as an independent voice; the fines that are imposed on independent news sources acting in defiance to Yugoslav media laws; and what impact the extermination of news reporting has on Serbian people. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6395

    "Operation Driving Force," this segment began with a Tom Bearden report on the meeting held between Russian Prime Minister Yevgeny Primakov and Serb President Milosevic in which Milosevic said he would stop the ethnic cleansing attacks on Albanians if NATO halted its air strikes against Serbia, which was later rejected by President Clinton; followed by two ITN reports from Belgrade on the worsening situation for Kosovar Albanian refugees. "Diplomacy," a Margaret Warner discussion in which former NATO ambassador Robert Hunter, former National Security Council member Ivo Daalder, and Stanford University professor Michael McFail exchanged views on the NATO rejection of Milosevic's proposal, discussing the terms to the agreement; Primakov's role in constructing the proposal; how the rejection of Milosevic's deal strengthens NATO's resolve; whether the Rambouillet Accords should be removed from the negotiation table; the need to look to Primakov as a positive force in the diplomacy; and the need for NATO to follow through with its mission to free Kosovo and use whatever force necessary to do so. "Great Terror," Kwame Holman began this segment with a report addressing the humanitarian crisis in Kosovo in which over 100,000 refugees have fled to Macedonia, Albania, Montenegro and Bosnia. Elizabeth Farnsworth then joined Bob Turner of the International Rescue Committee, Karen Abuzayd of the United Nations and Ljupica Acesvska, Macedonia's ambassador to the US, to discuss the severity of the crisis. They discussed the number of refugees forced from Kosovo; the call by Koffi Annan to give international aid to the refugees; an estimation of the refugee numbers in Macedonia and the burden that it is imposing on the country; an assessment of the way in which refugees have been treated in Macedonia and the other bordering countries; whether Serbia is likely to launch an attack on the Albanians in Macedonia; and whether Kosovar refugees will be able to return to their country in the face of a ceasefire. "Dow Jones Industrial Average," a feature on the historic day for the DOW Jones Index, which for the first time passed the 10,000 mark. Phil Ponce spoke with Gretchen Morganson of the NY Times on the stock market phenomenon, focusing on the factors which have contributed to the record-breaking performance, including an efficient US economy, relatively low interest rates, the affect that a consumer market has on spending, and the positive effects of innovative technology. "Hero in Wartime," US poet laureate Robert Pinsky read excerpts from Wallace Stevens' poem, "Examinations of the Hero in a Time of War." [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6396

    "Operation Allied Force," a Tom Bearden summary report on the bombing attacks on Serbia in which he noted that bad weather had deterred NATO from carrying out attacks on Serb ground forces; details of more ethnic cleansing operations being carried out by Serb forces; and the Russian deployment of seven warships to monitor the situation in defiance of NATO attacks. This was followed by a three ITN reports from the Albanian, Montenegran, and Macedonian borders on the refugee catastrophe developing as mass numbers of Albanians have fled to these regions for safety. "Newsmaker," a Jim Lehrer interview with Sen. John Warner (R-VA), chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee, who discussed the severity of the humanitarian crisis in Kosovo and bordering countries; how NATO has had to expand its targets to include more military sites in efforts to stop Milosevic's ethnic cleansing operation; an assessment of the Kosovo Liberation Army's counterattack on Serb forces; the complexity of putting in NATO ground troops; how mountainous terrain and inclimate weather impede a ground attack; the assertion that air strikes must continue to deter Milosevic's regime; and the necessity that NATO stick to its mission to defeat Milosevic. "On The Front Line," a Kwame Holman report describing the current military operations in Kosovo following NATO's call for phase two in the deployment of aircraft, including A-10 war planes which are exposed to greater risk yet are more effective in hitting targets. "Military Options," Margaret Warner spoke with four retired military leaders on the options available to NATO in further immobilizing Milosevic's capabilities. Former Air Force Gen. Merrill McPeak, Rear Adm. Eugene Carroll, Gen. George Joulwan, and Lt. Gen. William Odom agreed that NATO mission was failing in its political objective but was succeeding in its military initiative to damage Milosevic's operations. They exchanged views on whether ground troops should be deployed, noting the adverse effects that the air campaign had on Milosevic's regime, and discussed the pros and cons of other options such as returning to diplomacy and negotiations. "An American Original," a Clarence Page essay on the life of Duke Ellington and the lasting imprint he left on the music world. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6397

    "Operation Allied Force," a Tom Bearden update report on the previous day's events in Kosovo, including the capture of three US soldiers patrolling the Macedonia border by Serb forces; a statement made by President Clinton holding Milosevic responsible for these actions; and reports of continuing ethnic cleansing operations taking place in Kosovo. "Newsmaker," Jim Lehrer spoke to secretary of defense William Cohen and chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff General Henry Shelton on the situation surrounding the three soldiers captured by Serb forces; whether the soldiers will be recognized and protected under the Geneva Convention; how the United States government has handled the capture with the Serb government; how the United States has threatened Milosevic with a severe penalty and the heavy toll that Milosevic will pay in refusing to halt the ethnic cleansing operation. This was followed by a Phil Ponce conversation, in which Vladislav Jovanovic, Yugoslavia's ambassador to the UN, commented on the capture of the soldiers; his uncertaintly about their location; why he believes they were detained for reasons other than patrolling the border and whether his country will respect their entitlements under the Geneva Convention. "Exodus Agony," the first part of this segment contained a Tom Bragby ITN News report from the Albanian border on the tens of thousands of ethnic Albanians awaiting entrance into the region, followed by a Terence Smith conversation with ITN reporter Mark Austin from the Montenegro border. He discussed the inclement weather the refugees are faced with upon entering Montenegro; the brutal way the Serbs are forcing the Kosovar/Albanians to flee Kosovo; his understanding of this refugee crisis as compared to others in Rwanda and Bosnia; and the difficulty that the United Nations will have in providing aid to the refugees. "Editorial Opinions," in this segment Elizabeth Farnsworth spoke to four editorial page writers on the war in Kosovo. Robert Freedman of the St. Petersburg Times, Don Wycliff of the Chicago Tribune, Beth Barber of the Cleveland Plain Dealer and Rob Elder of the San Jose Mercury News exchanged views on whether they supported the air strike in Kosovo, a ground operation, and President Clinton's posture on the issue, what other options are available to the United States and whether Congress should have a say in how the United States becomes involved in the war. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6398

    "Operation Allied Force," this segment on the war in Kosovo began with a Tom Bearden report outlining the growing refugee crisis in Macedonia and Albania as Kosovar Albanians have flooded into the regions; the need for more international aid; and Clinton's call to continue the air campaign in Kosovo. This was followed by a discussion in which former secretary of state Henry Kissinger and former national security advisors Zbigniew Brzezinski and Brent Scowcroft assessed NATO's position in Kosovo, agreed that NATO must intensify the bombings and expressed the imperative that NATO stick to its course of action to defeat Milosevic. They discussed the media's role in influencing foreign policy; the significance of public opinion on the matter; the prospect of deploying a ground campaign and the need to reform the Rambouillet Accords. "Keeping in Touch," the first of two reports looking at how the war is affecting the American public. Elizabeth Brackett talked to three Serb-American families on their opinions of Milosevic, the NATO decision to strike and the difficulty in being separated from their families in Serbia during this time of conflict. This was followed by a Charles Krause report from New York, where the largest population of ethnic Albanians resides, on their reaction to the crisis in Kosovo. He talked to Albanians whose relatives were still in Kosovo, who fear that they will never see or talk to their families and who support all necessary action to prevent further cleansing of their people. "Editorial Views," Terence Smith began this segment with excerpts from various newspaper's editorial pages that post differing views on the war in Kosovo, followed by a Margaret Warner conversation with David Brooks and Mark Shields, in which they discuss the importance of editorials; what they reflect about the nation; whether they influence public opinion; whether the public will eventually support ground troops and how effective President Clinton has been in his pursuit for action in Kosovo. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6399

    "Operation Allied Force," a Tom Bearden report on the worsening conditions for Kosovar Albanian refugees, who are increasingly being blocked from entering bordering countries of Albania, Macedonia and Montenegro; a statement made by President Clinton on the international aid being supplied for the refugees; and the NATO decision to intensify the air campaign by launching more aircraft. "Newsmaker," a Jim Lehrer newsmaker interview with NATO secretary-general Javier Solana, who assessed the Kosovo bombing campaign, hailing it a success; discussed the purpose behind phase I and phase II of the air campaign; whether the refugee exodus surprised NATO officials; NATO's position in helping the refugees; his guarantee that Kosovar/Albanians will be able to return to Kosovo; whether NATO will accept and use the 25 additional helicopters offered by the United States Air Force to strengthen its military position and the international community's move to help relocate refugees to other regions by plane and bus. "Emergency Effort," a Tim Ewart ITN background report on the Kosovar/Albanian exodus to Macedonia. Margaret Warner followed with a discussion in which Kosovo refugee coordinator Brian Atwood, United Nations representative Karen Abuzayd and Bill Frelick of the US Committee for Refugees discussed the refugee situation in the Balkans, explaining the relief efforts taking place to relocate some refugees from bordering countries, how long the operation will be in effect; the process by which the refugees will be selected to be relocated; why refugees are reluctant to leave Macedonia and whether the relocation operation will be expanded past the original 100,000 people declared by NATO. "Teaching About Kosovo," a Lee Hochberg report from Portland, Oregon, looking at the ways public and private schools are teaching students about the war in Kosovo. "Incantation," US Poet laureate Robert Pinksy translates the Polish poem, "Incantation," which looks at how poetry can be useful during harsh times of war. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6400

    "Operation Allied Force," this Tom Bearden background report began with a statement made by President Clinton rejecting Serbian President Milosevic's appeal for a ceasefire; a remark made by Zeljko Raznatovic, the Serb paramilitary leader and alleged war criminal, dismissing claims of genocide; and a statement made by secretary of state Madeleine Albright expressing NATO's intention to continue air strikes and not to deploy ground troops to the region. "Newsmaker," Former secretaries of state Frank Carlucci, Harold Brown and James Schlesinger exchanged views on whether a bombing campaign will cause Milosevic to retreat; the likelihood of Kosovar/Albanian refugees ever returning to Kosovo; the need for deploying ground troops; why US Apachee helicopters have been deployed to Kosovo; how public opinion influences foreign policy and the prospect that Milosevic will reach his goal in forcing out all Albanians from Kosovo. "Exodus of Agony," this segment contained a Tim Ewart ITN report from the Macedonia border where thousands of ethnic Albanians await entrance into the country; a Tom Bradby ITN report from the Albanian border looking at the impact the war is having on children who have witnessed the deaths of loved ones and family members; and an Abby Rado ITN report on the political impact the war is having on Montenegro, in which the country's pro-democracy supporters fear Milosevic's regime may spread. "News From the Front," a Terence Smith report on the adversarial relationship between the press and the Pentagon, followed by a conversation in which Kenneth Bacon and George Wilson discussed why the Pentagon restrains the press from certain information on the Kosovo operation; how leaked information can strengthen the enemy's defense system; how, by restraining information from the public, the service men and women are protected abroad. "Justice Without Justice," in this essay, Roger Rosenblatt looked at the way in which those responsible for accidents and evil disasters sometimes forgo formal punishment, while the people who they affect are damaged forever. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6401

    "On The Move," this segment contained a Tim Ewart ITN report on the sudden extraction of nearly 60,000 Albanian refugees from the Macedonian border to Albania, Turkey and Greece by the Macedonia government and a statement made by James Rubin calling for Macedonia to uphold international standards in treatment of the refugees. A Margaret Warner conversation with Ljubica Acevska, Macedonia's ambassador to the United States, in which she explained where the refugees were taken and denied claims that Macedonia does not want to increase its Albanian population by allowing additional refugees in the country. A Phil Ponce report on Macedonia's history in the Balkans and the country's struggle with becoming a democratic nation after being granted independence following two thousand years under Balkan rule. Charles Kupchan of the Council of Foreign Relations and Stephen Larrabee of Rand discussed the government's motive for removing Albanian refugees; noted how an influx of ethnic Albanians could destabilize the country politically and economically; whether there is a cultural link between the Macedonian Albanians and Kosovar Albanians that could lead to a common plight for a greater Albanian state and whether Macedonia should allow the refugees to stay in its lesser populated regions. "Operation Allied Force," a Tom Bearden opening report on the heaviest day of NATO bombing in Serbia since the attacks began two weeks ago, a statement made by President Clinton calling to continue the strikes until Milosevic concedes to NATO requisites; a remark made by secretary of defense William Cohen warning Yugoslavia that the bombing will become more aggressive; the success of the previous night's more concentrated attack; the unanticipated call by the Canadian government to consider sending NATO troops to Kosovo and the meeting held between the acting president of Cyprus and Yugoslav officials on the release of the three US soldiers captured by Serbia. "Student Views," Terence Smith talked to five college paper editors on the crisis in Kosovo. Sharif Durham of The Daily Tarheel, Aesha Rasheed of The Oklahoma Daily, Dan Alter of The Badger-Herald, Gregory Thomas of The Hampton-Sydney Tiger and Bridget Blair of The Daily Collegian exchanged views on what the next step should be by NATO and the United States; how students at their universities are reacting to the situation in Kosovo; whether a ground war is inevitable; how television journalism has influenced the public opinion on the matter and whether the US should take on the role of global "policeman". "State of Mind," in this essay, Richard Rodriguez examined life in Silicon Valley, noting the irony of the contrast between the region's quest for technological mastery and the true beauty in the mundane aspects of the day to day life in the region that technology erodes. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6402

    "Campaign For Kosovo," a Tom Bearden background update on the situation in Kosovo, including accounts of more then two thousand refugees who are unaccounted for; the way in which the Serb media has aggrandized the damage by the bombings in Kosovo through television; and reports that Serb forces are in the process of mining Kosovo's borders to entrap ethnic Albanians. "European Views," Elizabeth Farnsworth spoke with representatives from four foreign nations on the crisis in Kosovo. Jonathan Freedland of the Guardian, Josef Joffee of the Sudeutsche Zeitung newspaper in Munich, Marcello Foa of Il Giornale in Italy, and Pierre Rousselin of Le Figaro discussed whether Milosevic's temporary ceasefire indicates his willingness to come to a deal with NATO; the possibility that Milosevic is creating a human shield to NATO bombings by trapping Albanians in Kosovo; Italy's strong support for action against Milosevic; the unanimity among NATO nations on supporting sustained intervention in Kosovo; the European perception of this conflict as a replay of its darkest history in war; the way in which the pictures of refugees have enhanced this view in Europe; and the greater role that history plays in the European posture than the United States posture. "Volunteer vs. Draft," a Phil Ponce background report on the debate ensuing over whether a military draft should be reinstated in light of the recent slide in military enlistment. This was followed by a conversation in which Joseph Califano, the former aide to President Lyndon Johnson, and Lawrence Korb, the assistant secretary of defense during the Reagan Administration, discussed Califano's hypothesis that an all-voluntary military facilitates politicians in embarking in dangerous foreign crises. The two exchanged views on whether a voluntary military unfairly targets Hispanics and minorities; whether a draft would make Congress take foreign policy more seriously and whether the military should represent the broad spectrum of economic backgrounds in the United States. "US Visit," this segment contained remarks made by President Clinton and Zhu Rongji in a press conference following the arrival of China's premiere to the United States that morning. Topics addressed included: China's denial of stealing nuclear technology and contributing money to finance US campaigns and Clinton's assertion that the US will investigate the matters in depth. "Safeguarding Secrets," this Spencer Michaels feature looked at Los Alamos National Laboratory, where a Taiwanese-American scientist was fired last month for leaking US nuclear technology to China. The report examined the security measures followed at Los Alamos, talking to employees of the laboratory about whether they believe there should be more scrutiny by the government and lab management. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6403

    "Campaign For Kosovo," a Tom Bearden summary report on the day's events in Kosovo, including footage from NATO bombing damage in Pristina; the failure of Cyprus acting president to obtain freedom for the three captured US soldiers following a meeting with President Milosevic; a remark made by Russian Foreign Minister Igor Ivanov denying rumors that Russian President Yeltsin had ordered nuclear missiles to be retargeted at NATO countries in defiance of NATO bombing; a statement made by James Rubin assuring that Russia will not become involved in the battle; and a statement made by President Boris Yeltsin reinforcing this message. "Newsmaker," in this newsmaker interview, Jim Lehrer spoke to Zhu Rongji, the premiere of The People's Republic of China. The premiere first discussed China's stance on Kosovo, in which he strongly advocated a diplomatic course to bring forth a resolution, denounced NATO military action and evaded the question of whether China supports Milosevic's regime. The two then discussed US-China relations, including China's desire to become a member of the World Trade Organization, in light of the current war; responses to claims made about China's harsh treatment of political dissidents and his assertion that China is on the road to a more democratic society; his willingness to be open to a US investigation over China stealing US nuclear technology; comments on his meeting with Secretary of State Albright; whether this trip will influence his posture on Kosovo and how he would like to see US-China relations evolve in the face of tensions between the two countries. "Political Wrap," a Margaret Warner conversation with Tom Oliphant and Paul Gigot on the interview with Zhu Rongji, in which they pointed out that China's denouncement of using force in Kosovo relates to its discussed own self-interest in protecting Taiwan and discussed whether the interview will reverse the anti-China sentiment in Washington. The two then anticipated the political climate over Kosovo in the coming week, including the likelihood that the president will have to consider ground troops; whether the Republicans will support Sen. John McCain's (R-AZ) position on Kosovo; and how Kosovo is playing out in Congress as a moral issue and its effect on party lines. "Power of Music," in a time of ethnic strife abroad, this Paul Solman report looked at spirituality in the music of Bach and how it can bring all people closer to a universal understanding of the world and religion. He visited an Episcopal church in Boston that is the home of the renowned Emmanual Philharmonic, which is dedicated to bring the beautiful sounds of Bach to the parish every week. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6404

    "Campaign For Kosovo," this Spencer Michaels report included an update on the day's bombing events in Kosovo, in which a passenger train carrying Serb civilians was hit by NATO strikes, according to Serb reports; an account of the alliance signed between Russia, Belaruse and Yugoslavia; a statement made by secretary of state Madeleine Albright refuting claims that the United States would support partitioning Kosovo; a remark made by British foreign minister Robin Cook opposing the use of ground troops in Kosovo; a statement made by President Clinton at a ceremony thanking B-52 pilots for their efforts in the mission; and a report on the continuing struggle of refugees seeking a safe escape from Kosovo. "Upon Their Return", this segment began with a Kwame Holman background report on the return of Congress following a two week recess, after an eleven-member bipartisan group accompanied secretary of defense William Cohen to Europe and the Balkans. A conversation in which senators Rep. Chuck Hagel (R-Nebraska), Rep. Tim Hutchinson (R-Arkansas), Rep. Joe Leiberman (D-Connecticut) and Rep. Paul Wellstone (D-Minnesota) exchanged views on how the United States should proceed in carrying out military action in Kosovo, discussing the need for the American public to understand the consequences that could result from sending ground troops to the region; the need for Congress to have a role in making that decision; whether Congress should publicly debate the issue and how a divided Congress could weaken the United States resolve; the prospect of returning to diplomatic measures with President Milosevic and the crucial need for the United States and NATO not to compromise in reaching a deal with Milosevic. "On The Move," this segment began with a Tim Ewart ITN report from the Macedonia border, followed by a Phil Ponce conversation with two refugees who escaped Kosovo to Washington, D.C. Vjosa Dubruna, the former head of The Center for Protection of Women and Children in Pristina, and Aferdita Kelmendi, director of Radio-TV 21 in Pristina, talked about their experiences being ousted from their homeland. They shared their stories of when they first became aware of the ethnic cleansing operation in Pristina and were forced into hiding from the Serbs, only to later be beaten, robbed and finally allowed exit from the region. They discussed the humiliation they experienced and their continuous fear of being killed, but said they would like to return one day. "Sermons on War," a Betty Ann Bowser report, in which she talked to ministers belonging to a broad group of religious denominations in Denver to see if they approve of how United States and NATO have handled the conflict in Kosovo and whether the use of force is justified under religious principles. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6405

    "Campaign for Kosovo," a Spencer Michaels update report on the third week of NATO attacks on Kosovo, including footage from the previous day's bombings of the region's largest oil refinery, plastics factory and military barracks; the Serb invasion of the Albanian border town Kamenica; a statement made by Madeleine Albright denouncing the Serb incursion; and the meeting held between Secretary Albright and Russian foreign minister Igor Ivanov, in which they debated the make-up of the international peace keeping force to be established in Kosovo. "Troubled Neighbor," a Mark Austin ITN background report on the incursion of Serb troops into Kamenica, Albania, the stronghold and home of the Kosovo Liberation Army, followed by a Margaret Warner report on Albania's history and current struggle with democracy. Gen. Edward Atkeson, Charles Kupchan and Janusz Bugajski discussed the United States' reaction to the Serb offensive, in which they have strengthened forces in Albania to a brigade-size unit; the Serb attack as a mechanism in preventing an Albanian counterattack in Kosovo; whether the outflow of refugees into Albania is likely to provoke a move towards a "Greater Albania" and to what extent they are destabilizing Albania's political and economic infrastructure; whether the deployment of the US Apache helicopters may deter further incursions into Albania and whether Macedonia, Albania and Montenegro will become NATO protectorates. "War and Remembrance," in this feature, Elizabeth Brackett spoke with Serb Americans who were forced out of a small region of Croatia, known as Krajina, under the same principle of ethnic cleansing, to see whether they were sympathetic to the plight of the ethnic Albanians in Kosovo. "Update in Contempt," Phil Ponce spoke with Roberto Suro of the Washington Post on the decision by judge Susan Webber Wright to find President Clinton guilty of contempt of court for intentionally misleading testimony in the Paula Jones deposition, discussing the terms of the charge, the unexpected harshness of her words despite the light penalties imposed, and the White House response to the sanction. "Prize Winner," the program concluded with an Elizabeth Farnsworth conversation with this year's winner of the Pulitzer Prize for fiction, Michael Cunningham, for his novel, "The Hours." He talked about how he wrote "The Hours" to express the depth of human experience by tracing the day of the lives of three women trying to find art out of ordinary situations; his love for Virginia Woolfe, who is one of the central characters, and his impressions on winning a prize for his novel. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6406

    "Campaign on Kosovo," a Spencer Michaels update report on the previous day's events in Kosovo in which a military convoy escorting ethnic Albanians to the border were hit by NATO missiles, according to Serb reports, reports of the food shortage crisis in Kosovo and NATO's inability to get additional aid to the region; and Germany's proposal for a twenty-four hour NATO ceasefire if Milosevic agrees to roll back Serb troops. "Denver Views," Elizabeth Farnsworth had a conversation with a group of Denver citizens, in who exchanged views on whether the United States forces should be involved in the bombing campaign in Kosovo; whether there is a military solution to the Balkans; whether Americans have a full-scale understanding of the severity of the war; the impact of the television pictures of refugees on the public; and how foreign policy must be carried out in Congress in the Twenty-First Century. "Picture Power," a Terence Smith background report on the history of television through times of war and its impact on the plight for human rights, followed by a discussion in which Johanna Neuman and Michael Beschloss discussed the relationship between television and foreign policy, including whether television is the catalyst that drives foreign policy; the benefits of television in connecting the public with global crises; how previous presidents have used or abused the media in driving foreign policy; whether Americans have become immune to pictures and how the pictures of Kosovo refugees has driven Clinton policy in the war. "Starr Testimony," a Kwame Holman report on Kenneth Starr's testimony in front of the Senate Governmental Affairs Committee in which he denounced the Independent Counsel Law of 1974 and said that it should not be renewed after it expires in June. The report contained excerpts by Starr, who was the Independent Counsel assigned to investigate the Monica Lewinsky scandal and the Whitewater Land deal, on this decision, reactions from members of the Senate committee and testimony from the three federal judges whose duty it is to appoint Independent Counsels. "Prize Winner," the program concluded with a conversation with Margaret Edson, the Pulitzer winner for drama, for her play "Wit," on a poetry teacher's fight against cancer. She talked about her play and why she chose a poetry teacher as her central character; where she acquired her knowledge of the medical aspect of her play; her experiences working in a cancer and AIDS unit; how her play made it from a household read to the theaters of New York; how she had to adapt it to half the original length; her love of teaching; and whether winning a Pulitzer will have any impact on her life. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6407

    "Campaign for Kosovo," a Spencer Michaels update report on the previous day's events in Kosovo, including a NATO apology for killing over sixty Kosovar civilians after accidentally bombing a refugee convoy, followed by footage of the recent exodus of more Kosovar refugees to Macedonia. A Kwame Holman report including excerpts from the day's testimony at an Armed Senate and House Committee hearing on Kosovo, in which secretary of defense William Cohen and Joint Chiefs chairman Henry Shelton answered questions about the US involvement in the war and were asked to urge Clinton to call for congressional backing for his objectives in the Balkans. "The Military Situation," in this segment Col. David Tretler, professor of military strategy at the National War College in Washington, Gen. Richard Neal, former assistant commandant of the Marine Corps, and Robert Hunter, the ambassador to NATO during President Clinton's first term assessed the success of the air campaign in Kosovo; discussed whether Milosevic will succeed in using propaganda to divide the allied forces; the possibility of preparing and deploying ground troops in a speedy fashion; and how the administration's public stand in opposing ground troops enforces Milosevic's regime. Police Brutality," in this report, Betty Ann Bowser looked at the ensuing controversy over the way the New York City Police Department has mistreated African Americans in New York, sparked by the brutal shooting of an innocent African immigrant, Amadou Diallo, by an undercover policeman. The report talked to members of the African American community who condemn the police behavior, New York mayor Rudy Giulianni on his efforts to control police force aggression, and the New York Police Department on their response to the allegations that they operate impulsively and make arrests without proper cause. "Prize Winner," Elizabeth Farnsworth spoke with Mark Strand, this year's winner of the Pulitzer Prize for poetry for his work, "Blizzard of One." The former US poet laureate discussed whether poetry is a respectable profession; whether poetry should be analyzed to make a certain point; his aim in writing poetry to astonish people; the ambiguous way he finds his poetry and whether one can make a living off of poetry. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6408

    "Campaign for Kosovo," a Spencer Michaels summary report on the previous day's events in Kosovo, including reports of more than 100,000 Kosovar/Albanians headed for the Macedonian border; a statement made by State Department spokesman James Rubin on new evidence of mass grave sites near Pristina; excerpts from a NATO press briefing in which NATO spokesmen answered questions surrounding the bombing of an Albanian convoy earlier in the week; and a statement made by secretary of defense William Cohen on President Clinton's decision to send the first group of military reservists and the National Guards to the Balkans. "Newsmaker," Elizabeth Farnsworth spoke with national security advisor Samuel Berger on the crisis in Kosovo. He hailed the bombing campaign as a success and said that NATO had successfully crippled Serb military forces and infrastucture but noted that the overall process requires patience and time. He discussed whether more reservists would be called upon to serve in the Balkans, defined the NATO objectives for victory, asserted that Milosevic will lose control of the situation if he does not retreat and illustrated the way in which targets are chosen without congressional input. "Political Wrap," a conversation in which Mark Shields and Paul Gigot discussed whether Sandy Berger commended the air campaign in efforts to gain congressional support of the mission; criticized how Republicans have shied away from taking a public stand on the war by calling it "Clinton's war" and how this policy could backfire in the face of a Clinton victory; and discussed why the administration still does not support sending ground troops to Kosovo and the need for political officials to show more leadership in the war. "Trade-Offs," a Phil Ponce background report on China premiere Zhu Rongji's visit to the United States, in which China's hopes to become a member of the World Trade Organization (WTO) were struck down after President Clinton refused a deal that would allow the country into the organization. This was followed by a conversation in which Yasheng Huang of the Harvard Business School discussed why the Chinese are pushing to become a member of the WTO, including their desire to become a competitive market economy and to bolster their wealth with greater foreign direct investment. Rep. Sherrod Brown (D-Ohio) and Robert Kapp of the US-China Business Council discussed the failure of the US and China to sign the deal; Chinese foreign politics over the last year; the astounding concessions China agreed to give to the international community for WTO and whether the Chinese should have to curtail its abuses of human rights and improve its domestic situation before a deal could be met. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6409

