2018 World Food Prize

Oct 18, 2018  | 1 hr 47 min  | 2018

Funding for the 2018 World Food Prize has been provided by Friends, the Iowa Public Television Foundation. And a grant from the W.T. and Edna M. Dahl Trust.

A crisp, autumn evening in America's Heartland, leaders from across the globe converging in Des Moines, Iowa's capital city, honoring agricultural breakthroughs and discussing initiatives for alleviating hunger issues. Moments ago, guests from across the world climbing the steps of the State Capitol for a night of dialogue and honoring achievements all culminating with the 2018 World Food Prize ceremony.

(music)

Dean Borg: Welcome inside the Statehouse chambers of the Iowa Capitol. Tonight, Des Moines hosting hundreds of global leaders from many professions all focusing on world hunger issues. Hello, I'm Dean Borg. For more than three decades now the World Food Prize evaluating and honoring hunger fighters and their agricultural achievements. Tonight we're remembering Iowan Norman Borlaug's legacy, spotlighting the work of young Americans in the agricultural sector and honoring two World Food Prize Laureates, both careers elevating issues of maternal and child undernutrition. Tonight's kaleidoscope of dialogue, honors and music begins now.

(music)

(trumpet fanfare)

(trumpet fanfare)

(trumpet fanfare)

Ladies and gentlemen, welcome to the 2018 World Food Prize Laureate Award Ceremony. Now, please welcome the World Food Prize Council of Advisors. Ms. Margaret Catley-Carlson of Canada.

(applause)

Dr. W. Ronnie Coffman of Cornell University.

(applause)

Sir Gordon Conway of Imperial College in London.

(applause)

Dr. Louise Fresco, President of Wageningen University in the Netherlands.

The President of Auburn University, Dr. Steven Leath.

(applause)

(applause)

From Des Moines, Dr. Rachel Ruan McLean.

(applause)

President of Iowa State University, Dr. Wendy Wintersteen.

(applause)

The Chairman of the World Food Prize Council of Advisors, Mr. Paul Schickler.

(applause)

Now, join me in welcoming past World Food Prize Laureates. The 1996 Laureate from India, Dr. Gurdev Khush.

(applause)

From India, the 2000 Laureate, Dr. Surinder Vasal.

(applause)

Dr. Per Pinstrup-Andersen from Denmark, the 2001 Laureate.

(applause)

The 2002 World Food Prize Laureate, a native of Cuba from the United States, Dr. Pedro Sanchez.

(applause)

From the United Nations, the 2003 Laureate, Catherine Bertini.

(applause)

Former Minister of Agriculture of Brazil, the 2006 World Food Prize Laureate, His Excellency Alysson Paolinelli.

(applause)

The 2007 Laureate, a graduate of Purdue University, Dr. Philip Nelson.

(applause)

A native of Ethiopia, Dr. Gebisa Ejeta, the 2009 Laureate and Chair of the Laureate Selection Committee.

(applause)

From the United States, the 2010 Laureate, Reverend David Beckmann.

(applause)

Dr. Robert Fraley, the 2013 Laureate from the United States.

(applause)

The 2014 Laureate from India and Mexico, Dr. Sanjaya Rajaram.

(applause)

From Bangladesh, the 2015 Laureate, Sir Fazle Hasan Abed.

(applause)

Now welcome the four 2016 Laureates. Dr. Maria Andrade of Cape Verde.

(applause)

From the United States, Dr. Howarth Bouis.

(applause)

Dr. Jan Low from the United States.

(applause)

And representing Uganda, Dr. Robert Mwanga.

(applause)

(trumpet fanfare)

Please welcome representing the leadership of the state of Iowa, the President of the Iowa Senate, Senator Charles Schneider and Senator Matt McCoy.

(applause)

From the Iowa congressional delegation, Senator Charles Grassley.

(applause)

And Congressman Steve King.

(applause)

At this time please join us in welcoming our distinguished national and international guests. The 2018 Norman Borlaug Field Award Recipient from the United States, Dr. Matthew Rouse.

(applause)

The Honorable Ruth O'Niago, the 2017 African Food Prize winner from Kenya.

(applause)

Dr. Nteranya Sanginga, Director General of the International Institute of Tropical Agriculture in Nigeria, the 2018 recipient of the African Food Prize.

(applause)

The head of the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization in the United States, Vimlendra Sharan.

(applause & music)

The head of the British Consulate General of Chicago, Her Majesty's Consul General, Mr. John Saville.

(applause & music)

The Honorable Ted McKinney, Under Secretary of Agriculture of the United States.

(applause & music)

Her Excellency Gerda Verburg, Assistant Secretary General of the United Nations and Former Minister of Agriculture of the Netherlands.

(applause & music)

And now please welcome tonight's distinguished special guests. The Former President of Nigeria, His Excellency Olusegun Obasanjo.

(applause & music)

Please welcome -- Vice President of Peru, Her Excellency Mercedes Araoz.

(applause & music)

 

(trumpet fanfare)

Please welcome the World Food Prize Laureate Party -- the Chair of the World Food Prize Foundation, John Ruan III and Foundation President, Ambassador Kenneth Quinn.

(applause & music)

And now please welcome the 2018 World Food Prize Laureates. From the United Kingdom, Dr. Lawrence Haddad and Dr. David Nabarro.

(applause & music)

(applause & music)

(applause & music)

(applause & music)

-- tonight's ceremony, please welcome the Governor of the state of Iowa, The Honorable Kim Reynolds.

(applause & music)

(applause & music)

(trumpet fanfare)

(trumpet fanfare)

(music)

As eyes once again turn to Des Moines for the presentation of the World Food Prize, it is edifying to reflect on the fact that when the Iowa territory was first open for settlement in 1834, the global population had just reached 1 billion. When Norman Borlaug and John Ruan Senior were born in 1914, the world population had only risen to 1.7 billion, an addition of 700 million people in 80 years. However, just 95 years later, when Dr. Borlaug passed away in 2009, there were 7 billion people on the face of the Earth, an increase of 5.3 billion more mouths to feed. As global population grows at this staggering rate, the battle against hunger struggles to keep up. It was a singular dedication to feeding this ever-expanding world that led to Norman Borlaug's vision of creating the World Food Prize.

