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  • NOVA scienceNOW

How hard is it to predict the future of technology? | NOVA scienceNOW | PBS

Duration: 01:04
Program: NOVA scienceNOW
Broadcast Date: Nov. 14, 2012

Watch NOVA scienceNOW: What WIll the Future Be Like? at 10PM on PBS. www.pbs.org Mobile phones that read your mind? Video games that can cure cancer? Wearable robots that give you the strength of Ironman? David Pogue predicts which technologies will transform daily life for you —and your grandkids. They're already taking shape in laboratories around the world — and gadgets that once were purely science fiction are on the verge of becoming a common reality. Pogue visits with the innovative engineers and computer scientists working to create thought-controlled video games, robotic exoskeletons and virtual reality that seamlessly integrates with the real world through lifelike 3D holograms that will not only respond to touch, but feel like real objects. What technological hurdles must engineers and computer scientists overcome before robots, mind-readers and holograms are all around us? And what will it mean to us as humans if we become even more entrenched in a 24/7 digital world? Then, computer scientist Adrien Treuille describes how his groundbreaking games can harness the combined efforts of video gamers around the world to help cure diseases. One program, FoldIt, turns protein- folding — a biological mystery that's difficult for even the most powerful computers to solve —into a puzzle that gamers can master easily, and they're already making medical breakthroughs.

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Post Date: November 14, 2012