    "Campaign for Kosovo," a Tom Bearden summary report on the day's events in Kosovo, including more NATO reactions to the bombing of a Albanian convoy killing over eighty ethnic Albanians; evidence of possible grave sites located in Kosovo; a statement by defense spokesman James Rubin on NATO's decision to try and cut off Yugoslavia's oil; and President Clinton's call for more funding to finance the military and relief operations, estimated at six billion dollars. "Refugee Crisis," this segment began with a Terry Lloyd ITN report examining a secret route taken by refugees from Kosovo to Montenegro through arduous terrain and snowy mountains, followed by a Saira Shah ITN report from the Albanian border illustrating the dire conditions refugees are faced with upon entering the country, where food and shelter is limited. A Margaret Warner conversation in which Dennis McNamara and Jeffrey Colyer discussed the impact of the recent overnight exodus of nearly 20,000 ethnic Albanians; the inconsistency with which refugees are being expelled from Kosovo; the fraction of refugees staying in homes and makeshift camps; the difficulty host cities are having with supplying enough water and food for the refugees; and the need for more funding to provide refugees with proper medical and living standards. "Eyes in the Sky," this Tom Bearden feature report looked at the Global Positioning System (GPS) used to navigate aircraft and guide missiles by most military operations, in which a constellation of over two dozen satellites are relied upon to locate military targets. Since the procedure is relatively new, questions of accuracy and effectiveness are still being examined. "The Great One," a Phil Ponce report on ice hockey legend Wayne Gretsky's retirement from the sport after twenty seasons at age thirty eight. A conversation in which Steve Dryden and Jonathan Feinstein discussed his astounding career; the finesse with which he played hockey; his ease with handling stardom; his place in Canadian history; his role in expanding hockey's popularity in the United States; his overall impact on the sport; and the significance of his retirement. "Prize Winner," an Elizabeth Farnsworth conversation with Melinda Wagner, this year's Pulitzer Prize winner for music, for her "Concerto for Flute, Strings and Percussion." She discussed the genesis of her work; winning a Pulitzer as a woman; whether she has faced any discrimination in her career; and her next work, in which she will write a piece for the New York New Music Ensemble. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6410

    "Congressional Views," a Kwame Holman report on a bipartisan member proposal headed by Sen. John McCain (R-Arizona) calling for a resolution granting the president all necessary forces in carrying out the war in Kosovo, followed by a discussion in which four House members debated the issue. Rep. John Edward Porter (R- Illinois), Rep. Eliot Engel (D-New York), Rep. Robin Hayes (R-North Carolina) and Rep. Rod Blagojevich (D-Illinois) exchanged views on whether Congress should surrender its voice to the president; what message this would send to Milosevic; and whether sending ground troops to Kosovo should be debated in the Congress. "Moving Out," a Betty Ann Bowser report looking at the eighty-second airborne division of the army being deployed to Kosovo to help operate the twenty-four US Apache helicopters sent to the region this week. Bowser spoke to the unit on their attitudes behind the mission and talked with the family of one Apache pilot who has volunteered to go to Kosovo. "Prize Winner," Terence Smith spoke to this year's Pulitzer Prize winners for history. Professors Edwin Burroughs and Mike Wallace discussed their book "Gotham: The History Of New York City to 1898," for which they won the award. They spoke about the twenty years they spent writing the book; what they uncovered about New York City throughout that time and whether they ever expected that they would win a Pulitizer for their work. "Update: School Shootings," this segment began with a portion of a news conference given by Jefferson County sheriff John Stone on a school shooting at Columbine High School outside of Denver, in which three students attacked fellow students and teachers with shotguns and bombs and may have killed twenty five students and injured nearly twenty more. This was followed by a reaction from President Clinton to the nation on this crisis. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6411

    "School Shootings," a Betty Ann Bowser report from Littleton, Colorado on the brutal school shooting at Columbine High yesterday, resulting in the deaths of fifteen people, including Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold, the two students responsible for the attack. The report outlined the ongoing search efforts being carried out by the police to uncover planted pipe bombs inside and surrounding the school and how the state is coming to terms with the tragedy. A Jeffrey Kaye report looking at the investigation surrounding the two gunmen responsible for the shooting, talking to students about the teenagers' personalities and place in the high school. "Newsmaker," Jim Lehrer spoke to Jefferson County District Attorney David Thomas on the Columbine shooting; the death toll of twelve students; why the bodies have not been removed from the school; an account of the bombs planted in and around the school; an account of the other weapons used in the shooting, including two sawed off shot guns, a semi automatic rifle and a handgun; whether others were involved in the attack; an account of the Trenchcoat Mafia, the group the gunmen belonged to; whether they crafted the explosives from directions on the Internet; and whether there were "missed signals" in the suspect's behavior that might have foreshadowed the attack. An Elizabeth Farnsworth discussion in which Gerrold Tirrozi, James Garbarino, Franklin Zimring and Dr. Joan Kinlan discussed teen violence in the United States, including the rising number of kids with emotional problems and the reasons behind them; kids' poor coping skills; the need for schools to have a nurturing atmosphere to accommodate teachers and children; the need for a closer tie between schools and communities; and the disintegration of families in America and the way this leads to aggressive and impulsive behavior. "Campaign For Kosovo," a Tom Bearden update report on the previous day's events in Kosovo, a statement made by William Cohen on NATO's military campaign and a statement made by Madeleine Albright saying that any Yugoslav incursion into bordering countries would be met with serious consequences. "European Views," a Margaret Warner conversation with four journalists from allied countries in Europe. Hugo Young of the Guardian, Christine Ockrent of France 3 Television; Josesph Joffe of Suddeutsche Zeitung, and Lucio Caracciolo of Limes Magazine discussed whether their countries have begun to favor the use of ground troops and if using only an air campaign was losing support from the public. They discussed the significance of the European Union's united stance on the issue, how that strengthens Europe and how the war has affected the relationship between NATO, Europe and the United States. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6412

    "Campaign for Kosovo," a background report on the previous day's events in Kosovo, including NATO's successful bombing of one of President Milosevic's two residences; a statement made by Pentagon spokesman Kenneth Bacon on NATO bombing policy; a statement made by Madeleine Albright opposing the use of ground troops; and Milosevic's proposal to allow a security force monitor Kosovo under the auspices of the United Nations. "NATO at War," this segment began with a background report by Phil Ponce on the history of antagonism between Turkey and Greece, followed by an interview with Turkey's president and Greece's foreign minister on how their countries have been impacted by the war in Kosovo. Turkish president Suleyman Demire shared his opinion on the success of the NATO bombing campaign, expressed his utmost dedication to the NATO mission and denounced Milosevic's heinous treatment of ethnic Albanians. Then Greek foreign minister George Papandreou discussed the need to support a democratic Eastern Europe by allowing ethnic groups to live together peacefully; the unique position of Greece as being both a NATO and EU member as well as having close relations with both the Serbs and Albanians; and Turkey's preference that ground troops not be deployed to the region. "High School Horror," in this segment, President Clinton spoke to students from TC Williams High School in Alexandria, Virginia, about the school shooting in Littleton, Colorado, and listened to student's comments on ways to combat teen violence and ensure safety in schools. A Betty Ann Bowser conversation with four teachers who were named "Teacher of the Year" for their respective states. New York, Kentucky, Oklahoma and Georgia recipients discussed student violence in the wake of the Columbine tragedy, focusing on their school system's strategy in preventing violence and in coping with tragedies; ways schools can help students express themselves better; whether schools should implement dress codes and stricter rules; the need to begin teaching children safety issues early in life and the need to impart the important message to children that they are okay and have much to contribute to society. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6413

    "Campaign For Kosovo," a Tom Bearden summary report on the previous day's reports in Kosovo, including the NATO bombing of the headquarters of the Serbian state television, killing over ten civilians, and two electric power transformers in Belgrade and excerpts from the NATO summit in Washington, DC celebrating the alliance's fiftieth anniversary. "Newsmaker," Jim Lehrer spoke with British prime minister Tony Blair on the crisis in Kosovo. Blair discussed the successes of the air campaign and assured that it was the only opportunity available to NATO; whether the British support sending ground forces to Kosovo; why NATO chose the Serbian state television station as a military target; the procedure by which NATO decides military targets; his approval of NATO expanding its role from defensive to offensive organization and his assertion that NATO must succeed in its mission in order to ensure a stable future for the international community. "Political Wrap," a Margaret Warner conversation in which Mark Shields and Paul Gigot discussed the way this generation of international leaders is handling war; the difference between World War II politics and Kosovo's politics; Blair as the vanguard of the military operation; the leading role that Europe is taking in the war; how public opinion is dwindling over Clinton's weak posture on Kosovo; the need for a congressional debate over sending ground troops to Kosovo and the need for America to have a stronger voice in the campaign. "Prize Winner," Elizabeth Farnsworth spoke to A. Scott Berg, this year's winner of the Pulitzer Prize for biography for his story of Charles A. Lindbergh's life. He discussed why he chose to write about Charles Lindbergh; his desire to tell the story accurately as opposed to the legends in schoolbooks; how he conducted his research for the book; Lindbergh's strong relationship with his wife; how fame and fortune cost the Lindbergh their son; Lindbergh's close ties with prewar Germany; whether Lindbergh was anti-semitic; and his thoughts on Lindbergh's character. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6414

    "Kosovo Summit," a Charles Krause background report outlining NATO's fiftieth anniversary summit held in Washington, DC, this weekend, including NATO's decision to intensify air strikes in Kosovo, to provide bordering countries with military and economic aid and to cut off oil supplies by land and water to Yugoslavia. Margaret Warner joined Michael Beschloss, Haynes Johnson, Jim Hoagland, Michael Mandelbaum and Ronald Steel to discuss the content and significance of the summit, including how NATO has become a "new" NATO geographically, politically and economically; how this NATO differs from previous NATO activities; the role that the United States plays in NATO; whether expansion is positive for NATO; the need for NATO to match its military efforts in Kosovo to its grand objectives; and how NATO's military tactics of using an only-air campaign are sure to fail. "news.com," this Terence Smith feature looked at how the news industry has been affected by the trend toward getting information on the Internet and if traditional news sources such as the newspaper and television will be replaced by an only Internet society one day. Smith talked to an array of people, including a cotton farmer, an engineer, and people in the news industry to see how they perceive the face of news to be changing; the pros and cons of getting news from the net and whether the newspaper and television industries have been adversely affected by this phenomenon. "Dialogue," in this segment David Gergen spoke with Brian Greene on his recent book, "The Elegant Universe," which imparts his and other physicists unified theory explaining the universe under a few solid principles. He discussed their theory known as the string theory, which combines Einstein's theory of relativity and quantum mechanics. He discussed the nature of the three theories; how his theory suggests that the universe consists of up to eight dimensions; and how he believes that the string theory may solve the eternal question of how the universe works. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6415

    "Campaign For Kosovo," a Tom Bearden summary report on the previous day's events in Kosovo, including the second bombing of Belgrade's downtown Serbian television headquarters; the crash of an Apache helicopter and survival of the two pilots; the threat of disease in the overcrowded refugee camps; and a statement made by Yugoslav deputy premier Vuk Draskovic saying that his country would allow a United Nations peace keeping force in Kosovo. "Calling up The Reserves," a Phil Ponce conversation in which he spoke to chief of the National Guard Bureau, Lt. Gen. Russell C. Davis (USAF), on Clinton's decision to call for reservists and the National Guard to be deployed to Kosovo as operators, navigators, pilots, flight engineers, maintenance personel and ground crews; whether military enlistees volunteer with the knowledge that they may be sent to war; the maximum time they are allowed at war; the destinations that the reservists and guards will be sent to and to what extent the military reserves are trained before being allowed to go to war. "Gun Control," a Kwame Holman background report beginning with a remark made by President Clinton in which he proposed new gun legislation that would raise the age for owning and buying a gun. This was followed by a conversation in which Rep. Orrin Hatch (R-Utah) and Sen. Richard Durbin (D-Illinois) debated whether the president's proposed legislation is supportable; whether gun laws would prevent teen violence and if the problem should be addressed through the culture or through tougher gun laws. Durbin discussed the validity of the components of the legislation, including whether gun owners should be held legally accountable for selling guns to minors and Hatch refuted new legislation, saying that Congress need to enforce the laws already in existence and that the problem is much deeper than guns. "Painful Rebound," this Charles Krause report focused on the looming economic crisis in Brazil despite improvement in the global economy. The report discussed the recent plunge of Brazil's currency that sent the country into chaos, how this will impact US companies who have invested in Brazil and whether the country will be able to dig itself out of economic decline or if it needs further IMF funding. According to Brazilian financial experts, the IMF is largely responsible for the economic conditions, after imposing exceedingly high interest rates for its loans, which led to high unemployment and cut-backs in social programs. "Through a Child's Eye," US poet laureate Robert Pinksy read part of Ben Johnson's poem, "The Carry Morrison Ode," on an infants desire to return to the womb after seeing the tumult in the world into which he was born. This was cited in context of the tough conditions surrounding children, who face a world of guns, war and social unrest. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6416

    "Campaign for Kosovo," a Tom Bearden report on the previous day's events in Kosovo, including reports of another major exodus of ethnic Albanians to Macedonia; a statement made by President Clinton calling for 6 billion dollars more in funding for the humanitarian and military needs in Kosovo; and a statement made by James Rubin over Milosevic's decision to fire Yugoslav deputy premiere, Vuk Draskovic for stating views opposing those held by the Yugoslav government, including supporting a United Nations peace keeping force in Kosovo. "Exodus," Jim Lehrer spoke to Sergio Vieira de Mello, undersecretary general of the United Nations, on the current status of the refugee crisis in Kosovo. He discussed the difficulty the UN is having in finding camps for the refugees; whether the Macedonian government is likely to expand its existing refugee camps; and the extent to which camps are overcrowded, face health risks and are unsanitary. "Eyewitness Account," in this segment, Margaret Warner spoke to Michael Dobbs of the Washington Post on his experiences reporting from Belgrade. He described life in Serbia amid the NATO air war; the access journalists have to Kosovo; the conditions in Kosovo to which he has been exposed via a bus trip monitored by Serb officials; his eyewitness account of the bombing and shelling damage in Kosovo; and whether he feels he has the freedom and the access to report the war and situation accurately. "War Of Words," this Kwame Holman report included excerpts from the day's hearings on Kosovo, in which House members debated Rep.Tom Campell's (R-California) proposition that Congress declare war on Yugoslavia or forgo further military involvement, and legislation that would require the president to obtain congressional approval before deploying ground troops to Kosovo. Campell's proposal was voted down easily and Congress voted that the president must get their permission before sending ground troops to war. "Disabilities Debate," Phil Ponce spoke to Jan Crawford Greenburg, legal correspondent for the Chicago Tribune, on three cases recently heard by the Supreme Court disputing the Americans with Disabilities Act, which was created to give those with disabilities equal access to job opportunities, public accommodations and the government. Greenburg discussed the terms of the cases, which question the definition of disabled, what the act provides for those covered and when the judges are likely to come up with a decision. Elizabeth Farnsworth followed with discussion with employment lawyers Vicke Laden and John Fox on the significance of these cases; the poor way in which the law was written; the need to expand those covered by the act; and the problem of those who are not covered by the act yet are too disabled to be given a job. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6417

    "War of Words," a Kwame Holman report on the approval by the House Appropriations Committee of funding for the operation in Kosovo for up to eleven billion dollars despite Congress' failure to pass a bill the day before supporting the air campaign in Kosovo. Margaret Warner joined two congressmen to discuss the meaning of the votes. Rep. JC Watts (R-Oklahoma) and David Bonior (D-Michigan) exchanged views on why parties are divided on the issue of the Balkans; whether the vote opposing pulling troops from Kosovo and opposing an air campaign in Kosovo was partisan and why Republicans would not support the war but would approve funding the mission by nearly twice that which Clinton requested. "Horrors of War," this segment began with a Bill Neely ITN report from a refugee camp in Albania detailing the horrific stories of ethnic Albanians who have witnessed the worst atrocities and mass executions carried out by Serb officials yet. A Phil Ponce conversation with Louise Arbour, the chief prosecutor of the International Criminal Tribunal, in which she discussed whether the atrocities are credible; the procedure by which Tribunal conducts investigations over war crimes; the possibility for all officials, including heads of states, to be tried by the Tribunal; the assistance given by governments to the Tribunal in providing evidence for the case; and how the Tribunal should proceed in getting Serbs to halt committing any further atrocities. "Evil on the Internet," this Betty Ann Bowser report examined the Internet and the harmful information that it can provide, after Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold received instructions to make pipe bombs on the Internet that they later used in their massacre on Columbine High. Elizabeth Farnsworth then spoke to Katrina Heron, Rabbi Abraham Cooper and Bruce Taylor on whether the Internet can be regulated without violating the first amendment; the role that individual companies and portals play in filtering harmful content; whether the Internet should be blamed for the Columbine shooting; the need for parents to monitor their children's use of the Internet and the pros and cons of the Internet. "Celebrating a Centennial," on the one-hundredth anniversary of the birth of Duke Ellington, this segment featured footage of the infamous jazz musician and composer playing "Take the A Train". [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6418

    "Staying Power," a Margaret Warner discussion with Ron Hatchett, Dusko Doder and Warren Zimmerman, in which they discussed President Milosevic as man and leader of Serbia; the role of his wife in his political decisions; whether he is likely to concede to NATO's demands and the root of his unabated persistence in carrying out the war in Kosovo. They exchanged views on the prospect of negotiating with Milosevic and if compromising with him would severely tarnish NATO's credibility. "Reporting Live," Terence Smith looked at the danger of live news coverage in certain critical situations, including hostage predicaments and terrorists acts and how it has endangered police officers and hostages at the scene. Smith examined how several cities have agreements between the police and news organizations, in which they established a set of guidelines by which the media should follow in live coverage of critical situations. "Newsmaker," a Kwame Holman background report on more incriminating evidence that indicates a Chinese scientist leaked information on US nuclear technology to China. According to the report, it was recently uncovered that the Taiwanese-American downloaded classified material from the Los Alamos nuclear facility to a more accessible database. Elizabeth Farnsworth followed with a newsmaker interview with secretary of agriculture Bill Richardson, in which he discussed the content of the information transferred, including computer simulations of US nuclear weaponry; the time when the transfer occurred; how the FBI is going to handle the investigation; the measures being taken to prevent such a security breech from occurring again and why he opposes legislation proposed by Congress that would prohibit foreign scientists programs. "Shields & Gigot," Mark Shields and Paul Gigot joined Jim Lehrer to discuss the week in politics, including criticism over the House votes not to declare war, not to withdraw troops from Kosovo and not to support sending ground troops or an air war; the president's failure to make the case to the American people for war in Kosovo; whether the Republicans are to blame for Congress's disunited posture over Kosovo; how these ambiguous votes will impact US policy in the war and whether the partisan divide in Congress will continue for the next two years. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6419

    "Campaign for Kosovo," a Tom Bearden report on the previous day's events in Kosovo, including the return of the three captured US soldiers to their families following a meeting held by Jesse Jackson and Slobodon Milosevic; a statement made by Jesse Jackson on his return to the United States; and the arrival of Russian envoy Victor Chernobyl to the White House to talk to Clinton about possibly ending the conflict in Kosovo. A Kwame Holman report including excerpts from the day's Senate debate over whether Congress should pass a resolution headed by Sen. John McCain (R-AZ) that would grant the president all necessary forces in carrying out the war in Kosovo; a statement made by President Clinton at a press briefing stating his current position in Kosovo and that he would not begin to consider halting the bombing unless Milosevic began to pull out forces and agree to NATO's requisites. "Diplomatic Efforts," Ivo Daalder, Toby Gati and William Hyland joined Jim Lehrer for a discussion over the direction the conflict in Kosovo is taking, asking whether NATO is likely to negotiate with President Milosevic. They discussed whether Jesse Jackson's successful mission to Kosovo should influence NATO's strategy; Clinton's loss of control over the situation; and the likelihood of Milosevic agreeing to pull out forces in Kosovo and allow a peacekeeping force. "School Shooting," Betty Ann Bowser examined the aftermath of the Colorado school shootings around the country, looking at how schools are coming to terms with the tragedy, engaging in open talks about teen violence and anger and trying to ward off any more copycat acts of violence that have occurred since the tragedy nearly two weeks ago. "Fallen Star," on the eve of the visit of the Japanese prime minister to the United States, this Paul Solman of WGBH Boston feature examined the Japanese economy as it is slowly recovering from its decade-long recession. The report looked at why it fell so dramatically in the early nineties, due to poor management of financial institutions, a lack of skilled workers and rampant government corruption and then talked to economists to see whether Japan now has the tools to bring itself back to prosperity. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6420

    "Deadly Twisters," Jim Lehrer spoke to Lt. Governor Mary Fallin(R-OK) on the deadly tornadoes that swept through central Oklahoma and Kansas yesterday, killing forty people and devastating several towns. She discussed whether the warning system helped people escape the tornadoes, estimated the cost to rebuild the towns and assessed the spirit of the people in the wake of the storms. Phil Ponce followed with a conversation with Joe Schaefer, the director of the Storm Prediction Center, in which he discussed the intensity of the tornadoes, the frequency that tornadoes of such severe intensity occur, the likeliness of tornadoes hitting a city, the rarity of two tornadoes occurring simultaneously and whether storm predictors can foretell the intensity of a tornado. "Campaign For Kosovo," a Tom Bearden summary report on the previous day's events in Kosovo, including the possible transfer of thousands of refugees from Macedonia to Albania and a statement by President Clinton before he left to meet with NATO and the three released UN prisoners of war in Europe. "Fair Game?," following a background report on NATO's bombing of Serbian television headquarters, Terence Smith spoke to Robert Leavitt of New York University and Gen. Richard Neal, (RET.)US Marine Corps, in which they debated whether NATO is justified in bombing the media for serving as a propaganda tool or whether this only makes journalists acceptable targets in later wars, whether bombing state-funded media unfairly harms innocent civilians and whether NATO should have the power to decide what media is propaganda and what is not. "Call Up," Jeffrey Kaye of KCET Los Angeles talked to a military reservist called up under President Clinton's order for military personnel to be deployed to Kosovo. He discussed his mission as a mid-air refueling operator, whether he was scared and how his family feels about him leaving for up to nine months at war. "Family Roots," speaking from personal experience, Anne Taylor Flemming looked at people's increasing desire to have a home base and a close network of family and friends, despite America's reputation as a self-seeking and nomadic society. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6421

    "Apache Troubles," a Tom Bearden background report on the Apache helicopter that crashed during a training mission killing its two pilots, followed by a Jim Lehrer conversation with Col. Michael Hackerson and Thomas McNaugher, in which they discussed the details surrounding the crash; NATO's objectives for the Apache mission; the risks involved in using Apache helicopters and an analysis of the damage that an Apache helicopter can sustain. "Deadly Twisters," in the wake of the killer tornadoes that swept through Oklahoma and Kansas, this Kwame Holman report looked at how the states' victims are coming to terms with the storm's damage and how the government is assisting the states in rebuilding the devastated communities and cities. "Responsibility," Elizabeth Farnsworth spoke to a group of high school students on the impact that the Columbine school shooting has had on their lives. Topics included whether they were more fearful of going to school; what they are doing as students to prevent such a tragedy from occurring in their schools and whether they feel that they have the power to prevent violence; the trials they have faced in picking on and being picked on by students and what they think should be done by schools and parents so that teens feel better about themselves in today's stressful world. "Lost & Found," Seventy five years after his mysterious disappearance from the slopes of Mount Everast, mountaineer George Mallory's body was found near the mountain's summit by a recent expedition. Following a brief background on Mallory and this find, Terence Smith spoke to David Breashears, who created the film, "Everest: The Mystery of Mallory and Irvine," in which he discussed how the discovery could unleash the secret of whether Mallory was the first person to successfully reach the summit. He talked about what scientists can learn from his body, how the film in his camera may be able to provide pictures of Mallory reaching the summit and how earlier climbers compare with today's more technologically savvy climbers. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6422

    "Campaign for Kosovo," a Tom Bearden summary report on the previous day's events in Kosovo, including a meeting held between the G8 members in Bonn, Germany that concluded in a diplomatic resolution proposal to the conflict in Kosovo that mirrors NATO's objectives; the increasing number of refugees awaiting entrance into Macedonia; and a statement made by President Clinton to Kosovar refugees promising that they will return to their homeland. "Pursuit of Peace," Jim Lehrer spoke to four senators on the peace proposal drafted by G8 members in Bonn yesterday. John Warner(R-VA), Sen. Richard Lugar(R-IN), Chris Dodd(D-CT) and Carl Levin(D-MI) discussed the content of the legislation and whether it meets NATO's objectives, agreed the terms of the agreement were vague, and assessed whether Russia's approval of the proposal is an indication that Milosevic will also agree to it. They exchanged views on how Milosevic would react to the proposal and how the talks are likely to play out in coming weeks. "Conversation," Phil Ponce engaged Kosovar editor Blerim Shala in a conversation on his perspective on the situation in Kosovo, including his support of NATO objectives and opinion that Milosevic must agree without compromise to those objectives if Kosovar/Albanians are to return to the region. "Dealing with Disaster," in the aftermath of the deadly tornadoes that swept through the midwest this week, Betty Ann Bowser visited a small community in Oklahoma and talked to the residents faced with rebuilding or relocating to new areas after their homes were destroyed from the storm. "Mega Deals," Terence Smith joined Ken Auletta to discuss the meaning behind AT&T's acquisition of Media One, the fourth largest cable provider, and Microsoft's subsequent high-stake investment in AT&T. He discussed AT&T's desire to compete in local telephone markets via the cable industry, whether the deal makes AT&T a monopoly and the risks involved for AT&T in profiting from the venture into the local telephone market. He then discussed Microsoft's role in AT&T and their quest to become involved in the cable industry in hopes that the Internet will one day be available via cable lines. He discussed the pros and cons of having a single service provider for television, telephone, and the Internet. "Mothers of Invention," in this essay, Roger Rosenblatt looked at the rise of prominent women writers, whose work for the first time is more prolific and celebrated than men's. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6423

    "Newsmaker," Jim Lehrer spoke with Secretary of State Albright on the recent diplomatic efforts by NATO to resolve the conflict in Kosovo. She discussed the conditions Milosevic must agree upon in order to stop the bombing, whether NATO will halt the bombing to engage in peace talks with Serbia, how long it will take to establish a successful diplomatic resolution, whether the United Nations will have a say in the makeup of the peacekeeping force in Kosovo, her conviction that the countries of NATO will work together to establish a successful diplomatic agreement and whether she sees the bombing campaign as a success. "A New Beginning," an Elizabeth Brackett of WTTW Chicago report in which she visited Fort Dicks military base, where the first group of Kosovar refugees await clearance before being assigned a temporary home in the United States. "Political Wrap," a Terence Smith conversation on the week in politics with Mark Shields and Paul Gigot, in which they discussed how the war in Kosovo is playing out in Congress, including the Republican divide on the issue and its impact on the party, the significance of President Clinton's visit to refugees in Germany, the poor performance of the Congress throughout the war and the way in which Sen. Tom Delay has led the Republican party in the House. "Responsibility," Elizabeth Farnsworth spoke to a group of parents on the difficulty teens are having growing up in today's society. They talked about the extent to which kids are pressured to succeed and the competitive nature of schools, sports and art, their responsibility as teachers and parents in the lives of teens, the importance that trust plays in a parent-child relationship and the need for a common understanding of the school's role. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6424