Born on a small Iowa farm, Dr. Borlaug's pioneering work in Mexico to produce higher yielding strains of wheat ushered in the Green Revolution, preventing large scale famine in South Asia and earning him the title of the man who have saved more lives than any other person who has ever lived. Shortly after receiving the Nobel Peace Prize in 1970, Dr. Borlaug embarked on a mission to recognize and inspire those individuals who would lead the fight against world hunger. And in 1986, the General Foods World Food Prize was born. The first World Food Prize was awarded in 1986 to Dr. M.S. Swaminathan of India. However, just three short years later, the future of the World Food Prize was in serious doubt after corporate restructuring ended financial support for the prize. Dr. Borlaug would once again have to find a sponsor. This time his search would lead him back to Iowa and toward the formation of a partnership that would forever change the World Food Prize.

Noted businessman and philanthropist John Ruan Sr., who like Dr. Borlaug was born in a small Iowa town in 1914, had a long standing vision that Iowa be seen as the agricultural capital of America. Thus, a resonant chord was struck in Ruan and in 1990 he announced his intent to bring the prize to Iowa, thereby securing its future. Over the last decades, with the support of the Governor and the state legislature and its many donors, the prize has not only survived but flourished, especially under the direction of its new chairman, John Ruan III and Foundation President Ambassador Kenneth Quinn.

Fulfilling Norman Borlaug's vision, world leaders have called the World Food Prize the Nobel Prize for Food and Agriculture. The World Food Prize Laureates hail from countries around the world and have been at the forefront of the single greatest period of food production in all of human history. They are responsible for a diverse array of accomplishments, including dramatically improving rice production in Asia and Africa, the development of quality protein maize in Mexico, the eradication of pests and diseases, promoting and expanding the dairy and seed industries in India, reforming the food policy framework in China and countries in South Asia and North Africa, utilizing methods of microcredit, aquaculture and humanitarian belief to empower poor rural women, making deserts bloom in the Middle East, unveiling the promise of biotechnology and uplifting smallholder farmers out of poverty across Africa.

In conjunction with the presentation of the $250,000 prize in the magnificent Iowa State Capitol, each year the World Food Prize gathers international experts to address critical issues in global food security through its International Symposium known as the Borlaug Dialogue. Referred to as the premier conference in the world on global food security, it has featured speakers such as UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon, Prime Minister Tony Blair, Agrichairman Kofi Annan, Princess Iman bint Hussein and Bill Gates, who launched his multi-billion dollar initiative to uplift African agriculture in 2009 as well as smallholder farmers from Africa, Asia and Latin America. Other World Food Prize events have featured world leaders such as President Xi Jinping of China and U.S. Secretary of State Colin Powell.

As we celebrate the accomplishments of the Laureates who have uplifted the lives of tens of millions of people over the past decades, it is sobering to reflect on the fact that in 2046, when Iowa celebrates its bicentennial as a state, and the World Food Prize will observe its 60th anniversary, the global population will have just reached 9 billion. Whether we are able to sustainably and nutritiously feed all of these people is perhaps the greatest challenge the world has ever faced. It will be the next generations of laureates and global leaders who will determine whether we are able to fulfill Norman Borlaug's dictum enshrined in the magnificent World Food Prize Hall of Laureates, that food is the moral right of all who are born into this world.

With the legacies of Norman Borlaug and John Ruan Sr. to guide them, and the World Food Prize Laureates to inspire them, there is every reason to be optimistic. And so, thanks to the remarkable accomplishments of its Laureates, and the contributions of its founders, what began as one man's idea has grown to become the world's foremost award recognizing great accomplishments and inspiring even greater achievements in the fight to eradicate hunger and poverty in the 21st century.

(music)

(applause)

Ladies and gentleman, please welcome the President of the World Food Prize Foundation, Ambassador Kenneth M. Quinn.

(applause)

Ambassador Quinn: To everyone watching us on Iowa Public Television, watching the webcast around the world, welcome. Welcome to the 2018 World Food Prize Laureate Award Ceremony. Governor Reynolds, thank you so very much on behalf of John and Janice Ruan, my wife Le Son, all of us at the World Food Prize, to you and First Gentleman Kevin Reynolds for presiding tonight's ceremony. Thank you to the bipartisan leadership of the Iowa legislature, Senator Charles Schneider, Minority Leader Matt McCoy, Senator Annette Sweeney and Representative Zach Nunn. Thank you for the incredible privilege of holding our award ceremony here in this magnificent building over the last 19 years.

Quinn: We're so honored to have Her Excellency, the Vice President of Peru, Mercedes Araoz and the special guest of honor as well, His Excellency General Olusegun Obasanjo, Former President of Nigeria, former member of the World Food Prize Council of Advisors here with us tonight. Special welcome to Senator Grassley and Mrs. Grassley for being here. Congressman King, thank you so very much for being here. And I want to have a special word of welcome to Tom Donohue and Suzanne Clark from the U.S. Chamber of Commerce being here tonight. I know that's very special to John Ruan III because he was the Chairman of the U.S. Chamber. John and I have had almost a 20 year partnership building upon his father and Dr. Borlaug's legacy and I am forever grateful for the opportunity, John, you have given me and for what you and your family have done for the World Food Prize. John, please stand up so we can recognize you and show our appreciation.

(applause)

Quinn: As Norman Borlaug always said, there would not be a World Food Prize except for the generosity of the Ruan family. Now, to commemorate Norman Borlaug's presence we keep his chair empty. This is where Norm always sat during the ceremony. But we're so pleased that we have members of the Borlaug family here with us tonight. Jeanie Borlaug Laube, Julie Borlaug, thank you so much for being here. Thank you for all that you're doing to carry forward your father and your grandfather's legacy in fighting hunger around the world.

(applause)

Quinn: This is the part of the ceremony where we have a moment of inspiration. To set the tone for the evening and to highlight the achievements of our Laureates, Dr. Haddad, Dr. Nabarro, just when in 2010 your efforts to enhance nutrition and fight malnutrition were gaining urgency, there was an event that took place that year in Johannesburg, South Africa, Dr. Haddad, where you were born and that event was the World Cup. And during the opening ceremony of that event, an internationally acclaimed opera singer, a man who had sung at most of the world's great opera houses, in front of kings and queens, presidents and popes, premiered a song. And that song more than any other work we could find captures the achievements of our two Laureates. That song was Save the Children, Save Their Lives. That man who performed it was Iowa native Simon Estes. I talked to Simon and he volunteered to be here tonight to sing that song, to reprise that performance just to honor you. He called me yesterday and he said he has come down with a cold, his voice had broken and he could not perform. I was despondent because this was, I'm going to have to remove this segment from the program. I was sitting in the Symposium, I turned and I looked to my side and there was a young woman who had been touched by Dr. Borlaug, whose life had been influenced at an early age and I asked her if she might be willing to step in and allow you to hear those words. And she agreed to do that. So here to recite the words from Save the Children, Save Their Lives, please welcome Catherine Swoboda.