    "What Went Wrong," a Betty Ann Bowser background report on continuing protests in Beijing over the accidental bombing of the Chinese Embassy in Belgrade and the subsequent decision by the Chinese government to temporarily disengage in diplomatic talks over human rights and arms control with the United States; a Phil Ponce conversation with Newsweek correspondent John Barry on the details of the accidental bombing, including the outdated map NATO used to locate its target provided by United States' sources, the inaccuracy of the database that provides off-limit targets and which failed to include the Chinese Embassy; who is responsible for keeping the database and maps up-to-date; the CIA's role in locating targets and what the US Intelligence Committee is doing to prevent a miscalculation from occurring again. "Newsmaker," Jim Lehrer spoke to Li Zhaoxing, China's ambassador to the United States, on the accidental bombing. He expressed his doubts over the bombing as a sincere accident on the United States part, the three objectives by which the United States must comply in order for the Chinese to reestablish friendly ties with the nation, his government's insistence on a thorough investigation of the matter, why he believes the United States would intentionally bomb the Chinese and whether the US ambassador and his family are safe from the protesters in China. "Outrage," Margaret Warner spoke to three experts on China to discuss China's reaction to the bombing of their embassy in Belgrade. They discussed why the ambassador reacted with such hostility towards the United States and whether his reaction is warranted, how this accident reinforces the Chinese deep-seeded belief that the West is out to get them, why they believe the United States is conspiring to contain the Chinese, how this will impact Sino-American relations and whether the situation could escalate in China. "Powerful Influences?," following a brief report looking at the relationship between violence in the media and children's behavior, Terence Smith joined guests to talk about Clinton's recent initiative to help stave off violence in the entertainment industry. Filmmakers Allen Hughes and Rob Reiner, Sen. Sam Brownback(R-KS) and psychologist David Walsh agreed that violence on television does not directly cause kids to kill, discussed the roots of teen anger and debated whether television and music content has increased in violence. They discussed what measures the industry can take in curtailing violence and what the government can do to regulate the entertainment industry without violating the first amendment. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6425

    "What's Next?," Jim Lehrer joined guests to talk about the next phase in the war in the Balkans after forty-eight days of bombing has not forced Milosevic to retreat. Peter Galbraith, Donald McHenry, Charles Kupchan and Eugene Carroll all agreed that NATO's current strategy was failing and discussed why a bombing campaign was sure to fail in getting their objectives met by the Serbian government, how a diplomatic resolution should be carried out simultaneously with the bombing campaign, the role that the Russians and Chinese are playing in the talks, whether the Chinese would veto a UN Security Council resolution and how long the bombing campaign is likely to continue. "The China Connection," a Kwame Holman report including excerpts from a House hearing in which Johnny Chung testified about his involvement in the 1996 Clinton/Gore campaign after he was alleged to have contributed hundreds of thousands of dollars on China's behalf to the Democratic party. "Recovering from Tragedy," Lee Hochberg visited Springfield, Oregon, a year after the town's school shooting in which a fifteen year old student opened fire on his classmates, killing two and injuring twenty-two. The report looked at what efforts the town and city have made to prevent teen violence and how victims of the shooting are coping and coming to terms with the tragedy. "Controlling Guns," Phil Ponce spoke with two members of the House over new gun legislation that will be debated later in the week. Rep. Zoe Lofgren ( D-CA) talked about her draft, which would ensure that gun manufacturers could not circumvent the ban of assault weapons law by proposing to expand the definition of an assault weapon. Rep. Bill McCollum (R-FL) criticized her proposal, saying that the issue at hand is the need to enforce laws already in place, then discussed current legislation being debated in Congress that would give states funding to strengthen their juvenile justice systems by implementing tougher laws on delinquents. They debated whether tougher consequences or less access to guns would prevent teen violence. "Children's Bards," US poet laureate Robert Pinsky remembered poet Shel Silverstein, who died yesterday, by reading two of his most well-known poems: "My Beard," and "Where The Sidewalk Ends." [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6426

    "Money Manager," this segment included remarks made by Robert Rubin on his decision to resign as secretary of treasury and subsequent remarks made by Lawrence Summers, who was nominated to assume that position. A conversation followed in which Charles Payne, Daniel Tarullo, Allan Metzer and John Berry exchanged views on Rubin's accomplishments, whether he can be credited for Wall Street's prosperity over the years, whether Summers is likely to carry out the same monetary policy as Rubin and his aptitude as an economist. "Politics in Moscow," a Betty Ann Bowser background report on Russian President Boris Yeltsin's decision to fire his prime minister Yvgeny Primakov for failing to provide economic reform, followed by a conversation in which Dimitri Simes, Leon Aron and Stephen Cohen discussed why Yeltsin made the decision to let Primakov go, including the upcoming impeachment hearings against the president, whether this could lead to an internal political crisis, whether it will hamper the Russian's role in promoting a diplomatic resolution in Kosovo and the long term implications for Russia. "Inside Kosovo," Elizabeth Farnsworth spoke by phone to Steven Erlanger of the New York Times in Belgrade on his experiences covering the war in Kosovo. He discussed his accessibility to Kosovo, the six days he spent there, an assessment of the NATO bombing damage in Pristina and the overall condition of the people still residing in Kosovo. "An American in Europe," in this essay, Richard Rodriguez illustrated the life of American painter John Singer Sergeant through his works, noting his fascination with the rise and fall of societies in the early Twentieth Century. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6427

    "Facing The Issue," Following a statement made by President Clinton on why it is in America's best interest to be engaged in the war in Kosovo, a Margaret Warner background report looked at the way hopeful presidential candidates have voiced the issue, including excerpts from Sen. John McCain, Bill Bradley, Al Gore, Lamar Alexander and George W. Bush. Next, two reporters covering the presidential hopefuls discussed how the polls have been affected by candidates' stand on the war, the Republican internationalist and isolationist division over foreign policy and whether foreign policy is going to take a large role in defining the presidential debate. "A Better Treatment?" this Susan Dentzer feature report looked at the newest treatments for breast cancer, including high dose chemotherapy and bone marrow transplants. The report looked at the debate over the treatments' effectiveness, in which several case studies have shown that patients do not benefit any better than from other less costly and less threatening methods. Dentzer spoke to patients who have undergone treatments and key doctors in the profession to see whether they will become more commonly used by breast cancer sufferers. "Responsibility," following the Colorado shooting, Elizabeth Farnsworth spoke to a group of police and juvenile justice personnel in Denver. They exchanged views on what they see as a lack of moral understanding among teenagers today, whether they feel they can do more to prevent violence and the need to change parents perception of policeman so they don't feel they are so threatening. "Woman of Distinction," Roger Rosenblatt paid tribute to former Washington Post editorial page editor Meg Greenfield, who died today, after a long battle with cancer. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6428

    "Cost of Conflict," following a background report on accounts of various accidental bombings by NATO, Lt. Gen. Thomas McInerney and Lt. Gen. Robert Gard joined Phil Ponce for a discussion on whether NATO is bombing responsibly, whether the bombing campaign is working and the need to negotiate with Milosevic. "Outraged," a Spencer Michaels feature looking at how Chinese-Americans view the accidental bombing of the Chinese embassy in Belgrade and how the Chinese press is covering both that story and the alleged espionage of the Taiwanese-American scientist at Los Alamos Research Center. "Gunfight," a Kwame Holman report including excerpts from the day's debate in the Senate over gun control legislation, including an ammendment that would require mandatory background checks for purchases at gun shows. "Shields & Gigot," Margaret Warner spoke with Mark Shields and Paul Gigot on the week's political events, including the politics behind the vote in the Senate over gun control legislation, whether gun control politics are likely to take a large part in the presidential campaign and whether Al Gore is campaigning effectively. "Another Country," David Gergen of US News & World report spoke to Mary Pipher Ph.D. on her book "Another Country," which discusses the cultural divide between the elderly and the baby boomer generations in communication, life styles, and dealing with life. She talked about the importance in getting to know your parents and integrating older people into today's society. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6429

    "Israel Votes," Following a brief report on the Israeli elections in which Ehud Barak was voted in as prime minister and Benjamin Netanyahu stepped down from the Likud party, Margaret Warner spoke to Yitshak Ben-Horin, Robert Satloff and Thomas Friedman on the vote. They discussed why the Israelis wanted Netanyahu out of power, including his lack of leadership in the peace process and his lack of achievement throughout his term, and the way that the campaign was "issue free" and driven on personality. "Court Watch," in this segment, Phil Ponce spoke to legal correspondent Jan Crawford Greenburg on two recent Supreme Court rulings. She discussed the terms of the cases in which it was ruled that it is unconstitutional for a state to implement welfare programs that prevent new residents from receiving higher benefits in the state and that states cannot take race into account when drawing legislation districts. "Bankruptcy Reform," a brief Spencer Michaels background report on the current bankruptcy laws, which have been criticized for allowing people to erase credit card debt too easily, followed by a discussion on recent legislation introduced in the Senate and passed in the House that would make it more difficult to file for bankruptcy. Law professors Todd Zywicki and Karen Gross exchanged views on whether the current system is too generous, the merits of the new legislation and if it is warranted and how it will impact women, children, and minorities. "Youth Poetry Slam," in this feature report, Spencer Michaels visited a modern day poetry contest in San Francisco sponsored by Writer's Corp, a foundation established to bring poetry and introspection into the lives of young people on the street. The feature included excerpts from the contest in which two teams battled for the championship: a team of women at risk and a team of men from a detention program. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6430

    "Public Opinion," Betty Ann Bowser began this segment with a background on the previous day's events in Kosovo, followed by a Margaret Warner discussion with Andrew Kohut of the Pew Research Center for an analysis of public opinion on Kosovo, including the most recent polls which, indicate people's diminishing support for the air war in Kosovo and the president and rising support for ground troops. Terence Smith then spoke to Newshour regional commentators Lee Cullum, Bob Kittle, Cynthia Tucker and Patrick McGuigan, who agreed that support has declined in their regions for the war, criticized Clinton's handling of Kosovo and discussed what options are available to NATO to end the war. "Election Fallout," a Laurie Neff background report on the Israeli elections voting Ehud Barak in as prime minister, followed by a conversation in which Geoffrey Kemp, Joel Singer and Khalil Jahshan discussed the significance of the vote, how it will enhance Israel's relationship with its neighboring countries and the United States, whether a new prime minister will advance the peace process, and how US-Palestinian and US-Israeli relations may be affected by Barak. "Criminal Numbers," a Tom Bearden report examining the Philadelphia Police Department initiative to improve crime statistics following an FBI crime report, which falsely stated Philadelphia to be the safest US city. The report looked at the way Philadelphia police commissioner John Timoney has implemented programs to accurately track crime statistics and monitor crime trends in the city. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6431

    "Gunfight," a Kwame Holman background report on the bipartisan backing in the Senate of three more amendments to the Juvenile Justice Bill that would raise the age of owning a handgun to twenty one, require mandatory background checks at gun shows and require safety locks on all guns. A Jim Lehrer conversation in which Norman Ornstein and Franklin Zimring discussed why the Republicans supported the amendments and how gun legislation is likely to become more politicized in coming months. "Spending the Surplus," this Kwame Holman report included excerpts from House debate over an emergency supplementary bill that would provide 14.6 billion in funding for emergency situations, including aid for farmers, the military, hurricane and tornado damage and refugee relief. The report featured remarks from the Senate Approprations Committee, who met around the clock for days until finally coming to a resolution. "Exodus," Margaret Warner spoke to Brunson McKinley of the International Organization for Migration on the current refugee situation in Kosovo, discussing the number of refugees taken from Macedonia and Albania, the conditions of the existing camps holding refugees and an assessment of the probable length of the crisis. "Star Wars Fever," a Phil Ponce background report on the release of the long-awaited film, "Star Wars: The Phantom Menace," the prequel to the Trilogy that tells the story of Darth Vader. Elizabeth Farnsworth discussed the Star Wars phenomenon with Paul Dergarabedian and Elvis Mitchell, who they exchanged views on why the public's interest level is so high for "Star Wars," the appeal of the film's central characters, how the media has influenced the film's marketing and who will attend the film. "Going To Extremes," this Richard Rodriguez essay looked at pop culture's fascination with dangerous sporting events, wondering why people need to face death to feel alive. He noted the contrast between traditional sporting events that include opponents and rules and the newer events that combat nature's obstacles and inconsistencies. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6432

    "Staying on Course," the segment began with a remark made by President Clinton reinforcing his stand to continue bombing despite growing tension in NATO over the current military strategy, followed by a Margaret Warner conversation in which four European journalists shared their view on the war. Hugo Young, Christine Ockrent, Klaus Frankenberger, and Lilli Gruber discussed how public support of the campaign and of ground troops is waning in their countries and exchanged views on whether they are still in strong support of NATO's hard-lined position and whether they would be willing to negotiate. "Luxury Fever," this Paul Solman feature examined the spending frenzy now taking place in America and how that allocates resources inefficiently. The report looked into why people are competing for status, how America's prosperity is driving this craze and the ways in which such spending is harmful to consumers and society. "Reflecting on a Tragedy," On the one-month anniversary of the deadly Columbine shooting, Elizabeth Farnsworth spoke to NewsHour regular essayists Clarence Page, Roger Rosenblatt, Richard Rodriquez, Anne Taylor Flemming and Jim Fisher to discuss school violence. They exchanged views on the extent to which society has been affected by the shootings, sharing their opinions on what they think would prevent childhood violence, anger and isolation. Although they agreed that by taking away the guns and by cutting down school size the problem would be helped, the essential problems, they said, was in the way in which children are being brought up in this impersonal, modernized world of suburbia. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6433

    "Newsmaker," Margaret Warner spoke to British foreign secretary Robin Cook on the possibility of sending ground troops to Kosovo, why the United States has made a public stand to beef up its forces, his assertion that the Serb military has suffered from the bombing campaign, whether NATO bombing accidents have influenced public opinion, whether NATO will revert to negotiations with Milosevic and Clinton's strong position in resolving the war. "Culture Clash," a Tom Bearden feature examining current debate between the United States and Canadian governments over C-55, a Canadian law that would prohibit Canadian advertisers from advertising in American magazines in efforts to protect the country's culture. The report looked at whether this would actually hurt the advertisers, the Canadian economy and trade relations with the United States. "Shields & Gigot," a conversation in which Mark Shields and Paul Gigot assessed the Senate's success in passing tough gun control legislation, the terms of the legislation and whether it includes substantive reform measures, how this will impact the Republican Party and the lack of leadership in the Republican Party. The two then discussed why public support is waning over the war in Kosovo and Clinton's poor handling of the issue. "Conversation," Terence Smith spoke to Max Frankel, the former executive editor of the New York Times, on his recent book, "The Times of My Life and my Life With The Times." He shared his view on the state of journalism today and the way in which it has been brought down by technology and outside influences. He discussed how journalism has changed over the years, how reporters today differ from past journalists and his confidence that in any age the media can rise to the occasion of reporting quality news. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6434

    "Prisoners Freed," a Mark Austin report from the Albanian/Kosovo border on the continuing refugee crisis in which thousands more Kosovars were displaced from their homeland and forced to Albania after being separated from family members and tortured. "Wars Discontent," Jeffrey Kaye of KCET television examined the rising domestic opposition to Clinton's policy over war in Kosovo by some Republicans and Democrats, who have organized mass protests and meetings in efforts to stop the bombing campaign by NATO. "Just A War?," Margaret Warner joined Rabbi David Saperstein, Bishop Thomas Gumbleton and Sean Murphy and Tom Gerety to discuss whether the war in Kosovo is justified. They exchanged views on whether the war fits under religious criterion as justifiable, whether the bombing is morally acceptable, what justifies war, how war should be carried out, and what should be done to end the conflict. "Court Watch," a Phil Ponce conversation in which Jan Crawford Greenburg explained two recent Supreme Court cases that ruled school districts liable for sexual harassment between students if complaints go unaccounted for and cause a student's education to suffer and that it is unconstitutional for reporters to enter a person's home with a police officer on police raids and arrests, discussing the impact and terms of the cases. "Bechkman in St. Louis," Paul Solman visited the St. Louis Art Museum, where the only US exhibit of German-born Twentieth Century modern artist Max Bechkman resides, looking at his work and how his expression evolved throughout his career. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6435

    "Stolen Secrets," a Kwame Holman report on the House Select Committee's findings on Chinese espionage concluding that a great amount of US nuclear technology, missile design and satellite information was stolen by the Chinese from four laboratories in the United States. Jim Lehrer then spoke to Rep. Christopher Cox (R-CA) and Norman Dicks (D-WA), who headed the committee, on who is to blame for the theft, the need to drastically improve US counterintelligence, whether the Chinese will continue to steal US technology, how the US should carry out China foreign policy and whether cabinet members were aware of the espionage. "Damage Assessment," a Kwame Holman background report including excerpts from House and Senate reactions over the Chinese espionage report, followed by an Elizabeth Farnsworth conversation with Jonathan Pollack, Douglas Paal and Henry Sokolski, in which they exchanged views on what the report means, including whether the US should alter its relations with China, how the Chinese stole the technology, the difficulty in protecting US nuclear information and whether this will escalate into an arms race between the US and China. "Newsmaker," Margaret Warner spoke with Germany's foreign minister Joschka Fischer on his country's stance over Kosovo, including how the conflict should be handled diplomatically, the need for Russia to agree to a NATO resolve, whether ground troops will become a favorable options providing diplomatic failure, how he defends going to war to his country and how he denounces what the Serbs and President Milosevic stand for. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6436

    "Stolen Secrets," Kwame Holman spoke to House Speaker Dennis Hastert on the validity of the report finding China guilty of espionage, in which he discussed the content in the report, the need to continue trading with China despite the allegations and what should be done to ensure that this type of security breech does not occur again. A conversation with US Representatives Dana Rohrbacher (R-CA), Porter Goss (R-FL), John Spratt (D-SC) and Ellen Tauscher (D-CA) in which they exchanged views on whether China is the culprit, whether the situation should be handled internally or externally, the need to establish an efficient counterintelligence program, the need for accountability among US officials heading security, why a missile defense system is necessary and whether the Clinton Administration should be held accountable. "Listeria Bacteria," this Elizabeth Bracket report looked into the recent breakout of the deadly bacteria listeria, which is found in packaged meats and cheeses, after several people died from eating Sara Lee ballpark hotdogs. The report outlined what measures the US Department of Agriculture has taken to prevent future breakouts and whether warning labels should be put on packaged meat and cheese products of possible contamination. "Dialogue," David Gergen talked to New York Times columnist Thomas Friedman about his book, "The Lexus and The Olive Tree," on his theory of globalization. He discussed the post Cold War era as a time of globalization, how globalization spawned democratization, the need to sustain individual governments in this time and how children should be raised to be a part of this global world. "Land Grab," a Spencer Michaels report on the burgeoning suburbs surrounding the San Fransisco Bay area, which is causing massive traffic jams, as well as debate between conservationists and real estate developers over whether the influx of new housing is bad for the state, the land and for the economy of California. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6437

    "Called to Account," a Tom Bearden report on the indictment of Slobodon Milosevic and four other high ranking Serb officials by the UN War Tribunal for committing serious war crimes, including a lengthy statement made by chief UN war crimes prosecutor Louise Arbour on the evidence proving the officials guilty of atrocities. "Newsmaker," a Jim Lehrer conversation with national security advisor Sandy Berger in response to the indictment of Slobodon Milosevic. He discussed how it weakens Milosevic's hold on power within his country, the US principles to which Milosevic must agree to end the war, his confidence in the air campaign, whether he would consider resigning after some White House officials called for his resignation in response to the Chinese espionage allegations, his assertion that he acted immediately in 1996 when first told about possible espionage, why he told the president a year after he was briefed and his confidence that he did the right thing in that issue. ATom Bearden report on the Yugoslavian reaction to the UN War Tribunal indictment of President Milosevic in which they rejected the charges, followed by a Margaret Warner discussion with Lawrence Eagleburger, Warren Zimmerman and Nina Bang-Jensen on how it will affect the US, whether it should prevent NATO from negotiating with Milosevic, the likely outcome of a War Tribunal investigation and how this will influence future world leaders. "Gun Control Debate," a Kwame Holman report including debate from the first day's testimony in the House over recently passed legislation in the Senate on gun control. "Heart Attack," Elizabeth Farnsworth spoke to Dr. David Thieman of Johns Hopkins Hospital on his recently published article in New England Journal of Medicine that found that heart attack victims stand a better chance to survive at a hospital with more qualified heart specialists. He discussed the terms of his study, what this means for heart attack victims, how it should be used to improve emergency policy and the need to improve health units and hospitals in rural areas. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6438

    "Roller Coaster," a Jim Lehrer conversation with Gretchen Morgenson of the New York Times on the recent swings in the Dow Jones Industrial Average, in which she discussed why the market has turned down, including the impact of interest rates, the volatile Internet stocks, and Internet trading. "Wrestling with the House," a Kwame Holman report looking at Dennis Hastert's role as speaker of the house after being thrust into the position during the impeachment trial, whether he has shown any leadership in the House, including his position in the spending bill and gun control, and excerpts from an interview with Hastert on how he feels the term is proceeding. "Political Wrap," a conversation with Mark Shields and Paul Gigot in which they shared their views on Hastert's role as speaker of the house, his lack of leadership and the divide among the Republican party, the meaning of the Christopher Cox report finding China guilty of espionage, how this will play into the presidential campaign, whether China will get its Most Favored Nation status in the World Trade Organization and whether any in the administration will resign over the allegations. "The Templeton Prize," an Elizabeth Farnsworth conversation with the winner of this year's Templeton Prize in religion, Ian Barbour, for his achievement exploring ethics and theology in science, including how he became interested in religion, why interest has peaked in combining science and religion, whether scientists are willing to understand the beginning of the universe in religious context and why he is giving one million dollars of his prize money to The Center for Theology and Natural Sciences in Berkeley, California. "Human Nature," this Roger Rosenblatt essay examined the goodness in society as seen following the tragedies of Columbine High and the Oklahoma bombing despite the evilness of the acts themselves. The essay examined people's kind hearted behavior in the wake of the Columbine tragedy and how those hurt by the tragedy have coped bravely in spite of the media. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6439

    "Memorial Day Commemoration," this segment included excerpts made by President Clinton at Arlington Cemetary to commemorate Memorial Day, in which he addressed why Americans must support the men and women fighting abroad in Kosovo and why it is important that this generation protect the liberties of coming generations by ensuring that no person should be persecuted for their race or religious beliefs. "Citizen Soldiers," a David Gergen of US News & World Report dialogue with author Stephen Ambrose on his book, "Citizen Soldiers; The US Army from the Normandy Beaches to the Bulge to the Surrender of Germany." He discussed the story and the heroics of the brave men who fought the battle of Normandy in 1944 and the surrender of the Germans eleven months later and explained the patriotism with which the young GI soldiers fought in the war. "Crisis in Sudan," a Tom Bearden feature on the efforts of a suburban Denver fourth grade class to bring an end to slavery in Sudan. The children wrote letters to the president and their senator and held fundraisers in hopes that the issue will be addressed by Congress. "Smart Trek," this Rod Minott feature examined the Federal Highway Administration's efforts to combat traffic in highly congested areas in Seattle by using hi-tech resources to provide instantaneous traffic reports to commuters through the Internet. With this information, the administration believes commuters can make better judgements on journey routes and can eliminate congestion in the process. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6440

    "The Battle for Kashmir," this segment began with a background report on the recent fighting between Pakistan and India over the disputed territory of Kashmir, followed by a conversation in which Michael Krepon and Paula Newberg discussed why the recent fighting broke out between the two countries and whether Pakistan is to blame, the history of antagonism between India and Pakistan, whether the situation warrants outside intervention and whether the United States should be concerned. "Quality Sells," a Terence Smith report on how the quality of local television news is changing by looking at KAKE TV, a Wichita-based ABC affiliate that has been awarded for the high quality of its coverage of local news. Smith talked to the KAKE news director, reporters and rival markets to see how the news business is evolving in the face of a local flashy news media. "Microsoft Trial," a Phil Ponce conversation, in which John McChesney of NPR updated the Microsoft antitrust trial of the Supreme Court after it resumed following a three month hiatus. He discussed why Microsoft is being sued for acting like a monopoly and not providing competition for Netscape, how the government is going to present its case and how Microsoft will carry out its rebuttal, how the AOL-Netscape merger is changing the case and the timetable for the rest of the trial. "Y2K Blame Game," a Margaret Warner background report on the current debate in Congress over whether computer software companies should be held liable for products being sold that are Y2K non-compliant, after the House passed legislation that would diminish lawsuits against these companies by putting guidelines over who can, and who cannot, sue the companies. Howard Nations, Harris Miller, Paul Strassman and Bruce Chapman debated whether the legislation would ward off unwarranted lawsuits, whether the legislation could damage the economy, why trial lawyers are against the bill, and whether fraudulent non-compliant companies are protected by the bill. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6441

    "Arkansas Air Crash," a Phil Ponce report on the Little Rock Flight 1420 plane crash from Dallas that ended in tragedy after the pilot attempted to land in a thunderstorm and killed nine people and left nine unaccounted for. "Passing the Torch," a Judy Aslet report on the elections today in South Africa voting Tabu Mbeki the next president of the country, followed by a conversation in which Sheila Sisulu, John Chettle and David Goodman exchanged views on what this means for South Africa, why elections in South Africa are not competitive, whether Mbeke will be able to bring South Africans out of poverty, the factors behind the large economic divide between whites and blacks in the country, the investment opportunities in South Africa, what Mandela achieved in advancing democracy, and the need for the whites to be more proactive in rebuilding South Africa. "Binge Drinking," a Susan Dentzer report on increasing binge drinking at college campuses, where students will consume vast amounts of alcohol at parties, which could result in deaths across America. Dentzer spoke to doctors, students and college officials about the problem and looked at measures Penn State University has taken to decrease drinking among college students. "Getting Online," following a report on Merrill Lynch's recent decision to provide online trading facilities for its customers, Elizabeth Farnsworth spoke to John Batelle and Joseph Nocera on the process of trading online and whether it is difficult, America's obsession with the stock market, the significance of online trading and how the Internet is changing the nature of big businesses. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6442