(music)

There is a child standing there, she is a world apart. When she turns around, she has a broken heart. Everything inside of her shows within her eye, and she looks at you and you just want to cry. With his mother at his side, hurt by what she sees, knowing that his future lies within her memories. Anyone to whom she turns looks at her in fear, so she holds her child and covers him with tears. Children are the dreams, the heart of our reality, they bring music to our souls. Let our tomorrows be giving meaning to this world like nothing else we know. Our greatest joy to live and watch them grow. Save the Children, Save Their Lives. Anyone knows you and I can save the children, save their lives. All we need to do is try. Save the Children, Save Their Lives. Everyone knows you and I can save the children, can save their lives. All we need to do is try.

(applause)

Quinn: Thank you for sharing those powerful words so eloquently. When Cathy was in high school she attended East High School just up the street here. She was a city kid, no background in agriculture. She got into the World Food Prize Youth Institute and met Dr. Borlaug and the next thing she knew she was in Brazil doing research on soybeans. That led her going to Iowa State University. She has got a master's degree in agronomy and she is on the faculty today at Iowa State University changing lives just as hers was changed. Now, I could tell you more details about her journey and our programs but I think you'll find it more interesting to watch this.

(music)

The Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Dr. Norman E. Borlaug and Iowa philanthropist John Ruan Sr. shared a vision and dream that students in every school in every state in America and around the world would learn about global food security and be inspired to commit their lives to combatting hunger and meeting the challenges of the 21st century. Since its beginnings in 1994 with just 14 Iowa students, World Food Prize Youth Education Programs have expanded nationally and now internationally and have grown to be recognized as among the most innovative in the world. The wide array of programs aims to educate and inspire the next generation of great scientific and humanitarian leaders, young women making up two-thirds of its participants. Each spring the World Food Prize Youth Institutes take place in 24 states on the campuses of land grant universities. At these state youth institutes, high school students and their teachers explore and learn about the ever-increasing worldwide demand for food and the complexity of issues that affect global food security. The Iowa Youth Institute, held in collaboration with Iowa State University and its College of Agriculture and Life Sciences in Ames, serves as the flagship for this experience with over 60% of Iowa high schools participating. To date, over $275,000 in scholarships to Iowa State have been awarded to students participating in the World Food Prize Youth Program.

Top students from the United States and abroad then travel to Des Moines each October with their high school teachers to participate as delegates in the Global Youth Institute where they are immersed in an exchange of ideas with the World Food Prize Laureates, international leaders and agricultural experts, research scientists, industry executives and heads of state leading the fight against hunger. Once these exceptional young men and women enter college, they become eligible to become a Wallace-Carver Fellow. This unique opportunity offers students paid internships that allow them to collaborate with prominent American scientists and policymakers at U.S. Department of Agriculture Research Centers and offices across the United States. From the more than 200 high school students who participate in the Global Youth Institute, each summer two dozen are selected for a two month long life changing experience as a Borlaug-Ruan International Intern. These students are immersed in new cultures and take on research assignments at leading agricultural research centers in Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Middle East. Students participate in original research projects with acclaimed international scientists, while getting a personal view of pressing food security issues and nutritional problems in poverty stricken villages of the developing world. The Borlaug-Ruan International Internship began in 1998 with just two students. This year, as we celebrate the 20th anniversary of this unparalleled experience, we can note that more than 320 high school students have had their lives redirected toward issues of confronting hunger and ensuring global food security.

The Borlaug-Ruan Internship Program is only possibly with the involvement and support of an array of international agricultural research centers around the globe. The renowned facilities provide mentors and real world experiences to our young interns that could not be replicated in any other way. Whether planting rice with farmers in the Philippines, working alongside scientists in China, hiking the Inca Ruins of Machu Picchu in Peru or discovering the wildlife in Africa, Borlaug Ruan Interns have a once in a lifetime opportunity to travel to a foreign country and learn about its history, culture and way of life. The impact of all of these programs is dramatic. Over 90% of participants pursue college majors in agricultural science or STEM related disciplines and 77% have careers in these same areas.

No matter which World Food Prize Youth Education Program a student participates in, one point is very clear, all of these experiences are truly transformational.

(music)

(applause)

Please welcome the 2000 World Food Prize Borlaug-Ruan International Intern Bian Li.

(applause & music)

Bian Li: I'd like to share with you my experience with the World Food Prize Youth Programs and how they changed my life. 20 years ago I was a shy 15 year old high school student from Ankeny, Iowa, not far from here. 20 years ago was also the first time I met Ambassador Quinn. It was his first year at the World Food Prize. And I participated in the Global Youth Institute and I wrote a paper on the logistics of food security. And I had to present my paper in front of Dr. Borlaug and that was a life changing experience. Afterwards he comes up to me and he gives me two thumbs up and that was the first of a life lesson. I realized that hey, if I can get a Nobel Peace Prize winner to give me two thumbs up I can probably do anything. And so that gave me the confidence to apply for the Borlaug-Ruan International Internship. That next summer in the year 2000 I was on a plane to Nairobi, Kenya and I spent the next two months with Dr. Z.R. Khan who is here today and I participated in interviews with rural women on the shores of Lake Victoria in the Kakamega Rainforest on the role of gender and the importance of equity and microfinance in poverty alleviation. What I learned was it takes a village, it takes an ecosystem and to grow strong yields you have to grow strong roots and soils matter. And after that it has been an amazing adventure, always taking the lessons that I learned from that summer and my interaction with Dr. Borlaug. I went on to pursue a degree in economics and then as an investment banker I learned the importance of financing. As an impact investor I learned the importance of mentorship, not just providing capital. And at MIT's Global Skill Program I learned the importance of supply chain and logistics and how do you actually build real sustainable ecosystems.

Bian Li: And in 2010 I came back full circle to the World Food Prize as the Director of Planning where I learned that at this stage where big ideas are born it is so important to involve all stakeholders and to make sure that all voices matter. And since then I have taken all of those lessons and as CEO and co-founder of the Hungry Lab we're using the ethos of Dr. Borlaug in creating a next generation technology platform to help educate and inspire and empower the next generation of problem solvers, the students who are the next generation of leaders, the startups who are the innovators and the change makers, the small business enterprises who are still the engines of job growth, the scientists who take their ideas from market to lab. And we're taking all of these lessons and we're combining them into a platform to help inspire and guide and mentor and create the village needed to sustain all of these organizations. And with that I'd like to conclude by saying that the most important lessons that Dr. Borlaug taught me were three simple words. And so after he gave me the two thumbs up I asked him, Dr. Borlaug, what advice would you give me as a high school student? And I thought that he would actually talk about the importance of food security and what he learned throughout his career. But he just looks at me and he puts his hand on my shoulder and he says, my dear, never give up. And that is the ethos of the spirit that we're using to build this. And I invite all of you to join us in this endeavor. And I'd like to close by saying thank you to the Ruan family, thank you to Ambassador Quinn, thank you to the whole global village that it takes to really make a difference. And with that, I want to say that one of the most memorable experiences that I've had was having the youth program. So thank you again and I look forward to working with you all.