    "A Possible Peace," a Kwame Holman report on a possible peace agreement in Kosovo after President Milosevic and his parliament agreed to a plan delivered by Victor Chernomyrdin and Martti Ahtisaari two days ago. The agreement contained provisions that would call for a withdrawal of Serb troops within seven days, deployment of an international force under UN auspices with NATO participation, the safe return of all refugees and the establishment of an interim administration for Kosovo, providing that NATO halts its bombing. "Newsmaker," in this segment, Jim Lehrer spoke to national defense secretary William Cohen on the peace agreement signed by the Serb parliament, in which he confirmed that NATO would not halt the bombing until the Serbs withdraw and discussed what preparations NATO has made in implementing the peace deal, why he is cautious about the Serb agreement, his assertion that most of the forces must leave Kosovo before NATO complies to the agreement and that the UN has no control over the peacekeeping force, his approval of a role for Russian troops in this force, and why the bombing campaign was worth carrying out. "Analyzing the Deal," Margaret Warner spoke to Gen. George Joulwan, Zbigniew Brzezinski and Warren Zimmerman on their opinions of the peace plan agreed to by President Milosevic. They agreed that the terms of the Serb deployment and the implementation of an international force need to be more concrete and said the bombing must continue until the very last of the Serb troops have withdrawn. They discussed whether the UN should have any part in the peacekeeping force, whether the KLA could dismantle a peaceful solution in Kosovo and why the Russians must have a role in the peace process. "The Lost Continent," this Roger Rosenblatt essay looked at the remarkable feat of Sir Earnest Shackleton, who embodied the true heroism and endurance present in human nature after he saved the lives of his twenty-seven man crew when his voyage to Antarctica shipwrecked in 1914. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6443

    "Reaction from the Hill," a statement made by Clinton on the first step in ending the war in Kosovo, after Serb officials agreed to withdraw troops from Kosovo, followed by an Elizabeth Farnsworth conversation, in which senators John McCain (R-AZ) and Joseph Lieberman (D-CT), and representatives Jim Leach (R-IA) and Dennis Kucinich (D-OH) discussed their optimism over the peace plan, whether this indicates a NATO defeat, what Milosevic needs to do to for the war to end, Russia's role in the deal, and whether other military strategies would have worked better than the air campaign. "Gigot & Oliphant," Jim Lehrer spoke to Tom Oliphant and Paul Gigot on the Kosovo peace plan, including whether Clinton came out the victor, how this will affect the Senate, the House and the coming elections, Madeleine Albright's role in the deal, whether Al Gore will benefit from the war in pursuit of the presidency, the outlook for the primaries, and how the war adversely affected the Republican party. "Rocket Science," this Jeffrey Kaye report of KCET TV looked at what measures the Pentagon is taking to produce an efficient missile defense system, including the establishment of the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization, after both houses of Congress approved missile defense funding. The report looked at the current program being explored and its efficiency despite its failure in practice tests. "Ten Years After," an Ian Williams ITN report on the tenth anniversary of the Tianneman Square massacre in China looking at how the country has changed in its views on democracy, including the significance of recent protests in Beijing against the NATO bombing of China's embassy in Belgrade. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6444

    "War or Peace," a Kwame Holman update on the Kosovo peace talks, in which members of the G-8 met to finish the deal, but did not succeed, after the foreign ministers were unable to agree on whether NATO would have the authority to decide the makeup of the peacekeeping force in Kosovo. "Uncertain Future," a Betty Anne Bowser background report on the refugee crisis in Kosovo, where over 800,000 Kosovar Albanians were displaced from their homes, followed by a Margaret Warner conversation with UN Undersecretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs Sergio Vieira on whether all the refugees would be safe to return to Kosovo in the event of a successful peace deal, a realistic timetable for their return, and what measures the UN is taking to prepare Kosovar for the refugees. He then talked about the current state of electricity, food and water in Kosovo and expressed the deteriorated mental and physical state of the refugees. "Mental Illness," a Susan Dentzer report on the first White House Conference on Mental Health, hosted by President Clinton in efforts to promote the awareness of mental illness in America, from which fifty millions suffer, and call for mental health coverage under health care plans. The report talked to doctors, scientists and mental illness sufferers about the most recent treatments available due to breakthroughs in the scientific community. "Enduring Play," following "Death of a Salesman's" sweep in this year's Tony Awards, this Paul Solman of WGBH Boston report looked at the current revival on Broadway, talking to its director, actors and writer Arthur Miller. "In Memoriam," this tribute to Mel Torme featured excerpts from a PBS special in which he sang Cole Porter's "Just One of Those Things," after the acclaimed singer/songwriter died at age seventy three. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6445

    "Road to Peace," a Betty Ann Bowser update on the Kosovo peace talks held between the G-8 foreign ministers, followed by an Elizabeth Farnsworth conversation in which Britain's UN ambassador Sir Jeremy Greenstock discussed the terms of the draft resolution, how it must be approved by the UN Security Council before implemented, whether the Chinese will hold it up due to their reservations and the need for the G-8 to first establish how the Serb troops will withdraw in order to end the bombing. "Russia's Role," a Margaret Warner conversation in which Sen. Richard Lugar and former Sen. Sam Nunn exchanged views on the Russian role in the peace resolution in Kosovo, whether Russia should be part of the peacekeeping force, the difficulty NATO will have in rebuilding the Kosovo infrastructure and whether the Russians have a right to feel bitter about their role in the war. "Emergency Medicine," this Lee Hochberg report of Oregon Public Television looked at the ongoing debate between medical professionals and legislators over whether emergency medical technicians should have the right to administer life-saving drugs to victims at the scene of an emergency. Currently prohibited by law, this practice could save many lives, including people reacting adversely to allergies and going through cardiac arrest but who are not near a paramedic facility. "The American Century," a David Gergen of US News & World report dialogue with Harold Evans on his book, "The Century," which examines the Twentieth Century of America and where it is headed into the next century. He criticized the way American history is taught in school, shared his optimism over the future of the United States as a capitalistic country, compared the US now to Britain during the industrial revolution and discussed how important the history of the country should be to the people. "Liberty," on the bicentenary of Russian national poet Alexander Pushkin's birth, US poet laureate Robert Pinsky read excerpts from one of his poems entitled, "Liberty." [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6446

    "Newsmaker," Jim Lehrer spoke to national security advisor Samuel Berger about the peace deal that was struck between NATO and Yugoslav officials yesterday. He discussed the terms of the agreement, including when the Serbs will withdraw from Kosovo, the method by which they will withdraw, how many NATO troops will move in to monitor Kosovo, whether the UN will be part of the peacekeeping force, the assertion that NATO will continue bombing until Serb troops withdraw and when the Kosovars will return to their homeland. "European Views," an Elizabeth Farnsworth discussion with four Europeans on the Kosovo peace talks before the deal was announced. Journalists Christine Ockrent, Josef Joffe, David Buchan and Lucio Caracciolo exchanged views on whether NATO is headed for victory, the estimated amount of time it will take to return the refugees, how history will judge the war, how Europeans view the Russian role in the war and how the war has altered the European view of security relations within Europe and the United States. "Spy vs Spy," a Kwame Holman background report on the day's House debate over proposed legislation that would secure US nuclear information at laboratories as a result of the Christopher Cox report that found China guilty of stealing US nuclear technology. Margaret Warner spoke to three Chinese specialists on the issue. Paul Moore, James Lilley and Vincent Cannistraro discussed the complex Chinese espionage operations, how the Chinese can hack into vulnerable American computer programs to get information, how the reform legislation could unfairly target Chinese-Americans as possible spies, whether the US can successfully implement a counterintelligence program and how the Chinese may use US nuclear information for their own defense system. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6447

    "Peace Movement," a Betty Ann Bowser background report on the first day of peace in Kosovo, including the beginning of the Serb withdrawal, NATO's decision to stop the bombing, debate in the House over the cost of the peacekeeping force, a meeting held by the UN Security Council over the makeup of the peacekeeping force and an outline of how Kosovo will be patrolled by NATO-led forces. "Newsmaker," a Jim Lehrer interview with Secretary of State Albright in which she assessed the peace deal. She discussed her confidence in the air campaign, whether it lasted longer than anticipated, the humanitarian justification of the war, whether she minds the war being called "Madeleine's war," her role in the war, whether Congress' wrangling over the war detracted from US influence, the significance of the victory to NATO, how she never once doubted NATO's course of action and her enthusiasm over being the secretary of state of the United States. "Belgrade View," Phil Ponce spoke by phone to Boston Globe correspondent Kevin Cullen about the reactions in Belgrade after the peace deal. He said Serbia was not celebrating in the streets and that the Serbs do not see it as a Serb victory or loss, assessed the total damage in major cities and surrounding towns, the Serb perception of Milosevic and NATO, and explained why Serbs are likely to turn on Milosevic in coming months. "Peacekeeping Force," following a report including remarks made by NATO allied commander General Henry Shelton at a Pentagon press briefing, Margaret Warner joined Gen. Richard Neal and Gen. Stanley Cherrie to discuss the challenges that lay ahead for the NATO peacekeeping force. They discussed how the Serb withdrawal will take place through zoning, the difficulty in withdrawing Serb troops on the same communication lines as the incoming Kosovars, the need to establish rules and procedures for rebuilding a new infrastructure, the likelihood of Serb revenge during the Serb withdrawal, how the Kosovar/Albanians are likely to respond and a prediction of how long the stabilization in the region will take. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6448

    In this special episode, Jim Lehrer spoke to President Clinton at the White House for an assessment of the war in Kosovo after it ended in a peace deal this week. Clinton discussed when NATO troops are likely to move into Kosovo, the method by which Kosovo will be monitored using zones, why he chose to carry out an only-air bombing campaign, his assessment that the US soldiers did risk their lives despite criticism that an air campaign alleviates risk, why he believes that US and European differences on the war were overstated, why the impeachment scandal did not affect his ability to take moral positions over the war, why he believes the Republicans are against him, his assertion that there is still much to accomplish in the Balkans and why he is sure he did the right thing by becoming involved in the war. This was followed by a Betty Ann Bowser background report on the day's events in Kosovo and a conversation in which Lawrence Eagleburger, Zbigniew Brzezinski and Lee Hamilton discussed the Clinton interview and shared their views on whether the US was right in carrying out the war, the dangers involved in the next phase of the conflict, their concern over the Russian-Serbian relationship, the prospect of partitioning Kosovo, and how other countries may perceive the US as "bully-on-the-block" as a result of the war. "Shields & Brooks," Phil Ponce spoke to Mark Shields and David Brooks on the week's political events, including the public's reaction to the war and whether Clinton will get credit for the victory, the president's weakened political authority, the ramifications of the war on the Republican party, how the war will affect Clinton's legacy, and whether they see this as Clinton's best moment during his presidency. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6449

    "Shields & Brooks," Phil Ponce spoke to Mark Shields and David Brooks on the week's political events, including the public's reaction to the war and whether Clinton will get credit for the victory, the president's weakened political authority, the ramifications of the war for the Republican party, how the war will affect Clinton's legacy, and whether they see this as Clinton's best moment during his presidency. "Congress Reacts," Jim Lehrer joined Sen. John Warner (R-VA), Sen. Paul Wellstone (D-MN), Rep. J.C. Watts(R-OK) and Rep. Sam Gejdenson(D-CT) to discuss the outcome of the war. The congressmen agreed that Russia should have a role in peacemaking in Kosovo, but said that an unsolicited deployment of their troops to the region was unacceptable. They exchanged views on whether the US acted appropriately in the war, the importance of the fact that NATO held together through the war, whether this warrants the US to become involved in other international crisis, and the need to focus on the challenges that lay ahead. "Off & Running," a Terence Smith report on the race for the 2000 presidency, looking at George W. Bush, who launched his presidential campaign this weekend, beginning in Iowa and New Hampshire, and his command of the polls as the Republican candidate. According to the report, Bush has been endorsed by an overwhelming majority of Republican public officials and has attracted more media attention than any other candidate in previous elections. "A Different Drummer," a Jeff Brown report on Scottish-born musician Evelyn Glennie, the world's first solo percussionist, who made her debut at the National Symphony Orchestra in Washington, DC in a concert that featured over 150 different types of percussion instruments. In the report, Glennie discussed her personal collection of over 1000 percussion instruments, how becoming partially deaf contributed to her love of drums and how she interprets the sounds of the instruments through her body. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6450

    "Peacemaking," a Tom Bearden update report on peace in Kosovo, including findings of more mass gravesites by the KFOR army, reports of continuing skirmishes between the Kosovo Liberation Army and the Serb troops, a statement made by James Rubin on the minimal role that Russian troops will have in the peacekeeping force, and the Serbian Orthodox Church call for President Milosevic and his cabinet to resign. "Public Opinions," Elizabeth Farnsworth joined a group of Denver citizens to exchange views on the situation in Kosovo, including whether they feel proud of how the war ended, the way the war was fought, whether Clinton should be congratulated for his part in the war, whether Milosevic still poses a threat to the US and whether he should resign, and whether the US has irreparably damaged relations with the Russians and the Chinese as a result of the war. "Public Opinions," a Jim Lehrer conversation with Andrew Kohut of the Pew Research Center, in which he shared the outcome of recent polls suggesting that Americans are unsure of the success of the war, noting that a high number of Americans are against the US being a part of the peacekeeping force in Kosovo, approve of the new "no-casualty" war system and support President Clinton's tactic in the war. "Mixed Emotions," Elizabeth Brackett of WTTW Chicago conducted a roundup discussion with a group of Chicago Serbian-Americans on their views at the end of the war, in which they condemned President Clinton for NATO bombing, denied that ethnic cleansing caused Albanians to flee Kosovo and said Serbia should be granted funding to repair the county's severely damaged infrastructure. "Worm Infested," Margaret Warner spoke to Dan Schrader and Richard Smith about a recent outbreak of a computer bug called Worm.Explore.Zip, which has infected computers across the globe by appearing as a reply from a friendly email composed by the user. Schraeder described how the worm spreads through email sent by the infected computer and explained the difference between a worm and a virus. Smith discussed whether the data lost by the worm can be recovered, the economic cost of the worm and the severity of this on a global level. The two discussed how people can prevent the bugs and viruses. "AIDS Vaccine," a Fred de Sam Lazaro report on a recent study carried out by California firm Vax Gen, which administered a trial AIDs vaccine to people, the first such AIDs study using human candidates. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6451

    "Homeward Bound," reporting from Prizren, Kosovo, Charles Krause described the post-war situation in the city where thousands of Kosovar/Albanian refugees returned from Albania after the successful withdrawal of all Serb troops the previous day. Krause talked to Albanians, who were overjoyed to return to their homes, and an official of Catholic Relief Services on whether the influx of natives may cause another humanitarian crisis due to food, water, and shelter shortages. "Lessons Learned," an Elizabeth Farnsworth conversation in which former military experts Gen. Merrill McPeak, Gen. Richard Neal, Lt. Gen. Robert Gard and Lt. Col. Ralph Peters exchanged views on whether the war was a victory for air power strategy or whether it resulted in greater concessions for the Serbs; whether the bombing successfully crippled the Serb military and damaged the country's infrastructure, and the role that the KLA had in forcing the defeat of Serb troops. "Guns & Violence," a Kwame Holman report on this week's debate in the House over the Juvenile Justice Bill passed in the Senate, to which forty-four amendments were added and then debated. "Dialogue," David Gergen of US News & World Report talked to Princeton physics professor Freeman Dyson on his recent book, "The Sun, The Genome and the Internet," in which he explained his theory on how the sun, genome and Internet could combine to help bring poor people out of poverty in the next century. He discussed the benefits of solar energy and genetically engineered trees, the benefits of a technological society, and the negative consequences of genetically engineered children. "New York in June," as a native New Yorker, Roger Rosenblatt explored the mystery of New York in June, looking at the memorable events that took place in the city this year. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6452

    "Peacekeeping," a Tom Bearden update report on the day's events in post-war Kosovo, including findings of a Serb-run torture center in Pristina; a mass exodus of Serb civilians from Kosovo who fear the Kosovo/Albanians and the ongoing meeting held between NATO and Russian officials to establish a role for the Russian military. "Russians in Kosovo," a Margaret Warner conversation on the Russian role in the peace process in Kosovo, in which Anna Vassilieva discussed how Russia's hostile reaction to NATO's victory was guided by emotions rather than rationality and Nina Khrushcheva explained why Russia should no longer be treated by the West as a superpower. Jack Matlock then discussed the necessity in keeping Russia a prime player in world politics. The three exchanged views whether Russia should agree to be integrated into the NATO peacekeeping force. "Looking Homeward," this repoprt by Lee Hochberg of Oregon Public Television profiled a Kosovar/Albanian family who found a temporary safe place of refuge with a kind Seattle family. Both the parents and children admitted that living conditions in the United States were better than in their hometown but that their heart and values would always be in Kosovo, to which they would one day like to return. "Off & Running," a Kwame Holman background report on Vice President Gore's presidential quest, as he launched his campaign for the 2000 presidency in Manchester, New Hampshire this week. Then political reporters James Brosnan and Ceci Connolly discussed whether it will be a Bush/Gore election, Gore's campaign strategy in which he is positioning himself as a distinct voice from Clinton, people's Clinton fatigue, why he has framed his campaign as "families in crisis", how Gore is trying to soften his image and whether people will become preoccupied with his "wooden" style. "Brave New World," a Terence Smith report including excerpts from a Tech Summit on Capitol Hill this week, where politicians, economists and computer industry representatives discussed the future of the Internet and technology. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6453

    "Gun Control," a Kwame Holman report on gun control legislation that was voted down in the House by both Republicans and Democrats after the Dingell amendment was added to the legislation, which would require twenty-four hour background checks on gun purchasers at gun shows by all dealers. The report included extensive excerpts from the three-day testimony on the matter. "Shields and Gigot," a Jim Lehrer conversation in which Mark Shields and Paul Gigot discussed the House vote, including why the bill had bipartisan opposition; how the Dingell amendment weakened the bill; the increasing influence of gun control supporters on Congress and whether the issue would surface again. They critiqued George W. Bush's and Al Gore's presidential campaigns, discussed whether they will win their parties' nominations and assessed their political styles as compared to Clinton's. "Murder in Kosovo," this Charles Krause report from Pristina profiled Nekibe Kelmendi, a Kosovar/Albanian woman who returned to her home after three months in hiding and who witnessed the abduction of her acclaimed human rights lawyer and negotiator husband Serbian police, who were later murdered. She discussed her and her husband's lifelong mission to expose the Serbian government's heinous treatment of ethnic Albanians to the international community and said she would continue that battle until her death. "War Crimes," Margaret Warner spoke to Terree Bowers and Erick Stover on the process of investigating international war crimes by the War Crimes Tribunal, in which they explained how teams will investigate the seven sites in Kosovo where atrocities were found to have occurred, what evidence the Tribunal needs to indict someone, the difficulty in finding documentary evidence against the Serbs, why victim's families play a crucial role in the investigation, whether any Serb has ever been extradited by the Tribunal, and the likelihood that they will have more success this year. "Father's Day," in honor of Father's Day this Sunday, US poet laureate Robert Pinksy read Elizabeth Bishop's poem, "Manners." [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6454

    "Rebuilding Kosovo," a Kwame Holman background report on the damage estimates in Kosovo in which it was predicted to cost nearly 30 billion dollars over the next five years to rebuild the region's infrastructure. Jim Lehrer followed with a conversation in which the European Commission's Lodewijk Briet, US policy analyst Bill Frelick and Nancy Lindborg of Mercy Corps International elaborated on the damage findings, saying nearly fifty percent of homes and countless municipal government buildings were devastated by the bombing. They explained how the Kosovars can help their country, whether the people will face severe agriculture and food shortages in the winter, and how they will get the resources to rebuild the structures. "Toxic Dispute," a Betty Ann Bowser report examining the ongoing controversy between a small African American community in New Orleans and the Environmental Protection Agency over the location of their homes which were built over an old landfill and to which they claim is the primary cause for the high number of cancer cases in the area. The community says that the EPA should relocate them to new homes that are safer and traveled to Washington to lobby Congress for their cause. "Juneteenth," following an Elizabeth Farnsworth report on the life of author Ralph Ellison whose unfinished works were compiled in a book recently published entitled, "Juneteenth," publisher John Callahan and University of Washington professor Charles Johnson discussed his legacy. The two discussed the importance of publishing this work in order to understand the evolution of Ellison's writing, his warm and generous character, his remarkable belief in the American experience, and whether he purposely did not finish his last novel. "Security Risk," a Jeffrey Kaye of KCET Los Angeles update report on the outcome of an ongoing federal court case in which six Iraqi immigrants, detained by the Immigration and Naturalization Service for being Iraqi spies, claimed that because the evidence used against them was classified and was inaccessible, they weren't given a fair trial. The US finally agreed to release the prisoners pending their agreement to be transferred to another country. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6455

    "Defining Disability," Jim Lehrer spoke with Jan Crawford Greenburg on the Supreme Court's Ruling over the Americans with Disabilities Act. She discussed the terms of the cases in which three parties filed for discrimination after being fired for having treatable conditions and the court's decision with the employers that the parties did not fit under the definition of disabled in the Act. Then, Marca Bristo and Peter Petesch exchanged views on the impact of the court's ruling, including whether it will benefit those with real disabilities or employers, how it may adversely affect those with epilepsy and psychiatric disorders, and whether this ruling denies those with disabilities their right to sue. "Restoring Peace," a Charles Krause report from Urosevac, where one of the first US army units arrived to patrol the US zone of Kosovo near the Macedonia/Kosovo border. Krause spoke to US soldiers about their views on their mission to secure the city, whether the area is safe now for ethnic Albanians, whether the Serbs still reside in Urosevac and the horrifying aftermath of the three months of bombing to the city's infrastructure. "A Just War," a Margaret Warner discussion in which Father Bryan Hehir, Rev. James Lawson and Rabbi David Saperstein exchanged views on the ethical and moral issues surrounding using force in the war. They discussed whether the war was justified under their religious principles, whether the United States' motives were purely altruistic, why two wrongs do not make a right to warrant war, and whether the US should become involved in more humanitarian crises. "Dumping Steel," a Kwame Holman report on the day's debate in the Senate over steel quota legislation that would protect the US steel industry from foreign steel dumping, which was later turned down. The report contained excerpts from the day's testimony and discussed why passing the bill could result in more harm than good to the US trade industry. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6456

    "Weighing State's Rights," a Jim Lehrer conversation in which Jan Crawford Greenburg explained the previous day's Supreme Court cases in which various citizens sued their states for not abiding by federal law but were voted down by a five to four ruling. Greenberg discussed the ruling, which denies citizens the right to sue the state, and how this greatly increases states' power, the passionate nature of the trial, the significance of such a tight vote, the dissenters' opinions and whether this unfairly denies citizens their due rights. "Fighting for the Future," a Charles Krause report from Prizren, Kosovo, examining the newfound role that the Kosovo Liberation Army is taking in postwar Kosovo, granting themselves more political and military authority than agreed to in the peace deal. Margaret Warner followed with a conversation in which Janusz Bugajski, Fron Nazi and Christopher Layne discussed how the KLA grew in power due to anger, frustration and dismay with the Serb government, their mission to gain independence for Kosovo, whether the KLA is a defensive operation or a terrorist group, how the KLA is not funded by drug traffiking, whether the KLA wants Kosovo to be a multiethnic, democratic society, the need to focus on the returning refugees rather than the agenda of the KLA, and how the KLA-NATO relationship is likely to play out. "A Guessing Game," a background report looking at the media trend in which journalists are making predictions on the outcome of newsworthy events and have often been wrong, followed by a conversation in which Terence Smith spoke to journalist Eleanor Clift, Fox correspondent Tony Snow and CNN analyst Jeff Greenfield on why the media is driven by this type of "drive-by journalism," whether journalists should be taken seriously in their predictions, how this influences public trust of the media, and the extent to which media opinions actually influence politics and news events. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6457

    "Unionizing Doctors," a Susan Dentzer background report on the American Medical Association's vote to form a union for doctors and give them authority to negotiate incomes and clinical practice with HMOs. Then Margaret Warner joined guests to discuss the controversial matter. AMA president Thomas Reardon and AMA member Dr. John Harvey debated whether doctors need a union or whether it will breed greediness and how it would affect patient care. Families USA representative Ron Pollack discussed how unions could benefit patients through better care but with a greater cost and National Health Insurance Assocaition president Chip Kahn expanded on the extent to which health care costs would rise. "Russia's Anger," In this feature report, NewsHour special correspondent Paul Miller examined the residual anger among Russian people over their role in Kosovo in which they feel their support for a diplomatic resolution was neglected and their authority to stop the bombing was undermined by NATO. "Campaign 2000," this segment marked the first of a series dedicated to the 2000 presidential elections and focused on what issues should be at the forefront of the campaigns. NewsHour regular historians Haynes Johnson, Doris Kearns Goodwin, and Michael Beschloss and guests Linda Chavez and Shelby Steele exchanged views on the core issues candidates should address in their campaigns, including the need to have a clear direction for the country in a time of economic prosperity and how they will handle such timely issues as foreign policy, family issues, science, technology advances and medicine. Other significant issues were economic justice, women's role in society, inner city schools and the poverty level. "Send in the Clowns," this Jim Fisher essay looked at how a group of clowns is trying to bring smiles to the residents of a small Missouri town that was washed out by an uncontrollable fire last year. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6458

    "Microsoft on Trial," a Terence Smith conversation in which Joel Brinkley of the New York Times updated the Microsoft antitrust trial. He discussed the timetable for the rest of the trial following the closing testimony this week, why Microsoft is likely to lose the trial and then appeal, whether both sides will settle and the impact of the trial on the computer industry and on Microsoft's business practice. "Fighting Fat," this Susan Dentzer report examined Xenical, the recent drug now available for weight loss, looking at how the drug works by digesting only certain percentages of fat, how it is administered and whether it has been clinically proven to work. "Political Wrap," Margaret Warner spoke to Mark Shields and Paul Gigot on the week's political events, including whether Congress will pass any bipartisan legislation this term, why Medicare legislation will not be passed, George W. Bush's smooth relationship with Republicans and how he softens the party's image, and why Bush is doing so well in the polls. "Conversation," a Jim Lehrer conversation with Marine Corps commandant Gen. Charles Krulak, in which he discussed his longstanding career in the Marine Corps and his thoughts on his retirement next week. He expressed his feelings over the Marine Corps role in Kosovo, explained the concept of a "three-bloc" war, explained why Marines are allowed to shoot at someone when fired upon, and discussed the intense danger involved in the mission, his concerns over the future of Europe and the US role in the stabilization of the country, why he opposes the notion that air war is risk free, why young Marines can become disenchanted by civil society and its lack of morality and self-discipline, his view on cultural America, why the US needs to pay teachers more and his plans after retirement. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6459

    "Spending The Surplus," following remarks made by President Clinton on his agenda to pay off the national debt with the budget surplus by 2015, Clinton's budget director Jack Lew and chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee Bill Archer (R-TX) exchanged views on spending the surplus. Lew explained the president's plan to first repair Medicare and Social Security with one trillion in funding and then target other areas including defense, environment and education and Rep. Archer said the public needs some of the extra wealth in the form of an income tax cut. They debated how people should be relieved of some of the tax burden, whether in universal spending accounts or an across-the-board cut; whether it is realistic to pay off the national debt, and whether the president's agenda is possible taking into account annual spontaneous spending. "Prescription Drugs," this Susan Dentzer report looked at the ongoing debate between Congress and pharmaceutical companies over adding prescription drugs benefits for Medicare recipients. The current industry lacks proper regulation and charges consumers unfairly say government officials, but the industry denies this charge and confirms that private sector practices produce competition and better products. According to the report, Clinton will unveil his proposal on drug benefits tomorrow. "End of the Term," following a Margaret Warner background report on the cases heard by the Supreme Court this term, constitutional law professors Kathleen Sullivan, Paul Camps, Doug Kmiec and Michael Gerhardt assessed the cases. They discussed the significance of the states rights cases and whether the balance of power between the states and federal government has been altered, why states rights were expanded by the court, the impact of the civil liberty cases on individual's rights, an assessment of the court's divide on various issues, and how the next president will influence the balance of the court. "Front Porch," this Richard Rodriguez essay examines the modern-day phenomenon of suburban sprawl and society's disconnect with their home and neighborhood as compared to previous generations, looking at the sense of identity an old home gives to its inhabitants. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6460