(applause)

Bian Li: And one of the most memorable experiences that I had with the World Food Prize was receiving one of the two World Food Prize Youth awards, the John Chrystal Award and the Elaine Syzmoniak Award. And today I'd like to introduce two young women who are caring for their grandfather's legacies to present the awards. Dr. Rachel Ruan McLean, the granddaughter of John Ruan and Julie Borlaug, granddaughter of Dr. Norman Borlaug. Thank you.

(applause & music)

The first worldwide Ruan Intern Award is named for Iowa Agricultural Ambassador John Chrystal who spent decades during the Cold War learning greater understanding between the U.S. and the Soviet Union through agricultural exchanges. This year the recipient of the John Chrystal Intern Award is Hans Riensche. Hans is from Jesup, Iowa. He was a Borlaug-Ruan Intern at the Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences in Beijing, China. He is now a student at Iowa State University majoring in agricultural business and international agriculture.

(applause & music)

The second award was named for the late Iowa State Senator Elaine Syzmoniak who was a passionate supporter of the World Food Prize and who played an instrumental role in connecting Norman Borlaug and John Ruan Sr. in 1990. The recipient of the 2018 Elaine Syzmoniak award is Isabella Culotta from Ithaca, New York.

(applause)

Isabella was a Borlaug-Ruan Intern at the International Center for Integrated Mountain Development in Kathmandu, Nepal. She is now a student at Cornell University majoring in international agriculture and rural development.

(music & applause)

On behalf of our grandfathers it is truly an honor to represent their legacies and we know they would both be thrilled for each one of you and tell you to continue on the path as a hunger fighter. But they would also turn to the audience and they would remind all of us here that it is our responsibility to mentor these young people, to provide opportunities and support them through their careers. So thank you.

(applause)

Quinn: Jeanie and Julie, I'm sure both your grandfathers are looking down from the Green Revolution heaven with a big smile on their face. And weren't those two interns and Bian Li, weren't they fantastic and impressive. My goodness. Since our International Internship Program began in 1998 over 300 students just like them sent to research centers around the globe and especially pleased that tonight we are celebrating the 20th anniversary of the Borlaug-Ruan International Internship. We have here in the audience 18 scientists from 18 of those centers that serve as mentors to our interns. They are here as our guests to help us celebrate. Please join me in expressing our appreciation to those mentors.

(applause)

Quinn: There's one other group that participates in our youth programs that are just as critical to success, all of them, and that is the teachers. And thousands of students are involved in our programs and each of them receive an inspiration from their high school teachers or college teachers and I have to admit we have been remiss in not recognizing them before this. So I'm going to begin to make up for that tonight and I'm going to announce that we have a new annual award just for a teacher. It is called the World Food Prize Inspiring the Next Generation Award and it will be presented every year at this ceremony to one of the teachers from one of our youth education programs who had been especially dedicated encouraging students to emulate Dr. Borlaug. Now, most appropriately, here to present this year's first award, please welcome Norman Borlaug's daughter, a former teacher herself, Jeanie Borlaug Laube.

(applause)

The first World Food Prize Inspiring the Next Generation Award is presented to Associate Dean David Acker of the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences at Iowa State University.

(applause)

-- extraordinary educational leadership through his essential involvement since the 1998 World Food Prize Global Youth Institute, the Borlaug-Ruan International Internship Program and the Iowa Youth Institute as a central source of guidance, encouragement and insights from his own experiences. For 20 years, through his instruction, insights and inspiration, Dean David Acker has impacted more students in the World Food Prize programs than any other teacher or instructor. He has fulfilled the goals articulated by Norman Borlaug and John Ruan when they created the World Food Prize Youth Education Programs. As such, he is truly worthy to be the first recipient of the Inspiring the Next Generation Award. Please welcome David Acker.

(applause & music)

David, my father always considered himself a teacher. He loved teaching. I know he is deeply grateful for all that you have done to inspire the many thousands of students who have participated in our program. And from the heart we thank you so much and all of our teachers. We love you and keep up the good work.

(applause)

David Acker: I am deeply, deeply honored to receive this recognition and especially receiving it from a fellow teacher. Thank you, Jeanie. A shout out to all the teachers in the audience who make a difference every day. A shout out to the World Food Prize who through their Youth Institute is creating a vast army of future Norman Borlaug's. And a special shout out to all of my current and former Iowa State University students. You inspire me every day. Thanks so much.

(applause)

Quinn: I was at the first Youth Institute with Dean Acker, I looked over and he looked so young, I thought he might be a grad student or something but he was a professor. The problem is he still looks as young -- so here at this point in the program we want to set the tone for the Laureate recognition and we do that by having a musical performance. And tonight we have a truly remarkable musical ensemble. I heard them perform at Mount Vernon, George Washington's home and so taken with them I rushed up to the stage and I said, you've got to come to Des Moines. Well, they're here and they have a performance with a special connection for our Laureates. So please join me in welcoming the ensemble from Handel and Haydn Society in Boston.

(applause)

Thank you so much, Ambassador Quinn, distinguished guests, honored Laureates. The work that the World Food Prize recognizes seeks to provide crucial physical nourishment, the nourishment that George Frideric Handel sought to provide in his oratorio the Messiah is a different sort. You need charity giving, common themes are bound in this world. In fact, we are embodied by Handel himself who bequeathed the score of his work as well as an annual performance of it to benefit an orphanage that he was the governor of. The special connection that Ambassador Quinn references is of course our Laureates -- Handel lived in England, had most of his professional life in England and we thought this work would be perfect for tonight. And the aria of he shall feed his flock of course very appropriate for this event. The Handel and Haydn Society was founded in Boston in 1850 making us the oldest and longest running, continuously running arts organization in the country. We premiered the Messiah in the United States and this Christmastime we'll be performing it for the 165th consecutive year. So we feel like we have something to say about it and tonight we'd like to say it to you. So thank you so much. We're delighted to be here. Congratulations.