    "Mending Medicare," a Susan Dentzer background report on president Clinton's Medicare proposal to invest 800 billion dollars of the surplus into the program in a fifteen year period and offer part prescription drug coverage to any beneficiary for a $24 monthly premium. This was followed by a Jim Lehrer conversation on the proposal with Alan Holmer, Robert Moffit and Martin Corry, in which they exchanged views on whether a surplus funded Medicare reform is financially possible, whether prescription drug coverage stifles competition, whether senior citizens need drug benefits, how price controls affect the pharmaceutical industry and how Medicare will play into the 2000 elections. "Death Sentence," a Kwame Holman report on the Turkish government's announcement that Kurdish PKK leader Abdullah Ocalan will be sentenced to death for treason, followed by a Margaret Warner conversation on the trial's meaning with Sabri Syari and Dr. Najmaldin Karim in which they debated whether it was a just trial and sentence. They discussed how the sentence may provoke more rioting by the Kurds, whether it will be appealed then tried in higher courts and the likelihood of whether Ocalan will be hung. Karim then discussed how the Kurdish people could be appeased by being given political assimilation and having their culture and language recognized in Turkey, and Syari negated the view that the Kurd motive is only cultural. "Campaign 2000," in this week's conversation on the presidential campaign 2000, regional commentators Bob Kittle, Cynthia Tucker, Lee Cullum, Patrick McGuigan, John Diaz and Christine Bertelson discussed with Terence Smith what issues they would like debated, including American values, defense, economic issues of the next century, criminal justice, national service, and the need to address American despair. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6461

    "Interest Hike," a Paul Solman of WBBH Boston report on the Federal Reserve's decision to raise interest rates a quarter of a percentage point to 5% to prevent speculatory inflation that may result from the overheated economy, followed by a conversation in which Richard Trumpka, Allan Meltzer, Michelle Laughlin and David Jones discussed whether the rate rise will influence the economy or whether it is a cautionary move, how minorities, developing countries and small businesses will be negatively affected by the rates, and how the stock market is affected by rate changes and whether it could cause further pressure on wage and price increases. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6501

    "Making History," following a Spencer Michaels background report on Hillary Clinton's first move towards the New York Senate in which she established a committee to explore a candidacy, Margaret Warner spoke with Doris Kearns Goodwin, David Gergen and Jay Gallagher about this prospect. They agreed that the first lady has always yearned to hold a public office, discussed how her celebrity status may affect her campaign and whether she can handle the pressure and public scrutiny of politics, and explained how her campaign may deflect attention from Al Gore's presidential campaign for 2000. "Crime Wave," a Charles Krause update report looking into Cuahtemoc Cardenos' term as the first elected mayor of Mexico City, after he took on the position last year under a platform promising to combat and decrease the rampant crime and lawlessness in the city. But, according to the report, street crime, including car jackings, murders, theft, rape and assault, has deteriorated and the longtime corrupt police continue to exacerbate the problem. Krause spoke to the mayor, political analysts, criminologists, and journalists about how these urban issues will be faced, the severity of the problem and whether Mexico City will ever become a fully democratized and safe, law-abiding society. "Campaign 2000," Terence Smith spoke to five of this year's McArthur Foundation fellowship winners, awarded to people demonstrating exceptional creativity and ingenuity in their respective fields, on the coming presidential elections. Sara Horowitz, Mark Danner, Shawn Carlson, Wilma Alpha Subra and Campbell McGrath discussed what the candidates should address, including surplus spending, education, campaign funding, working issues, economic development, and foreign policy. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6502

    "Newsmaker," Margaret Warner spoke to Supreme Allied Commander of Europe General Wesley Clark about the aftermath in Kosovo following the NATO air war. He discussed the extent to which Serbs have fled the country, the timetable for the deployment of KFOR troops to Kosovo, his assessment of decision-making under NATO constraints during the war, his response to criticisms over the "no casualty" war tactic associated with NATO, how future wars will be guided by the successes and failures of Kosovo, and his outlook for the future in Kosovo. "Decade of Inquiry," this Kwame Holman report looked at the longest Independent Council inquiry in history in which Judge Arlin Adams investigated the Department of Housing and Urban Development during the Reagan Administration for nearly ten years for profiteering and influence peddling and ended with 17 criminal convictions, $10 million recaptured from HUD and $2 million in criminal fines collected. "Conversation," a Jim Lehrer conversation with Treasury Secretary Robert Rubin after he announced his resignation from that post earlier that day. He talked about the state of economy and his thoughts on future inflation, his relationship with Federal Reserve chairman Alan Greenspan in light of their opposing political parties, the importance of an independent Federal Reserve and a competitive private sector, his high regard for President Clinton despite his egregious mistakes, what economic issues presidential hopefuls should address in the coming elections, including the surplus and national security, the importance of public officials in the future of the United States, and his personal thoughts on serving as the secretary of treasury. "Swingin," this Spencer Michaels report looked at the comeback of swing, which is making a scene across America, bringing people of all ages to the dance floor to learn the moves of the thirties and forties. Michaels spoke to old-time swing performers, singers and band members about the move's return and looked at why people are interested in this type of dance now. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6503

    "Jobs in America," a Paul Solman background report on unemployment in America after recent statistics show the US rate steady at 4.3 percent, looking at the decade-long trend of increasing employment opportunities in the information technology, service and banking services while manufacturing jobs were cut. William Rodgers and Alan Krueger joined Solman to discuss these trends, including whether the booming economy will continue to bring opportunities for the less educated and whether minorities have better opportunities or are herded to the less-paying, service oriented jobs. Then Irene Cohen and Bill Banis discussed what jobs are being offered to college graduates, including web page managers, fire wall experts, and Internet jobs; the average salary a college graduate will make in 1999, $43,000; why graduates are flocking to small, Internet start-up companies; and why the pay gap between less educated workers and high-scale jobs has risen so dramatically in the past decade. "Money Race," this segment included a Kwame Holman background report examining the success presidential candidates have had this year raising campaign money, including the astonishing 39.6 million dollars raised by George W. Bush, the highest amount ever contributed to a campaign this early and twice that amount procured by Vice President Al Gore. Margaret Warner followed with a discussion in which Dan Balz explained Bush's tactics in fundraising using a network of the Republican party's most successful fundraisers, how he is leading his campaign on a broad base of political issues and how his money allows him to effect a White House-like campaign. "Political Wrap," a conversation in which Mark Shields and Paul Gigot shared their views on George W. Bush's success in campaign fundraising, which they attribute to his success in the polls, his Republican counterparts, and the organization of his campaign. They discussed Bill Bradley's relative success in fundraising, why Republicans are likely to use the surplus as a platform to cut taxes, whether Republicans will get a Medicare reform passed by 2000 and why Al Gore's presidential campaign is lagging in the polls. "American Landscapes," this Betty Ann Bowser report considered an unusual exhibition that features landscape artwork from the Whitney Museum of New York in efforts to bring both well-known and lesser known artists together in a non-traditional display and in a more intimate setting at the San Jose Museum of Art. "Home Alone," on the turn of the century, this Roger Rosenblatt essay examined the state of America juxtaposed with the dreams and promise of the country one hundred years ago, finding a greater social divide than ever before despite unprecedented economic prosperity. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6504

    "Law and Order," first, a Tom Bearden report on the continuing struggle in Kosovo where Serbians are being harassed and tortured by ethnic Albanians nearly three weeks after the war's end. Then, Margaret Warner spoke to the Brookings Institution Ivo Daalder, the New York Police Academy Lt. John Gorman, UN special advisor Shashi Tharoor and US Army Col. David Hunt discussed the difficulty the KFOR army is having in enforcing peace in the region. They explained how Kosovo lacks a proper legal and police system which is making it difficult to establish order in a lawless society, NATO's role in the peacekeeping mission, why the UN is planning to send an international police force to Kosovo, and how the situation in Kosovo differs from that in Bosnia. "Luxury Fever," this Paul Solman feature examined the spending frenzy now taking place in America and how that allocates resources inefficiently. The report looked into why people are competing for status, how America's prosperity is driving this craze and the ways in which such spending is harmful to consumers and society. "Campaign 2000," Terence Smith spoke to five of this year's McArthur Foundation fellowship winners, awarded to people demonstrating "On the Inside," a Terence Smith background report on journalist Bob Woodward's controversial book, "Shadow: Five Presidents and the Shadow of Watergate," which was questioned for the accuracy of its sources. Then a conversation followed in which Woodward emphasized that his details over the impeachment scandal are accurate, and media analyst Alex Jones and former White House Counsel Leon Panetta exchanged views on whether a competent journalist has a right to publish a book with unnamed sources or whether it is his duty to write more journalism-based books. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6505

    "Unplugged," a Jim Lehrer conversation in which Energy Daily publisher Llewelyn King discussed how the heat wave has affected electrical power across the north-east United States over the past week. He explained why over 400,000 people lost power due to the excess demand for electricity, how shortages can be covered using other region's electricity power surplus and how regulation prevents the construction of new power plants, which will be necessary to accompany the rising heat in coming generations. "amazon.com," a Paul Solman of WGBH Boston feature looking at the way the online bookstore amazon.com is changing the face of the book and other consumer industries through its speedier, cheaper distribution process. Solman spoke to amazon.com founder Jeffrey Bezos on why an Internet bookstore is economically more efficient than traditional methods, including a greater cash flow and less investment costs, and whether all shopping will one day be provided online. "Net Effect," Margaret Warner spoke to Andrew Shapiro, John Battelle, Paul Kedrosky and Anitesh Barua on the Internet revolution, discussing the definition of the Internet including software providers, space providers, and product providers, the proportion of overall GDP accounted for by the Internet economy, whether the Internet is altering other industries' business practices, and predictions for how the Internet will affect the overall economy and culture in America. "Coming to Terms," a Gabby Rado ITN report on Britain's decision to resume diplomatic ties with Libya after the country accepted blame for the murder of a British police officer in London over fifteen years ago, followed by an Elizabeth Farnsworth conversation in which associate professor Dirk Vandewalle and Financial Times columnist Stephen Fidler discussed whether the United Nations should lift sanctions on Libya for the country's admission, why the US will not restore friendly ties with Libya yet, and how Britain's decision will affect the Libyan economy. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6506

    "Tobacco Verdict," Jim Lehrer spoke to tobacco analysts Mary Aronson and Martin Feldman and law professor Clark Freshman on the previous day's historic ruling in phase one of the first class-action lawsuit against the tobacco industry in Florida in which it was charged with engaging in extreme and outrageous conduct. They explained the rulings of the jury, which found tobacco to cause disease and the industry to have behaved egregiously, and discussed the next phase in the case that addresses the individual plaintiff's cases, why a class-action lawsuit is broken up into phases, the difficulty in getting a class-action lawsuit to be heard by the Supreme Court, and why it is unlikely that the tobacco industry will incur big losses from the case or will have to compensate every plaintiff for losses. "Alzheimer's Vaccine," a Susan Dentzer background report on the latest advances in Alzheimer's disease research after biotech company elon carried out a successful vaccine trial on mice and will seek to administer a human trial if given FDA approval later this year. Margaret Warner spoke to Dr. Steven Dekovsky of the Alzheimer's Association, who he discussed how the vaccine works, by killing off harmful plaque as it is produced in brain's containing the faulty Alzheimer's protein, whether a vaccine would be capable of eradicating the disease or only slowing it, the likelihood that the effect of the vaccine on mice will translate to humans, and the need to develop a vaccine for the aging population soon or face a Medicare financial crisis. "Test of Democracy," an Elizabeth Farnsworth background report on Indonesia's first open election in forty-five years, a reform initiated by President BJ Habibie, who took on the post last year, ending the thirty-three-year reign of the former authoritarian ruler Suharto. But, according to the report, the elections have been criticized for vote tampering and the results have yet to be announced, causing mass demonstrations and continued violence in the archipelgo. Elizabeth Farnsworth then spoke to Donald Emmerson, Paul Wolfowitz and Sidney Jones on the elections, focusing on how a democratic Indonesia could affect other Asian nations, the significance of the peacefulness of the voting, whether the current leader of the Democratic opposition Megowati is more a figurehead than a politician, and why the opposition to Mowati is being strengthened during the election's delay. "The Cathedral Within," David Gergen of US News & World Report spoke to Bill Shore on his book, "The Cathedral Within: Transforming Your Life by Giving Something Back." He discussed why he left politics to establish a foundation to fight poverty and hunger called Share Our Strength, why these problems can be solved through creating new wealth rather than by redistributing wealth and charity, and how new profit-based businesses could greatly aid humanitarian issues. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6507

    "Opposing Milosevic," a Charles Krause background report on the growing opposition to President Milosevic's rule in Serbia, where anti-government protests have spread across the region and people have called for his resignation. Margaret Warner spoke to James Hooper, Dusko Doder and Stacey Sullivan about Milosevic's future and the significance of the protests, including how the Serb people have formed a Democratic opposition party to Milosevic, whether the growing number of protests will strengthen and influence his rule, and why the protests should be read with caution and not over-analyzed. They discussed the country's inherent dissatisfaction with their government, whether the protests are paving the way to a more Democratic nation, why ultra-nationalist opposition parties threaten such a move and how the international community needs to help the Democratic movement. "Having a Ball," on the eve of the women's World Cup soccer championship match between the United States and China, this Spencer Michaels report looked at the growing fervor over the sport in America and how the team's success has inspired young girls across the nation to become athletes and heightened American awareness of the team's dynamic talent. "Political Wrap," a Jim Lehrer conversation in which Mark Shields and Paul Gigot discussed the political events of the week, including Hillary Clinton's first step towards the New York Senate race after she launched her campaign in New York. They assessed her candidacy, noting the difficulty she will have in being a non-New York native, whether she will be viewed as a Bill Clinton-extension, and the way in which she electrifies audiences. They exchanged views on whether Mayor Giuliani will obtain the Republican nomination, Bill Clinton's motives for going on a poverty tour, and whether the Senate misuses its power to block nominations for public officials after three senators blocked a White House-appointed nomination for Richard Holbrooke this week. "2000 Campaign," a Tom Bearden report summarizing the more than 22,000 responses received by the NewsHour on what issues viewers would like to see addressed in the 2000 presidential election campaign. It featured many Americans' e-mail responses, including public information, environmental clean-up, public education, racism, immigration policy, overpopulation, international policy-especially with Russia and China-, campaign finance reform, American values, and biological and chemical weapons. "In Memoriamm," as a tribute to Charles Conrad, the commander of the second lunar landing in 1969 and the third man to walk on the moon, this segment contained a clip from that expedition after the astronaut died yesterday at age sixty-nine from wounds received in a motorcycle accident. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6508

    "Patients' Rights," a Margaret Warner background report on the first day of debate in the Senate over Patients' Bill of Rights legislation proposed by Democrats and Republicans in efforts to give people covered under managed care organizations certain federal rights as patients. This was followed by a conversation in which Sen. Bill Frist (R-TN) and Sen. Edward Kennedy (D-MA) debated their proposals, which they both agreed are centered on protecting the patients from profit-seeking health care organizations but differed in the extent of protection and coverage. Frist said the Republicans did not want to overprotect patients in a way that would increase premiums and Kennedy explained that cost would only rise by one percent a year. Then manage care lobbyist Karen Ignani discussed why both bills would prevent patients from receiving proper oversight reviews currently in practice and consumer advocate Ron Pollack talked about why the Democratic bill is the preferred solution that would protect patients the best. "Cable News War," this Terrence Smith report looked at the cable TV news industry beginning with the formation of a twenty-four hour CNN cable station ten years ago that spawned other networks to launch cable networks, including Fox News and MSNBC. Smith spoke to top executives of the three news organizations on the new phenomenon to see how competition influences the content of their news coverage, whether twenty-four-hour news operations have produced profits, and why people have come to depend on instantaneous news. "Having a Ball," this segment featured clips from the weekend's World Cup soccer match between the United States and China after the US won the game in overtime with a penalty kick made by Brandi Chastain. This was followed by a conversation in which Donna de Varona and Sandy Bailey discussed the US victory, including how the match was the most exciting sports event for women ever, why the US team has generated such enthusiasm and interest from the public, why the team sets a good example for young girl athletes, how it boosts the stature of women in sports, and whether women athletes will ever be paid as much as men athletes. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6509

    "Patients' Rights," a Kwame Holman background report on the second day of Senate debate on Patients' Bill of Rights legislation, in which a Democratic amendment that would allow a woman's gynocologist/obstetrician to be her primary physician in managed care organizations was voted down 52 to 48 by Republicans, followed by a Margaret Warner conversation addressing a controversial subject in the debates, a patient's right to sue an HMO or health insurance company, which is now prohibited under law but being challenged by Democrats. Connie Barron of Texas Medical Association explained how the current law allows patients to be compensated for the costs of medical wrongdoing but prevents them from suing the companies for malpractice, and Chip Kahn of the Health Insurance Association of America said that medical issues should be settled out of court. The two exchanged views on whether this provision would increase healthcare premiums and whether it would increase the quality of care given by managed care organizations. "Chaos in Iran," a Charles Krause report on continuing student protests in the Iranian capital of Tehran for the past six days, the largest public anti-government demonstration since the Islamic Revolution in 1979, which have been targeted against the rule of the hard-lined clerics for denying social and political reform in the country. Professors Shaul Bakhash and Bahman Baktiari and former State Department analyst Stephen Fairbanks joined Jim Lehrer to discuss the meaning of the riots, the students' motives, including democracy, freedom of press, and the freedom to interact with the opposite sex, whether the demonstrations may erupt into violence, the students' frustration with the government's tame response to the protests, how long the students will continue to rally and whether they will effect a change in the politics of Iran. "Election 2000," an Elizabeth Farnsworth conversation with four former White House science advisors on what issues should be addressed by candidates in the 2000 presidential campaigns. John Gibbons, William Graham and Edward David agreed that high technology issues, including pharmaceutical research and funding, public partnerships with science industries, and educational issues are vital for maintaining economic growth. They discussed the importance of promoting higher education in the sciences and funding university research programs. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6510

    "Patients' Rights," a Tom Bearden report on the day's debate in the Senate over Patients' Bill of Rights legislation, in which a Republican amendment that would ensure breast cancer treatment would be made by medical professionals rather than by insurance providers was passed along with two other Republican amendments. The report included excerpts from the day's testimony, including the Democratic complaint about the partisan nature of the legislation after three of their amendments were defeated and all of the Republican amendments were passed. "Under Fire," reporting from Michigan, this Kwame Holman report looked at how Rep. Bart Stupak (D-MI) has handled negative reactions from his pro-gun congressional district over his vote on gun control legislation, in which he voted for a mandatory three-day background check for gun purchasers at gun shows. The report featured remarks made by his constituents on whether they will support him in the coming term because of his position and asked Stupak about his vote and if he fears losing over this issue in the next election. "Breaking Point," an Ian Williams of ITN report on Montenegro's efforts to protect itself from the threat of President Milosevic by beefing up its police force and by declaring its intention to become an independent, democratic nation. This was followed by an Elizabeth Farnsworth discussion in which Daniel Serwer, Janusz Bugajski, and Laura Silber explained why Montenegro and Serbia are engaging in talks over the next two days, why Montenegro is looking to become politically and economically independent from Serbia, and how the talks could end in conflict. They discussed the differences between the two countries, why Milosevic depends on Montenegro for Serbia's survival under his rule, whether a civil war could erupt between the two nations and why the United States needs to more forcefully support a democratic movement in Serbia. "A Life against Cruelty," a Charles Krause conversation in which Helen Bamber discussed her life dedicated to helping victims of torture through her organization The Medical Foundation for the Care of Victims of Torture. She discussed the organization's purpose, to help people who have been tortured deal with life, the complexity of the effects of torture on someone, the different types of torture endured by the victims, how she handles the victim's post-traumatic grief and suffering, and how her own fears caused her to want to help others with similar fears. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6511

    "Troubled Peace," an Elizabeth Farnsworth report on the breakdown of the peace process in Northern Ireland after Ulster Unionist leader David Trimble and his party refused to partake in cabinet elections for the new independent Northern Ireland state because Sinn Fein will not force the IRA to decommission its weapons as it agreed to do in the Good Friday agreements last year. Elizabeth Farnsworth followed with a discussion in which Ulster Unionist spokesman Anne Smith explained why her party will not support a government in which one party supports an armed terrorist group and Sinn Fein representative Rita O'Hare disagreed by saying that the Ulster Unionist party does not want to wield any of its power over to Sinn Fein and that the IRA could not decommission its arms until the government is established. The two exchanged views on how this issue will influence the peace process, the likelihood of violence breaking out in Northern Ireland over the dispute, and how the problem can be resolved. "Patients' Rights," a Kwame Holman background report on the day's debate in the Senate over Patients' Rights legislation, including testimony on the most contested issue involving a patients' right to sue his HMO, on which Republicans and Democrats differ; Democrats' anger over the partisan nature of the votes - which have not passed a single amendment- why both parties fear legislation will not be approved by the president and the need for a more bipartisan approach to the issue. "Follow the Money," a Jim Lehrer conversation on mid-year fundraising results after presidential candidates filed their reports with the Federal Election Commission yesterday. Reporters Susan Glasser, Ron Brownstein and Elizabeth Arnold discussed how Bush is the leading Republican candidate, earning $37 million in fundraising, followed by Senator John McCain and Elizabeth Dole and Al Gore and Bill Bradley as the Democrat leaders, why the focus has been on money rather than votes, why Bush is generating so much money, and how the candidates use their money. "Revolutionary Artist," Jeffrey Kaye of KCET of Los Angeles considered the artwork of Diego Rivera, which is being exhibited in a retrospective at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. The report looked at Rivera's revolutionary contribution to the art world in trying to fuse politics into art, how he celebrated the life of the ordinary Mexican citizen in his work to make his people feel good about themselves and understand their purpose in society, and the ways in which his work was appreciated throughout his lifetime and received by the public. [60 minutes]

  • Episode #6512

    "Patients' Rights," a Kwame Holman report on the passage of Patients' Bill of Rights legislation in the Senate by 53 to 47 margin that included seven of the Republican amendments and none of the Democrat, including excerpts from the last day's debate on the issue. This was followed by an Elizabeth Farnsworth discussion in which Dr. John Allen, nurse Judy Sheridan-Gonzalez, Dr. Beth Gallup and Dr. Rex Lagestron agreed that managed care needs reform but debated whether reform needs to be established through the federal government, state government, the marketplace or by the doctors themselves. They discussed the need for physicians to make accurate medical decisions, the need for government to be capable of making more informed decisions on health care, and why Congress first should determine whether all citizens have the right to health care before passing this legislation. "Political Wrap," Terence Smith spoke to Tom Oliphant and Paul Gigot on the week's political events, focusing on the politics of the Patients' Bill of Rights legislation and whether it was a Republican victory, Rep. John Caseck's decision to withdraw from the Republican presidential nomination, whether this is the first signal of a Bush victory, the significance of Bush's fundraising capacity and why it isn't corrupt, how recent campaign reform legislation has reduced political competition, and the race between Bill Bradley and Al Gore for the Democratic nomination. "Montana Mining," this Betty Ann Bowser report examined the ongoing clash between Congress and Montana miners after the industry underwent significant losses over the past couple of years when the US Forest Service reclaimed over 400,000 acres of mining land to the government in efforts to preserve the beauty of the state. Bowser spoke to environmentalists, miners, and to the US Forest Service about whether the land should be public and whether the recreation and sporting industries could generate as much profit for the state as mining did. "Out for Good," a David Gergen of US News & World Report conversation in which New York Times reporters Adam Nagourney and Dudley Clendenin discussed their book, "Out for Good: The Struggle to Build a Gay Rights Movement in America." They talked about how homosexuals are distinct from any other minority group, how the gay rights movement began as the Gay Liberation Front following the Stonewall Riots, how AIDS affected the movement, the difference between gays and lesbians facing discrimination in society, and how homosexuals are handling being gay in today's society. [60 minutes]

  • Episode #6513

    "Pursuit for Peace," a Terence Smith background report on Ehud Barak's visit with President Clinton after the Israeli prime minister embarked on a diplomatic tour to Egypt, the Gaza strip, Jordan and the United States to restore the peace process, including excerpts from the day's press conference following their meeting. William Quandt, Joel Singer, Hisham Sharabi and Hisham Melhem discussed whether Syrians, Israelis and Palestinians are optimistic about Ehud Barak's initiative to resolve peace in the region, how the process needs to gain momentum in order to succeed within the fifteen-month time period, the complex nature of the disaccord between the Middle Eastern countries, why a peace accord mandates a lengthy period of time and many negotiations, Yassir Arafat's objective for a Palestinian state from the peace process, and whether the Palestinians will ever be able to come to an agreement with Israel. "Family Tragedy," a Kwame Holman report on the life of John F. Kennedy Jr. after he was presumed dead at age 38 when his plane was reported missing over the waters of Martha's Vineyard two days ago. This was followed with a conversation on the tragedy with NewsHour regulars Doris Kearns Goodwin, Michael Beschloss, Haynes Johnson, Roger Rosenblatt and former Robert Kennedy press secretary Frank Mankiewicz in which they explained why this news is affecting the public so deeply. They agreed that the Kennedy family symbolizes the American Family and that through this death the reality and significance of President Kennedy's assassination was brought to light, as well as the public's close ties with the Kennedy family and all its members. They talked about JFK Jr.'s place in society and how he was headed towards a career in public service, the remarkable way in which the family has coped with this and all the previous Kennedy tragedies, and how the Kennedy family will live on forever in American's lives. [60 minutes]

  • Episode #6514

    "New Hope," Jim Lehrer spoke to cardiologist Dr. Bertram Pitt on a recent study he headed that found the drug Aldacton to cut death rates in heart failure patients by thirty percent over a two year period. Pitt defined heart failure as a condition in which the heart cannot pump blood into the body causing an overflow into the lungs, described the standard treatment for heart failure, including ace inhibitors and diuretics, and explained how Aldacton functions by blocking the hormone Aldesterone that predisposes heart failure sufferers to sudden death. He discussed how the study using the drug was stopped early because of the unexpected positive results and was administered to the patients using the standard therapy. "One Giant Leap," On the thirtieth anniversary of the Apollo 11 mission launch, this Tom Bearden report included footage of Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin landing, walking, and planting an American flag on the moon. Elizabeth Farnsworth followed with perspective on this historic event and analysis of space exploration today with NewsHour regulars Haynes Johnson, Doris Kearns Goodwin, Michael Beschloss, and former astronaut Mae Jemison and editor Andrew Chaiken. They talked about their memories of that mission and the sense of excitement permeating society at that time, how the mission was guided by politics rather than human inquiry but signified the possibility of man, why space exploration has slowed and the need for children to once again become interested in the field, and why the government has lacked interest in the space race in previous years. "Funding PBS," a Terence Smith background report on the day's subcommittee hearing on Public Broadcasting affiliate WGBH Boston and other stations' swapping of donor lists with the Democratic Party, including remarks made by chairman of the Telecommunications Subcommittee, PBS donors, Corp. for Public Broadcasting CEO Robert Coonrod, and PBS President & CEO Ervin Duggan. "American City," a Spencer Michaels report profiling a previously uninhabited area of San Francisco holding empty warehouses but now home to many high-profile multi-media organizations. The report looked at how this burgeoning industry is attracting more and more companies and accounting for 2.2 billion dollars of wealth for the city as well as raising its status as one of the city's worst areas to a cultural enclave. [60 minutes]