(music)

(applause)

(applause)

Please welcome the Assistant Secretary General of the United Nations and the coordinator of the Scaling Up Nutrition Movement, Her Excellency Gerda Verburg.

(applause & music)

Ladies and gentlemen, the World Food Prize did this year an excellent, excellent job for two reasons. Not only because they selected Dr. David Nabarro and Dr. Haddad, both great champions in the field of nutrition, as the Laureates for this year, but also because no, let me keep this for later, the second point. They are both leaders, great leaders in nutrition. They are both connectors of people. They bring people together. They look at problems as you need to look at challenges and they are able to create opportunities of bringing people together and solving the problem through people themselves giving ownership to people. They are both involved in the Scaling Up Nutrition Movement, a movement that is driven by 60 countries -- David Nabarro as the first coordinator, Lawrence Haddad as an active member of the executive committee of the Scaling Up Nutrition Movement and they are both champions for this movement because it is country owned and country driven. But they are also different in their leadership and what they are doing right now.

David Nabarro is focusing on food systems, transforming agriculture and food production into nutrition and sustainable food systems. Lawrence Haddad is bringing together the private sector and making them a contributor to also better nutrition. So that is the first reason. The second reason is that the jury of the World Food Prize and World Food Prize Foundation has decided to bring together for the future food security and nutrition security. I am aware of the last two years -- but I think it's now very clear and Norman Borlaug can be happy it is not only about food security right now, it is from now on about food and nutrition security as a pair that cannot be separated again and that is the future because it's not only about food as the fuel as David Nabarro said this morning, it is food and nutritious and healthy food can do for the body. Farmers need to get a fair price and consumers need to pay a fair price. It should be accessible and it should be affordable for everyone.

Ladies and gentlemen, I'm extremely proud to announce a message of the UN Deputy Secretary General Madam Amina Mohammed.

(applause)

Friends and colleagues, I'm really pleased to send greetings to the World Food Prize Ceremony and to congratulate this year's recipients, Dr. Lawrence Haddad and Dr. David Nabarro, my brother. Both men have been instrumental in advancing the cause of food security and mobilizing governments to address malnutrition, particularly among women and infants. Ending hunger is the objective of a sustainable development goal two, one of 17 interlinked and mutually supportive internationally agreed global goals that are designed to provide peace, prosperity and dignity for all people on a healthy planet. Achieving the goals cannot be accomplished piecemeal. Each goal is dependent on others. So tackling hunger has to be accomplished holistically, embracing poverty eradication, better education, empowering women and sustainably managing our environment. Tonight's recipients understand this and they have devoted their professional lives to getting governments and their partners to see the big picture. The goals are also dependent on partnerships among a wide range of stakeholders to make them a reality. Examples such as the Global Alliance for Improved Nutrition and the Scaling Up Nutrition Movement spearheaded respectively by Dr. Haddad and Dr. Nabarro represent a new and more effective way of achieving results that scale across the globe. I thank the World Food Prize Foundation for recognizing these two outstanding individuals and I congratulate both Dr. Haddad and Dr. Nabarro on this well-deserved award. I wish you a really rewarding ceremony.

(applause)

Quinn: We would be very grateful if you would convey to the Deputy Secretary General our great appreciation to her for sending that wonderful message to us. So now we have the mood set for the Laureate Award Presentation. We only have one more step. I've been to the Nobel Peace Prize and there's a big moment and the King of Norway issues a proclamation. So I said, what do we do we don't have a king of Iowa? But we do have a Governor. And we're so honored that she is with us tonight. During her time as Lieutenant Governor as a great friend and supporter of the World Food Prize and she has continued that interest, that involvement as Iowa's first female Governor. She has been a leader in promoting STEM education in our state and every year she has been with us at our Iowa Youth Institute, our Iowa Hunger Summit and our Laureate Award Ceremony. So now to issue the official Laureate proclamation it is my great personal privilege to introduce the 43rd Governor of Iowa, The Honorable Kim Reynolds.

(music and applause)

Governor Reynolds: Well, good evening. Ambassador Quinn, thank you for that nice introduction. And on behalf of all Iowans I want to extend the warmest possible welcome to all of our distinguished guests from around the world who have traveled to Des Moines to join us. Vice President Mercedes Araoz of Peru and Assistant Secretary Gerda Verburg we're especially honored to have your presence. Fighting hunger and feeding the world are two great Iowa legacies. Our state's heritage is filled with the names of individuals who have been at the forefront of these efforts from President Herbert Hoover to Vice President Henry Wallace to George Washington Carver, Jessie Field Shambaugh, the mother of 4-H and of course Dr. Norman Borlaug, the founder of the World Food Prize. And this year, we lost another great Iowan humanitarian, former Governor Robert D. Ray. Given this proud heritage it is most fitting that we gather here tonight in the Iowa State Capitol for the presentation of the 2018 World Food Prize. And as we celebrate the 20th anniversary of the Borlaug Ruan International Internships it is most appropriate to reflect upon the partnership that Dr. Norman Borlaug and John Ruan Sr. established in 1990 to bring the World Food Prize to Iowa. John Ruan III, you have my deep and our deep appreciation for your personal leadership over the past 18 years in building the prize and especially your vision for the Hall of Laureates. I also was so excited to see the young students honored earlier this evening for their excellence as international interns. The World Food Prize is playing a central role in inspiring the next generation of young students and young Iowans to education and careers in STEM. I have been so pleased to have the opportunity to partner for the last six years with Ambassador Quinn and his dedicated staff in helping build the Iowa Youth Institute at Iowa State University into one of the premier educational experiences in America. President Wintersteen, we are so proud to have you as the first woman leader of that great institution and thank you for being here this evening. And to all of the students who are watching the broadcast, please keep up your dedication in following Dr. Borlaug's example. To all of the teachers, thank you for your commitment and your invaluable contributions. Next year one of you may be joining us to receive the top educator award just as Dean Acker did this evening. Tonight we're honoring two of the most dynamic leaders in improving child nutrition around the globe.

Reynolds: The 2018 World Food Prize Laureates personal stories are that of perseverance, advocacy and actions leading to breakthrough achievements. One Laureate is a pioneer in food policy research and the other a champion of public health. Together, these two individuals made a monumental impact in reducing the number of stunted children around the world. It is therefore with great pride as the Governor of Iowa I officially proclaim Dr. Lawrence Haddad and Dr. David Nabarro as the 2018 World Food Prize Laureates.

(applause)

(music)

In June of 2013, just eight months after he spoke at the World Food Prize Borlaug Dialogue, United Nations Secretary General Ban Ki-moon spoke at the first Nutrition for Growth Global Summit in London.

No child should suffer the injustice of malnutrition. -- stunted by chronic malnutrition unless we act. Overcoming stunting is a vital element on the zero hunger challenge, my vision for a world where everyone enjoys the right to adequate food and good nutrition.

In the audience were the two individuals who were leading the international campaign to dramatically reduce early childhood stunting. Their efforts had in fact begun to intensify several years earlier in 2008 and 2009 as the global financial crisis and a steep spike in food prices swept across the developing world. And as riots erupted in over 30 cities the rising human cost of hunger and malnutrition was brought into stark focus. The number of chronically hungry and malnourished people soared to 1 billion, a reversal of the steady decline of previous years. As prices rose, those in poverty now had to spend most of their income on staple grains leaving little money for more nutritious vegetables, fruits or dairy products. This in turn threatened tens of millions of children in developing nations who experienced the most acute effects like anemia and the insidious impact of physical and mental stunting. As the renowned author Roger Theroux has so succinctly summarized, stunting is a life sentence of underachievement and underperformance.

In the wake of this crisis, two nutrition champions, Dr. Lawrence Haddad and Dr. David Nabarro rose to the challenge.

(music)

From an early age, Lawrence Haddad faced his own experiences with hunger and undernutrition. Born in South Africa in 1959 to Lebanese immigrant parents, Haddad was not even two years old when his family emigrated to England, embarking on a journey that would dramatically shape the way he viewed the world. Although times were hard, his mother still found time to volunteer at a Save the Children charity shop where Haddad joined her on weekends. It was in that shop that Haddad first learned of international relief efforts and the global mission of such organizations. He was inspired to make his own impact on the world. After earning a bachelor's degree in food science and economics from the University of Reading, Haddad boarded a plane for the first time in his life to fly to the United States to pursue a master's degree from the University of Massachusetts followed by a Ph.D. in food research from Stanford University. While completing his graduate degree, Haddad spent the summer of 1984 interning for the International Food Policy Research Institute referred to by its acronym IFPRI. It was an experience that would alter the course of Haddad's life and set him on the path to become a nutrition specialist. At IFPRI, his division director was future World Food Prize Laureate Dr. Per Pinstrup-Andersen who impressed Haddad with his dedication and focus on the importance of policy. Haddad also met Dr. Howarth Bouis, another future World Food Prize Laureate. Bouis offered Haddad a job as his research assistant for a long-term project surveying intra-household resource allocation in the Philippines. Haddad was now on the path to gather the research data that would eventually thrust him to center stage during the global food security crisis in 2008.

(music)

Born in London in 1949, David Nabarro volunteered at the age of 17 to run Youth Action York, a volunteer movement that endeavored to involve young people in improving the lives of the local poor, elderly and disabled citizens. Nabarro cites this experience as beginning his lifelong interest in social work and setting the tone for the kind of medical professional he would become. He enrolled at the University of Oxford receiving his medical degree in 1974. Later he would also obtain a master's in public health of developing countries from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. After graduation, Nabarro was drawn to the front lines of public health in difficult and dangerous settings. In the 1970s he became a member of a relief team with Save the Children in Northern Iraq providing health services and immunization to Kurdish children caught in fighting between the Kurds and the Iraqi Army under Sadam Hussein. Save the Children recruited him again to spend two years in Nepal setting up a child health service. In 2003, back in war torn Iraq, now with the United Nations, Nabarro narrowly escaped serious injury or death in the canal hotel bombing that targeted the United Nations' mission taking 22 lives and wounding over 100.

Returning to the United Kingdom in 2004, Haddad assumed leadership of the Institute of Development Studies, or IDS, where he endeavored to help policymakers see nutrition as a central issue linked to economic growth and food security. In 2007, Haddad and IDS were invited to evaluate the Department for International Development known as DFID and the European Commission's programs to improve nutrition. Haddad's analysis found that neither organization had a clear nutrition strategy nor direct measurements of their success. His report described both organizations' views on nutrition as everybody's business and nobody's responsibility. In that one sentence, Haddad had identified the central structural policy deficiency in addressing global malnutrition. With Haddad's research now shaping their efforts, the United Kingdom government, and particularly DFID, substantially increased its spending on fighting undernutrition in South Asia and sub-Saharan Africa. Their new focus on nutrition that Haddad was promoting was clearly visible at the 2009 World Food Prize Borlaug Dialogue Symposium when Bill Gates dramatically launched his global effort to uplift millions out of poverty and combat malnutrition and business executive Indra Nooyi called for a nutrition revolution. These actions came alongside the 2008 food price crisis, which underscored a global lack of accountability and transparency regarding nutrition. It was here that Nabarro was thrust into the situation when UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon called upon him to lead the United Nations' high level task force on global food security. Two years later in 2010, Nabarro's role expanded as he assumed leadership of the new United Nations Scaling Up Nutrition Movement. Known as the SUN movement, the goal of the campaign was to bring together national governments to eradicate malnutrition by 2030. Nabarro was directly responsible for uniting countries under the SUN movement to implement evidence-based nutrition policies and programs. Together with these actors, Nabarro propelled a concerted effort to reduce childhood undernutrition and stunting in the first 1,000 days of life. Nabarro was fulfilling the challenge Haddad had outlined by focusing the responsibility for improving nutrition and influencing policy worldwide. Through the SUN movement, Haddad and Nabarro's work had converged. In the wake of the food price crisis, each man rallied a broad group of governments, NGOs, private sector partners and development champions to prioritize nutrition. Haddad used economic and medical research to persuade development leaders that maternal and child nutrition should be an urgent priority, while Nabarro's role in leading efforts to counter malnutrition in the SUN movement had allowed him to unify over 50 countries. More than any other individuals, Haddad and Nabarro's separate but complimentary efforts resulted in significantly improved nutrition for mothers and children in the first 1,000 days of life across a stunning array of countries. By the end of 2017, 59 countries and 3 Indian states have joined SUN. Many, like Bangladesh, Cambodia, El Salvador, Kenya, Myanmar, Nigeria and Tanzania reported a significant decline in the number of stunted children. Reflecting the name of the organization that had played a significant role in both of their lives, Haddad and Nabarro have truly saved the children.

For their visionary leadership and relentless advocacy, which caused the number of stunted children in the world to be decreased by 10 million between 2012 and 2017, and for showing the world the pathway to even greater reductions and zero hunger, Lawrence Haddad and David Nabarro are truly deserving to be proclaimed as the 2018 World Food Prize Laureates.

(music)

(applause & music)

Ladies and gentlemen, please welcome the 2018 World Food Prize Laureates, Dr. Lawrence Haddad and Dr. David Nabarro.