  • Episode #6515

    "Taxing Debate," a Kwame Holman background report on the day's debate in the House on the Republican $800 billion tax cut proposal over the next ten years, including statements made by the bill's founder Rep. Bill Archer and a subsequent statement made by President Clinton denouncing the bill, followed by a conversation in which Norm Ornstein, Bob Greenstein, and Lawrence Kudlow discussed why the Republicans cannot get the bill passed in the House because of spontaneous spending that could deplete the surplus in coming years. They debated whether the projected amount of the surplus is accurate and whether that money is the government's or the American public's. "Funding PBS," this segment featured a discussion in which members of the Telecommunications Subcommittee Rep. Edward Markey (D-MA) and Rep. Michael Oxley (R-OH) discussed the swapping of PBS donor lists with the Democratic Party as reported yesterday in a NewsHour feature. The two exchanged views on whether PBS handled the Senate hearing appropriately on the matter: Rep. Markey said that the government should not punish the corporation with less funding and Rep. Oxley disagreed by saying that the government already funds PBS in excess. The two agreed that eventually Congress would come to a bipartisan resolution on the conflict and opined whether they believe PBS' material to be partisan. "Hemingway at 100," on the one hundredth anniversary of Ernest Hemingway's birth, this Roger Rosenblatt report considered his works, looking at how his simplistic style changed the writing world forever. Elizabeth Farnsworth followed with a conversation in which contemporary writers Richard Ford, Nicholas Delbanco, and A.J. Verdelle exchanged views on Hemingway's biggest influence as a writer and whether his legacy is negative in any way. They discussed whether they advise young writers to emulate his style, how he became famous in his time, and how his work differentiated from others' during his time. [60 minutes]

  • Episode #6516

    "Taxing Debate," a Kwame Holman report on the day's debate in the House over the Republican proposed tax cut of $800 billion over the next ten years, including testimony from key Republicans and Democrats. Despite harsh partisan opposition to the bill, six Democrats dissented and voted for the Republican bill, which passed following the debate. "Newsmaker," a newsmaker interview in which Jim Lehrer spoke to the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees Sadako Ogata on the refugee situation in Kosovo and surrounding areas. She discussed the number of refugees outside of Kosovo and whether they will return, her surprise over how many have already returned, to what extent Kosovo has undergone restructuring and the difficulties that lay ahead, including establishing an interim administration. She talked about how many other refugee problems exist in the world that are in equal need of assistance and about the satisfaction and challenge of her job. "Schizophrenia," this Susan Dentzer report looked at the mental condition of schizophrenia in light of last year's shooting by schizophrenic Russell Weston of two Capitol police guards. Dentzer followed an inpatient at the University of Pennsylvania's psychiatric ward who is suffering from the condition and is undergoing treatment to curb his aggressions and stabilize his behavior, looked at the latest treatments for schizophrenics, including now-available drugs and psychotherapy, and reported how people with the disorder can be treated successfully and should not be regarded as social misfits. "Dialogue," David Gergen of US News & World Report spoke to author and journalist Elizabeth Drew on her book, "The Corruption of American Politics." She explained her intent to write a book on the demise of politics over the past twenty-five years as the public has lost faith in the political process. She discussed how both Democrats and Republicans are cynical about the state of politics, how the polls guide the political process, and how politicians stand for issues so that they can win elections. "Summer Grief," this Roger Rosenblatt essay observed how the summer's adventurous and happy temper can disappear in a moment's notice in the face of tragedy and death, as evident in the plane crash that killed JFK Jr., his wife and her sister. [60 minutes]

  • Episode #6517

    "War of Words," a Spencer Michael background report on the worsening tensions between China and Taiwan in which China fears that the island may soon attempt to gain independence after Taiwanese President Lee Tenghui said he wanted to deal with China on a state-to-state basis. The report contained excerpts made by President Clinton and Pentagon spokesperson James Rubin in which they said that the US must be careful in dealing with the two countries so they will not escalate the situation. "Newsmaker," an Elizabeth Farnsworth conversation with Tung Chee-Hwa, Hong Kong's chief executive since its return to Chinese control in 1996. He discussed how the one-China policy, under which Taiwan is governed, needs to remain intact or the entire eastern region, including Hong Kong, will feel its effects. He explained how well Hong Kong has adjusted to the "one country, two systems" doctrine and said that Taiwan could have equal success to this type of system in which it would have judicial, military and monetary independence. He denied criticisms that Hong Kong does not enjoy those freedoms and is dominated by China and said the system works very well but sometimes needs Chinese intervention. "War of Words," Elizabeth Farnsworth discussed China-Taiwanese relations with Michel Oksenberg and David Brown. The two discussed the antagonistic Taiwan-Chinese history and why Taiwan may be willing to go to war for its independence, how Taiwanese President Lee has created a barrier to conduct US-Taiwanese relations, why President Lee is looking for greater independence at this time, the difficulty Chinese President Zhang Zemin is having on both domestic and international fronts, why the Chinese recently banned the spiritual practice of Falun Gong, which it saw as a threat to political order, and why Taiwan does not believe in a "one country-two systems" policy. "Shields & Gigot," a Jim Lehrer conversation in which Mark Shields and Paul Gigot assessed the politics of the week, including the passage of Republican tax legislation in the House, Dennis Hastert's role in the passage of the bill, the way in which moderate Republicans are holding back more conservative measures, how tax cuts are likely to play into the presidential elections of 2000, and why Republican believe the surplus should be given to tax cuts rather than spend on other issues. "Grades and Games," a Fred de Sam Lazaro of KCTA St. Paul Minneapolis report examining a scandal in the University of Minnesota athletics department after the some members of the university's basketball team were said to have had an administrator complete assignments for them for money at the request of their former basketball head coach, Clem Haskins. According to the report, many basketball players do not graduate and have trouble passing required courses to participate in athletics. Following the allegations that the athletes were cheating, four were suspended on the eve of the NCAA tournament. "Update Campaign 2000," a Kwame Holman update on responses received by the NewsHour on issues viewers would like to see addressed by presidential candidates in the next election. Topics included campaign finance reform, pollution, civil rights, international policy, health care reform and the current state of politics of the United States. [60 minutes]

  • Episode #6518

    "Newsmaker," Jim Lehrer spoke to national security advisor Samuel Berger on the continuing clashes between Serbs and Albanians in Kosovo. He explained how the slaying of fourteen Serb farmers should be a one-time tragedy and said that the KFOR army is doing everything within its power to stabilize the region. He discussed why most of the Serbs have left Kosovo- but asserted that this is not a reversal of the ethnic cleansing operation- how Milosevic is losing popular support in Serbia, why the international community will not help rebuild Serbia, his thoughts on Israel-Syria relations, and the pivotal role that Ehud Barak will have in mending the Middle East peace process. "Divided Party," a Betty Ann Bowser report on the Reform Party annual convention held in Michigan, which more than 350 of the party's delegates attended. The report included footage from an interview with one of the party's figureheads, Minnesota governor Jesse Ventura, an assessment of the party's objectives by chairman-elect Jack Gargan, and and a look at why the Reform party has failed to produce a presidential candidate with such support as Ross Perot in 1992. "Race and TV," a Terence Smith conversation in which actor Damon Standifer and syndicated columnist Earl Ofari Hutchinson discussed last week's controversial announcement by NAACP president Kweisi Mfume that he plans to launch a campaign against four networks for not casting enough minorities in prime-time programs for the fall season. Standifer said that the NAACP should focus on other issues in need of attention in the African American community and Hutchinson sided with the move by the NAACP, agreeing that not enough minorities are cast in television roles and that this is a sign of racism within the entertainment industry. The two exchanged views on why blacks are excluded from major roles, why blacks are stereotyped into certain roles when they are cast by producers, and whether pressure groups help to promote executives to cast better quality roles for blacks. "An American in Paris," this segment began with a report on Lance Armstrong, who, after surviving a battle with testicular cancer just two years ago, won the Tour de France, the twenty-day, twenty-three- hundred mile annual bicycle race in France. Then Davis Phinny and Jerome Godefry discussed the intense training required for the race, how Armstrong's fight with cancer made him a stronger person and cyclist, the hope he gives to those fighting cancer, how the race is guided by a team, and how France is beginning to accept Armstrong as a drug-free contender. [60 minutes]

  • Episode #6519

    "Fighter Fight," a Kwame Holman background report looking at the controversy behind the establishment of a new air superiority fighter jet, the F-22, which was omitted from the defense spending bill last week in the House for its high cost of nearly $200 million per jet but is strongly supported by the Senate and the president. Elizabeth Farnsworth then spoke to US Rep. Jerry Lewis (R-CA), Sen. Max Cleland (D-GA), Gen. Richard Hawley and Lawrence Korb, who debated whether the F-22 needs immediate funding or if other high-tech planes are comparable to the F-22 in war, why the costs have risen so dramatically in the past decade, how costs will only continue to rise if Congress does not pass the bill, the threats posed to the US if the bill doesn't pass. "Y2K Consequences," this Paul Solman of WGBH Boston report examined the current state of the Y2K computer bug by talking to various Silicon Valley computer firms, who say that their biggest fear is bad computer data for the first months of the new year but agree that by focusing intently on the possible catastrophe the computer companies and consultants have begun understanding computers better and established closer ties with other industries and communities. "Age of Celebrity," this segment began with a Richard Rodriguez essay on the way in which the press ordains people into celebrity figures as with the Kennedy family. Terence Smith followed with a discussion in which film critic Richard Schickel, author Richard Reeves, and English professor Leo Braudy expressed their views on the coverage of high-profile people in the news and whether Americans should feel emotion towards people they don't know, whether people should focus more on their own lives and families rather than these "virtual families," and how people will have to get used to this type of hyped news. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6520

    "Taxing debate," a Kwame Holman update on the first day's debate in the Senate of a Republican tax bill that would provide a $792 billion tax cut over the next ten years, including a 10% across-the-board income tax cut. This was followed by an Elizabeth Farnsworth conversation in which four senators discussed the current proposal. Sen. John Beaux (D-LA) explained that the Democrats and Republicans need to compromise on a reasonable tax cut that the president would approve and Sen. Phil Graham (R-TX) said that spending a quarter of the surplus on tax cuts was reasonable. Then Sen. Olympia Snowe (R-MA) discussed the need to preserve the middle ground on tax cuts, including perhaps a $500 billion cut, rather than be indignant about the Republican proposal. Sen. Richard Durbin (D-IL) replied that a tax cut of that proportion would only provoke inflation and curb growth. The four discussed the likelihood of coming to a compromise that the president would not veto. "Newsmaker," Jim Lehrer spoke to World Bank president and CEO James Wolfensohn about the bank's joint venture with the United Nations to fund a 2.2 billion program to rebuild the Balkans, including donations from over 50 nations. He discussed the difficulties in rebuilding the social structure of the region moreso than the physical infrastructure, the ethnic Albanians' enthusiasm over regaining their lives in Kosovo, whether the international community will aid Serbia, and how the process will be lengthy. "Homeless in Seattle," a Jim Compton of KCTS Seattle report looking at how Seattle is handling the rising number of homeless in the city by prosecuting those living on the street and in parks and sending them to jail. The report featured testimony from homeless advocates, city prosecutors, the city mayor and the victims on this technique to cut down the problem and whether the system is fair. "Breaking the Code," a Terence Smith conversation in which MIT scientist Robert Weinberg discussed his recent breakthrough study that detected how to turn a normal human cell cancerous, explaining how his team uncovered how a cell becomes defected to the point that it multiplies uncontrollably, producing a tumor, why this is a turning point in cancer research and in the road to finding a cure, how this discovery will help scientists figure out how cells can respond to cancer therapies, and how his team was excited about the study's results and its possible effects. [60 minutes]

  • Episode #6521

    "Taxing Debate," a Betty Ann Bowser report on the day's debate in the Senate over a Republican proposed tax cut, including a statement made by President Clinton on his plans to veto any tax cut of $800 billion, excerpts from the Republican's and Democrat's testimony in which a Democratic alternative bill and a bipartisan bill were introduced, and why the Republican bill is likely to pass following the August recess. "Newsmaker," following a Spencer Michaels background report on the current state of peace in Northern Ireland a year following the Good Friday Agreements, Jim Lehrer spoke to former senator George Mitchell, who helped broker that deal, about the recent Ulster Unionists boycott of the accord in response to the IRA's refusal to decommission its arms. Mitchell discussed why he is not surprised or threatened by the conflict, saying that implementation of peace is more difficult than brokering a peace deal; the distrust between Sinn Fein and the Ulster Unionists and how that guides their actions; why it is in both party's interests to stick to the accord; and the origin of his interest and dedication to Northern Ireland. "Network Blues," this Jeffrey Kaye of KCET Los Angeles report looked at the continuing plunge of network television ratings after being faced with the crippling surge of cable television stations and the battle over advertising money to prevent losses. The report spoke to television programmers and executives on how the networks are coping with decreasing viewership in the new age of television and whether they look forward to more losses in the future. "Campaign Agenda," a Terence Smith conversation in which six small-town weekly newspapers' editors exchanged views on the issues they would like to see addressed by the candidates for the 2000 presidential election. Larry Atkinson, Nancy Slepicka, Nicholas Benton, Joel Hack, Robert Trapp and Charles Tisdale mentioned many issues, including how to spend the surplus, the need to aid American farmers, education, paying off the national debt, health care, and international relations. The group then discussed whether the candidates speak to particular regions, why a two candidate race thwarts a healthy national debate, and their concern over voter turnout for the coming election. [60 minutes]

  • Episode #6522

    "Atlanta Shooting," a Terence Smith report on a shooting spree in the Atlanta-based All-Tech Investment Group building by one of the company's day traders. It was reported that Mark Barton shot and killed nine employees and injured thirteen more after first killing his wife and two children in his Atlanta apartment earlier in the week, then eventually killing himself when uncovered by police at a local B&P gas station. The report included footage from the scene of the crime and excerpts from a letter, written by Barton after he killed his family which stated his intention to murder those who were dedicated to financially ruining him. "Crackdown," an Elizabeth Farnsworth background report on the China's recent crackdown on the spiritual group Falun Gong, banning the practice followed by nearly 100 million Chinese, for threatening political stability. First, Chinese Embassy spokesperson Liu Xiaoming discussed why any well-organized group that is against Chinese principles is illegal, why Falun Gong's leader and New York resident Li Hongzhi is a perpetrator, and his wishes for the US to hand Li Hongzhi over to China. Then Falun gong practitioner Erping Zhang explained that Falun gong is not an organization but a practice to connect mind and body, the group's lack of political pretensions, and that that the government has not abided by its constitution by banning the practice. "Cycle of Revenge," a Martin Hemil report from Mitrovica, Kosovo, looking at the how the Serbs facing angry Albanians have been led to remain on one side of the divided city or face possible death by the Albanians residing on the other. The report profiled Albanian and Serb residents on the extent of Albanian revenge and whether the city will ever return to an integrated community as before the war. "Shields & Gigot," a Jim Lehrer conversation with Mark Shields and Paul Gigot on the week's political events, including the passage of the Republican tax legislation and the president's threat to veto any tax cut over $300 billion, the likelihood of the surplus issue becoming a primary focal point of the 2000 election, whether George W. Bush will become a target for campaign finance reform, why candidates will have to find other issues to bring down Bush, and the splintering of the reform party following its annual convention due its lack of political ideology. [60 minutes]

  • Episode #6523

    "Weathering the Drought," a Kwame Holman background report on the agricultural crisis in the eastern US states following a drought caused by excess temperatures and little rainfall, followed by a Margaret Warner conversation in which D. James Baker explained the difference between a drought and an extreme drought, the relationship between excessive heat and a drought and why this drought is the second most severe drought of the century. Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman discussed who has being hit the hardest by the drought, including soybean and corn farmers, whether prices will be affected on agricultural goods, the impact on water supplies, the need for a better crop insurance risk management system, and the need to alter the current farm bill to accommodate the volatile weather patterns and the international marketplace. "Air Campaign," this Terence Smith report looked at the current Clinton Administration drug campaign to see its effect on young people. Smith spoke to Northeastern professor Jack Levin about the campaigns, in which he explained the inadequacy of the campaigns in failing to give kids alternatives to drug use, how they only challenge kids to try drugs, why adults are more responsive than children to drug campaigns, and how other methods such as adult supervision and after-school programs would be more effective than the ads. Then director of the Office of National Drug Control Policy Barry McCaffrey refuted Levin's statements, saying the drug campaign has had a heavy impact on children across the nation, agreeing that more after-school programs are necessary to combat the problem and explaining how the success of the campaign has been measured. "Working on Welfare," the segment began with a Lee Hochberg of Oregon Public Broadcasting update report talking to welfare beneficiaries interviewed in a previous NewsHour report to see whether they have succeeded in moving off federal assistance, followed by an Elizabeth Farnsworth conversation in which Wendell Primus, Larry Mead, Sandra Traylor and Sharon Dietrich debated the success of current welfare reform programs. Topics discussed included: whether the 38% drop in welfare cases over the last two years was anticipated by the government, why the program has led to such success, the decreasing number of children and single mothers in poverty, whether people are likely to continue to stay off welfare, and why certain states are have more efficient welfare programs. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6524

    "Poison Controls," a Kwame Holman background report on the Environmental Protection Agency's decision to ban pesticides methyl parathion and azinphos methyl for posing danger to children and infants, followed by a discussion in which EPA administrator Carol Browner explained why the EPA decided to ban the pesticides, which are used on fruits and vegetables under the guidelines of the Food Protection Act, and why trade associations and environmental groups are disputing the newly enacted legislation and filing suit against the EPA. Then, American Crop Protections Association president Jay Vroom discussed why the process by which the pesticides were tested was insufficient and Environmental Working Group president Ken Cook said that the EPA has acted too slowly and that a large number of other pesticides need to be tested and banned too. Browner refuted both group's contentions, saying that the tests performed were lengthy and thoughtful and that there are alternatives to the affected fruits and vegetables to obtain the nutrients. "Sweeping Reform," this Lee Hochberg of Oregon Public Television report looked at how Congress is enforcing new legislation to ensure that sweepstakes publishers include clear messages to customers that no purchase is necessary to win after some sponsors have led people to falsely believe their chances are increased if they buy their products. "Dialogue," David Gergen of US News & World Report spoke to anthropology professor Lionel Tiger on his recent book, "The Decline of Males." He shared his philosophy that men are suffering at the hands of a rising female society that is now bearing children on their own, becoming more educated and taking on more responsibility than ever before. "Making Music," a Jeffrey Kaye of KCET Television report on an unusual musical collaboration between the Mexican traditional group Mariachi and the Yiddish band Ellis Island for a one-day concert celebrating the two cultures through music and with which the audience is encouraged to participate. Kaye spoke to members of the bands about the origin of their respective musical genres and the similarities between their immigrant backgrounds. The report included footage of the concert later that evening. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6525

    "One China," a Betty Ann Bowser report on the intensifying strains between mainland China and Taiwan after Taiwanese president Li Teng Hui referred to the two countries' relations on a state-to-state basis rather than under the "one China" principle and sparked anger among Chinese officials who later ordered the US to cease trading with Taiwan. An Elizabeth Farnsworth conversation followed, in which China native Minxin Pei of the Carnegie Endowment Center and Taiwanese-born Vincent Wang of the University of Richmond exchanged views on current legislation being debated in the House that would strengthen military relations between Taiwan and the United States, including whether the legislation would exacerbate the China-Taiwan conflict and lead to war or whether it would lead Taiwan into a more confident position to independence. The two discussed how their countries are anxious about the current situation, whether the Taiwanese are looking to be reunified with China and the likelihood of military reaction resulting from these strains. "Revenge Building," the segment began with three ITN reports chronicling the week's events in post-war Kosovo in which ethnic Albanians face extraordinary challenges in rebuilding the damaged country, estimated at costing millions over the next ten years amidst revenge on the Serbs, followed by a Terence Smith conversation in which UN administrator Sergio Viera de Mello discussed the reconstruction efforts taking place in Kosovo following his return from the region the previous day. He discussed the need to supplement the existing KFOR army with a UN police force as well as a new Kosovo police force, whether the KLA is acting as the de facto government, his certainty that the Albanian revenge will deteriorate soon, and his estimate of the timetable for social, economic and political reform. "Lame Duck President," Margaret Warner joined presidential historians Doris Kearns Goodwin, Michael Beschloss, journalist Haynes Johnson and Marlin Fitzwater to discuss whether President Clinton's energetic attempt to drive legislation in this last stretch of his term will fail. They explained the inevitable waning of the last year in a presidency but said that in accommodating circumstances presidents can make changes, exchanging views on whether the Clinton Administration should be considered "lame duck", and discussed how his best chance to pass influential legislation is in foreign policy. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6526

    "Taxing Debate," a Kwame Holman report including excerpts from the final day's debate in the House over the Republican's proposed tax cuts totaling $792 billion over ten years, which passed on a partisan line by the day's end; and excerpts from the Senate debate on the same issue not yet voted on. "Down on the Farm," in light of this week's $7.4 billion farm aid package passed in Congress, this Fred de Sam Lazaro report profiled families in Minnesota who are faced with finding new jobs or forgo their farms after droughts, floods, strong currency and foreign competition has resulted in the worst farm crisis since the 1980s. Margaret Warner followed with a conversation in which agricultural professor Daniel Sumner discussed who will be affected the most from the crisis, including moderate-sized farms; National Farmers Union president Leland Swenson said that the deregulation of the 1996 Farm Act and newly introduced free trade legislation has caused a crisis similar to the Great Depression by depriving farmers of a safety net in volatile crop conditions. The two exchanged views on whether government funding will remedy the farmers' challenges, how other countries' currencies affect the US market, and why some farmers will be forced out of business. "The Millennium Bug," a Tom Bearden report looking at the Healthcare industry and the millennium, after the most recent White House Y2K report was released and found that the health sector will face the most risk in the coming year. According to hospital officials thousands of medical devices are not Y2K accommodating, including heart monitors, ventilators, intravenous pumps, and pharmacy billing equipment and doctors fear that the biggest insecurity is about the utility capability on January 1, 2000. "Campaign 2000," Terence Smith spoke to four police chiefs about what they would like the presidential candidates to address in the coming election year. Ellen Hanson, Richard Pennington, Robert Duffy, Gregory Cooper and Rubin Greenberg exchanged views on whether the potential candidates are addressing their needs and said major issues that need government attention are drugs, violence with guns and in schools, inner city education, military, and monetary support of the police force. They also explained how crime has reached peak levels and is only getting worse. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6527

    "Choosing Sides," a Kwame Holman report on the day's activities in Congress as it prepared for its August recess, including the status of the Patients' Bill of Rights in both houses and the recent passage of the Republican-proposed tax cut in the Senate. "Political Wrap," Margaret Warner spoke to syndicated columnist Mark Shields and Wall Street Journal columnist Paul Gigot on the week's political events, including how the Republican Patient's Bill of Rights regained strength in the House, the pitfalls of HMO's, the likelihood of a bipartisan bill being passed in the Senate, why Clinton will veto the Republican-proposed tax cut, and analysis of Hillary Clinton's controversial interview with Talk magazine. "Following the Leader," this Terence Smith report examined how various news organizations have covered and contributed to George W. Bush's race for the Republican presidential nomination. The report featured statements made by other Republican candidates Dan Quayle, Gary Bauer, and Lamar Alexander about whether the media's preferred treatment to Bush is fair, whether his fund-raising capabilities should not be the focus of the race, and the extent to which the press has influenced Bush's lead in the polls. "Southern Roots," following a tribute to author Willie Morris, who died this week at age 64, Elizabeth Farnsworth joined his former friends and colleagues, artist Bill Dunlap and author Edwin Yoder, to discuss Morris's life and legacy. They talked about how he was revered by his home-state Mississippi, his brilliance as an editor, his generosity, his verbal genius, and how being a Mississippian was the core of his soul. "The Heartland," Essayist Roger Rosenblatt considered the work of American writer J.F. Powers, who died last week at the age of eighty-one. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6528

    "Kremlin Shake-up," this segment began with a Lindsey Hilsum of ITN report on Boris Yeltin's recent announcement to sack Prime Minister Sergei Stepashin for his security chief, Vladimir Putin. Margaret Warner followed with a discussion in which Harvard University's Marshal Goldman, Center for Democracy president Allen Weinstein and author Lilia Sheztsova assessed this move, explaining why he is trying to protect himself from the threat of a rising moderate nationalist coalition, why Yeltsin chose Putin as the next Prime Minister, whether Putin would serve as a possible candidate in the coming year's presidential elections, why Yeltsin's regime is doomed, the problem posed by Kosovo on Russian-US relations, and whether Russia is truly an unstable nation. "Diplomatic Dispatch," following a report on the normalization of trading ties between Vietnam and the US for the first time since the Vietnam War, Elizabeth Farnsworth spoke with Pete Peterson, US ambassador to Vietnam. He discussed the negative impact of the Asian financial crisis on the Vietnam's economy, the need for political and economical reform in the banking system, non-tariff trade barriers, and the need for privatization. He then explained the atmosphere in post-war Vietnam, the details of the recently implemented trade bill, and an update on the Americans missing-in-action in the country. "The Not-So Grand Canyon," a Ted Robbins of KUAT-Tucson report on the US Forest Service's initiative to create a Grand Canyon community after buying three hundred acres for housing restaurants, hotels, and shops so that more of the community can enjoy the natural wonder. "Words of Summer," US Poet Laureate Robert Pinsky read Wallace Steven's "The House Was Quiet and the World Was Calm," about how to spend a quiet summer evening. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6529

    "MA Cable," this Paul Solman report looked at how the long distance telephone carrier AT&T is attempting to break into the local telephone industry by investing in the cable market through the acquisition of TCI, a cable TV company. According to the report, consumers will soon be looking to obtain their telephone service through cable wires, which can provide much more facilities and services than the copper wires utilized by Bell Atlantic and other local companies. "Capital Gains," Margaret Warner spoke to American Council for Capital Formation president Mark Bloomfield and deputy director of the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities Iris Lav on the Republican tax cut proposal, focusing on the prospect of a capital gains tax cut. Bloomsfield explained how a capital gains cut is fiscally responsible and an overall benefit to society and Lav negated this view by saying that a cut would only benefit high-income investors. They exchanged views on whether middle and lower-income families would be impacted from the cut, whether it is morally justifiable to tax savings, and whether recent reports on the 1997 8% capital gains tax cut are correct in reporting the overall economy prospered as a result of the move. "Year 2K," in this segment, Elizabeth Farnsworth spoke to NewsHour essayists Clarence Page, Anne Taylor Fleming, Roger Rosenblatt and Richard Rodriguez about what issues they would like presidential candidates to address. Issues mentioned included: an American belief system, campaign finance reform, education, honest politicians, foreign policy, gun control. They then exchanged views on whether they foresee a healthy national debate among candidates, why candidates usually fail to address their concerns and their hope that presidential hopefuls will one day be brave enough to impart their own beliefs. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6530

    "Hatred," a Jeffrey Kaye of KCET TV report on the surrender to the Las Vegas FBI of Buford O'Neal Furrow, who entered a Los Angeles Jewish Community Center yesterday and shot and injured five people, including three small children. "Hate Speech," this Elizabeth Brackett of WTTW Chicago report considered how free speech enables hate groups, including the World Church of the Creator, to spread rapidly via the Internet, looking at whether groups that preach racist mantras should be illegal after some cult members have acted violently against people of other races. "Colombia in Crisis," a Spencer Michaels background report on the controversy over the US involvement in the escalating drug war in Colombia in which the country's President Pastrano and the leftist rebels, the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia -linked with the drug traffickers- battle over Colombia's rule and have forced it into economic decline, social unrest and civil war. This was followed by an Elizabeth Farnsworth conversation in which Peter Reuter, Gabriel Marcella and Michael Shifter discussed the extent of the relationship between the FARC and the drug traffickers, the US involvement in combating the insurgency movement and whether the US should support the Colombian military with funding, and whether peace can be established without US help. "Drought," in light of this summer's dought, US poet laureate Robert Pinksy read a Frederick Goddard Tuckerman sonnet about threats of summer storm. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6531

    "Russia's Troubles," a Spencer Michaels background report on the recent outbreak between Russian soldiers and pro-independent guerillas in the Russian republic of Dagestan, which declared a holy war against the Russian Federation for their liberation. Professors Philip Kohl and Fiona Hill joined Margaret Warner for a discussion, in which they explained how social unrest, unemployment and the influence of the warring neighbor republic of Chechnya has caused Dagestan to desire independence, why Russia wants to hold on to Dagestan, the difficulty Dagestan will have in procuring independence due to quibbling religious factions, and whether Russia can resolve Dagestan's economic constraints and bring the country political stability. "Seeding the Future," this Tom Bearden report looked into the continuing controversy over genetically engineered crops after it was reported in a Cornell University study that a BT gene in genetically altered corn crops was killing off non-target insects, monarch butterflies, a potential hazard to the ecosystem and to the environment. Bearden spoke to the head of the report, biotech representatives, farmers and government officials on what this may mean for the industry, whether legislation will be enacted to protect consumers, and how ethics play into the issue of genetically engineered food. "Pledge Break," this special pledge week report included excerpts from the day's conference over the establishment of a cabinet-level BioEnergy Commission by President Clinton which will oversee the production of more fuels through grasses, crops and trees to reduce the US dependency on oil. "Tax Debate," After a Kwame Holman background report on the Democrat and Republican stand on the Republican-proposed tax cut, Terence Smith spoke to NewsHour regional commentators on the current debate in Congress. Lee Cullum, Cynthia Tucker, Patrick McGuigan, Rachelle Cohen and Jane Eisner exchanged views on whether the (whatever) surplus should be spent in tax cuts, Medicare, Social Security, and the national debt, then focused on what typed of tax cuts would be in order provided the tax legislation passed. They agreed that a tax cut would take place eventually despite a presidential veto but said that the amount would likely be much less than the projected $800 billion in the Republican bill. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6532

    "Grasping for Straws," reporting from Ames, Iowa, this Margaret Warner feature looked at the Republican straw polls, where Republican candidates battled for votes and the contest ended in a George W. Bush victory, followed by Steve Forbes and Elizabeth Dole. Warner talked to candidates, attendees, and the press on the meaning behind the poll, what this means for George W. Bush and which candidates are likely to drop out of the race. "Political Wrap," live from Des Moines, Paul Gigot and Tom Oliphant joined Terence Smith to discuss the Republican straw polls in Iowa. First they described the atmosphere, which they likened to the February caucuses, and assessed the current standings of the Republican candidates; the likely presidential drop-outs, including Dan Quayle and Lamar Alexander; the significance of the contest; the likelihood of a third party candidate; and whether Warren Beatty is seriously considering running for president. "Pledge Break," this special pledge break report featured excerpts from a meeting sponsored by The Federalist Society in Washington, DC in which a group of lawyers and legal scholars exchanged views on security measures being taken by some US schools in efforts to eradicate school violence. "Master of Suspense," on the one-hundredth year anniversary of Alfred Hitchcock's birth, this Kwame Holman report looked at his life and legacy as one of the world's most celebrated film directors. Then, Elizabeth Farnsworth spoke to "LA Confidential" writer and director Curtis Hanson, Columbia University film professor Annette Insdorf and University of Southern California film professor Drew Casper about Hitchcock's work. They shared their views on Hitchcock's greatest talents in filmmaking, including his examination of the dark side of the human psyche and his meticulous attention to detail, why no other filmmaker can master his genre, and why his films were capable of scaring audiences so intensely. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6533

    "Return to Columbine," a Tom Bearden background report on the reopening of Columbine High where students returned for the beginning of classes for the first time since the deadly school shooting last year. Bearden spoke to Columbine students, teachers and parents about whether they feel safer in the school with the newly implemented security measures, how they perceive the school after the shooting and how they are all fighting to ensure that the school lives on. Elizabeth Farnsworth followed with perspective from school superintendents David Hornbeck, Rod Paige, Kate Stetzner and David Domenech in which they discussed the measures they have taken in preventing school violence, including whether stricter security measures should be enacted, and the benefits of peer mediation, conflict resolution and community service programs. "After Iowa," a Margaret Warner background report on the results of the Ames, Iowa Republican straw polls in which George W. Bush won with 31% of the votes, followed by Steve Forbes and Elizabeth Dole. This was followed by a Margaret Warner discussion in which The Washington Post' Dan Balz and Kevin Marida assessed the results, including the significance of Lamar Alexander's drop-out from the race, Steve Forbes campaign strategy, the extent of Bush's lead, and the likelihood of a Republican running under the reform party nomination. "Dialogue: The First Sex," David Gergen of US News & World report spoke to anthropologist Helen Fisher on her book, "The First Sex," on how women are changing the world. She explained the most important discovery of her career, that women have finally risen to the point in at which they are capable of achieving their true talents, relying on communication skills and "web thinking." She explained the effects of estrogen and testosterone in workplace ethics, why this is the best time to be a woman and why women will always play different roles in families than men. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6534

    "Deadly Force," this segment included two ITN reports from Turkey on the deadly earthquakes that struck Izmit, a town twenty-five miles south of Istanbul, and measured 7.8 on the Richter scale, killing at least two-thousand people and burying thousands more. "Inside Iraq," first, a Zackary Fink of New Jersey Network News report on the continuing accounts of US air raids on Iraq for attempted fire at US planes patrolling the No Fly Zone over the northern and southern borders of Iraq. Margaret Warner followed with a conversation in which Voices in the Wilderness spokesperson Kathy Kelly, retired commander Richard Hawley and former assistant secretary of state for Near Eastern Affairs ambassador Robert Pelletreau exchanged views on the US bombing policy over Iraq, including whether the Iraqi government is to blame for civilian deaths, how to contain Iraq and minimize danger, whether the UN should halt sanctions against Iraq, and whether it is time to alter the UN policy against Saddam Hussein. "Poetry Slam," an Elizabeth Farnsworth report on the 10th annual Poetry Slam held in Chicago last week where teams from San Fransisco and San Jose tied for first place. Individual winners of the slam Roger Bonair-Augard and Arian Waynes joined Farnsworth for a conversation on the art of poetry slamming. The two explained how they became involved in poetry slamming, what "slamming" means, the most influential poetry performers on their work, and discussed how slamming is bringing poetry back into mainstream America. "Logjam," this Jim Fisher essay examined how a blockade of logs and debris in a Midwestern river is causing nearby neighbors to complain to their local politicians to restore the flow of the river that has been blocked for over a decade. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6535

    "Deadly Force," the segment began with two ITN update reports from Adapazari and Golcuk, Turkey on the killer earthquakes yesterday that struck Izmit, killing at least 4,000 people and injuring more than 18,000. The reports included footage from some of the worst-hit areas where rescue workers continued to work around the clock to pull survivors from the wreckage. Margaret Warner followed with a conversation in which Turkish Ambassador Baki Ilkin described the terror of the event as he experienced it and American Red Cross manager Tim McCully discussed the relief operations taking place by the US in conjunction with the Turkish group Red Crescent. Then research geophysicist Robert Wesson explained why Turkey is vulnerable to earthquakes by resting on the North Anatolian Fault line, why the structure of buildings may have led to their extreme damage and the likelihood that Turkey will experience aftershocks up to a 6.0 magnitude on the richter scale. "Change of Mind," this Jim Compton of KCTS Seattle report on the controversy surrounding Rep. George Nethercutt's (R-Washington) decision to run for a 4th term in Congress after promising he would only serve three terms. "Campaign Agenda," Terence Smith engaged four architecture professors in a conversation on the upcoming presidential elections, talking to them about what issues should be covered in the candidates' campaign agenda. Robert A.M. Stern, Walter Hood, William Morrish, and Julie Bargmann mentioned issues including the problem of urban sprawl and suburbanization, the federal government's role in urban planning, national housing policy and public transportation, and the need to form more partnerships between environmentalists, industrialists and government. "Mozart & His Music," this segment begins a NewsHour series talking to various writers who are part of a book series launched this year called The Penguin Lives, for which they write about interesting subjects they know well. Elizabeth Farnsworth spoke to Peter Gay on his book on the life of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. Gay discussed his research for the book, including his surprise over Mozart's grave side, Mozart's relationship with his father, and why his death can possibly be blamed on his doctors. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6536

    "Deadly Force," a Julian Manyon ITN report from Adapazari, Turkey, one of the worst-hit towns of the deadly earthquake that struck the country earlier in the week and where more than 5,000 lay buried under rubble from the 60% of the town's buildings that fell during the quake. "Voices for Protest," the segment began with a background report from John Draper of ITN from Belgrade where 150,000 Serbs protested against the rule of president Slobodon Milosevic, the largest rally against the president since the end of the war. Elizabeth Farnsworth followed with a conversation in which New York Times correspondent Steven Erlanger described the day's events as he covered them in Belgrade, discussing the reasons behind the rallies, the role of the Serbian Orthodox Church, why the police failed to halt the demonstrations, Milosevic's reaction to the protests, and whether this will lead to a greater political movement. Then, Daniel Serwer and Charles Ingrao exchanged views on the importance of the demonstrations, including whether the opposition is strong enough to change the government, and whether the outbreak is likely to erupt into civil war. "Hazardous Baggage," this Tom Bearden report examined the growing danger of carry-on baggage in airplanes that has caused an estimate of 4,500 serious injuries to airplane passengers yearly and which is the greatest cause of plane injuries. The report outlined the causes for the injuries, why the FAA is reticent to implement safety guidelines for carry-on bins, the extent of carry-on injuries, and how different airlines are addressing the problem with greater passenger awareness and safer bins. "Dialogue," David Gergen of US News & World Report spoke to musician Kitty Ferguson on her book, "Measuring the Universe: Our Historic Quest to Chart the Horizons of Space and Time." She discussed how she became fascinated with astronomy at a very early age, the details of her book, including the history of cosmic measurement, the Copernicus revolution, the history of the solar system and the Universe, and the strides scientists have been able to make in deciphering the age and the future of the Universe. "Hatred," US poet laureate Robert Pinsky read a Polish poem translated by Stanislaw Baranczak and Clare Cavanagh entitled "Hatred." [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6537

    "Searching for Miracles," the segment began with a Julian Manyon of ITN report on the rescue efforts taking place in Izmit where the death toll has reached 3,300 after the deadly earthquake earlier in the week. Then Elizabeth Farnsworth spoke to Frank Donaghue, chief executive officer for the Southeastern Pennsylvania chapter of the American Red Cross, who arrived in Istanbul to assess the damage. He discussed the extent of the damage in Izmit, which he described as dismal and extensive, the need for more relief aid in the form of donations to relief organizations and the condition of the hospitals crowded with injured people and in need of medical supplies. Then Kwame Holman reported on the rescue of a young woman after seven hours of intense effort. "Questioning the Candidate," this Terence Smith report looked at the media's prodding inquiry over questions of Republican front-runner George W. Bush's previous drug use, including cocaine, which he continues to evade. The report chronicled the way various network and cable news programs have handled the issue, and whether they should have the right to ask such questions to political candidates. "Gigot & Oliphant," a Margaret Warner conversation in which syndicated columnist Paul Gigot and Boston Globe columnist Tom Oliphant assessed the way in which George W. Bush has handled questions of previous drug use, including whether he should be accountable to that question, if it matters if a candidate has used an illegal substance in his past, how this ties into his political strategy, and why Democrats are likely to inflate the issue to make Bush appear "Clintonian." "Wooing Iowa," an Elizabeth Bracket of WTTW Chicago report on Democratic presidential candidate hopefuls Bill Bradley and Al Gore's trip to Iowa to campaign for the coming January caucuses. Both candidates used their backgrounds to their aid, Bradley's career in pro basketball and Gore's work in the administration, and have had success in pitching their campaigns to the people of Iowa. "Art in Motion," this Spencer Michaels report considers the artwork of Bill Violla, who has pioneered a new movement in art known as "video-art," and whose work "The Crossing" is being displayed at the San Fransisco Museum of Art. The report included excerpts from an interview with Violla in which he describes his art-that many see as disturbing and dark-yet which he explains depicts life and images of one's existence through the medium of video, lights and sound. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6538

    "Amid The Ruins," this segment began with a Robert Moore and John Irvine ITN report on the state of ruins in Turkey, a week after the country was hit by a devastating earthquake, where over thirty-thousand people lie buried under the rubble and whose decomposing bodies pose threat to the region. Elizabeth Farnsworth followed with a conversation in which World Health Organization Dr. Claude de Ville de Goyet and executive director of Doctors without Borders USA Joelle Tanguy discussed the current health risks facing Turkey, including the danger of "crush" syndrome experienced by those crushed by debris-in which the muscles elicit toxins into the body causing shock- the psychological damage to victims, why they are not worried about epidemic spreading among survivors, how the relief teams are dealing with post-traumatic stress disorder, and the need for more trained local physicians. "Reflecting America," this Terence Smith report looked at the current status of minorities in journalism, including whether small news organizations offer equal opportunities to minorities, how news organizations are making efforts to incorporate more diversity issues into their papers, and the way in which ethnic reporters can add substance to minority coverage. "Tough Questions," first, a Kwame Holman report on personal privacy and political figures by looking at whether the press has the right to ask George W. Bush about his previous drug use, followed by a conversation in which Gov. Gary Johnson (R-NM), Gov. Frank Keating (R-OK), Sen. Dale Bumpers (D-AK) and former presidential adviser David Gergen exchanged views on whether George W. Bush should be questioned about all his previous experiences, what level of standards public officials should be held to, including drug use, whether society is too voyeuristic, whether private affairs should be evaluated to judge a candidate's capability to govern, and which issues, including psychological help and emotional problems, are not the public's business. "Livin' La Vida Loca," this Anne Taylor Flemming essay examined the influx of Latino music being embraced by American culture, including a look at the current stardom of ex-Menudo Ricky Martin with his recent album "La Vida Loca." The report traced the increasing interest in Latino dance and salsa as the number of Latin immigrants continues to skyrocket and Latins are expected to be the largest minority by the millennium. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6539

    "Controlling Interest," Paul Solman joined guests to discuss the Federal Reserve's decision to raise the discount rate and Federal funds rate a quarter of a percent. Former Federal Reserve vice chairman Alice Rivlin, Forecasting Center at the Jerome Levy Economics Institute director David Levy, and Primark Decision Economics chief global economist Allen Sinai evaluated the Fed's decision, agreeing that inflationary scares and market prosperity were the two primary factors behind the move. They discussed how the market will react, whether the stock market will continue to rise as before, how consumption is likely to fall, and why people will continue to feel prosperous in the economy. "Amid the Ruins," the segment began with two ITN reports from Turkey on the continuing rescue efforts taking place a week after the deadly earthquake, including the need for more aid from international agencies as makeshift camps and hospitals are low on supplies. Then, Margaret Warner spoke to US ambassador to Turkey Mark Parris about the mounting health risks, the need for shelter for the 200,000 homeless following the quake, how the government has coped with the housing problem, the extent of the US efforts in providing ships and transportation for the recovery and the swiftness with which the US responded, and the long-term effects of the quake on the Turkish political system. "Making the Grade," this Betty Ann Bowser report looked into mandatory summer school classes that public schools are implementing as a result of the increasing number of below-average students in America. According to the report over five million children are enrolled for the courses that provide smaller classes for suffering students over the summer who may also be required to attend Saturday classes in the coming school year. "Ageless Art," following a background report on the life of Merce Cunningham, Elizabeth Farnsworth spoke to the acclaimed choreographer about his long-standing career in modern dance spanning over sixty years. He discussed how he became involved in theater and dance at an early age, his training at the Cornish school, his unique choreographing style, guided sometimes by chance, his disinterest in narrative dance, his fascination with the art of dance and how he now incorporates technology into his choreography. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6540

    "Operation Ramp Rat," first, a Kwame Holman background report on a multi-law enforcement task force drug bust at Miami Airport in which fifty eight people were arrested for smuggling internationally, including thirty American Airlines workers and 13 Lufthansa Sky Chef employees. Margaret Warner spoke to US Customs Commissioner Raymond Kelly on the arrest. He described the two-year investigation in which authorities uncovered 700 pounds of cocaine being smuggled from South America to the states, the measures that will be taken by airlines to ensure drug-free cargo, the significance of the arrest, and why investigations will continue following this bust. "Fault Lines," a John Irvine report on the conditions in Turkey following the earthquake that killed at least 14,000 people, followed by an Elizabeth Farnsworth conversation in which research geophysicist Robert Wesson, EQE International engineer Peter Yanoff, and Degenkob Engineers Mary Ann Phipps exchanged views on how builders will learn from the quake. They explained how the Turkish buildings are structurally inadequate for earthquakes, the difference in safety precautions taken by Turkey and the US, why this incident should be a major warning to other countries who don't take proper precautionary measures for natural disasters, especially those with industrial facilities. "Unwanted," an Elizabeth Brackett of WTTW report on the controversial way Cicero, Illinois has attempted to eradicate the city's many gangs by invoking an ordinance banning gang members or strapping suspicious youths with a $500 fine. The report interviewed gangs' family members, the town president, and the district attorney on whether this method, which has been challenged by the ACLU for being unconstitutional, is legal or effective. "Dialogue," David Gergen of US News & World Report spoke to authors Theodore Sizer and Nancy Sizer on their collaborative book, "The Students Are Watching." The two discussed the book's premise about how children learn teachers' and adults' behavior and that teachers have a moral contract with students as role models, how teachers are failing in that task, the need for more time spent between teachers and students, and how charter schools are much better in serving children and their educational and character-developing needs. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6541

    "Waco," this segment began with a Kwame Holman report on Janet Reno's announcement that pyrotechnic devices were used by the FBI in the events that occurred in Waco, Texas six years ago where eighty-one members of the Branch Davidian were killed by fire. This was followed by a Margaret Warner conversation in which journalists Lee Hancock and Robert Suro discussed the FBI's involvment, including how Reno became aware of new evidence negating the FBI's previous statement of their actions, why independent arson investigations concluded the ignition of the fire was more complex than by incendiary devices, and whether the FBI really was aware of the new evidence since the onset of the investigation. "Eye in the Sky," a Spencer Michaels report on the images received by NASA's broadband X-ray telescope, the Chandra X-Ray Observatory, of exploding stars, which scientists say will help explain the origin, structure, and evolution of the universe in detail. Terence Smith then spoke with Dr. Martin Weisskopf and Dr. Robert Kirshner about the images, explaining the historical significance of the launch of the twenty-two-year project and what they expect to learn from it. "Special Emphasis," Elizabeth Farnsworth spoke to religious leaders Laurence White, Cecil Williams, Azizah Al-Hibri, and Charles Kroloff about which issues they would like presidential hopefuls to address in the coming year. The guests all agreed that politics has become too political and candidates are not addressing anything of substance but said moral issues, such as abortion, family issues, human rights, parenting should be a center point of attention in their campaigns. They discussed the need for real leaders that possess integrity and values unlike many of the public officials today. "Summertime," US Poet Laureate Robert Pinksy read an Emily Dickinson poem about the mystery and excitement of summertime. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6542

    "Troubled Peace," the segment began with a Lindsey Hilsum report from Litina, Kosovo, where Albanians and Serbs struggle to coexist on peaceful terms after petty crimes and arson continue to plague the region. Terence Smith followed with a conversation in which reporter Jonathan Landay, the Brookings Institution senior fellow Ivo Daalder and American Enterprise Institute scholar Jeffrey Gedmin discussed the continuing strife in Kosovo. They exchanged views on whether the atrocities are surprising, whether a multi-ethnic Kosovo is a prospect, why Albanians are not likely to embrace the Serbs living in Kosovo, how Russia will be integrated into the peacekeeping mission, and the outlook for the overall peace process. "Atlanta, line in The Sand," a Betty Ann Bowser report from Atlanta on an affirmative action lawsuit filed by three small white-owned contractors against the Atlanta City Council for a fifteen-year-old program established to give minorities more public building contracts through affirmative action requirements, which they say violates the Constitution. Bowser spoke to black contractors benefited by the program, white opponents, black opponents, the Southeastern Legal Enterprise supporting the lawsuit and the current and previous mayor on whether the law is a necessary move in eliminating discrimination, whether the program is beneficial to minorities or acts as a crutch, and whether it helps minorities unfairly. "Political Wrap," a Margaret Warner spoke to syndicated columnist Mark Shields and Weekly Standard columnist Matthew Reese on the week's politics events. Topics discussed included: the repercussions of recently uncovered information about the FBI's involvement in Waco, how this may affect the credibility of the FBI, Sen. John McCain's public stand against abortion, how he is running on candor, character and courage, and an analysis of the Republican campaigns preparing for the upcoming primaries. "Prize Winner," the program concluded with a conversation with Margaret Edson, the Pulitzer winner for drama, for her play "Wit," on a poetry teacher's fight against cancer. She talked about her play and why she chose a poetry teacher as her central character; where she acquired her knowledge of the medical aspect of her play; her experiences working in a cancer and AIDS unit; how her play made it from a household read to the theaters of New York; how she had to adapt it to half the original length; her love of teaching; and whether winning a Pulitzer will have any impact on her life. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6543

    "Price War," a Terence Smith conversation in which telecom industry analyst Jeff Kagan and Forbes magazine executive editor Dennis Kneale discussed the ongoing price war between MCI Worldcom and AT&T after AT&T further cut its long distance rates by thirty percent. The two exchanged views on the extent to which prices are likely to drop and whether long distance calls will one day be free, how telecommunications companies have covered costs through added services, and whether companies will profit by new customer business as a result of rate cuts. "Future Phones," this Paul Solman report of WBGH Boston considered the future of the telecommunications industry by visiting AT&T and Bell Atlantic headquarters and MIT's technology lab, known as the "Intelligent Room," to talk to top officials about what lay ahead in technology. Both AT&T and Bell Atlantic are looking to provide information in the future through a cable modem-based system and an Internet-based system and agreed that picture telephones will be available to consumers soon. But they also warned that only technology embraced by the people will succeed. "Uncertain Destiny," a Kwame Holman report on the day's vote in East Timor over its independence within Indonesia, which took control of the east-Asian island after Portugal ceased control twenty-five years ago. Jim Lehrer followed with a conversation in which East Timor native Constancio Pinto and former US ambassador to Indonesia Edward Masters discussed the elections, including whether the Indonesian government would respect a vote for succession, why East Timor would be better off economically to stay with Indonesia, the likelihood of an averse reaction from the militia, and how long it may take for peace to come to the region. "Still Playing," In this segment, Elizabeth Farnsworth reported on the 25th anniversary of the Kronos Quartet. David Harrington joined Elizabeth for a discussion about how he became involved in this type of music and his love for string quartets. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6544

    "Aids," Jim Lehrer spoke to Dr. Helen Gayle, director of the AIDS Program for The Center for Disease Control and Prevention, about the findings at the first annual AIDS conference in Atlanta, Georgia. She shared the current statistics on AIDS, in which she noted concern over the lessening drop in AIDS cases over the last year as compared to previous years despite new treatments. She explained alarming statistics revealing that a higher number of heterosexual women are getting the virus, why African Americans make up more than half of the new cases in 1999, the prevalence of new cases among gay men, and the growing sense of complacency surrounding the disease. "Aids Epidemic," This segment consisted of a Fred de Sam Lazaro report on the AIDS situation in South Africa. The report covered the rate at which the number of cases are rising in the country; the lack of trust between the white doctors and black citizens of South Africa; how the oppression of women has added to the epidemic; and whether the government is doing anything to stop the spread of the disease. "Targeting Guns," this Jeffrey Kaye report of KCET Los Angeles looked at how California has tackled the problem of gun violence, where Gov. Grey Davis (D-CA) signed three gun control measures into legislation this week. Elizabeth Farnsworth followed with a conversation in which Sterling Burnett and Frank Zimring discussed the terms of the legislation, whether California's efforts are more symbolic than substantive, whether this will spawn other states to enact similar legislation, and whether the media hypes the need for tighter gun control more than it should. "Conversation," following Margaret Warner background report chronicling the year's tense relations with China, she spoke to Jim Sasser, the outgoing US ambassador to China. He first shared his views on the Chinese anger over the US bombing of the Chinese embassy in Belgrade and why the people perceived the attack as an overt message to China, China's move towards reform, American's misconception over the state of China's economy, and his worry about how the Chinese may react to a transformation to a democracy. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6545

    "Airline Delays," Tom Bearden began this segment with a background report on the extensive number of flight delays this summer, followed by a Jim Lehrer interview with Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) head Jane Garvey on the report released today by the FAA on the reasons for the delays. She summarized the report that found weather, new equipment and more air traffic as the major causes for flight delays, and discussed how the FAA is implementing new regulation to minimize delays, including shortening flight distance requirements between routes, centralizing the air traffic control system and modernizing the overall flight operation system. Then aviation experts Darryl Jenkins and Michael Boyd joined the conversation, attributing flight delays to an antiquated air traffic system and inefficient use of air space, not to bad weather. They discussed the need for Congress to restructure the FAA and the need for the FAA to be accountable for its decisions. The two debated whether the FAA is successfully meeting the challenges facing the aviation industry. "Getting a Life," this Spencer Michaels report examined the state of the California prison system, which has been criticized for being overcrowded, expensive and for failing to provide the kind of support that would prepare inmates for life after prison. Bearden spoke to inmates who have been exposed to drug rehab programs and training courses as part of a small organized effort to prevent parolees from returning to crime on the streets. But some Republicans denounce preventative programs as being too expensive and a failure in keeping former inmates away from drugs and crimes. "Candid Campaigner," the segment began with a background report from Margaret Warner tracking Sen. John McCain on his presidential campaign tour in New Hampshire, followed by a conversation in which Washington Post reporter Dan Balz discussed McCain's bus tour this week, including the candidate's candor and his blunt and funny campaigning style, whether his straight-talk style is winning over candidates, how he has used his experience as a prisoner of war in Vietnam as an example of his character, his interaction with journalists, and the progress he is making in the polls. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6546

    "Still Smoldering," Jim Lehrer spoke to Robert Suro of the Washington Post about the possibility of an outside investigation of the FBI for its conduct in Waco after the Bureau recently disclosed that it did use incendiary devices against the Branch Davidian compound six years ago. He explained how the inquiry appointed by Janet Reno would be carried out, why the FBI claims it was not responsible for the fire that broke out in Waco, Texas and killed eighty people, the Justice Department's anger over the FBI's decision to withhold information and evidence, and how this is affecting FBI-Justice Department relations. "Vouchers on Trial," an Elizabeth Brackett of WTTW report on the recent injunction issued by a Ohio Federal Court District judge to halt the state's voucher program allowing low-income families to send their children to their school of choice. Elizabeth Farnsworth followed with a conversation in which American Civil Liberties Union president Nadine Strossen and Institute for Justice director and vice-president Clinton Bolick debated whether children should have the right to chose their schools, whether voucher programs violate the secular laws in the United States by indirectly funding private religious schools, why this case is likely to go to the Supreme Court, and why the voucher program benefits the public school system and the students. "Measuring Up," this Betty Ann Bowser report looked at how new standards of learning tests were implemented in the Virginia school system's curriculum last year as part of an effort to improve education in the state. But, according to the report, the tests, which students will be required to pass for graduation by 2004, are criticized for being too difficult after only 7% of schools passed in the first year of implementation and many say have unfairly targeted minorities and caused children to suffer from anxiety. "Road to Peace," a Terence Smith background report on the resurgence of the Middle East peace talks this week where Palestineans and Israelis have yet to strike a deal over the release of Palestinean prisoners of war. This was followed by a conversation in which Hasan Rahman of the Palestine Liberation Organization and Israeli Embassy charge-de-affairs Lenny Ben-David discussed current Israeli-Palestinean relations, including how Ehud Barak is deciding which prisoners of war will be freed, why no terrorists will be freed, the difficulty that lay ahead in partitioning the West Bank and the issue of Jerusalem, and how the US should be involved in the peace process. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6547