(music & applause)

At this time, we invite the World Food Prize Chairman, John Ruan III and Laureate Selection Committee Chair Dr. Gebisa Ejeta to present the World Food Prize sculpture to our Laureates. And we ask Her Excellency, Vice President Mercedes Araoz, UN Assistant Secretary General Gerda Verburg and President Obasanjo to join in witnessing on the dais.

(music)

(music)

The World Food Prize sculpture will now be presented to the 2018 Laureates.

(music)

(music)

(applause & music)

(applause & music)

(applause & music)

(applause & music)

Quinn: So I now invite Chairman Ruan and Dr. Ejeta, Vice President, President Obasanjo, Assistant Secretary General Verburg to return to your seats. Governor. Ladies and gentlemen, please be seated. So this is a big moment in the ceremony as to which Laureate speaks first. Do I need to flip a coin or have you already decided? All right. So I now invite our Laureates to give their remarks.

Dr. David Nabarro: Governor, Ambassador Quinn, John Ruan, ladies and gentlemen, this really is a wonderful moment for me. It's a brilliant recognition of the efforts of thousands of people within my work. And just to say I'm really grateful Gerda Verburg for you coming here and also for the wonderful message from Amina Mohammed. Big surprise. I hope that everybody who has been involved in this enormous effort to get nutrition to the place where it really should be, we've still got quite a long way to go, but I hope that they all feel pride in this moment and I do know that there are many people who have come from all over the world to share it with us. And as you saw in the film, I started out as a medical doctor. I was specializing in the health of children in populations and I was actually working for Save the Children in first of all Northern Iraq and then in Nepal when I realized the crucial, crucial importance of nutrition in determining whether or not children who are sick get well. In early research that I was doing I saw very clearly that a child who is malnourished is much more likely to suffer and unfortunate to die as a result of a mild illness compared with a child who is well nourished. And I also learned how stunting, this shortness of stature that we talk about so much, actually leads to terrible consequences, lifelong consequences that last through childhood into adulthood. And I quickly saw in my medical work that agriculture and food are absolutely critical and have a very powerful link to whether or not children are well nourished. And that led to activities that would try to bring together people working on health, people working on agriculture, people working on education, people working on -- to create a new way of looking at malnutrition, seeing it as a truly multi-sectoral activity. Throughout my life I always worked on behalf of people whose lives are less comfortable than mine. I am committed to helping them and their children have sustainable, peaceful and prosperous futures, not just in the current generation, but in generations to come.

Nabarro: In doing this working I am truly fortunate, I have been guided by many of the people in more than 50 countries where I've worked, some who are in this room. I feel I'm constantly learning, picking up ideas, synthesizing them and sharing them. And I'm saying this because within this Scaling Up Nutrition Movement that I was able to help start and with the support of Ban Ki-moon who used to be the Secretary General of the United Nations, within that movement which I am still involved in, we involve people from within communities and countries in finding their own solutions. Our role was one of being catalysts or facilitators, we enable those who have little power to find it, to harness it and to use it well. We engage governments, businesses, civil society and scientists, then we enlarge the circle so that farmers, consumers and parents can be part of the effort because we encourage work together, partnering, sharing ambition, debating what needs to be done and to work it out. I do encourage everybody in this room and beyond to continue to put more emphasis on nutrition as key to the development of humanity, key to the emergence of communities from suffering, key to the empowerment of populations to have the intellectual and physical capacity that they need for the future. And I say to everybody, do this by encouraging partnership and collaboration, whenever you're in doubt bringing people together, communicate, motivate, agitate, captivate, measure, make sure that everybody is working for the justice that comes with good nutrition, recognize that sometimes you'll feel uncomfortable, recognize that sometimes things won't go well, find mentors who will support you in the way that we have been hearing about today and follow the advice of Dr. Borlaug, take it to the people, reach for the stars, but most importantly, engage the politicians because they in the end will be the people who will be determining the nutritional state of the future of our world. Thank you.

(applause)

           

Dr. Lawrence Haddad: Governor, Ambassador, Mr. Ruan, Borlaug family, thank you so much, distinguished guests. I would like to thank the Council of Advisors for selecting David Nabarro and me as this year's World Food Prize Laureates. It means so much to so many of us that this community has recognized transformative power of nutrition. So, the speech, my first attempt at writing this speech reminded me of the UK civil servant who retired to write poetry but ended up writing poems that sounded like ministerial briefings. My first speech sounded very much like a policy brief. I don't think you need to hear that because this is a very special night tonight. So I ditched that one and decided to get out of my comfort zone as David and I are always telling other people to do and share with you some things that I rarely acknowledge to others and perhaps not even to myself.

Haddad: So, firstly I was brought up by a warrior mother. She fought like a tiger for me and my sister. When we no longer had a father she became both parents. When we had no money for new clothes she got us good second hand clothes. When it looked like I couldn't get into a good state school she made sure I did. And that is the power of mothers. Thank you, mom.

(applause)

Haddad: I was born in Africa and raised in England and I am very proud of my African roots. But I was lucky to be brought up in a country like the UK with its powerful welfare system. Our small family qualified for a council flat, I got free school meals, free prescription glasses and free university education and that is the power of the state. So let me tell you about my uncle, he was the first in our family to go to a university. He worked at a very small flavoring company and as a teenager I would get regaled with stories of some of the things the food industry was doing in the 1970s, freeze dried coffee, instant mashed potato, ravioli in a can. If you can make ravioli in a can taste okay you can do anything. And that is the power of business. My mother worked as, the video said and I didn't know there was a Save the Children connection with David so I'm very happy about that, my mother worked as a volunteer in a Save the Children store in London and she had no childcare so she brought me along. And while helping out I took to the staff and I was really inspired by their sense of purpose, their conviction that they would make a difference. And that is the power of civil society. So by age 18 I had powerful examples of the roles mothers, governments, civil society and businesses play in shaping destiny. But one in three people on this planet are denied a say in shaping their destiny because they are malnourished. That is outrageous, it is unacceptable and it cannot be tolerated.