    "The Great Divide," a Margaret Warner conversation on wages, employment and the financial markets after record low unemployment numbers were reported for August. Columbia University professor Frederic S. Mishkin, Institute for Policy Studies director John Cavanagh, executive compensation specialist Charles Peck and author Kevin Phillips exchanged views on the likelihood of inflation in light of low unemployment, why "financial" inflation, which includes the stock market and executive salaries, has surged tremendously this year, why it is economically inefficient to tie CEO wages to stock options, whether the large salary gap between executives and minimum wage workers is a negative for society, whether an increase in minimum wage would redistribute wealth more efficiently, and how government policy should be enacted to help stave off financial inflation. "Playing in Vegas," a Kwame Holman report looking at how Republicans fared in selling their tax-cut proposal in Las Vegas during their August recess. The report visited Republican and Democratic districts, talking to middle and high income residents about whether a tax cut would benefit them or whether only a few high-income earners would be affected. "Political Wrap," following excerpts from the day's press conference given by Janet Reno on her plans to appoint an independent investigation over the events of Waco, Jim Lehrer spoke to syndicated columnist Mark Shields and Wall Street Journal columnist Paul Gigot about that decision. They agreed that an investigation is warranted to find out whether the FBI was responsible for the fire that killed over 80 people of the Branch Davidian, discussed who should be appointed to the investigation, the severity of the issue, and how Congress is likely to handle it, and explained why Waco needs to be put to rest to recapture people's faith in the government. Then, the two exchanged views on the probability of a tax cut and whether Pat Buchanan will run under the reform party for the 2000 presidency. "Viewers' Views," in this segment, Terence Smith reported what NewsHour viewers would like presidential candidates to address in the coming election year. Among the most common issues were: campaign finance, health care, foreign policy, education and the budget/debt. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6548

    "Price of Freedom," the segment began with an Ian Williams of ITN report on the evacuation of UN workers and journalists from Dili, East Timor, followed by a Jim Lehrer conversation in which Charles Costello of the Carter Center described first-hand evidence of collusion between the militia and the Indonesian police force and explained how the police could stop the violence if ordered to do so by President Habibie. He discussed whether the international community is likely to step in, whether Indonesia will peacefully grant East Timor independence, and how the UN Security Council is going to react. "Back to Berlin," a Spencer Michaels background report on the history of Germany on the tenth anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall, looking at how the once-divided Germany has strengthened under reunification and why the government has decided to relocate from Bonn to Berlin. Margaret Warner followed with a taped discussion with four European journalists: Hugo Young of The Guardian, Thomas Wroblewski of Wprost in Warsaw, Dominique Moisi of the French Institute for International Relations in Paris and Josef Joffe of Suddeutsche Zeitung in Munich. The four exchanged views on how they perceive the government's move, whether it signifies the German desire for a more eastern country, and the role that geography plays in European history and politics. "The Overworked American," the segment began with a Kwame Holman report on how Americans' rigorous work schedule is increasing stress in their lives. This was followed by an Elizabeth Farnsworth conversation, in which Walter Olson of the Manhattan Institute, Kathleen Gerson of New York University, Geoffrey Godbey of Penn State University and Paula Rayman of Radcliffe Public Policy Institute discussed whether Americans are working more hours than in previous decades or whether they are just working faster, why women are working more and how this sacrifices families' closeness. They explained how a decline in unions is giving rise to fewer worker's rights and whether people need to change their work ethics to improve the overall well being of society. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6549

    "Viacom Megamerger," a Betty Ann Bowser background report on the proposed Viacom/CBS merger, which would be the biggest media merger in history if approved by the FCC. Jim Lehrer followed with a conversation in which media correspondent Ken Auletta and entertainment consultant Bruce Liechtman discussed the merger. Auletta explained why media companies are driven by the "bigger is better" presumption, and Leichtman opined whether both companies will benefit from the merger, looking at the successes and failures of the ABC/Disney merger. The two discussed how media profits lay in the syndication business, why Viacom and CBS are complementary, whether the public will benefit from the merger, and whether the merger will be blocked by the FCC. "Beat the Clock," a Kwame Holman report on Congress's struggle to pass thirteen appropriation's bills allocating $538 billion of federal funding before the month's end. The report featured interviews with senators throughout the summer on whether the funds are being divided fairly among the various committees and on whether the bills are likely to pass. "Price of Freedom," a Tom Bragby of ITN report on the continuing clashes in East Timor, where students protest for their region's independence against the local militia, followed by a Margaret Warner discussion with Indonesia's ambassador to the UN Makarim Wibisono and Portugal's ambassador to the UN Antonio Monteiro on the clashes, including why Indonesia is not controlling the militia in East Timor, the difficulty of the process of carrying out independence for the region, Indonesia's plan to send more police to Dili to contain the militia, and whether the Indonesian government will allow an UN peacekeeping force in the region. "Big Picture," David Gergen of US News & World Report spoke to Dr. Ben Carson on his book, "Big Picture." The acclaimed neurosurgeon first discussed his philosophy that people are capable of doing whatever they imagine and shared his life purpose to help people realize their true potential. He discussed the role of self-perception on one's achievements, the need to elevate expectations to achieve, and how he turned his life around at the age of ten when he began to visualize himself achieving his goals. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6550

    "Newsmaker," a Margaret Warner newsmaker interview with East Timorese independence leader Jose Ramos-Horta. Following a brief background profile on Horta, the 1996 Nobel Peace Prize winner discussed the conditions in East Timor where 250,000 have been forced to flee the region in escape of the violent Indonesian police, why sending more Indonesian police to East Timor would only exacerbate the problem, the betrayal of the international community for its inaction in East Timor, and his hopes for independence for the region. "Clemency Controversy," a Betty Ann Bowser background report on a clemency deal struck yesterday between the US government and twelve pro-independent Puerto Rican militants who were imprisoned for involvement in terrorist acts twenty years ago. Elizabeth Farnsworth then spoke with Rep. Vito Fossella (R-NY) and assemblyman Ruben Diaz (D-NY) about the deal. Fossella shared his view that a clemency deal for terrorists sends a negative message to other terrorists and Diaz explained that the individuals are not terrorists and that they renounced violence years ago. The two debated why the deal was struck now, whether the clemency deal was a political move, why the first lady asked that the deal be rescinded, and how Congress will handle the matter with testimony next week. "Cable Heavyweight," On ESPN's twentieth anniversary, Terence Smith traced the success of the all-sports cable network that is consistently outperforming the major networks as cable is making its way in mainstream television. The report looked at how sports has been changed through television, why more Americans are interested in sports, which is taking a greater role in their every day lives, and why sports television is only likely to expand in coming years. "Vietnam Reflections," this Ann Taylor Flemming essay considered how different documentaries have depicted Vietnam, noting the films' similarities in identifying the lasting unease the war left on many people's lives, which are all told through personal experiences. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6551

    "Price of Freedom," an Ian Williams of ITN report on the devastating conditions in Dili, East Timor after pro-Indonesian gangs burned and looted the region that voted for its independence last week. "Newsmaker," a Jim Lehrer newsmaker interview with national security advisor Samuel Berger. He elaborated on the situation in East Timor, including the failure of the Indonesian military to handle the situation, at what point a UN force will be deployed to the region, President Clinton's involvement in the conflict, and how Indonesia will be financially distraught as a result of the events in East Timor. "Newsmaker," a Margaret Warner newsmaker conversation with former Sen. John Danforth, the recently appointed independent investigator for the events in Waco, after recent evidence uncovered that the FBI did use incendiary devices in the siege of the Branch Davidian compound six years ago. He explained why he took the case, what issues the case will be addressing, why he will not investigate specific judgement calls, how he will carry out the investigation, and his hope that the investigation will be expedient. "Teacher Shortage," the segment featured a segment from the PBS documentary to air this week, "The Merrow Report: Teacher Shortage--False Alarm?", looking at how many teachers are being hired to teach subjects in which they are not qualified in light of a national teacher shortage. The report visited a school in Georgia suffering from a teacher shortage and that lacks proper laws that would prohibit teachers to teach "out of field" classes. "Presidential Player," the segment began with a report including segments from Bill Bradley's presidential campaign launch in his home town of Crystal City, Missouri. Elizabeth Farnsworth then spoke to Washington Post correspondent Thomas Edsall on the content of Bradley's campaign and which issues he is focusing on, including campaign finance and gun control, whether he has successfully differentiated himself from Gore, his numbers in the polls, and whether he is successfully reviving the liberal Democratic party. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6552

    "What Price for Freedom?" the segment began with an Ian Williams of ITN interview with Indonesian President Habibie in which he discussed how the situation in East Timor is under control and why he will not allow UN peace keeping forces in the region, followed by an Elizabeth Farnsworth conversation in which Douglas Paal, Sidney Jones, and Jim Hoagland exchanged views on whether Habibie has the police under control, the role that the UN should take in containing the violence, how the UN should get the Indonesian government to allow an international force, and whether the UN should commit troops to the regions without Indonesia's approval. "Political Wrap," Jim Lehrer spoke to syndicated columnist Mark Shields and Wall Street Journal columnist Paul Gigot about the week's political events, including Janet Reno's appointment of Sen. John Danforth as independent counsel for the investigation of Waco, Clinton's grant of clemency to twelve Puerto Rican militants, Bill Bradley's launch of his presidential campaign for 2000, Bradley's growing popularity in the polls, and whether he can defeat Al Gore in the primaries. "The Sun City Choice," this Susan Dentzer report looked at alternative choices to end-of-life care by visiting the retirement community Sun City, Arizona, where hospital care for the elderly is being replaced by hospice care after it was reported that expensive hospital care does not extend dying people's life and only makes it less spiritually and physically comfortable than it is at one's home. "Leonardo's Horse," this Nick Glass of ITN report visited the 15-ton bronze horse outside New York City constructed as a tribute to Leonardo DiVinci and created from DiVinci's own drafts. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6553

    "Stopping the Killing," a Robert Moore of ITN report on recent squabbling in the UN over the makeup of the peacekeeping force to be deployed to East Timor, followed by a Margaret Warner conversation in which Sir Jeremy Greenstock, the British ambassador to the United Nations and Francesc Vendrell, deputy personal representative of the secretary general for East Timor discussed the previous day's Security Council meeting, where a resolution for the task force was debated. They said that forces should arrive within four days, discussed the extent to which Indonesians are harming East Timor refugees, and whether New Zealanders, Australians and Americans will be part of the task force. "APEC: Road to Recovery," Spencer Michaels began the segment with a background report looking at Asia's attempt to recover from its economic decline and how those countries anticipate positive growth in the coming year. Then, Golman Sachs analyst Robert Hormats, AFL-CIO economist Thea Lea, and University of California professor Godwin Wong discussed how Indonesia's economy is being affected by the current crisis in East Timor, the need for political, banking and labor reform in many Asian countries, how a stronger yen and increased growth in Japan could bolster other Asian economies, and why China needs to become a member of the WTO to boost its, and the global, economy. "Busing Halt," following the recent decision of a North Carolina federal court judge to cease race-based school busing, the NewsHour reprised a previously aired segment about the struggle over busing in Charlotte, North Carolina, including historic problems over busing minorities into all-white schools; whether the busing should end; racial division on SAT scores; and whether racial quotas should exist within the school system. "Dialogue," David Gergen of US News & World Report spoke to inventor Ray Kurzweil on his book, "The Age of Spiritual Machines." First, he discussed his own inventions, including a synthesizer and reading machine, and then explained his theory that one day machines will outsmart humans and be a thousand times more powerful than the human brain. He predicted future machine capabilities, including being able to fully understand the workings of the human brain, duplicating human emotions, and ruling the world. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6554

    "Stopping the Killing," a Mark Austin of ITN report on the devastating conditions in East Timor, where some pro-independent East Timorese found safety off the shores in Australia and those reluctant to leave the island found temporary refuge in the forests. Margaret Warner spoke by phone to American freelance journalist Allan Nairn, who was taken prisoner in the East Timor city of Dili by the Indonesian military. He described the conditions of his place of detainment, how the local militia has joined forces with the Indonesian military against the pro-independent East Timorese, the extent of his interrogation by local police, and why they are allowing him to speak to the press on his cell phone. "Newsmaker," Margaret Warner continued the conversation on the crisis in East Timor with a newsmaker interview with Secretary of State Albright. She explained that the root of the problem is in the relationship between the regular military and the militia and discussed how Indonesia reacted to the brutal behavior of the local military by promising to send new military to the region, the UN's response in sending an international peacekeeping force to the region, why Indonesia will have no part in deciding the makeup of the force, and how this will serve as a test for the UN in crises situations. "Fearsome Floyd," a Tom Bearden report from Daytona Beach on the looming threat of Hurricane Floyd as it continues to gain strength off the Florida coast, looking at the local rescue efforts taking place to help ensure safety in the area and talking to people about whether they are prepared for the storm. Elizabeth Farnsworth followed with a conversation with deputy director of the National Hurricane Center Max Mayfield, in which he discussed the storm's immense strength as a category 4 hurricane, the likely path of the hurricane, the danger of inland flooding, and why Floyd gained such strength. "Campaign Agenda," a pre-taped Jim Lehrer conversation with child advocate representatives Starr Parker, Virgil Gulker, Bill Stephney, Margaret Brodkin, and Steve Culbertson on what issues they would like to see presidential candidates address in the coming year. The group agreed that there is a deep need to give a sense of belonging to children across the country and a need for a collective vision embraced by a president. Other issues discussed included government larsony, a better distribution of wealth, more non-profit funding, the role of the federal government, and the need for an empathetic and sincere leader. "From East to West," this Richard Rodriguez essay considered the art of photographer Carlton Watkins whose work is being exhibited in the San Francisco of Museum of Art and who is best-known for bringing awareness of the beauty of the West to a society then divided by the North and South. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6555

    "Fearsome Floyd," a Jim Lehrer conversation with Max Mayfield, the deputy director of the National Hurricane Center in Miami, on the approaching hurricane Floyd, which is expected to hit landfall in Wilmington at midnight. He discussed the anticipated track of the storm, the rescue efforts taking place by towns on the eastern seaboard, the danger of flooded roadways, and the expected rainfall from the storm. "Peacekeeping," the segment began with a Lindsey Hilsum of ITN report from Australia on the peacekeeping troops preparing to leave for East Timor, followed by a Margaret Warner interview with Australia's foreign minister Alexander Downer on the makeup and size of the force, when it will be deployed to East Timor, why this troop has a strong morale and a clear mandate in the mission, the short-term and long-term prospect for East Timor's independence, and how this multi-national force will have the upper-hand in East Timor. "Corruption," this Simon Marks report examined three scandals in Russia that involve money laundering by top Russian officials known as: The Bank of New York Scandal, The Credit Card Scandal, and The Aeroflot Scandal. All three are being investigated by Russian investigators and two directly involve the Yeltsin family. "Outbreak," the segment began with a Susan Dentzer background report on the recent New York outbreak of encephalitis, a disease carried by mosquitos that can cause swelling of the brain and sometimes death in humans. Elizabeth Farnsworth followed with perspective from New York's commissioner of public health Neil Cohen and research entomologist at the Center for Disease Control Roger Nasci, in which they discussed the seriousness of the outbreak, New York's efforts to combat further cases by covering the city and surrounding areas with a pesticide, the disease's symptoms, including headache, fever, lethargy and confusion, how many more cases are anticipated in the coming month, how certain conditions can promote the spread of the disease, and how the city's public health service did an outstanding job in identifying the disease early. "Back to School," US Poet Laureate Robert Pinksy read a back to school poem as schools across the nation resumed classes. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6556

    "Fearsome Floyd," Elizabeth Farnsworth spoke to governors James Hunt Jr. of North Carolina and James Hodges of South Carolina on the damage left by hurricane Floyd. Gov. Hunt explained how North Carolina is experiencing its worst flooding in history and Hodges said his state was more fortunate and only experienced minor flooding, wind damage and power outages. The two discussed how the hurricane wiped out many cotton crops, the need for a better multi-state evacuation system, and the need for more government aid to help the displaced families. "Terror in Texas," a Tom Bearden report on the previous day's shooting at Wedgewood Baptist Church in Fort Worth, Texas, where a 47-year old man opened fire on a group of teenagers in hymn and let off a pipe bomb killing eight people and leaving three others seriously injured before turning the gun on himself. "Newsmaker," a Jim Lehrer conversation with Richard Holbrooke, the new US ambassador to the United Nations. He explained why the US is sending a non-combat troop to East Timor and how only Australian and Asian troops will have authority to shoot, discussed whether 7,500 troops is enough to cease the violence in the region, why Indonesian President Habibie finally agreed to allow a peacekeeping force in East Timor, and compared the situation to Kosovo. "Tough Campaign," a Margaret Warner background report looking at former Vice President Dan Quayle's presidential campaign, who after a poor performance in the Iowa straw polls, has focused all his attention on New Hampshire, followed by a discussion in which Dan Balz of the Washington Post assessed Quayle's campaign. He described how the public has reacted politely to his campaign, his likeliness to lose the Republican nomination, and whether he is looking to find personal vindication. "Traditions," this Lee Hochberg of Oregon Public Television report examined how Reform Judaism, known for its disdain for Jewish tradition, is now incorporating many of the former practices into its Sabbath, including more Hebrew and song, the use of a prayer shawl and a kosher diet. According to the report, the reform is causing controversy within the division between members who don't feel they need tradition to be considered Jewish. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6557

    "Newsmaker," following a Spencer Michaels background report on US-North Korean sanctions, a conversation in which Margaret Warner spoke to former Secretary of Defense William Perry, who recently completed a classified report on North Korea and its nuclear status. He explained why the US decided to ease sanctions on the country in return for the country's agreement to end missile testing and discussed how the US would react if the agreement is breached, his optimism over normalizing US-North Korean diplomatic, trade and economic relations, and North Korea's nuclear and missile capacities. "Digital Divide," this Jeffrey Kaye of KCET Los Angeles report looked at how the Internet is alienating those without computer access due to race, geography, or economic class and causing a "digital divide" across America. The report detailed the FCC's initiative to implement computer access in all schools through a new tax program and the need for more private-public partnerships to increase communication technology. "Political Wrap," Jim Lehrer spoke to Wall Street Journal columnist Paul Gigot and Boston Globe columnist Tom Oliphant about the week's political events. The two focused on the passage of campaign finance reform in the House, including the terms of the legislation, which would ban soft money donations, why the bill is likely to fail in the Senate, and Sen. Mitch McConnell's role in campaign finance reform. The rest of the conversation focused on President Clinton's clemency deal with Puerto Rican militants and the ensuing controversy over the decision by Republicans. "Following Floyd," a Tom Bearden report on the Red Cross's efforts to handle the aftermath of Hurricane Floyd, which left millions of East Coast residents without shelter, food or water. The feature looked at how volunteers became frustrated with the disaster relief mission and the challenges faced due to storm's unpredictable path. "The Sopranos," a Roger Rosenblatt essay on the HBO's hit-series "The Sopranos," which was praised for being a true depiction of the mob told through the life of a man born into that lifestyle and from which he was unable to exit. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6558

    "After Floyd," Jim Lehrer spoke to North Carolina governor Jim Hunt on the damage left by Hurricane Floyd and its devastating floods, which have killed livestock, buried houses and damaged telephone and power plants. He expressed his concern over the situation and pleaded to citizens across America to donate funds to the relief efforts, which will be controlled by the Red Cross. "Asian Views," this segment began with an Ian Williams of ITN update report on the current situation in Dili, East Timor, where Australian troops continue to arrive to the region, followed by a Terence Smith conversation in which Japanese wire service bureau chief Kazuyoshi Nishikura, freelance journalist Bin Braingin and Korean daily paper bureau chief Yun-Joo discussed how Asia is being effected by the crisis in East Timor. They explained how Asian countries rely on the Indonesian economy, their fear over worsening tensions between Asian countries and Indonesia and concern over the US foreign policy over international crises, and the need for a unified military operation in Asia. "Funding the F-22," this Kwame Holman report looked at the current controversy on Capitol Hill over defense spending legislation passed in the Senate and rejected in the House that would allocate $3 billion to Lockheed Martin to build the fighter jet F-22. The House disagreed on the policy, which many said gave too much money to one program, and Lockheed Martin continues to lobby for its contract. "Campaign Agenda," Elizabeth Farnsworth spoke to four novelists about what issues they would like presidential candidates to address in the coming year. Winston Groom, Gish Jen, Charles Johnson and Annie Proulx shared their views, which included poverty, rural America, a cultural vision for the next century, tax reform, individual privacy, nuclear waste, bio-ethics and a redefinition of the American spirit. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6559

    "Taiwan Temblor," a Tom Bragby of ITN report on the deadly earthquake that struck Taiwan during the night, killing over 1,700 and toppling many buildings across the island. Elizabeth Farnsworth then spoke to Stephen Chen of the Taipei Economic and Cultural Office in Washington, who updated the conditions in Taiwan, estimating a $100 billion cost in rebuilding the region and discussed the need for expertise in rescue efforts and how neighboring countries are aiding in the recovery. US Geological Survey geophysicist Robert Wesson explained how the Philippine sea plate and the Eurasia plate shifted and caused the quake, why it was much stronger and more damaging than previous quakes, and why it occurred on the West, more populated side. "School of the Americas," this Tom Bearden report examined The School For The Americas, founded to teach South, Central and North American soldiers about combat and the military, looking at why controversy has brewed over the schools intentions, which some say are to turn soldiers into assassins and murderers. Then Margaret Warner spoke to Army secretary Louis Caldera and Rep. Joseph Moakley (D-Mass) about upcoming testimony over government funding of the school, debating whether the school breeds human rights violators, whether Central and Latin America need to revolutionize their militaries, and the likelihood that the school will lose its US funding in coming years. "Taking Back the Neighborhood," the segment aired a portion of a documentary to be aired on PBS this week, entitled "Seeking Solutions." Reporter Hedrick Smith visited Blue Hills, Missouri, a Kansas City suburb renown for its heavy drug problem, where the community has banded together to fight crime, clean-up the drug haven neighborhoods, and ensure a safe place for children and adults to live. "Code of the Street," David Gergen of US News & World Report spoke with Elijah Anderson on his book, "Code of the Street: Decency, Violence and the Moral Life of the Inner City." He discussed how minorities in poverty, at a point he calls "ground zero," are guided by a set of moral principles that keeps them from breaking out of the violent lifestyle. He discussed how characters in his book have had the will to escape poverty on the streets and said that it is also possible for other minorities if they have the guts to break the cycle. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6560

    "Taking on Tobacco," the segment began with remarks made by President Clinton at the Rose Garden on the Justice Department's civil suit filed against the tobacco industry, followed by an Elizabeth Farnsworth discussion in which independent litigation researcher Mary Aronson discussed the terms of the suit, which would require the industry to pay millions of dollars to taxpayers and to government funded programs, including Medicare. Soloman Smith Barney analyst Martin Feldman explained that the government found the tobacco industry guilty in conspiring to withhold information from the American people. The two discussed the impact of this case, why the ruling may lead to hefty individual claims, and the effect of the suit on tobacco stock prices. "Newsmaker," Following a Kwame Holman background report on Gen. Barry McCaffrey's call for a billion more dollars to be funded towards fighting Colombia's drug war, Jim Lehrer spoke to Colombian President Andres Pastrana about his plea this week to the United Nations for an additional $3.5 billion dollars. Pastrana discussed how he would like to spend half of the money on narcotics trafficking and the other half on improving the country's infrastructure, why the problem is global and calls for international aid, why Colombia's problems with the insurgency needs to be solved through political means and not through force, and his optimism over the future of his country. "Y2K Bug," on the release of the Senate's final one-hundred-day report on the millennium bug, Paul Solman joined the report's authors, Sen. Robert Bennett (R-UT) and Sen. Christopher Dodd (D-Conn), to discuss their findings. They explained that the main trouble spots lie in the health care industry, especially in hospital systems and machinery capability on January 1, 2000, discussed why flying is safe on the millennium and the threat of an outbreak of panic, and assured that the problem is not very severe for Americans. "Combative Candidate," a Terence Smith background report on Pat Buchanan's possible run for the Reform Party nomination in the 2000 elections, followed by a conversation in which journalists Thomas Edsall, Elizabeth Arnold and Ron Brownstein exchanged views on why Buchanan transferred parties, whether he is likely to obtain the nomination despite his ultra-conservative social viewpoints, why Buchanan can make bold claims other candidates could not, and why people are more apathetic about this election than previous ones. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6561

    "Veto Politics," the segment began with a Kwame Holman report that included excerpts from the day's Rose Garden press conference held by President Clinton in which he vetoed the Republican-proposed $792 billion tax cut, which he said takes away funding from Medicare, Social Security and education. Elizabeth Farnsworth followed with a conversation in which Rep. David Bonior(D-MI) explained why the tax cuts would only increase interest rates and hurt society and Rep. JC Watts(R-OK ) shared his skepticism over the two parties compromising on a tax bill the president would approve. The two debated whether the thirteen appropriations bills will pass by the month's end. "Newsmaker," Jim Lehrer spoke to Larry Summers on the state of the economy. The newly elected treasury secretary first commented on the president's veto of the tax cut bill, saying that the president would be willing to engage in talks with the Republicans over Medicare. He then discussed the money laundering scandal in Russia, why the US has a vested interest in the Russian economy, his thoughts on the strength of the Japanese yen, his reluctance to tamper with the dollar's strength, and his agenda for the rest of the year. "Peacekeeping," an Ian Williams of ITN News report looking at the struggle for peace in East Timor a day after Australian peacekeeping troops arrived in the region to eradicate violence under the auspices of the UN. According to the report, by tomorrow the Indonesian police and militia will leave the region and East Timor will begin a path towards stability. "Campaign Snapshot," a Terence Smith report tracing Republican presidential hopeful Steve Forbes' campaign tour, followed by a conversation with Washington Post reporter Michael Powell on Forbes' campaign. He described the manner of his campaign trail as orderly and controlled, discussed which issues he is focusing on, including abortion and religion, and opined whether his efforts are being met with public approval. "Generosity of Slowness," this Clarence Page essay considered how new, speedy technology eradicates the personal value many find in daily life activities such as walking down the street, browsing and shopping. [56 minutes]

  • Episode #6562

    "Peacekeeping," an Ian Williams of ITN report on the deployment of the United Nations Australian-led peacekeeping force to East Timor, where it began its mission to stabilize the region after Indonesian troops retaliated against the people's vote for independence. "Newsmaker," an Elizabeth Farnsworth newsmaker interview with the European Union's commissioner of external affairs Christopher Patten on Europe's role in international peacekeeping, discussing the guidelines under which European troops become involved in external conflicts. He ex