(applause)

Haddad: So all of these different actors have to come together to end malnutrition and David has been a brilliant leader in doing this. They have to come together because the things that converge to generate malnutrition are powerful, not enough food, not enough water, not enough sanitation, not enough health care, not enough time to take care of kids, and they must be vanquished by even more powerful alliances drawn from all corners of society. But even that's not enough. These coalitions, alliances and movements need a spark, they need a spark to catalyze the outrage. And when I went to work in the Philippines and India as a young man the fire was lit for me. The shock of seeing the skin of babies impossibly stretched over those bones, the shock of hearing about farmer suicides because of the despair of failed harvests, the shock of seeing girls deprived of food that is routinely given to their brothers, the shock of seeing a mother who is trying desperately to care for her child with constant diarrhea. This was visceral only experienced, as Dr. Borlaug would say, by going to the farmer and the farming communities. This is when I realized that malnutrition was about injustice and it radicalized me. Since then, I have been a monomaniac on a mission. Some people would say egomaniac, but let's not dwell on that. Generating evidence on how to end malnutrition, sorry, how to end malnutrition, learning about how change really happens, really happens and David has been a brilliant mentor for that, working with countless others to become part of the change process. And many of you in the house tonight are sisters and brothers in arms and I honor you for your generosity of spirit, time and commitment. Working together I believe with all my being we can consign malnutrition to the history books and sooner than we think. So I've only been able to do this work because of my incredible family. My deepest thanks and love go to my wife Frederique and to my children -- they have made many sacrifices for my work, they have put up with many absences and been present a certain level of grumpiness, distraction and absent-mindedness. It's hard to believe isn't it? And despite all of this they have provided me with unending amounts of inspiration, support, encouragement and love. That is the power of family and that is the power of love. Thank you everybody.

(applause)

(applause)

(applause)

(applause)

(applause)

Quinn: So we now invite our Laureates to return to their seats. We're not quite done yet. Leave those there. We'll take care of them for you. That's what I tell them every year. So each year for our finale we conduct the extensive research so we can find out just what kind of music our Laureate might want. So we were really surprised to discover that both of our Laureates have in their background being DJs. Yes, yeah, no really. Lawrence Haddad was spinning discs in California while he was going to Stanford and David Nabarro had a whole business in promoting rock shows and he was the manager of the Marquee Club which was the place where Freddie Mercury and Queen and the stars of British punk rock were coming on the scene, the Rolling Stones premiered there. So I said wow, we've got to come up with somebody who if they were spinning records now whose music they might play. So I looked around and I found somebody who was born and raised here in the Iowa heartland, started his musical journey at age 4, by the age of 12 he was considered a child prodigy at piano and trumpet. 2016 he performed with three-time Grammy award winner Celo Green, you maybe know him. And in 2017 he was a top finalist on the NBC hit show The Voice. So now with a special tribute to our Laureates, please welcome Jon Mero and the Heartland Youth Choir.

(applause)

(music)

There's a place in your heart and I know that it is love. And this place can be much brighter than tomorrow. And if you really try you'll find there's no need to cry. In this place you will feel no hurt or sorrow. There are ways to get there if you care enough for the living. Make a better space, make a better place.

Heal the world.  Make a better place for you and for me and the entire human race. There are people dying. If you care enough for the living, make a better place for you and for me.

(music)

Now if you want to know why there's a love that cannot lie. Love is strong, it only cares for joyful giving. And if we try, we shall see, in this place we cannot feel fear or dread, we stop existing and start living. Then it feels that always love is enough for us growing. Make a better world, make a better world.

Heal the world.  Make it a better place for you and for me and the entire human race. There are people dying. If you care enough for the living, make a better place for you and for me.

And the dream we were conceived in will reveal a joyful face. And the world we once believed in will shine again in grace. Then why do we keep strangling life, wound this earth, crucify its soul. Though it's plain to see, this world is heavenly. Be god's glow. We can fly so high, let our spirits never die. In my heart I know you are all my brothers. Create a world with no fear, together we cry happy tears. See the nations turn their swords into plowshares. We can really get there, if you cared enough for the living. Make a better space. Make a better place.

Heal the world.  Make it a better place for you and for me and the entire human race. There are people dying. If you care enough for the living, make a better place for you and for me. Make a better place for you and for me. Make a better place for you and for me.

(music)

(applause)

Quinn: Aren't they wonderful?! Weren't they wonderful?! I'm sure you would be playing their records, your DJ. Dr. Nabarro, Dr. Haddad, you have healed the world, you have made it a better place. But there are more people to be healed. There are more work to be done. And if we're going to be able to do that it's going to take all of us, all of us here tonight, all of us who can hear our voices, all of us who are involved. And so for our final song, it's one that is calling to everybody. Together we can do this, together we can do this.

(music)

(music)

There comes a time when we heed a certain call and the world must come together as one. There are people dying, oh and it's time to lend a hand, to life, the greatest gift of all. We can't go on pretending day by day that someone, somehow will soon make a change. We are all a part of God's great big family. And the truth you know love is all we need.

We are the world, we are the children. We are the ones who make a brighter day, so let's start giving. There's a choice we're making. We're saving our own lives. It's true we'll make a better day, just you and me.

(music)

Send them your hearts so they know that someone cares. And their cries for life will not be in vain. We can't let them suffer, no we cannot turn away. The truth, they need a helping hand.

We are the world, we are the children. We are the ones who make a brighter day, so let's start giving. There's a choice we're making. We're saving our own lives. It's true we'll make a better day, just you and me.

When you're down and out and it seems no hope at all, you can just believe there's no way we can fall. Let us realize that a change will only come when we stand together as one, as one.

We are the world, we are the children. We are the ones who make a brighter day, so let's start giving. There's a choice we're making. We're saving our own lives. It's true we'll make a better day, just you and me.

We are the world, we are the children. We are the ones who make a brighter day, so let's start giving. There's a choice we're making. We're saving our own lives. It's true we'll make a better day, just you and me.

We are the world, we are the children, the children, the children.

(applause)

Jon Mero and the Heartland Youth Choir.

(applause)

(applause)

Quinn: You guys are terrific. Thank you, Jon. Thank you so much, the choir. Thank you to everybody for being here with us. And we look forward to seeing you all next year for the 2019 World Food Prize Laureate Award Ceremony. Good night.

(applause)

Borg: That standing ovation culminates a night of celebration, music and dialogue on this special night for the 2018 World Food Prize. Thank you so very much for joining us for this highlighting of the world's food and hunger issues and recognizing the men and women devoting their careers and lives to providing food. Tonight's Laureates were honored for elevating the issues of maternal and child undernutrition, issues standing as a reminder to the life and legacy of Cresco, Iowa native Norman Borlaug, a tradition perpetuated by the World Food Prize and personified by its latest Laureates. For our entire Iowa Public Television crew here at the Iowa Statehouse in Des Moines, Iowa, I'm Dean Borg. Thanks for joining us tonight.

(music)

Funding for the 2018 World Food Prize has been provided by Friends, the Iowa Public Television Foundation. And a grant from the W.T. and Edna M. Dahl Trust.